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East April 1 LoI dated 2019-04-01

Saluynges to alle scoleyingers, wrobberes, and luskes þat honeþ þus here. Holde we vs to-geder cloos when we must needs make ende of oure day work.

Þis Breuet wille be fulle gameful for to rede; therfor as me semeth is moste lysable.

Þe substitute Ymaginary de Est,

Dame Lillia de Vaux, Butterscotch Crampette Herault ymagynary

1: Axcell Rose - New Name & New Device

Or, within a U-form axle bracket sable a rose proper

Sound (1980s hair band) most important.
Language (English-ish) most important.
Culture (We don't need culture) most important.

Axcell is the expected nominative form of a given name attested in an inflected Latinized form, Axcellum (full name: Axcellum Wolson), dated 1491 in 'Rymer's Foedera with Syllabus: January-March 1491', in Rymer's Foedera Volume 12, ed. Thomas Rymer (London, 1739-1745), pp. 434-440. British History Online (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/rymer-foedera/vol12/pp434-440).

It must be noted that this instance appears to be an Anglicized rendering of the name of a Danish citizen. However, the form Axcil is found as a byname in Bardsley, s.n. Axtell, dated t. I Edw III (1327), and the submitted spelling is found as a 16th century English surname in FamilySearch:

Samuell Axcell, 07 Sep 1578, DIGSWELL,HERTFORD,ENGLAND, batch C07231-1 (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NRWF-QN5)

Therefore, the submitted form is definitely an English name rather than a Danish one.

Rose is found in this spelling in marked (e.g., filius Rose and atte Rose) and unmarked bynames/surnames dated between 1279 and 1609 in R&W, s.n. Rose.

The axle bracket was last registered as a period artifact in 1989 (PicDic, https://mistholme.com/dictionary/axle-bracket/). So we are going to just include random pictures of medieval wagons (bus!) and pretend you can see the brackets underneath. No one reads the documentation, anyway.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=2765/2019-03-28/08-16-01_A9AF1DE4-D202-495C-8D5E-E45AD24C9A73.jpeg
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=2765/2019-03-28/08-16-01_1DE4DDAF-BAB5-49AB-A2EF-3F9649607C8D.jpeg
#3 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=2765/2019-03-28/08-16-01_83D7F879-6A53-4661-91AA-62ECF74BBB3E.jpeg


2: Axcell Rose - New Household Name & New Badge

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

The Axle and Rose Tavern

(Fieldless) Upon the wheels of a carriage frame Or 
four roses proper

An axle is the bar connecting the wheels of a cart, found in this spelling in the MED:

(1367-8) Doc.Manor in MP 3457 : Et pro axelinge carecte cum axle [?] empto.

This would be a defining instance of this charge. The submitter argues that this follows the pattern of using carts or their pieces (such as wheels) as heraldic charges. Examples are the byname attewayne (1327) and inn-signs using forms of Katerne Whele (a.1413-1637), both found in Juliana de Luna, " Dictionary of Inn-Sign Names in Medieval and Renaissance England " (2017 KWHSS Proceedings, https://heraldry.sca.org/kwhss/2017/inn%20signs%20dictionary%20JdL.pdf).

In addition, we have the attested charges the cartwheel (PicDic, https://mistholme.com/?s=wheel) and the wagon (PicDic, https://mistholme.com/dictionary/wagon/), as well as the non-attested axle bracket, which has been previously registered as a period artifact (PicDic, https://mistholme.com/dictionary/axle-bracket/).

Whether an axle is registerable or not because it might too closely resemble a staff is out of my paygrade.

The rose is a heraldic charge found in bynames and in inn-sign names dated 1242-1637 in Juliana's article (ibid).

This inn-sign name follows the pattern <of the X and (the) Y>, where X and Y are both heraldic charges, found in Juliana's article (ibid). Examples from this article include the Rose and Crowne in high Holborne (1637), an Inne called the herte and þe Swanne (1440), and The Bolt and Tun Brewhouse (1638). The designator Tavern is found in the examples The Greyhound Tavern (1638), Bell tavern (1547), and Bores Head Tavern (c.1590).


3: Barony of Seers Robuck - New Order Name & New Badge

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Award of Free-gift

Or, a bordure checky argent and sable 
and in sinister base the letters "G" and "O" gules

This order name follows the pattern of orders named after a person, identified in "Medieval Secular Order Names" by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/). The May 2011 LoAR states that "[a] given name can be used to create an order name (one named after a founder or inspiration)." [Order of Taillefer, 5/2011 LoAR, A-Lochac].

