Drachenwald LoI dated 2018-04-30

Unto Juliana Laurel, Alys Pelican, and Cormac Wreath, and the commenting Members of the College of Arms, greetings from Stefanu de Mohac, Albion.

It is the intent of the Drachenwald College of Heralds that the following submissions be registered.

This item was on the 07-2018 LoAR

1: Aarnimetsä, Barony of - New Badge Association

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 1996, via Drachenwald.

(Fieldless) A chevron couped raguly on the upper edge sable.

This submission is to be associated with for Populace


This item was on the 07-2018 LoAR

2: Drachenwald, Kingdom of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1993, via Drachenwald.

Alae, Ordo

No major changes.
Language (Latin) most important.
Meaning (Order of the Wing) most important.

In the event of a conflict that cannot be cleared with a Permission to Conflict, or some other unsolvable issue preventing the registration of <Alae, Ordo>, the Kingdom of Drachenwald wishes to submit the name as <Alae Drachenwaldensis, Ordo>, 'Order of the Wing of Drachenwald' instead.

This order name follows the period pattern of naming after a heraldic charge, identified in Medieval Secular Order Names by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/). For example:

s.n. Crown of Roses (Germany): <societas Rosarii>, 'society of the garland of roses', c. 1400, Latin (German)

Ordo is a registrable designator (SENA Appendix E).

Alae is the Latin genitive singular of ala, 'wing'.

Wing is a period heraldic charge. The Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry by Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme (http://mistholme.com/dictionary/wing/):

"A wing may be used as a single charge; this usage dates from c.1295, in the English arms of Peek."

Drachenwald is a constructed German place meaning "dragon's forest". The name is formed of the elements Drache, 'dragon' in its genitive form Drachen, and Wald, 'forest', 'woods'. It is also a registered SCA Branch Name, but the submitter wishes the order name to be in Latin instead of containing the lingua Anglica form "of Drachenwald" required by the Branch Name Allowance.

An example of a German place name beginning with the element <Drachen-> is <Drachenfels>, 'dragon's rock', a hill and a castle (now a ruin) in Germany. Drachenfels and its grey period spelling can be seen in an engraving published in Thesaurus philopoliticus, 1623 (#1). <Drachenfels> and other examples are also mentioned in the Academy of Saint Gabriel report # 2924 (http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi/2924.txt):

"The places that we have found with the element <Drachen-> in them are <Drachenfels>, <Drakenburg> or <Drachenburg>, <Drackenfeld>, <Drackenstedt>, and <Drachenstein>."

An example of a German place name ending with the element <-wald> is Greifswald, 'griffin's forest', with various attested ways of spelling it including <Gryphiswald> (1607, #2 left side) and <Gripswald> (Tavola Nvova di Germania, 1561, #2 right side).

Drachenwaldensis has a Latin adjectival suffix appended to the vernacular form <Drachenwald>. Examples of such structure are:

  • <Hammaburg> -> <Hammaburgensis> in Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum, circa 1085 (#3)
  • <Duisburg> -> <Duisburgensis>, 1549 (#4)
  • <Gryphiswald> -> <Gryphiswaldensis>, 1607 (#2 left side)

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-03-19_16-48-11_Drachenwald_order-name1.jpg
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-03-19_16-48-11_Drachenwald_order-name2.jpg
#3 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-03-19_16-48-12_Drachenwald_order-name3.jpg
#4 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-03-20_16-48-12_Drachenwald_order-name4.jpg


This item was on the 07-2018 LoAR

3: Drachenwald, Kingdom of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1993, via Drachenwald.

Annuli, Ordo

No major changes.
Language (Latin) most important.
Meaning (Order of the Ring) most important.

In the event of a conflict that cannot be cleared with a Permission to Conflict, or some other unsolvable issue preventing the registration of <Annuli, Ordo>, the Kingdom of Drachenwald wishes to submit the name as <Annuli Drachenwaldensis, Ordo>, 'Order of the Ring of Drachenwald' instead.

This order name follows the period pattern of naming after a heraldic charge, identified in Medieval Secular Order Names by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/). For example:

s.n. Crown of Roses (Germany): <societas Rosarii>, 'society of the garland of roses', c. 1400, Latin (German)

Ordo is a registrable designator (SENA Appendix E).

Annuli is the Latin genitive singular of annulus, 'ring', 'annulet'.

