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Ansteorra ILoI dated 2016-07-08

Greetings to the Ansteorran College of Heralds. We have a large letter this month. I appreciate your commentary.

Letter Comments:

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:34:52
Comments on this letter under my name represent the consensus of the NE Calontir commenting group, consisting this month of Lady Rohese de Dinan, Shadowdale Pursuivant, Lord Galen MacColmain, Jey Morconi, and myself.

1: Aliénor de Loucelles -New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Culture (Provencal) most important.

Submitted at Gulf Wars

Consulting herald Colm Dubh

Aliénor s.n. Eleanor pp. 96-97 Withycombe, DICN

de Loucelles -- already registered.

Name Comments:

Maridonna Benvenuti at 2016-07-09 05:43:06
Alienor is found in Dictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources, Eleanor. "Eleanor f. Of uncertain origin. The name of Eleanor of Aquitaine, known as Provençal as Alienor,... France, Latin... 1378 Alienore (dat) hanquetvol1 597." http://dmnes.org/name/Eleanor

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-10 15:07:23
[Administrative] This is not a New Name, it is a New Name Change. <Askell de Loucelles> was registered June 1995. What does the submitter wish done with the currently registered name - retain or release?

Alys Mackyntoich (Ogress) at 2016-07-11 10:10:13
Are you sure that's the same person and not just someone one related to this submitter?

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-11 18:08:38
No, I'm not sure, but it's the only <de Loucelles -- already registered>. Name registration was from Atenvelt, and a Device registration was from Ansteorra Oct 2007.

If the submitter is a relative, evidence wasn't noted by Asterisk.

Sara Penrose (Sable Roundel) at 2016-07-11 20:27:17
The submitter is Askell's daughter.

Alys Mackyntoich (Ogress) at 2016-07-12 13:51:51
Then not a name change.

Do you have an attestation from Askell that this is her legal daughter and she has permission to use an element of Askell's name? She can't rely on the Grandfather Clause without that attestation.

Sara Penrose (Sable Roundel) at 2016-07-20 15:27:10
I can probably contact Askell to get one. Is this the correct form to use? http://heraldry.sca.org/formletters/letter-of-attesting-legal-relationship.pdf

Alys Mackyntoich (Ogress) at 2016-07-20 15:38:48
That form will get the job done, just make sure it is dated and signed with legal names.

Sara Penrose (Sable Roundel) at 2016-08-05 14:06:47
I have a signed letter from Askell. I will forward it to Bordure and Asterisk.

Alys Mackyntoich (Ogress) at 2016-07-12 13:55:12
The name is unlikely to be Provencal because Loucelles is located in Normandy.

<Alienor> appears on the cover page of La grande & triomphante entree des enfants de France & de madame Alienor, soeur de l'empereur, published in 1530 (http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k73758c/f1.item.r=Alienor.zoom)

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-13 18:33:23
Assuming we get a note from the father, the point is moot, however Loucelles, part of a land grant from 1482 between a number of families, none of which are named Loucelles, is tiny. The population is stable at around 200, and it is too small to appear on any period maps I have found. IGI gave me nothing, but I did find this French genealogical record, showing a Joachim de Loucelles marrying in 1599. The trouble is, he is of the family; his brother is listed as Roland de LOUCELLES, seigneur du Domaine 1610-1682 Married in 1640, Torigni-sur-Vire, 50160, Manche, Basse-Normandie. So the only evidence we have for the name is the noble family who owns it, which is problematic from a presumption standpoint. http://gw.geneanet.org/chuet?lang=en&pz=pierre+henry&nz=huet&ocz=0&p=jean&n=de+loucelles&oc=3

Dorcas Whitecap (White Hawk) at 2016-07-27 13:46:21
It's only problematic if <de Loucelles> is considered a dynastic name. Yes, it seems that the only documentation available shows that this is the name of a noble family. SENA PN.4.B.2 states, in part, "Names may not contain a byname uniquely used by a single dynasty. Dynastic names used by both a royal family and normal people are acceptable." Is the noble family of de Loucelles considered a royal family? If yes, then presumption. If no, then no presumption.

Song Zidie (Skraeling Althing) at 2016-08-05 14:33:02
I would hardly consider the seigneur of a manor estate of a couple of hundred people to be "royalty".

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:36:13
Given name doc checks out. Glad to see the surname issue clarified. No conflicts found.

Eglentyne Merryweather (Rivers Bend) at 2016-08-07 20:13:24
Alienor is a feminine personal name (accent over e), cited as Provencal in Feminine Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames by Talan Gwynek http://www/s-gabriel.org/names/talan/reany The information above is found in parentheses after the header Eleanor. This name is a variant of Ellen. A variety of spelling are found: Alianor (1281), Alienor (1202,1211), Alienora (1199, 1213). Most examples cited are in the 13th century.

I also found the name clear of conflict.


2: Aureliana Antonina -New Name & New Device

Azure, a fess Or between four billets in chief and a cinquefoil argent

Sound most important.
Spelling (anything except Aurelia) most important.

Submitted through the Barony of Elfsea

Consulting herald Artorius Germanus

http://heraldry.sca.org/names/roman.html#women

Under the Republic, women were frequently identified by just the feminine version of their father's nomina. These are formed by changing -us to -a:

Julius → Julia

Aurelius → Aurelia

Cognomina for women started appearing in the first century BC, and became common in the first century AD. They could be inherited or personal. Again, women used a feminine form of the name, typically formed by changing -us to -a:

Sabinus → Sabina

Fortunatus → Fortunata

As in men's names, the cognomen followed the nomen. Thus, the typical pattern for an Imperial Roman woman's name is:

Feminine Nomen + Feminine Cognomen

Like Imperial Roman men, Imperial Roman women treated the cognomen as the given or personal name. For example, Claudia Severa signed her personal letters Severa.

Antonina : Antoninus is shown on this page as a cognomen; the feminine form would be Antonina.

Aureliana : submitter offers http://www.ancient.eu/dacia/, which mentions Emperor Aurelian. However, his name was Lucius Domitius Aurelianus which Asterisk thinks documents Aurelianus/Aureliana as a cognomen but not a nomen. Submitter specifically rejects the easy to document Aurelia.

Submitted through the Barony of Elfsea

Consulting herald Artorius Germanus

Asterisk : would blazon be "Azure, a fess Or between four billets fesswise and a cinquefoil argent"?

Name Comments:

Maridonna Benvenuti at 2016-07-10 04:52:10
A later, Byzantine example of Auraliana is found in _Common Names of the Aristocracy in the Roman Empire During the 6th and 7th Centuries_ by Bardas Xiphias. Bardas states, "First, the names during the period covered by the PLRE were written in Latin or Greek. As a research tool, the PLRE has normalized and Latinized them... for masculine names, I included only those which were "common"- that is those which were shared by at least two people. Since the sample was so small and so biased, I included all feminine names of Roman origin." http://heraldry.sca.org/names/byzantine/PLRE_fem_names.html

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-13 18:40:27
Which is also support for the name as a cognomen or given name, not a nomen or family name. Concur with Asterisk. She can be Antonia Aureliana, as Antonius is a fine nomen, or she can be Aurelia Antonina, but anything else wants more documentation.

Artorius at 2016-07-25 15:32:35
Will we need to resubmit with this variation?

Vigdis Gráfeldr (Asterisk) at 2016-08-10 21:11:58
No, if she is okay with that version the documentation you have supplied supports it.

Artorius at 2016-07-24 17:30:58
She's OK with Antonia Aureliana

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:37:30
Glad to hear the client has found a registerable version acceptable. No conflicts found.

Device Comments:

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-10 15:21:13
Seems clear versus "Azure, a fess Or between six estoiles argent." (Leonora Simonetta d'Este, Device, Mar 2016). I see 1 DC for change to type, but nothing for change of numbr from 5 to 6. I see a 2nd DC for change of arrangement (The estoiles are 3 and 3. OSCAR emblazon attached)

1: Image 1

Johann Steinarsson (Caltrop) at 2016-07-31 08:17:06
Seeing the attached emblazon, I agree on the two DCs. Looks good to me.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:41:48
The PicDic says these billets are in their default posture. No conflicts found with this or the revised version.


3: Ceallach MacDonall -New Name & New Device

Argent, three peacocks in their pride proper.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound most important.

Submitted through the Barony of Bryn Gwlad

Consulting Herald Andreas von Meißen

Ceallach Gaelic masculine forename. Appears 14 times, dated 658-1376, in Index of Names in Irish Annals by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Cellach.shtml). "Ceallach" is the Early Modern Irish Gaelic (c.1200-c.1700) form.