Award is one of the designators for order names set out in Appendix E of SENA.

Free-gift is an English given name dated to 1591 and 1616 on p. 126 of Bardsley's Curiosities of Puritan Nomenclature.


4: Barony of Seers Robuck - New Branch Name

Seers is intended as the genitive form of a family name derived from the given name Seer, found in the byname filius Seer in R&W, s.n. Sayer.

Robuck is an unmarked form of an inn-sign-derived locative, atte Robuck ("at the roebuck"), dated 1313 in Bardsley, s.n. Roebuck. Unmarked locatives are allowed under Appendix A of SENA.

The pattern of <family name in the genitive> + <place name> is found in Juliana de Luna, "Compound Placenames in English" (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/EnglishCompoundPlacenames/). Examples include Bekesborne (1280), Craucombesbere (1325), and Ringgesashe (1306).

Barony is a standard designator for branch names per Appendix E of SENA.

The device for this is on display somewhere in home furnishings. The petition for this name is found at Customer Service, near the handbags.


5: Bernt Bread - New Name & New Device

Argent, two loaves of brown bread proper enflamed

Bernt is a Dutch given name dated to 1422, 1478-81 in "15th Century Dutch Names" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (https://heraldry.sca.org/names/dutch/dutch15.html).

Bread is an English surname found in FamilySearch:

Jhon Bread, spouse Margery Totnam, 29 May 1580, St. Botoph Aldgate, London, England, Batch: M00080-4 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NJQW-F5X)

Dutch and English can be combined within 300 years under Appendix C of SENA.


6: Brine Shrimp - New Name

Brine is an Anglicized Irish given name found in "Names Found in Anglicized Irish Documents: Men's Names" by Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/Masculine.shtml) s.n. Brian dated to 1602.

Shrimp is an English surname dated to 1569 in FamilySearch:

John Shrimp, Male, 27 May 1569, Aldringham, Suffolk, England, Batch C06250-2

(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N5VG-Z47)

Anglicized Irish and English are in the same regional naming group, and can be combined within 500 years under Appendix C of SENA.


7: Bryll Creme - New Name

Bryll is found in the place name Bryll super montem ("Brill on hill"), dated 1535 in Watts, s.n. Brill. This place name is also found in the surname Bryllys, dated 1527 in R&W, s.n. Brill. The submitted spelling is also found as an English surname in FamilySearch:

Chrystopher Bryll, 23 Feb 1574, SAINT GILES, READING, BERKSHIRE, ENGLAND, batch C01764-2 (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NP21-ZXN)

By precedent, late period English surnames can be used in given names.

Creme is a place name found in a locative byname in the MED:

a1126 Peterb.Chron.(LdMisc 636)an.1125 : Cardinal Iohan of Creme..heold his concilie on Lundene..& bead þær þa ilce lagas þa anselm ærcebiscop hæfde æror beboden.

This is an Anglicized form of the name Giovanni da Crema or Johannes Cremensis, an Italian legate from Lombardy who undertook a mission to England c.1125. However, the submitted spelling is also found as an English surname in FamilySearch:

Frauncis Creme, 11 Feb 1598, BUXHALL,SUFFOLK,ENGLAND, batch C06193-1 (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V5GW-WVY)


8: Bryll Creme - New Alternate Name & New Badge

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Little Dabbe

Argent, in base a gridiron warrior exultant proper vested azure

Little is found as an apparent English given name in FamilySearch, although it may represent a child christened with a diminutive of their father's name:

Little Castell, 04 Dec 1585, FARNHAM,SURREY,ENGLAND, batch C06973-2 (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NPYX-PY4)

"Little" definitely shows up as a second element in FamilySearch, used by an adult:

Rycharde Lyttell Hall and Johanne Hall, 08 Jun 1578, Romsey,Hampshire,England, batch M13669-1 (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NV2D-KXX)

Therefore, this element should be registerable as a given name.

Dabbe is a surname dated 1524 in R&W, s.n. Dabbs.


9: Derby Day - New Name

Derby is an Anglicized Irish given name found in "Names Found in Anglicized Irish Documents: Men's Names" by Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/Masculine.shtml) s.n. Dermot dated to 1584 and later.

Day is an English surname found in "Surnames in Durham and Northumberland, 1521-1615" by Juette Copin (https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juetta/parish/surnames_d.html).

Anglicized Irish and English are in the same regional naming group and can be combined within 500 years under Appendix C of SENA.