Annulet is a period heraldic charge. The Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry by Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme (http://mistholme.com/dictionary/annulet-2/):

"An annulet is a plain circular ring. It's an ancient charge, dating from c.1255 in the arms of Plessis or Plescy. In the earliest blazons, it was sometimes called a "false (i.e., voided) roundel", but soon became recognized as an independent charge."

Drachenwald is a constructed German place meaning "dragon's forest". The name is formed of the elements Drache, 'dragon' in its genitive form Drachen, and Wald, 'forest', 'woods'. It is also a registered SCA Branch Name, but the submitter wishes the order name to be in Latin instead of containing the lingua Anglica form "of Drachenwald" required by the Branch Name Allowance.

An example of a German place name beginning with the element <Drachen-> is <Drachenfels>, 'dragon's rock', a hill and a castle (now a ruin) in Germany. Drachenfels and its grey period spelling can be seen in an engraving published in Thesaurus philopoliticus, 1623 (#1). <Drachenfels> and other examples are also mentioned in the Academy of Saint Gabriel report # 2924 (http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi/2924.txt):

"The places that we have found with the element <Drachen-> in them are <Drachenfels>, <Drakenburg> or <Drachenburg>, <Drackenfeld>, <Drackenstedt>, and <Drachenstein>."

An example of a German place name ending with the element <-wald> is Greifswald, 'griffin's forest', with various attested ways of spelling it including <Gryphiswald> (1607, #2 left side) and <Gripswald> (Tavola Nvova di Germania, 1561, #2 right side).

Drachenwaldensis has a Latin adjectival suffix appended to the vernacular form <Drachenwald>. Examples of such structure are:

  • <Hammaburg> -> <Hammaburgensis> in Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum, circa 1085 (#3)
  • <Duisburg> -> <Duisburgensis>, 1549 (#4)
  • <Gryphiswald> -> <Gryphiswaldensis>, 1607 (#2 left side)

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-03-57_16-48-11_Drachenwald_order-name1.jpg
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-03-57_16-48-11_Drachenwald_order-name2.jpg
#3 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-03-57_16-48-12_Drachenwald_order-name3.jpg
#4 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-03-58_16-48-12_Drachenwald_order-name4.jpg


This item was on the 07-2018 LoAR

4: Drachenwald, Kingdom of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1993, via Drachenwald.

Annulorum, Ordo

No major changes.
Language (Latin) most important.
Meaning (Order of the Rings) most important.

In the event of a conflict that cannot be cleared with a Permission to Conflict, or some other unsolvable issue preventing the registration of <Annulorum, Ordo>, the Kingdom of Drachenwald wishes to submit the name as <Annulorum Drachenwaldensis, Ordo>, 'Order of the Rings of Drachenwald' instead.

This order name follows the period pattern of naming after heraldic charge(s), identified in Medieval Secular Order Names by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/). For example:

s.n. Flail (Germany): <Societas Tritarum>, 'Society of the Flails', 15th c. [1583], Latin (German)

Ordo is a registrable designator (SENA Appendix E).

Annulorum is the Latin genitive plural of annulus, 'ring', 'annulet'.

Annulet is a period heraldic charge. The Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry by Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme (http://mistholme.com/dictionary/annulet-2/):

"An annulet is a plain circular ring. It's an ancient charge, dating from c.1255 in the arms of Plessis or Plescy. In the earliest blazons, it was sometimes called a "false (i.e., voided) roundel", but soon became recognized as an independent charge."

Drachenwald is a constructed German place meaning "dragon's forest". The name is formed of the elements Drache, 'dragon' in its genitive form Drachen, and Wald, 'forest', 'woods'. It is also a registered SCA Branch Name, but the submitter wishes the order name to be in Latin instead of containing the lingua Anglica form "of Drachenwald" required by the Branch Name Allowance.

An example of a German place name beginning with the element <Drachen-> is <Drachenfels>, 'dragon's rock', a hill and a castle (now a ruin) in Germany. Drachenfels and its grey period spelling can be seen in an engraving published in Thesaurus philopoliticus, 1623 (#1). <Drachenfels> and other examples are also mentioned in the Academy of Saint Gabriel report # 2924 (http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi/2924.txt):

"The places that we have found with the element <Drachen-> in them are <Drachenfels>, <Drakenburg> or <Drachenburg>, <Drackenfeld>, <Drackenstedt>, and <Drachenstein>."