<MacDonall> Anglicized Irish surname, from the Gaelic Mac Domhnaill. Found as M'Donall in 16th & 17th Century Anglicized Irish Surnames from Woulfe

by Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada

http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/Woulfe/SortedByAnglicizedRoot_D2.shtml

M' is a scribal abbreviation for Mac

SENA App. C says that 1100-1600, names in the Gaelic language group can be mixed with those in the English/Welsh group. Anglicized Irish is in the English/Welsh language group. The two name elements are dated within 300 years of each other, so they are temporally compatible according to SENA PN.2.C.2.b.

Submitted through the Barony of Bryn Gwlad

Consulting herald for device Andreas von Meißen

Name Comments:

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-13 18:50:17
Sigh. Really? You couldn't have gone with Kelly MacDonall or Ceallach mac Domnaill and used ONE orthography? This combination is impossible in a period document.

Thomas de Groet at 2016-07-18 19:01:40
I concur with my esteemed colleague. This seems to be an instance of using two languages when one would actually be much easier to get exactly the same name.

Guillermo Pajaro de Escocia at 2016-07-25 14:38:48
So, the use of SENA App. C is not applicable here???? This goes against what I have learned in the past.

Once this can be answered, I will discuss the language conflict with the client. We are happy to understand, better the intricacies of orthography and its impact on our SCA lives.

Song Zidie (Skraeling Althing) at 2016-08-05 14:35:07
It is perfectly applicable. It's just discouraging to see submitters intentionally mix up orthographies.

Guillermo Pajaro de Escocia at 2016-07-27 13:07:39
Discussed with client the issues brought up this name entry. He is happy to go with Ceallach mac Domnaill but would like to ensure he understands the spelling is it Domnaill or Domnhaill?

Please clarify so we can move this forward...

Song Zidie (Skraeling Althing) at 2016-08-05 14:45:16
<Ceallach> Early Modern Irish Gaelic as the submission says, so the most correct byname for him in Gaelic would be <mac Domhnaill>. He can have <mac Domnaill>, which is the Middle Irish Gaelic form, but it would be kind of weird.

He COULD do Gaelic + Anglicised Irish as well as originally submitted, and he could do <Ceallach mac Domnaill>, but if he cares about authenticity of the name at all, <Ceallach mac Domhnaill> is the way to go for 13th-16th century Irish Gaelic.

If he's interested, the Anglicised Irish version of the given name can be found in http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/Masculine.shtml under "Callogh", so a fully authentic name would be something like <Callogh MacDonall>. The fully Old/Middle Irish Gaelic forms of the whole name would be <Cellach mac Domnaill>,

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:43:01
Docs check out. No conflicts found with this or the corrected version.

Device Comments:

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-10 15:28:12
Seems clear versus "Azure, a fess Or between six estoiles argent." (Leonora Simonetta d'Este, Device, Mar 2016). I see 1 DC for change to type, but nothing for change of numbr from 5 to 6. I see a 2nd DC for change of arrangement (The estoiles are 3 and 3. OSCAR emblazon attached)

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-10 15:28:33
No conflicts observed.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:43:21
No conflicts found.


4: Eadric Wolf -New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister argent and sable a bend sinister between two wolf heads couped counterchanged.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound most important.

Submitted through the Barony of Elfsea

Consulting herald not listed

Eadric R & W s.m. Edrich gives the datied forms Edricus (1066), Edrich(1200)(1275), and Eadric (1221) as surnames. Eadric is also cited from Anglo-Saxon names Aelfwyn aet Gyrum, A history of the English Church and People.

http://heraldry.sca.org/names/eng13/eng13.html

Given Names from Early 13th Century England

by Talan Gwynek

Edric 1 From OE Eadric.

Eddricus 1

(the) Wolf

SENA appendix A -- Middle/Early modern English - descriptive, may use article the/le or omit it.

Submitted through the Barony of Elfsea

Consulting herald not listed.

Name Comments:

ffride wlffsdotter at 2016-07-09 23:04:31
R&W sn. Nave
<Eadric Nauere> 13th c.

R&W sn. Wolf:
<John le Wolf> 1279

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:45:57
"Anglo-Saxon Names" by Ælfwyn æt Gyrwum https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/aelfwyn/bede.html lists Eadric. Don't see anything offered for "Wolf". R&W's earliest citation for this spelling is John le Wolf from 1279. Those are over 500 years apart, so we need more. Glad to see that ffride has saved the day. No conflicts found.

Eglentyne Merryweather (Rivers Bend) at 2016-08-07 20:27:04
The masculine personal name Eadric is also found in A Statistical Survey of Given Names in Essex Co., England, 1182-1272 by Magistra Nicolaa de Bracton wysig://12/http://members.tripod.com/nicolaa5/articles/names.html This survey explores the Essex Feet of Fines, a collection of legal documents. Edrich is cited once.

I found this name clear of conflict.

Device Comments:

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-10 15:51:28
Consider identfiabilty. The bend sinister is thin enough that it has almost the same visual impact as the heads. The necks are not really couped, which is a straight line cut. Still, it's obvious what the submitter intended.

No conflicts observed.

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-13 18:51:36
It's a really skinny bend, especially considering it's going to be cut in half.

Thomas de Groet at 2016-07-18 19:04:09
I concur with the others. This bend definitely needs to be bigger, and the cut on the heads is really neither couped nor erased. It needs to be one or the other. I recommend sending back for a redraw.

Johann Steinarsson (Caltrop) at 2016-07-31 08:20:35
Agreed. It's a good concept but the bend and the wolf's heads both need touch-up work. Still, should be a simple fix.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:46:29
We had no problem with the size of the charges. No conflicts found.


5: Elric Netterville -New Name & New Device

Purpure goutty argent, three mullets Or and in base a bag Or charged with a mullet purpure.

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Submitted through the Barony of Raven's Fort

Consulting herald Lady Lynette Turner with assistance from Valeria Solstice

Elric

Reaney & Wilson, pp. 5-6 s.n. Aldrich, date Elric to 1066.

Netterville

Submitter's legal last name as shown on DL.

Submitted through the Barony of Raven's Fort

Consulting herald Lady Lynette Turner

Name Comments:

Coblaith Muimnech at 2016-07-09 06:35:37
We should be able to do better than a mundane name allowance.

For starters, the _Calendar of the Justiciary Rolls, or, Proceedings in the Court of the Justiciar of Ireland Preserved in the Public Record Office of Ireland_ includes late 13th- and 14th-century forms of "de Netterville" in volumes I (indexed on p. 534; https://archive.org/details/calendarofjustic01irel), II (p. 583; https://archive.org/details/calendarofjustic02irel), and III (p. 378; https://archive.org/details/calendarofjustic03irel). Options include "Netteruile", "Neteruile", "Neteruyle", "Netteruile", "Netteruille", "Nettervill", "Nettreuill", "Netteruill", "Neteruill", "Nettiruill", and "Nettrevill". In that company, "Netterville" is unexceptional. Appendix A mentions, "Late period family names tend to drop articles and prepositions," so there should be no issue discarding the "de".

1: Image 1 2: Image 2 3: Image 3

Coblaith Muimnech at 2016-07-09 23:26:52
~~Oh, in the interest of bringing the elements together, temporally: The Online Middle English Dictionary, s.n. lei(e), dates "Edric. de la Lege" to 1200. That's a little less than a century before "Nich. de Nettervill", dated to 1297 in the Calendar.~~

EDIT: Don't know how I proofread that as many times as I did and still didn't realize I found "Edric" and the submitter's looking for "Elric". Never mind. Move along. Nothing to see, here.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:47:02
Given name doc checks out. Coblaith's surname documentation looks good. No conflicts found.

Device Comments:

Brenna Lowri o Ruthin at 2016-07-09 20:01:52
The default arrangement for three charges is two and one. These mullets are in bend and this needs to be added to the blazon. Also we can delete the first Or. Reblazon: Purpure goutty argent, in bend three mullets and in base on a bag Or a mullet purpure.

I believe there are some size issues with the charges as well. The mullets should be the primary charge group and the bag should be either part of the primary group or a secondary charge. However, the bag is drawn larger than any of the mullets. Also, this is not a usual arrangement for a primary charge group of four charges.

There is enough room for the mullets to grow (perhaps even double in size). The bag needs to be redrawn somewhat smaller than the mullets and not part of the primary charge group.

Juetta Copin at 2016-07-12 05:05:17
I recommend that the submitter consider an arrangement that will make the bag a proper part of the primary group.

Coblaith Muimnech at 2016-07-09 23:31:10
I agree--definite problem with SENA A.3.D.1 (http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html#A3D1).