10: Elwod Blewes - New Name

Elwod is a 16th century form of the given name Ælfweald, attested as a surname in 1572 in R&W, s.n. Ellwood. Earlier forms of this given name include Auuoldus (1066) and Aluuolt/Alfuuold (1066), Aluoldi (genitive, 1131), and Alfwold (1212). Other forms of the byname include Elwald/Elwaud (1469, 1579) and Elwold (1524). Surnames can be used as given names by precedent, so there should be no problem using a later form of the name as a given name.

Blewes is a constructed byname meaning "servant/son of a man named Blewe", where Bleue is a byname. Examples of bynames used in literal patronyms include le Parsones ("the parson's servant"), le Redes ("servant of a man named Rede"), and le Parkeres ("the park-keeper's"), all dated 1327 in the introduction to R&W, "The Final -s in Jones, Parsons, Stocks, etc".

Blewe is a color term meaning "blue" found in the MED, by itself and in compounds:

(?1278) Will Court Hust.(Gldh)1.32 : [His ship called] Blewebolle.

a1600(1472) Rec.Bluemantle (Jul C.6)384 : The King went to his chamber..these heroudes before hym..Wyndesore herralde..Blewmantell purseyvant, Esperaunce purseyvant to therl of Northumberland.

a1500(a1470) Brut-1461(1) (Add 10099)516/8 : Men gadred togedre & made þame capitaynes -- as BlewBerde & oþer.

c1330(?a1300) Tristrem (Auch)2404 : He was rede, grene, and blewe.

The pattern of using color terms as given names or bynames can be found in R&W:

  • le Redes, "red" or "reed", mentioned above

  • filius Grene (1202) - "green", R&W, s.n. Green

  • Blac/Niger (1086), leblac (1130), le Blacke (1275) - "black", R&W, s.n. Black

  • le Yelewe (1234, 1307), Yelowes, Yeallowe (1576) - "yellow", R&W, s.n. Yellow

  • Grai (1173), Grei (1198), le Gray, le Grey (1296) - "gray", R&W, s.n. Gray

    Given that at least two of the examples follow the <color + -s> construction, the submitted byname should be registerable.


  • 11: Filipp de Keg - New Name & New Device

    Gules, a barrel palewise Or 
maintaining in its bunghole a funnel argent

    Client requests authenticity for mid-to-late 13th century Scots.

    Filipp is the expected nominative form of the genitive Filippi, dated 1296 in Black, s.n. Philip. If this spelling is not registerable, the submitter will accept Philip instead. It is found in Scotland in a Scots-language document from 1544 (Records of the Parliaments of Scotland to 1707, http://www.rps.ac.uk/mss/1544/11/29).

    Keg is a Scots place name dated to 1268 in J. MacDonald, Place Names of West Aberdeenshire, https://books.google.com/books?id=br3NAAAAMAAJ), s.n. Keig.

    The pattern of using <de X> for Scots locative bynames is found in "Names from 13th Century Scottish Parliamentary Records" by Alys Mackyntoich (http://st-walburga.aspiringluddite.com/docs/13thcenScots.pdf), but no one trusts her.

    Note that this would be the first registration of a funnel in Society armory. While no instances of its use in period armory have been found, it is a period artifact, as shown in the below dated images representative of the medieval lifestyle we seek to reenact. The emblazon is based on the 1505 depiction by Bosch.

    Image 1: Detail from the Temptation of Saint Anthony, Hieronymus Bosch, Netherlands, 1505

    Image 2: Detail from %& $ #! Luttrell Psalter, England, circa 1330

    The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
    #1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=2765/2019-03-28/08-25-50_3D5A2C02-65A3-4B50-AF44-B4163665349E.png
    #2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=2765/2019-03-28/08-25-50_A1B5DAFD-7411-4DD4-AFE3-07C74D4D19F4.png


    12: Gitt Clone - New Name & New Device

    Per fess vert and sable billety argent, an arrow Or and in chief a billet argent

    Gitt is a German feminine given name found in FamilySearch:

    Gitt Faussen, 19 Feb 1629, EVANGELISCH, REICHELSHEIM FRIEDBERG, OBERHESSEN, HESSE-DARMSTADT, batch C93888-1 (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N8CS-96T)

    Clone is a Scots place name dated to 1170, found in J. MacDonald, Place Names of West Aberdeenshire (https://books.google.com/books?id=br3NAAAAMAAJ), s.n. Clune. Unmarked locative bynames are found in Scots per Appendix A of SENA.