An example of a German place name ending with the element <-wald> is Greifswald, 'griffin's forest', with various attested ways of spelling it including <Gryphiswald> (1607, #2 left side) and <Gripswald> (Tavola Nvova di Germania, 1561, #2 right side).

Drachenwaldensis has a Latin adjectival suffix appended to the vernacular form <Drachenwald>. Examples of such structure are:

  • <Hammaburg> -> <Hammaburgensis> in Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum, circa 1085 (#3)
  • <Duisburg> -> <Duisburgensis>, 1549 (#4)
  • <Gryphiswald> -> <Gryphiswaldensis>, 1607 (#2 left side)

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-04-39_16-48-11_Drachenwald_order-name1.jpg
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-04-40_16-48-11_Drachenwald_order-name2.jpg
#3 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-04-40_16-48-12_Drachenwald_order-name3.jpg
#4 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-04-41_16-48-12_Drachenwald_order-name4.jpg


This item was on the 07-2018 LoAR

5: Drachenwald, Kingdom of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1993, via Drachenwald.

Cygni, Ordo

No major changes.
Language (Latin) most important.
Meaning (Order of the Swan) most important.

In the event of a conflict that cannot be cleared with a Permission to Conflict, or some other unsolvable issue preventing the registration of <Cygni, Ordo>, the Kingdom of Drachenwald wishes to submit the name as <Cygni Drachenwaldensis, Ordo>, 'Order of the Swan of Drachenwald' instead.

This order name follows the period pattern of naming after a heraldic charge, identified in Medieval Secular Order Names by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/). For example:

s.n. Crown of Roses (Germany): <societas Rosarii>, 'society of the garland of roses', c. 1400, Latin (German)

Ordo is a registrable designator (SENA Appendix E).

Cygni is the Latin genitive singular of cygnus, 'swan'.

Swan is a period heraldic charge. The Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry by Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme (http://mistholme.com/dictionary/swan/):

"The swan is a water bird, both graceful and fierce, famed for its death song; it was said to bring good luck. It's found in the arms of Dale as early as 1387."

Drachenwald is a constructed German place meaning "dragon's forest". The name is formed of the elements Drache, 'dragon' in its genitive form Drachen, and Wald, 'forest', 'woods'. It is also a registered SCA Branch Name, but the submitter wishes the order name to be in Latin instead of containing the lingua Anglica form "of Drachenwald" required by the Branch Name Allowance.

An example of a German place name beginning with the element <Drachen-> is <Drachenfels>, 'dragon's rock', a hill and a castle (now a ruin) in Germany. Drachenfels and its grey period spelling can be seen in an engraving published in Thesaurus philopoliticus, 1623 (#1). <Drachenfels> and other examples are also mentioned in the Academy of Saint Gabriel report # 2924 (http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi/2924.txt):

"The places that we have found with the element <Drachen-> in them are <Drachenfels>, <Drakenburg> or <Drachenburg>, <Drackenfeld>, <Drackenstedt>, and <Drachenstein>."

An example of a German place name ending with the element <-wald> is Greifswald, 'griffin's forest', with various attested ways of spelling it including <Gryphiswald> (1607, #2 left side) and <Gripswald> (Tavola Nvova di Germania, 1561, #2 right side).

Drachenwaldensis has a Latin adjectival suffix appended to the vernacular form <Drachenwald>. Examples of such structure are:

  • <Hammaburg> -> <Hammaburgensis> in Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum, circa 1085 (#3)
  • <Duisburg> -> <Duisburgensis>, 1549 (#4)
  • <Gryphiswald> -> <Gryphiswaldensis>, 1607 (#2 left side)

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-05-14_16-48-11_Drachenwald_order-name1.jpg
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-05-15_16-48-11_Drachenwald_order-name2.jpg
#3 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-05-15_16-48-12_Drachenwald_order-name3.jpg
#4 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-05-16_16-48-12_Drachenwald_order-name4.jpg


This item was on the 07-2018 LoAR

6: Drachenwald, Kingdom of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1993, via Drachenwald.

Hirundinis, Ordo

No major changes.
Language (Latin) most important.
Meaning (Order of the Swallow) most important.

In the event of a conflict that cannot be cleared with a Permission to Conflict, or some other unsolvable issue preventing the registration of <Hirundinis, Ordo>, the Kingdom of Drachenwald wishes to submit the name as <Hirundinis Drachenwaldensis, Ordo>, 'Order of the Swallow of Drachenwald' instead.