Guillermo Pajaro de Escocia at 2016-07-23 16:05:34
Discussed with client challenges of device as well as visual problems. Redrew design as attached photo. Approved by client and conflict checked. Local herald will submit a new form with design. This done at Ansteorra Heraldric and Scribal Symposium by Gui de Escocia of Bryn Gwlad.

1: Image 1

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-26 19:46:59
It is up to (acting) Bordure to decide if the forms have sufficient time for commentary on this ILoI.

If the emblazon looks like identifiably like graphic 1, no conflicts observed versus "Purpure, a bend wavy argent between three mullets in bend and on a bag Or a mullet purpure." No surprise.

Elena Wyth (Bordure (Acting)) at 2016-08-10 16:51:09
Thanks for following up, Gui.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:47:42
How about "Purpure goutty argent, three mullets in bend and in base a bag Or charged with a mullet purpure"? We found no conflicts with the alternate design.


6: Herold von Wolfratshausen -New Name & New Device

Per bend gules and lozengy in bend sinister gules and argent, on a bend Or four mullets of six points azure.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound (similar to Harold) most important.
Culture (14th c. Bavaria) most important.

Submitted through the Barony of Bryn Gwlad

Consulting herald SCA Heraldry Chat

Herold personal name found in Deutsches Namenlexikon by Hans Bahlow (pg. 241) dated to 1323.

Wolfratshausen is a place name, found in Bayrisch Stammen-Buch : Der erst (ander) Theirl, Von den Abgestorbnen Fürsten, Pfalz-, March-, Landt- und Burggraven, Graven ... deß löblichen Fürstenthumbs in Bayrn etc

by Wiguleus Hund, Sartorius, 1598.

On page 216 in the second line, Wolfratshausen is dated to 1357. (see attached image)

(Asterisk: looks like Wofratshausen to me.)

https://books.google.com/books?id=TB9DAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA186&source=gbs_toc_r&cad=4#v=onepage&q&f=false

von is the standard German place name locative per SENA app. A.

Submitted through the Barony of Bryn Gwlad

Consulting herald SCA Heraldry Chat

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/images/cImages/1532/2016-07-06/12-25-07_Herold_von_Wolfratshausen_name_doc1.jpg

Name Comments:

ffride wlffsdotter at 2016-07-09 23:08:06
I disagree with Asterisk -- the attached page scan shows <Wolfratshausen>.

Coblaith Muimnech at 2016-07-09 23:41:05
The relevant page of the Bayrisch Stammen-Buch to which the link in the summary leads does show "Wofratshauſen", but the image attached to the submission has "Wolfratshauſen". Must be two different editions.

1: Image 1

ffride wlffsdotter at 2016-07-10 19:22:15
The really weird thing? Page 25 in the linked-to Google Book clearly shows Wolfratshausen!
https://books.google.com.au/books?id=TB9DAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA186&source=gbs_toc_r&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q= Wolfratshausen&f=false)

Song Zidie (Skraeling Althing) at 2016-08-05 15:23:19
Considering the number of times the word is spelled Wolfratshausen compared to Wofratshausen (about 16-1), I'm guessing the latter was a spelling mistake. Weird that they decided to use that particular one as the example of evidence.

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-15 16:08:31
Bahlow actually references the placename Wolfratshausen s.n. Wolfrath. According to its Wikipedia page, it was designated a market town in 1280, so it has been a large enough place to be from for quite awhile. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolfratshausen

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:48:42
Docs check out. The page with the surname looks OK to me, but I'm no expert at reading fraktur. No conflicts found.

Device Comments:

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-13 21:52:23
Consider the reblazon "Per bend gules and lozengy bendwise gules and argent, on a bend Or four mullets of six points azure." No registrations post SENA observed for this field division, but lozengy bendwise is a 15th C German field division [Coat of arms of the Dukes of Teck, Scheiblersches Wappenbuch, 1450-80 attached]

No conflicts observed.

1: Image 1

Coblaith Muimnech at 2016-07-14 03:14:03
Not sure why the S.C.A. registered that as "lozengy bendwise". Maybe other emblazons show it that way, but this one is just plain old paly bendy--one set of dividing lines running chief to base (paly), and the other dexter chief to sinister base (bendy)--on an escutcheon that happens to be tilted.

In the three registered instances of "lozengy bendwise" for which the emblazons are available in OSCAR (in devices registered to Aislinn Chiabach, Gottfried Kilianus, and Ullrych Sturm), the long axes of the lozenges run along bendy lines. The only registered item with an OSCAR emblazon that I found showing long axes running bendy sinister (as are those in the current submission) is blazoned as "lozengy bendwise sinister". That one was registered under SENA (to Aislinn Chiabach in August 2015), without comment.

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-14 20:03:29
Thank you for the correction, Coblaith. I agree the blazon should be "lozengy bendwise sinister" (And am wondering why I didn't think to do an OSCAR search rather than a complex form Google Search).

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:50:49
Agree: "…lozengy bendwise sinister…" No conflicts found.


7: Herold von Wolfratshausen -New Badge

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

An annulet per pale azure and gules surmounted by a mullet argent

Submitted through the Barony of Bryn Gwlad.

Consulting herald SCA Heraldry Chat.

Badge Comments:

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-10 17:30:26
Consider an obtrusively modern design (SENA A3.F3). Every time I look at this submission, I'm grabbed by the scruff of the neck and hauled, will me or nill me, back into the 21st Century screaming "It's not a conflict with Captain America's Shield." It's a Laurel call to make, but I request we consider forwarding opinions on the matter.

No conflicts observed.

Coblaith Muimnech at 2016-07-10 21:27:04
Captain America's shield didn't occur to me. I just kept thinking, "There's a new sheriff in town. . .."

Alys Mackyntoich (Ogress) at 2016-07-11 10:11:06
Is this intended to be fieldless?

Vettorio Antonello at 2016-07-22 12:38:54
Right after Captain America, this thought occurred to me as well. If this isn't fieldless, then the Mullet doesn't have any contrast with the field that it sits mostly on.

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-15 16:23:34
Oh, it's the first thing that occurred to me. Could we please just say that a white star smack in the middle of a red-white-blue annular motif rates a "..but thanks for playing our game..." and be done with it? IMO modern allusions need wider berths than medieval conflicts; the fact that I am moved to go check and see what the actual layout of Cap's shield is (Red-white-red and a white star throughout on a hurt) means my brain is already in the MCU and not in the medieval illusion we are trying to foster. To be clear, this is not a conflict with Captain America as we count difference, merely an uncomfortable allusion. As a point, if he did this with the six-pointed stars that feature on his submitted device, it wouldn't bother me at all. "(fieldless) An annulet per pale gules and argent surmounted by a mullet of six points azure" would be a nice badge, much more allusive of his armory, and not at all allusive of Marvel.

Also, my first instinct looking at it is that it would be better style for the star to either be within and conjoined to the annulet, or for it to surmount such that the points of the star do not terminate at the edge of the annulet. Sadly, I am having trouble coming up with a period star/circle motif for comparison.

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-15 16:58:16
For a totally non-scientific data point, I called my non-herald husband over and pointed to this design and he said "Captain America!" with no prompting whatsoever.

Thomas de Groet at 2016-07-18 19:10:48
I would consider this to be obtrusively modern in styling, if not a direct conflict with Captain America. However, I think a reasonable person in the SCA would immediately think this was a reference to Captain America.

Etienne Le Mons (Sea Stag) at 2016-07-18 19:41:29
I'd consider Captain America's shield to be Gules, on a hurt a mullet all within an annulet argent. (image 1) It's also similar to the Tricolore cockade of the French Air Force (image 2), The Who logo (image 3), the Royal Thai Air Force (image 4), the Korean People's Army Air Force (image 5). It is clear of all of those through multiple points of difference.

I have more of a problem calling this "surmounted". http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2011/02/11-02lar.html Nicodemus of Sylvan Glen. Device (see PENDS for name). Azure, in pale a triangle inverted surmounting a triangle overlapping at the points, both voided argent. This device is returned for violating our restriction on "barely overall" charges. Charges overall, or surmounting other charges, in period were nearly always bends, and when they did overlap, the overlying charge extended past opposite sides of the underlying charge.

This star does not extend past the opposite sides of the underlying charge. We can skip the obtrusive issue altogether.

1: Image 1 2: Image 2 3: Image 3 4: Image 4 5: Image 5

Guillermo Pajaro de Escocia at 2016-07-25 14:34:16
Discussed with client modern sensibility of design and it's implied challenges. Client chooses to withdraw this item for further redesign and personal consideration.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:51:34
There's no indication of whether this is fieldless or has an argent field. No conflicts found either way. I also flashed on the Captain America logo. Glad the client has withdrawn it.


8: Herold von Wolfratshausen -New Badge

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Azure, a straight trumpet bendwise and overall a par of compasses Or and two hammers in saltire argent.

Submitted through the Barony of Bryn Gwlad.

Consulting herald SCA Heraldry Chat.

Badge Comments:

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-10 17:12:47
Consider SENA Appendix J. The previously documented arrangements are for <an overall charge>, not "overall charge group". http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html#AppendixJ

Is there evidence for an overall charge group of two different charges and two different tinctures?

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-15 16:37:18
Agree that this is not a registerable arrangement. And no, I don't believe I have ever seen such a thing. It is certain that it is not reproducible from the current blazon. (It also says "par" not "pair" of compasses.) If I were attempting to draw two overall charge groups over a charge bendwise, I would absolutely place them in bend, not in pale as here (just as we would charges ON a bend). So this would have to be Azure, a straight trumpet bendwise and overall in pale a pair of compasses Or and two hammers in saltire argent.

Andreas Lucernensis at 2016-07-18 03:22:29
The only overlapping "overall" element is one tiny bit of the hammer, which is not centered, as one would expect of an overall charge.

With an alternate blazon, we also get slot machine.It certainly makes me want to book the next flight to vegas.

Guillermo Pajaro de Escocia at 2016-07-25 14:52:11
After discussions with client, he has submitted the attached change to this badge. Essentially it removes the straight horn and goes closer to the inspirational piece.

Included is an example of the style submitted in the badge design from an appropriate region and time frame of the submitter's target region and period.

The attached images are that of a stained glass window from the mid 14th century. It is a stained glass window on display in the Cloisters Exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in gallery 16.

The glass originated in 1446 from the Rhine Valley at he Carmelite church at Boppard-am-Whein near Koblenz.

A link to the exhibit is below. http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/473007

1: Image 1 2: Image 2 3: Image 3 4: Image 4

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-26 19:39:00
It is up to (acting) Bordure to decide if the forms have sufficient time for commentary on this ILoI.

If the emblazon looks like identifiably like graphic 1, no conflicts observed versus "Azure, in pale a pair of compasses Or and two hammers crossed in saltire argent."

Elena Wyth (Bordure (Acting)) at 2016-08-10 16:50:35
Thanks for staying on top of things, Gui. Make sure Asterisk gets the forms.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:52:31
"pair" Glad to see that the trumpet is being removed.


9: Lynette Turner -New Name & New Device

Argent, in the first and fourth quarters three gouts azure, in the second and third quarters a Catherine wheel gules, overall a cross sable

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Spelling (Lynette is mundane name) most important.

Submitted through the Barony of Raven's Fort

Consulting herald not listed

Lynette is the submitter's legal first name. Copy of DL included.

Turner -- Ralph le Turner (1191-1192) is in the Pipe Rolls of Leicestershire.

familysearch.org gives

Thomas Turner as the father of a bride in Kidderminster, Worcester, England, in 1541 (batch no M04395-3)

as well as many other Englishmen and women with the surname Turner in the 16th c.

Submitted through the Barony of Ravensfort

Consulting herald Shanahan the Fey

Name Comments:

Maridonna Benvenuti at 2016-07-09 05:14:32
Turner can also be found in _Names found in Cam, Gloucestershire, Marriage Registers 1569-1600_ by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (Sara L. Friedemann) and dated to 1587, 1591. http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/cam.html

Maridonna Benvenuti at 2016-07-12 04:42:30
Fwiw a form of Lynette can be found as Linette, s.n. Linet, is found in Alys Ogress' KWHSS article _Something Rich and Strange: "Undocumentable" Names From The IGI Parish Records_ by Alys Mackyntoich, LINETTE COLLETT 1577, LINETTE DEL BRESSINE 1583, LINETTE HUENSIS 1603 in Belgium. In the same article the Belgian masculine given name Lina uses show the "i" and "y" spellings. http://heraldry.sca.org/names/SomethingRichandStrange.html
<NR>SENA, Appendix C notes that English/Welsh names can be mixed with Dutch, French and Gaelic names 1100-1600. Hopefully this includes Belgium in our period.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:53:04
No conflicts found.

Eglentyne Merryweather (Rivers Bend) at 2016-08-07 20:38:00
No conflicts found.

Device Comments:

Coblaith Muimnech at 2016-07-10 00:04:26
This design gives a strong impression of marshalled arms. The quartering of arms with the same field and the use of crosses overall in marshalled arms are both well established period practices, so the similarity in the tinctures of the quarters and the cross overlying the lines of division do nothing to lessen that impression.

SENA does say, "Only designs with per pale and quarterly field divisions are potentially marshalled. Designs with another field division or no field division are not marshalled under these rules." (http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html#A6F1) But I think we should at least consider the possibility that the sovereigns might find this to be a special case, with the cross cutting the field into pieces the way it does. (Also, to consider the fact that this violates the spirit of the rule, which is intended to prevent the registration of any armory that appears to be marshalled.)

1: Image 1 2: Image 2 3: Image 3 4: Image 4 5: Image 5

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-15 16:55:37
Concur this still looks like marshalling, though do we know for sure that the examples you supplied ARE examples of marshalled arms? Otherwise, they are actually support for this arrangement, without which it may well fail as an unwieldy mess. The fact that the base color is all argent, and there are no charges terminating at the quarter edge argue in its favor. Drop the gouttes for a minute and consider Argent, a cross throughout sable between in bend sinister two catherine's wheels gules. Perfectly legal. Now how about Quarterly argent goutty de larmes and argent, a cross throughout sable between in bend sinister two catherine's wheels gules. Would it help if the gouttes in Q4 were three in bend sinister rather than two-and-one? BTW, those gouttes may need to go back for redraw anyway.

Song Zidie (Skraeling Althing) at 2016-08-05 15:34:44
I don't believe this counts as marshalling, even if we're being extra strict about it. There is a clear central primary charge, which is covered under A6F1c - Designs which do Not Create the Appearance of Marshalling, "Single Primary Charge Group Over The Entire Field".

This device can and should be blazoned as Argent, a cross sable between..., as the field is not divided into quarters, and under our rules the device is not marshalled, implying quarters. However, I'm not sure whether the gouttes, in their number, are blazonable? Maybe Argent, a cross sable between in bend two groups of three gouttes d'eau and in bend sinister two Catherine wheels gules. I have a nagging feeling we have a precedent against this kind of design though...

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-10 16:23:15
The proposed blazon is Victorian herald-speak for marshalling, which (as Coblaith pointed out) this isn't. The cross isn't overall, it is the primary charge. Consider the reblazon "Argent, a cross sable between six gouttes azure and two Catherine wheels gules."

Consider versus "Argent, a cross sable." (Teutonic Order, Device, Dec 1994 [Important non-SCA arms]). I see only 1 DC for addition of the secondary charges.

Coblaith Muimnech at 2016-07-10 21:32:35
I wouldn't have the vaguest idea where to put the secondaries, with that blazon. Something like, "Argent, a cross sable between in bend two groups of three gouttes azure and in bend sinister two Catherine wheels gules." But geez, that's ugly. (The blazon, I mean.)

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-10 22:01:16
You're right, Coblaith. "In bend" and "in bend sinister" should have been in the proposed reblazon. No need, however, to included the number in each quarter - default is to split them into two equal groups.

Juetta Copin at 2016-07-12 07:16:58
I think the use of a non-standard arrangement is grounds for return here.

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-12 18:20:15
Interesting concern, Juetta. I can see it argued that the emblazon is "A central ordinary, a secondary charge group around the ordinary (numbered charges), and another secondary charge group around the ordinary (numbered charges)" [which is not in Appendix J] but, IMO, we have "A central ordinary, a secondary charge group around the ordinary". If the number of secondary charges were the same in each quarter, no one would raise an eyebrow.

Etienne Le Mons (Sea Stag) at 2016-07-17 18:32:01
Are these gouttes registrable in their current apostrophe form?

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:54:53
We had a spirited discussion on whether this looks like marshalling or not. Didn't reach a consensus on the matter. Agree with Sea Stag that the gouts need to be properly drawn.


10: Marita Böe -New Device

OSCAR finds the name on the Ansteorra LoI of April 18, 2016 as submitted.

Per chevron argent and azure, an increscent and a decrescent purpure and an owl argent

SUbmitted through the Barony of Northkeep at Gulf Wars

Consulting herald Villana Palazolo

Device Comments:

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-13 22:01:39
Unity of posture (SENA A.3.2c) should not be an issue. "However, crescents, increscents, decrescents, and crescents pendant were used occasionally in the same armory, so armory which includes more than one of these is allowed."

No conflicts observed.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:55:24
No conflicts found. Must be a female owl with those long eyelashes. ☺


11: Robin of Gilwell -New Heraldic Title

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in July of 1981, via Ansteorra.