This order name follows the period pattern of naming after a heraldic charge, identified in Medieval Secular Order Names by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/). For example:

s.n. Crown of Roses (Germany): <societas Rosarii>, 'society of the garland of roses', c. 1400, Latin (German)

Ordo is a registrable designator (SENA Appendix E).

Hirundinis is the Latin genitive singular of hirundo, 'swallow'.

Swallow is a period heraldic charge. The Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry by Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme (http://mistholme.com/dictionary/swallow/):

"The swallow is a speedy bird whose migratory habits were known to medieval naturalists. Its notable feature is its forked tail, which is exaggerated in armorial emblazons. The swallow is a period charge, found in the canting arms of Swalow, c.1395."

Drachenwald is a constructed German place meaning "dragon's forest". The name is formed of the elements Drache, 'dragon' in its genitive form Drachen, and Wald, 'forest', 'woods'. It is also a registered SCA Branch Name, but the submitter wishes the order name to be in Latin instead of containing the lingua Anglica form "of Drachenwald" required by the Branch Name Allowance.

An example of a German place name beginning with the element <Drachen-> is <Drachenfels>, 'dragon's rock', a hill and a castle (now a ruin) in Germany. Drachenfels and its grey period spelling can be seen in an engraving published in Thesaurus philopoliticus, 1623 (#1). <Drachenfels> and other examples are also mentioned in the Academy of Saint Gabriel report # 2924 (http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi/2924.txt):

"The places that we have found with the element <Drachen-> in them are <Drachenfels>, <Drakenburg> or <Drachenburg>, <Drackenfeld>, <Drackenstedt>, and <Drachenstein>."

An example of a German place name ending with the element <-wald> is Greifswald, 'griffin's forest', with various attested ways of spelling it including <Gryphiswald> (1607, #2 left side) and <Gripswald> (Tavola Nvova di Germania, 1561, #2 right side).

Drachenwaldensis has a Latin adjectival suffix appended to the vernacular form <Drachenwald>. Examples of such structure are:

  • <Hammaburg> -> <Hammaburgensis> in Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum, circa 1085 (#3)
  • <Duisburg> -> <Duisburgensis>, 1549 (#4)
  • <Gryphiswald> -> <Gryphiswaldensis>, 1607 (#2 left side)

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-05-57_16-48-11_Drachenwald_order-name1.jpg
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-05-58_16-48-11_Drachenwald_order-name2.jpg
#3 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-05-58_16-48-12_Drachenwald_order-name3.jpg
#4 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/17-05-58_16-48-12_Drachenwald_order-name4.jpg


This item was on the 07-2018 LoAR

7: Drachenwald, Kingdom of - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1993, via Drachenwald.

(Fieldless) A gemmed ring sable.

This submission is to be associated with Annuli, Ordo


This item was on the 07-2018 LoAR

8: Drachenwald, Kingdom of - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1993, via Drachenwald.

(Fieldless) a martlet volant Or.

This submission is to be associated with Hirundinis, Ordo

It is the preference of the submitter that the charge is blazoned a martlet (instead of a swallow or a bird).


This item was on the 07-2018 LoAR

9: Drachenwald, Kingdom of - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1993, via Drachenwald.

(Fieldless) A swan sable.

This submission is to be associated with Cygni, Ordo


This item was on the 07-2018 LoAR

10: Drachenwald, Kingdom of - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1993, via Drachenwald.

(Fieldless) A wing terminating in a hand gules sustaining a sword fesswise reversed proper.

This submission is to be associated with Alae, Ordo


This item was on the 07-2018 LoAR

11: Eino Karjalainen - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister rayonny argent and gules, an armored arm fesswise embowed reversed sustaining a torch bendwise and an armored arm fesswise embowed sustaining a sword bendwise sinister counterchanged.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (Finnish) most important.
Spelling (Eino) most important.

Eino is a male Finnish given name of Germanic origin (E(i)newald(us)) dated to 1560 in Suomen Karjalan Nimistö (1975) by Viljo Nissilä (#1). On p. 251 (#2):

s.n. Eino < E(i)newald: "olli eynonca (= Einonpoika) Hemelin 1560" from Jääski parish.

<Eynonpo[i/j/y]ca> is a patronymic byname consisting of the genitive form of the nominative <Eyno>, and <-poica>, 'son'. In Katsaus vanhan kirjasuomen ortografiaan (University of Helsinki: ortography of old written Finnish language, http://www.helsinki.fi/vvks/lyhenteet_ja_ortografia/katsaus_ortografiaan/index.html) Pirkko Forsman Svensson writes:

In 16th century "/i/ = i ; ij ; j ; diftongeissa usein y" (/i/ could be written as i ; ij ; j ; in diphtongs often y).

Thus "ey-" in <Eyno> could also be spelled as "ei-" or "ej-", and the spelling <Eino> is plausible during the latter half of 16th century.

Karjalainen is a Finnish byname dated to 16th century and the gray period in Suomen Karjalan Nimistö (1975) by Viljo Nissilä (#1). On p. 156 (#3):

s.n. Karjala ja Karjalainen: <per karialain> 1543, <Lauri Karialaine> 1550, <S Karialaijne> 1551, <Coske Carialain> 1593, <Kuisma Karialainen> 1616.

According to Katsaus vanhan kirjasuomen ortografiaan (University of Helsinki: ortography of old written Finnish language, http://www.helsinki.fi/vvks/lyhenteet_ja_ortografia/katsaus_ortografiaan/index.html) by Pirkko Forsman Svensson, in 16th century Finnish ortography /i/ could be written as j.

Thus <Karjalainen> is plausible during the latter half of 16th century.

Name Notes:

The submitter is very invested in the spelling <Eino> and wishes no changes to it. He allows minor changes to <Karjalainen> if necessary.

Correction to Device (2018-Apr-10 15:04:34): This is going to have all sorts of unity of posture rules trouble

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/16-57-02_Eino_Karjalainen_1-name1.jpg
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/16-57-03_Eino_Karjalainen_1-name2.jpg
#3 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1279/2018-04-30/16-57-04_Eino_Karjalainen_1-name3.jpg


This item was on the 07-2018 LoAR

12: Elijah of Red Sky - New Device

OSCAR finds the name on the Drachenwald LoI of March 30, 2018 as submitted.

Gules, a mullet of four points and on a point pointed argent a pine tree eradicated gules.

The name was submitted in Drachenwald LoI 2018-03-30 (https://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=84939).


This item was on the 07-2018 LoAR

13: Frostheim, Shire of - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 2001, via Drachenwald.

Sable, a bend argent, overall a key, wards to sinister, within and conjoined to a laurel wreath Or.

The submission, as Sable, a bend argent, overall a key within a laurel wreath Or. was in Drachenwald LoI 2017-04-30 (https://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=75217), as Sable, a bend argent, overall a key, wards to sinister, within a laurel wreath Or. and was returned in LoAR 07-2017 (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2017/07/17-07lar.html#184):

This device must be returned for redesign. SENA Appendix I, Section D, states that "There can be only one overall charge group in any design." In this design, the laurel wreath is subordinate to the key, which is not allowed. Or, to put it another way, if there had been no bend, the key would have been the primary charge and the laurel wreath the secondary charge - two separate charge groups. They remain two separate charge groups when the bend is inserted.

This design was previously submitted in 1994, and was returned for conflict with modern armory. That conflict was rendered null with the Modest Proposal. This is an attempt at resubmission. Had the submission been more timely, the design issue which is the current cause for return would have been avoided.

The resubmission has been redesigned so that the key and the laurel wreath are conjoined.

A new petition document was created and is included in the packet:

We, the officers and recidents of the shire of Frostheim wish to register the arms of the shire the following:

"sable, a bend argent, overall a key, wards to sinister, within and conjoined to a laurel wreath or"

Resvik 14th April 2018 [signature] [legal name redacted] Seneschal / Marshal

Resvik 14th April 2018 [signature] [legal name redacted] Herald

Resvik 14th April 2018 [signature] [legal name redacted] Exchequer / Fencing Marshal

[legal name redacted] MoAS

Resvik 14th April 2018 [signature] [legal name redacted] Archery Marshal

Resvik 14th April 2018 [signature] [legal name redacted] Chatelaine

Additional Notes:

SENA Appendix I: Charge Group Theory (http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html#AppendixI)

"Charges that are held by, suspended from, or are otherwise touching another charge fall into two categories. Those that are large enough to be of equal weight with the charge holding them are called sustained charges and are considered to be part of the same charge group as the charge holding them. Those that are smaller we call maintained charges and treat as artistic details."

Frostheim argues that the key and wreath are of equal weight, or certainly not of such weight difference that one of them would be maintained. Conjoined, thus touching, according to the above they are in the same charge group.