Rapier Herald

Submitter has no desire as to gender.
Meaning (Rapier) most important.

Submitted through the Barony of the Steppes

Consulting herald Sara Penrose

<Rapier> - Heraldic Title, derived from a heraldic charge. Juliana de Luna's "Heraldic Titles from the Middle Ages and Renaissance" gives this as the third-most-common pattern for heraldic titles, and says it is most frequently found in the titles of English pursuivants. (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/HeraldicTitles/heraldic_titles_by_type.shtml#CHARGES, copy attached).

The rapier is a heraldic charge. See Bruce Draconarius' Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry (3rd Ed. Online, citing Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, the National Library of Bavaria). The PicDic lists rapiers as appearing in the canting arms (Italian spada) of Spatafora [BSB Cod.Icon 273:243]. (http://mistholme.com/?s=rapier, copy attached).

The OED s.n. "rapier" dates the spelling "rapier(s)" to c. 1590 (copy attached).

The right to a heraldic title was granted on November 14, 2015 by Sara Penrose, then Star Principal Herald (copy attached).

This submission was returned most recently at Laurel on the 12/2003 LoAR for conflict with the <Dreiburgen School of Rapier>: http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2003/12/03-12lar.html. Under SENA, this no longer conflicts with <Dreiburgen School of Rapier> because <Dreiburgen> is now no longer transparent for purposes of determining conflict. Further, permission to conflict from the Barony of Dreiburgen is attached. This also does not conflict with <Carolingian Rapier Company> or <Rapier Champion> or <Baronial Rapier Champion> as per precdent: "This title does not conflict with Carolingian Rapier Company (Carolingia, Barony of, November 1989), Rapier Champion (Atlantia, Kingdom of, March 1994), or Baronial Rapier Champion (Ponte Alto, Barony of, April 2001) because these items are generic identifiers and are not actually registered items. Generic identifiers are "functional, generic, and thus not held to conflict standards" (Cover Letter for the January 1993 LoAR). They may optionally include a reference to the branch name, but such a reference does not negate the generic nature of the identifier."

Heraldic Title Comments:

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-10 19:26:36
The Letter of Permission fulfills the pre-SENA conditions set out to clear conflict in the referenced Dec 2003 LoAR. The text in full reads:

"Ansteorra, Kingdom of. Heraldic title Rapier Herald. "This name conflicts with the household name Dreiburgen School of Rapier, which was registered to the barony of Dreiburgen in October 1995. School is the designator in this household name and is transparent for conflict purposes. The addition of a group reference, such as Dreiburgen, is normally transparent for conflict purposes. However, previous precedent (including The Order of the White Scarf of Caid (Caid, Kingdom of; Acceptances, Caid, April 1997) and Order of the Golden Swan of Aneala (Aneala, Barony of; Acceptances, Lochac, July 1999) has ruled that a group reference is enough difference to clear the conflict when used in conjunction with a letter of permission to conflict.

This title does not conflict with Carolingian Rapier Company (Carolingia, Barony of, November 1989), Rapier Champion (Atlantia, Kingdom of, March 1994), or Baronial Rapier Champion (Ponte Alto, Barony of, April 2001) because these items are generic identifiers and are not actually registered items. Generic identifiers are "functional, generic, and thus not held to conflict standards" (Cover Letter for the January 1993 LoAR). They may optionally include a reference to the branch name, but such a reference does not negate the generic nature of the identifier."

No conflicts observed.

Seraphina Delphino (Golden Dolphin) at 2016-07-23 22:36:14
Is rapier herald going to be generic to register?

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:56:51
The cited precedents cited appear to support the title.


12: Runa Duna hirðirdóttir -New Name & New Device

Gules, within three ivy leaves argent a stork in its vigilance argent maintaining a fountain.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No changes.

Submitted through the Barony of Raven's Fort

Consulting herald Lady Lynette Turner

Runa is found in the Nordiskt runnamnslexikon p. 185 sn. Rúna

http://www.sprakochfolkminnen.se/om-oss/arkiv-och-samlingar/nordiskt-runnamnslexikon.html

Duna - means thunder, found in An Icelandic-English Dictionary by Richard Cleasby and Gudbrand Vigfusson which is on the approved list for not needing a photocopy sent in. http://lexicon.ff.cuni.cz/html/oi_cleasbyvigfusson/b0109.html

DUNA, að. (cp. dynja), to thunder, give a hollow rushing1 sound; dunar

i skóginum, Edda 30; svá skal danzinn duna, Ísl. þjóðs. (nf dancing).

duna, esp. pl. dunur, f. a rushing, thundering noise, Eb. 174, Fms. iii.

184; hence the Dan. tor-den, qs. Thor-dön, the din ofThor, i. e. thunder,

supposed to be the noise of the god Thor in his wain.

hirðir same source http://lexicon.ff.cuni.cz/html/oi_cleasbyvigfusson/b0264.html

m. [Ulf. hairdeis = GREEK; A. S. hyrde; Engl. herd; Dan. hyrde; Swed. herde; Germ. hirt] :-- a herd, herdsman, shepherd, Gþl. 400, Grág. ii. 224, Barl. 35, Bs. ii. 91, Stj. 106 (hirðanna, gen. pl.); eccl., Hom., Mar., Bs., Stj. passim, as also N. T. in mod. usage; hirðir is used in a sacred and metaph. sense, smali or smala-maðr only in the proper sense; eg em góðr hirðir, John x. 14; heilagir hirðar, Stj. 9. hirðis-lauss, adj. shepherdless; sauðir h., Stj. 603. hirðis-ligr, adj. pastoral, Stj. 235. hirðis-nafn, n. a shepherd's name, Bs. i. 280. hirðis-rismál, n. a shepherd's rising time, a term for day-break; er sól er í miðju austri, i.e. six o'clock, Grág. ii. 224, cp. Hrafn. 20.

dóttir same source, p. 102

http://lexicon.ff.cuni.cz/html/oi_cleasbyvigfusson/b0102.html

DÓTTIR, f., gen. dat. acc. dóttur, plur. dœtr, later dætr or dætur: gen.

dætra, dat. dætrum; the Icei. keeps a single t throughout in the plur.,

whereas Swed. and Dan. have döttre; dæitr also occurs in Sks. B. (a Norse

MS.), and at least once or twice in poetry, cp. the rhyme, Ægis dættr

ok tættu, Edda (Ed. A. M.) i. 324; and Hies dættr, Skálda 198: [Gr.

BvyÁrrjp; Jf. daugbtar; A. S. dogbtor; Engl. daughter; Swed. dotler;

Dan. datter; O. H. G. tobtar; Germ, tocbter; the Greek has a short v,

and the Goth, has au, answering to Gr. o; the diphthongal 6 and the

double t in the Scr. ndin. is only caused by the suppression of the middle

consonant g h] :-- a daughter; hann átti dóttur eina er Unnr hét, Nj. i;

fjóra dóttir Sigurðar Orms í auga; jborgeiðr dóttir þorsteins ens Rauða,

2; Höskuldr átti sér dótîur er Hallgerðr hét, id.; er iüt at eiga dáðlausa

sonu, ok víst aetla ek yðr til þess betr felda at þér værit dætr föðurs

yðvars ok værit giptar, Ld. 236; gott skaplyndi hefðit þór þá fengit, ef

þtr værit dætr einhvers bónda, 216; nú veit ek at þú ert d. en ekki sonr,

er þú þorir eigi at verja frændr þina, Háv. 43. If suffixed to a name, -dóttir

denotes a woman, -son a man, e. g. þorsteinn Egils-son, but his sister

þorgerðr Egíls-dóttir; Halldórr Ólafs-son, but Halldóra Ólafs-dóttir, vide

the Index uf Names to Landn., the Sagas, etc.: this custom, in early

times common to all Teut. people, is still in almost exclusive use in IceL,

where a lady keeps her name all her life, whether married or not: einga-

dóttir, only daughter; sonar-dottir, son's daughter; dóîtur-dóttir, a

daughter's daughter, a granddaughter, Grág. i. 171; dóttur-maðr, a so n-

in-law, Germ, eidam, Fms. ix. 240, Grág. 1. 175: the waves are poet,

called Ranar-dsetr, Hlés-dætr, Ægis-dætr, the daughters of Ran, etc.,

Edda: the Earth is daughter ofunar, and, on the mother's side, of Night,

Edda; the Sun is daughter of Mundil-fari, 7. 2. Dótta is a fern,

pr. name in Denmark, prob. akin to daughter, Fms. vi.

(Submitter is listed in the Ansteorran OP as Runa of the Thundering Herd.)