If the above is not the case, Frostheim requests a clarification and possibly a change to the rules to make them more clear.

Frostheim also requests that if the above interpretation of the rules is not sound, their submission would nonetheless be accepted on the grounds of the notion expressed in the November 2013 Cover Letter, From Wreath: Required Elements and Style Rules (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2013/11/13-11cl.html#4):

"We do, however, recognize the inherent difficulty in design as a laurel wreath is required in all branch arms. A crown or coronet is additionally required for kingdoms, and optionally for principalities. We have long relaxed some of the style rules for augmentations. SENA A3A3 explains, "Because an augmentation adds complexity, augmented devices are often allowed to violate certain style rules, such as allowing charges on tertiary charges or a complexity count of greater than eight, as long as the identifiability of the design is maintained. However, they may not violate the rules on contrast." Because required elements add complexity to an armorial design, we are similarly willing on a case by case basis to allow branch armory with required elements to violate certain style rules, as long as identifiability of the design is maintained."

The design has no violations of contrast and is identifiable.


This item was on the 07-2018 LoAR

14: Frostheim, Shire of - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 2001, via Drachenwald.

Sable, a bend argent and overall a key, wards to sinister, Or.

This submission is to be associated with for Populace


This item was on the 07-2018 LoAR

15: Lief Wolfson - New Name & New Device

Quarterly argent and sable, four wolf's heads cabossed counterchanged.

No major changes.
Spelling (Priorities: 1. <Lief>, 2. <Wolfson>) most important.

Lief is a given name dated to 1575 Netherlands in FamilySearch records:

<Lief Gerrits>, male, christened 18 Nov 1575 in Amsterdam, Noord-Holland, Netherlands. Batch C90035-1: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XBPW-N3J

Wolfson is an English byname. Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames by Charles Bardsley, s.n. Wolfson, gives the etymology of the name as "the son of Wolf" and cites William fil. Ulf from 1200 and Uctred Ulfson from around 1200.

We have Wolf as a late period English surname which can be used as a given name.

FamilySearch Historical Records

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J7Q7-836

Thomas Wolf

Gender: Male

Christening Date: 28 Mar 1593

Christening Date (Original): 28 MAR 1593

Christening Place: DALLINGHOO,SUFFOLK,ENGLAND

Indexing Project (Batch) Number C06293-2

Appendix A: Patterns That Do Not Need Further Documentation by Language Group

English/Welsh

Middle/Early Modern English: Marked patronymics may use Fitz X or Xson; women may use these or use Xdaughter. These forms may all use the father's name unmodified; Xson and Xdaughter may also use the possessive form.

Name Notes:

Dutch and English names may be combined in 1100-1600 according to SENA Appendix C.


This item was on the 07-2018 LoAR

16: Morighane Ravenwood - New Name & New Device

Argent, a raven contourny sable within an orle of gouttes de sang.

No major changes.

Morighane is an Anglicized Irish male given name dated to 1570 in Names Found in Anglicized Irish Documents: Men's Names by Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/Masculine.shtml).

Ravenwood is an English compound place name derived from the family name Raven and the generic toponym wood. Compound Placenames in English by Juliana de Luna (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/EnglishCompoundPlacenames/) lists the pattern [Family names + generic topographic feature] listing such examples as <Aldborough Hacche> c. 1490, <Fygmershe> c. 1530, and <Culling Deepe> 1584.

Raven is an English byname dated to 1541 in Index of Names in the 1541 Subsidy Roll of London: Surnames of English men and women by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/english/engsurlondon1541.html).

Wood as a toponym is dated to 1544 in Compound Placenames in English by Juliana de Luna (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/EnglishCompoundPlacenames/)

<Ballardes Wood>, 1544.

Name Notes:

Unmarked locatives are known in Middle/Early Modern English (SENA Appendix A). Middle and Modern English as well as Anglicized Irish belong in the same language group in 1100-1600 (SENA Appendix C).


Any and all assistance will be gratefully appreciated.

In service,

Stefanu de Mohac, Albion.

Drachenwald College of Heralds

albion@drachenwald.sca.org


OSCAR counts 3 New Names, 5 New Order Names, 4 New Devices and 5 New Badges. These 17 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $68 for them. OSCAR counts 1 Resub Device. This item is not chargeable. OSCAR counts 1 Badge Association. This item may or may not require payment. There are a total of 19 items submitted on this letter.