Submitted through the Barony of Raven's Fort

Consulting herald Lady Lynette Turner

Name Comments:

ffride wlffsdotter at 2016-07-09 23:46:24
The documentation for Rúna is fine.

We actually have an almost-identical byname that has the same meaning.
Lind Personbinamn col. 67 sn. Duni
<Sira Ion duni> recorded in the dative as <duna>. A side-form of dynr "noise, din"
Lind's source is the Bergens kalvskinn ca 1310-1360.

col. 68 sn. Dynr
<Riðar dyn> circa 1235
Or, in a sound-alike name:
col. 67 sn. Dunna
<Einarr dunna> recorded in the dative <dunnu>, 1272-1276. Glossed as Gräsand, a mallard duck.

There is a pattern of <occupational byname's><son>, which we could apply to women.
Tilnavne i den islandske oldlitteratur Finnur Jónsson has:
(http://heimskringla.no/wiki/Herkomst_og_sl%C3%A6gtskab)
Sigurðr biskupsson, 13th c., d. 1226. "bishop's son"
Hávarðr jarlsson, 12th c., "earl's son"
Vígleikr prestsson, 13th c., "priest's son"
Jón prófastsson, d. 1240. "provost's son"

So there's a slim chance someone might be known as a shepherd's son, or a shepherd's daughter.

The genitive of hirðir, like the entry in Cleasby and Vigfusson suggests, is hirðis. Hence, the patronymic would be Hirðisdóttir.

I would recommend the name be changed to (including consistently-used accents)...
Rúna duni Hirðisdóttir
Runa duni Hirðisdottir
Rúna dynr Hirðisdóttir
Runa dynr Hirðisdottir
or
Rúna dunna Hirðisdóttir
Runa dunna Hirðisdottir

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:58:13
Docs for first and last names check out. The existence of a word does not automatically mean that it was used in a name; we need more support for Duna, or else suggest some of the alternatives ffride has suggested.

Device Comments:

Coblaith Muimnech at 2016-07-10 01:14:54
Per precedent, only a crane can be in its vigilance (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2011/03/11-03lar.html#23). And since cranes and storks are both classified as "crane-shaped birds" and therefore are not considered substantially different from each other (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2003/11/03-11cl.html), I imagine you'd have trouble registering a stork in any posture that was very "vigilance"-like, because of the confusion that would create.

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-10 18:27:32
The attached was registered Jan 2009 without comment. "Argent, a heron maintaining a stone in an upraised foot between flaunches vert." (Avelyn Grene, Device, Jan 2009). The LoI proposed the blazon "Argent, a heron in its vigilance between flaunches vert." http://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=7749 The implication is the blazon term is restricted, not the posture/maintained charge combination.

Consider, however, the orientation of the charges in the secondary group. They are not uniform. The best way I can think to blazon them so they don't violate unity of posture is "in pall, stems from center", but I'm not sure that's a viable phraseology (I've only seen "X to center"). If forwarded, consider the blazon "Gules, a stork argent maintaining a fountain in an upraised foot between in pall, stems from center, three (ivy) leaves argent." is "in pall, tips to center" (a pattern used twice in the O&A). I forwarded, consider the blazon "Gules, a stork argent maintaining a fountain in an upraised foot between in pall, tips to center, three (ivy) leaves argent."

Consider also identfiability of the secondary charges. Their size should be at least as large as the maintained charge. (My initial impression was poorly scanned mullets.)

1: Image 1

Coblaith Muimnech at 2016-07-10 21:36:53
I'd consider the rotation of the leaves a detail not worth blazoning. I agree they're awfully small.

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-15 17:19:56
Yep, only a crane can be vigilant, because the legend is specific to the crane. That does not preclude any other long-legged bird holding something in an upraised claw.

Concur that the secondaries need beefing up and orienting into one standard position. I had to read the blazon to know that they were not just random blobs, and the inward orientation makes the identifiability far more difficult.

Thomas de Groet at 2016-07-18 19:20:21
I agree with Actuarius' reblazon. If "tips to center" is a usable format in a blazon, I think that is a good way to put it.

Etienne Le Mons (Sea Stag) at 2016-07-17 18:35:13
The leaves almost looked like fleurs.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 13:59:43
The format of a blazon is "[Field], primary charge(s), secondaries, tertiaries". Agree that "in its vigilance" is exclusive to herons, so "Gules, a stork argent maintaining in its raised dexter foot a fountain, all between three ivy leaves, stems outward, argent." The leaves would be more recognizable if they were drawn larger, which there's room to do without shrinking the bird. No conflicts found.


13: Samuel Dewy -New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 2012, via Ansteorra.

Gules, two arrows inverted in saltire and overall issuant from a mount a sword inverted argent and in base a dragon head cabossed regardant sable.

Submitted through the Barony of Northkeep

Consulting herald Geoffrey deGournay

Device Comments:

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-10 18:48:45
Consider Non-Period style. The primary charge group is not issuant from the mount/base triangular, but conjoined to it - none of the blade is missing. IMO this gives the mount the impression and visual weight of a third primary charge of an in pale arrangement. IMO the size of the dragon's head issuant from base being comparable to the arrows and sword only exacerbates that impression. That having been expressed, I've not found a precedent to cite.

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-15 17:30:46
You don't need a precedent. This design is not doable, let me count the ways. The sword cannot be overall one charge group and issuant from another. The sword cannot interact with the saltire of arrows in any way BUT being overall. That's not a mount, it's a too-low per chevron field division; mounts are either round or naturalistic, this is neither. The dragon head cannot be issuant from base OVER a mount which is already issuant from base. There are many possible fixes here, but this is no-go.

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-15 17:33:45
Oh, and cabossed? Regardant? Huh?

Song Zidie (Skraeling Althing) at 2016-08-05 15:48:12
All the submitter needs to do is separate the sword from the point pointed. It is not difficult in that case to blazon this as:

Gules, two arrows inverted in saltire surmounted by a sword inverted, on a point pointed argent a dragon's head issuant from base sable.

I'm not even convinced that the conjoining is worth anything more than an artist's note.

Song Zidie (Skraeling Althing) at 2016-08-05 15:52:20
But as Green Anchor points out, the arrows need to ACTUALLY be inverted, or else you have UoP problems :P

Etienne Le Mons (Sea Stag) at 2016-08-05 18:02:24
Inversion doesn't count for UoP as of the 1/2016 cover letter (as long as it's *just* inversion).

Song Zidie (Skraeling Althing) at 2016-08-05 19:28:11
Oooh, I missed that one.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 14:00:17
In addition to the issues others have pointed out, the arrows are not inverted. Not conflict checked.


14: Sara Penrose -New Heraldic Title

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 1999, via Ansteorra.

White Heron Herald

Submitter has no desire as to gender.
Meaning (White Heron) most important.

Submitted through the Barony of Loch Soilleir

Consulting herald Andreas Meißner

White Heron Heraldic Title, derived from a heraldic charge. Juliana de Luna's "Heraldic Titles from the Middle Ages and Renaissance" gives this as the third-most-common pattern for heraldic titles, and says it is most frequently found in the titles of English pursuivants. in England, charges are sometimes combined with a color, often French. The color "white" appears several times in the cited examples, in the forms of "Blanc", "Blanch", and "Blanche", all of which can be rendered into "White" using the Lingua Anglica allowance.

http://medievalscotland.org/jes/HeraldicTitles/heraldic_titles_by_type.shtml

The heron is a heraldic charge, which Bruce Draconarious" Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry lists as appearing in the canting arms of Heron, c. 1255, citing Humphery-Smith, C.R. Anglo-Norman Armory Two: An ordinary of 13th Century armorials. Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies, 1984.

http://mistholme.com/?s=heron

The O.E.D. s.n. "heron" dates the spelling "heron" to c. 1405-, 1530, and 1577.

Per the Cover Letter of the December 13 LoAR, the right to a heraldic title was granted by Andrewe Bawldwyn as his last act as Star Principal Herald at Winter Crown Tournament, January 11,2014 http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2013/12/13-12cl.html#10

Heraldic Title Comments:

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-10 18:58:16
Consider Loch Salann, Barony of. "...The pattern of Order of the White [Bird] is also grandfathered to the Barony." (LoAR Nov 2014, A-Artemesia). http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2014/11/14-11lar.html#74

Nerts.

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-10 19:15:21
Would the submitter consider a change of language? Blanc Héron is a possibility.

Alys Mackyntoich (Ogress) at 2016-07-11 10:12:59
Loch Salann hasn't actually registered Order of the White Heron. There's no conflict here, and no reason the submitter can't have this title.

Sara Penrose (Sable Roundel) at 2016-07-11 12:25:44
I'm biased, obviously, but I agree with Ogress. I think that the language Tostig quoted from the LoAR was intended to provide additional support for the naming pattern in that particular case, not to restrict everyone else from using that naming pattern for every possible bird.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 14:00:48
Looks OK.


15: Sarah Rois Netterville -New Name & New Device

Argent, between two quatrefoils vert and a bear counter passant sable, on a chevron sable three fleurs de lys argent

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No changes.

Submitted through the Barony of Raven's Fort

Consulting herald Lady Lynette Turner with assistance from Valeria Solstice

Sarah Withycombe, E.G. -- s.n. Sara, pgs. 263-264 : Found in use in England as a christian name from the 12th century, usually in the form of Sara, but was not really common until after the Reformation, when Sarah becomes the usual spelling.

Index of Names in Irish Annals

by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (Kathleen M. O'Brien)

http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Rois.shtml

Number of women found in the annals with this name: 7

Found in Years: 1472, 1525, 1530, 1566, 1585, 1607

Netterville is the submitter's legal last name.

submitted through the Barony of Raven's Fort

Consulting herald Lady Lynette Turner

Name Comments:

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-15 18:01:58
There is no way (happily) to include Róis in this name. Double given names are attested in late period English, but not in Gaelic, and one English and one Gaelic name is right out. IGI will give us dozens of Sarahs with an H, and dozens of Roses, so she could be Sarah Rose, but not Sarah Róis. Appending the Netterville information that Coblaith listed above would be helpful.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 14:02:46
Docs check out, but Adelaide is correct about registerability as is.

Song Zidie (Skraeling Althing) at 2016-08-05 16:01:54
The submission doesn't include an accent on <Rois>, so I have to assume the submitter doesn't care about the accent. In that case, it is quite easy to document this name:

Sarah Adam; female; burial 19 Feb 1551; Tydd-St. Mary, Lincoln, England; batch no. B03306-3; https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JCMW-V3F

John Rois; male; marriage 15 Aug 1605; Saint Botolph,Cambridge,Cambridge,England; batch no. M13048-1; https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N2KM-FL2

Netterville is the submitter's legal last name.

Given name + double surname is well documented for late period England and needs no further documentation as per SENA Appendix A.

Eglentyne Merryweather (Rivers Bend) at 2016-08-07 20:44:00
The name is clear of conflict, but I also agree about the use of Rois. In checking, I found no Sara Rose or Sarah Rose registered, with or without a further byname. The closest example was Sarai Rose Perlea.

Device Comments:

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-13 22:13:08
The secondary charges fill the space well, but their disparate size is a result of the chevron being enhanced.

Consider period style. The symmetry of the chevron is above the fess line. I can't seem to locate the cover letter done by Mistress Emma which should be cited. [EDIT: Posted on Baby Heralds recently http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2011/05/11-05cl.html]

Etienne Le Mons (Sea Stag) at 2016-07-17 18:38:19
Some internal detail would help the identifiability of the bear.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 14:04:12
Agree that a bit of internal detailing would make the bear a good deal more recognizable. Since the quatrefoils and the bear are coprimary, they should be more nearly the same size. This is easily done since the chevron is drawn well above the center of the escutcheon, and if moved down, the charges can be resized. No conflicts found.


16: Seneca of Raven's Fort -New Name & New Device

Seneca of Raven's Fort

Sable, an owl argent grasping an arrow Or between on flaunches argent two flames gules.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.

Submitted through the Barony of Ravensfort

Consulting herald for name M. Shanahan

Documentation supplied on form is simply "Ancestry.com".

Asterisk has found Seneca Bulsell, a boy christened in England 1595 (batch C00311-7).

https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J92D-Q49?print=true

Submitter has asked for a female name.

Submitted through the Barony of Ravensfort

Consulting herald Lady Lynette Turner

Asterisk : blazon submitted as "sable per flaunches argent, an owl close guardant argent grasping and arrow Or, and two flame gules". Proposed blazon is Asterisk's best attempt.

Name Comments:

Maridonna Benvenuti at 2016-07-09 05:57:20
Historically Seneca is a masculine, Latin (Roman) cognomen. Finding the name used as a feminine given name would a great stroke of luck.

Maridonna Benvenuti at 2016-08-09 06:18:39
Seneca is found as a masculine given name in "Vicentine Names from the 14th to 16th Centuries" by Andrea Hicks. In the masc. name list there are several ancient names. Although ancient or pagan given names were rare footnote 1 notes the Pindemonte family from Verona names sons Demosthenes, Hector, Pliny, Seneca, Tullius. https://s-gabriel.org/names/maridonna/vicentine.html#loc

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-15 18:24:30
Yep, that's a VERY famous man's name. Depending on where in Ancestry she got the name, there are some possibilities. Seneca the Elder and Younger were from Hispania, where 1000 years later Sancho and Sancha were common names, Latinized Sancius and Sancia. Maybe she found Sancia? I note, amusingly enough, that IGI has a Senchia Eyton, Female christened 18 Jul 1585 (C04287-9). Either Sancia or Senchia are registerable feminine names.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 14:04:48
It appears that the client may have this name if she withdraws her request for a feminine one.

Device Comments:

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-14 20:31:07
Consider the reblazon "Sable, an owl affronty argent grasping an arrow Or and on flaunches argent two flames gules."

No conflicts observed, but I have some concerns over identifiability of the flames.

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-15 18:09:16
Indeed, this needs a redraw; we no longer accept amorphous blobs as flames. Submitter should be pointed to the period style flame: http://mistholme.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/flame.jpg

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 14:05:43
The arrow is fesswise, point to dexter. No conflicts found. Several of us had a problem with the emblazon of the flames.


17: Stephan Draco -New Name & New Device

Argent semy of flames gules, a dragon sable countersejant and on a chief gules three mullets of five points argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Submitted through the Barony of Raven's Fort

Consulting herald Lynette Turner

Stephan

Yorkshire Given Names from 1379

by Talan Gwynek

http://heraldry.sca.org/names/yorkshire.html

Stephan(us) 16/17 {Steuen}

http://heraldry.sca.org/names/brasses/men.html

2 Stephen - 1446 kt

Faire Names for English Folk:

Late Sixteenth Century English Names

by Chris Laning (SCA: Christian de Holacombe, claning@igc.org)

https://s-gabriel.org/names/christian/fairnames/givennames.html#men

Includes Stephen as one of the top 50 men's names, citing Names and Naming Patterns in England 1538-1700, by Scott Smith-Bannister (Oxford Historical Monographs, Clarendon Press, 1997, ISBN 0-19-820663-1).

Draco

https://www.houseofnames.com/draco-family-crest

House of Names article identifying it as an Italian surname.

Also submitted -- a page from the O & A showing many SCA registrations as a personal name.

Submitted through the Barony of Raven's Fort

Consulting herald Lynette Turner

Name Comments:

Maridonna Benvenuti at 2016-07-09 04:55:49
English and Italian names cannot be mixed.

Stephan is found in German Given Names 1200-1250, Alphabetical Lists, by Talan Gwynek (Brian M. Scott) http://heraldry.sca.org/names/germ13alpha.html

Draco is found as a given name in Alys Ogress' 2015 KWHSS article NAMES FROM THE SIGNET OF MATILDA OF TUSCANY (1072-1115) Alys Mackyntoich (Alissa Pyrich) and dated to 1114. http://eoforwic.ca/kwhss2015/?page_id=26

According to SENA Appendix C German and Italian can be combined throughout SCA period. SENA Appendix A, Patterns, shows Italian patronyms can be marked or unmarked.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 14:06:29
The source given for the surname is a heraldic bucket shop; not a source to be greatly relied on. Fortunately, Maridonna's documentation fills the gaps nicely.

Eglentyne Merryweather (Rivers Bend) at 2016-08-07 20:53:33
The masculine personal name Stephan is found as a header in German Names by Hans Bahlow, translated and edited by Edda Gentry, 2nd Ed., page 490. Stephan is derived from the Greek Stephanos "wreath, crown". It is also a saint's name, and that of the first Christian martyr (Acts of the Apostles 6 and 8).

Device Comments:

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-15 18:33:13
Again, amorphous blobs no longer fly for flames. It may in fact no longer be possible to adequately draw a semy of flames, as a single flame is a group of separate tongues. The dragon is sejant contourny. I don't believe he needs the flames for conflict; it might be worth trying Argent, a dragon sejant contourny and on a chief gules three mullets argent. If the flames are important, the mullets could be strewn (or not) and the flames could go on the chief.

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-15 20:41:34
If current depictions of "enflamed" are accepted, I can see them used in a semy.

1: Image 1

Etienne Le Mons (Sea Stag) at 2016-07-17 18:39:41
Wow. That's a LOT of white internal detailing.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 14:07:57
As drawn, the flames look very much like gouts de sang. Reducing the amount of internal detailing on the dragon would also be good. Our normal practice is to blazon the tincture of a charge after blazoning the posture: "a dragon countersejant (or sejant contourny) sable". No conflicts found.


18: Þorbjôrn orðlokarr -New Name & New Device

Argent, a bend sable, three feathers in bend sinister counterchanged

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Old Norse) most important.
Culture most important.

Submitted through the Shire of the Shadowlands

Consulting herald not listed

Þorbjôrn First name documentation Grettis saga

http://www.vikinganswerlady.com/VarangianNames.shtml#SagaVarangians

Men Mentioned in the Sagas who Served in the Varangian Guard of Byzantium

Þorbjôrn ôngull Þórðar son Grettis saga after 1031 Icelander.

orðlokarr Byname documentation : Geirr Bassi, Landnámabók

http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/vikbynames.html

Viking Bynames found in the Landnámabók

by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (Sara L. Uckelman)

orðlokarr word-plane, one who shapes his words carefully 1

Submitted through the Shire of the Shadowlands

No consulting herald listed

Blazon is Asterisk's. Blazon submitted as "Argent, on a bend sable between two feathers bendwise sable, one feather bendwise argent."

Name Comments:

ffride wlffsdotter at 2016-07-09 23:55:37
While the Viking Answer Lady site says Þorbjôrn, it's pretty obviously a typo for an o-ogonek, hence <Þorbjǫrn>.
A variant with consonantal i appears 55 times in Viking Names found in Landnámabók by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/landnamabok.html) as Þorbiǫrn.

Artorius at 2016-07-27 19:30:31
The name he is wanting is Thorbjorn

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 14:10:47
Docs check out, except that he needs to go with Þorbjǫrn or Thorbjorn. No conflicts found.

Device Comments:

Coblaith Muimnech at 2016-07-14 03:48:18
Arrangement is usually specified before the charge is named, as in, "in bend sinister three feathers". If it's forced by the field, however, I don't think it's necessary to blazon it at all. And here, that's pretty much the case (and would be more so were the charges drawn to fill the space).

The three feathers are in two different charge groups--one secondary, one tertiary--by virtue of their placement, and need to be blazoned separately and in an order that reflects the group types.

The default orientation for a long charge on a bend is bendwise, so I don't think you'd need to mention that. I'm not sure about long charges flanking a bend, but it seems logical to me that they would be the same. Depending on whether that's the case, I'd blazon this one either:

Argent, on a bend between two feathers sable a feather argent.

Or:

Argent, on a bend between two feathers bendwise sable a feather argent.

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-15 21:17:37
Consider the reblazon "Argent, on a bend between two feathers bendwise sable a feather argent." The identical size of the tertiary and secondary charges give the appearance of a single charge group but, since one of them lies totally on the bend, it cannot be an overall charge group per SENA Apendix I.D http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html#AppendixID Better style would be for the feathers to fill their allotted spaces, but IMO this emblazon is registerable.

Seems 2 DC clear versus "Argent, on a bend cotised between two fleurs-de-lys sable a feather argent." (Octavia de Verdon, Device, Nov 1999) for removal of the cotices and change of type to the secondary charge group. No other potential conflicts observed.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 14:11:21
How about "Argent, a bend sable and three feathers bendwise in bend sinister counterchanged"? No conflicts found.


19: Titus Aurelius Marcianus -New Name & New Device

Sable, a bend sinister azure fimbriated argent and in chief a mullet Or

Submitted through the Barony of Elfsea

Consulting herald Artorius Germanus

http://heraldry.sca.org/names/roman.html

Male citizens of the Roman Empire used the tria nomina (literally, "three names"). The tria nomina consisted of three different types of name elements, in the following order:

Praenomen + Nomen + Cognomen.

Titus listed as a praenomen

Aurelius listed as a nomen

Marcianus listed as a cognomen

Submitted through the Barony of Elfsea

Consulting herald Artorius Germanus

Name Comments:

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-15 18:36:15
Docs check, correctly formed, thank you!

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 14:11:48
Docs check out. No conflicts found.

Device Comments:

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-15 18:44:04
Very close to Eowyn Nightsong of Tharsis: August of 1979 (via Atenveldt): Sable, a bend sinister azure fimbriated argent, debruised by a sword proper; and in canton a mullet argent. That's a terrible blazon; I have seen her sword both over and under the bend as emblazoned. I believe her sword is meant to go UNDER the bend, making it primary, but this should still be clear for the sword plus the tincture of the mullet. http://wiki.caid-commons.org/images/Eowyn_nightsong_of_tharsis.gif

Tostig Logiosophia (Actuarius) at 2016-07-15 21:29:28
Also seems 2 DC clear versus "Sable, on a bend sinister azure fimbriated three New World dogwood blossoms palewise argent seeded Or." (Ælfthryth il, Badge, April 2016) for removal of the tertiary and addition of the secondary charge groups. No other potential conflicts observed.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 14:12:20
Wish the mullet were centered in its space instead of being smooshed into the corner. No conflicts found.


20: Wyldewode, Canton of -Resub Branch Name & Resub Device

Per fess embattled Or and azure, three chevronels braced vert and a savage's head couped within a laurel wreath Or.

Submitted through the Barony of Northkeep

Consulting herald Andreas Meißner

Wyldewode is an English place-name.

The MED s.v. wīld(e (adj.) (http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/m/mec/med-idx?type=id&id=MED52749) gives place names using this element: Wyldhulle (1365), Wyldedyche (c. 1380), Wyldegrene (1402), Wyldehelle (1433).

The MED s.v. wọ̄de (n.(2)) (http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/m/mec/med-idx?type=byte&byte=247306017) has: Southewood (1450), Rostwode (1312), rastwode (1320-21), Halfewode (c. 1400), Summewode/

Sumerewode (1307), Quenewode (1478), Holtewodez (c.1400).

Earlier submission, Canton of Wildwood Keep, was returned because Keep could not be supported as an element of a place name. Comments received on that submission (http://oscar.sca.org/kingdom/kingloi.php?kingdom=8&loi=3757) include:

Alys Mackyntoich (Ogress) at 2016-05-09 18:56:29

"The docs right now support <Wyldewode> -- we should find out how early the spelling -wood starts being used and get documentation for that.

<Wyldwood> here is structured like a compound place name, and follows the patterns were see in Juliana de Luna's "Compound Place Names in English" (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/EnglishCompoundPlacenames/)."

and

Maridonna Benvenuti at 2016-05-16 07:43:06

"From the OED via my library, wildwood, n... A forest of natural growth, or allowed to grow naturally; an uncultivated or unfrequented wood. (In later use chiefly poet.)

attrib.

a1568 in Bannatyne MS (Hunterian Club) 291/73 Ane heklit hud maid of the wyld wode sege.

a1616 Shakespeare Cymbeline (1623) iv. ii. 392 When With wild wood-leaues & weeds, I ha' strew'd his graue."

Submitted through the Barony of Northkeep

Consulting herald Geoffrey de Gourney

Branch Name Comments:

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-15 19:25:06
First, this is NOT an English placename, it is a constructed placename from English elements. Second, I don't think the OED citation is our friend here, as the header clearly includes the note "originally two words" and does not show even a hyphenated single form until 1776. I do think it is a totally plausible constructed compound name, and I think that's their best bet.

On the wode versus wood front, that was a post-Great Vowel Shift thing, but it was firmly rooted by 1600. John Manwood's 1598 work "A Treatise and Discourse of the Lawes of the Forrest" uses WOOD exclusively, and indeed he spells his own name Manwood, not Manwode. I think Wyldwood or Wildwood is fine. I'm less happy with an archaic non-pronounced E on the Wylde element and NOT on the wood element.

Alisone McCay at 2016-07-23 11:08:16
Clicked on links and they are working correctly.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 14:13:33
Agree that the placename is documented as constructed rather than historical. No conflicts found.

Device Comments:

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2016-07-15 19:27:06
They have fixed the wonky chevronels and the wonky laurel wreath as noted from the previous submission.

Etienne Le Mons (Sea Stag) at 2016-07-17 18:42:16
Do we have 3 primary charges or is the laurel wreath considered a secondary?

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2016-08-03 14:15:23
They've fixed the previous problems. Do the chevronels need to be specified as issuant from the partition line? No conflicts found.


Thank you again for your commentary and assistance.

Vigdís Gráfeldr, Asterisk


OSCAR counts 13 Names, 1 Branch Name, 2 Heraldic Titles, 15 Devices and 2 Badges. There are a total of 33 items submitted on this letter.