    By precedent, 16th and 17th century German given names can be borrowed into English and are subsequently considered to be English names. Therefore, we can combine the borrowed 17th century English name with the 12th century Scots byname under Appendix C of SENA.


    13: Hamme Sandwyche - New Name & New Device

    Barry and paly argent and gules, a boar's head couped close between two bread loaves proper

    Hamme is a male given name found in Bardsley's Curiosities of Puritan Nomenclature at p. 26 dated to 1311.

    de Sandwyche is a marked locative byname found in "Names in 1319 Subsidy Roll of London" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/english/surlondon1319.html).

    Unmarked locative surnames in English are permitted under Appendix A of SENA. The introduction to R&W notes that the preposition in locative surnames began to be dropped shortly after 1300.


    14: Jake Blewes - New Name

    Jake is a given name dated 1195-7, 1275, and 1279 by itself and in literal patronyms, found in R&W, s.n. Jack.

    Blewes is a constructed byname meaning "servant/son of a man named Blewe", where Bleue is a byname. Examples of bynames used in literal patronyms include le Parsones ("the parson's servant"), le Redes ("servant of a man named Rede"), and le Parkeres ("the park-keeper's"), all dated 1327 in the introduction to R&W, "The Final -s in Jones, Parsons, Stocks, etc".

    Blewe is a color term meaning "blue" found in the MED, by itself and in compounds:

    (?1278) Will Court Hust.(Gldh)1.32 : [His ship called] Blewebolle.

    a1600(1472) Rec.Bluemantle (Jul C.6)384 : The King went to his chamber..these heroudes before hym..Wyndesore herralde..Blewmantell purseyvant, Esperaunce purseyvant to therl of Northumberland.

    a1500(a1470) Brut-1461(1) (Add 10099)516/8 : Men gadred togedre & made þame capitaynes -- as BlewBerde & oþer.

    c1330(?a1300) Tristrem (Auch)2404 : He was rede, grene, and blewe.

    The pattern of using color terms as given names or bynames can be found in R&W:

  • le Redes, "red" or "reed", mentioned above

  • filius Grene (1202) - "green", R&W, s.n. Green

  • Blac/Niger (1086), leblac (1130), le Blacke (1275) - "black", R&W, s.n. Black

  • le Yelewe (1234, 1307), Yelowes, Yeallowe (1576) - "yellow", R&W, s.n. Yellow

  • Grai (1173), Grei (1198), le Gray, le Grey (1296) - "gray", R&W, s.n. Gray

    Given that at least two of the examples follow the <color + -s> construction, the submitted byname should be registerable.


  • 15: Jake Blewes and Elwod Blewes - New Household Name & New Badge

    OSCAR is unable to find the name (Jake Blewes) , either registered or submitted.
    OSCAR is unable to find the name (Elwod Blewes) , either registered or submitted.

    House of Our Lady of Blessed Acceleration

    Or, on a wagon sable a fess argent charged with a mullet sable-ish

    This household name follows the pattern of naming religious houses after religious figures (e.g., saints), including using epitaphs (in this case a constructed one) to describe them.

    The pattern of House of X for religious houses can be seen in the examples house of S. Leonard de Stratford and house of S. Elena (1360), House of S. Thomas (1361), house of S. Katherine by the Tower (1380), House of S. Thomas de Acon (1436), and House of the Salutation of the Blessed Mary of the Carthusian Order near London (1456), all found in Calendar of Wills Proved and Enrolled in the Court of Husting, London: A. D. 1258 - A. D. 1688. ed. R.R. Sharpe. (https://books.google.com/books?id=ytUxAQAAMAAJ).

    The use of Blessed in institutional names include the last example above, College Roial of oure blessed Lady of Eton (1447, MED), Brotherhood of Our Blessed Lady and St. Dunstan in the West of London (t. Henry VIII, [1]), "the abbey of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Coverham" (normalized, 1478, [2]), monasterie of our blessed Lady S. Marie and Saynt Agatha (1534, [3]), and his owne litle Church of our blessed Lady at Rome (1629, [4]) (additional sources given below).

    Epitaphs for Mary include "our Lady of all beauties" (1607, [5]), "Our Lady of Pittie" (t. Eliz I, [6]), Stella Maris ("star of the sea", from an 8th century song, [7]), and "mater dolorosa" ("mother of sorrows", [8]), "Blessed Virgin in the New Work" (1369, [Sharpe, cited above]), "Our Lady of the Bowe" (1504, [Sharpe]), "blessed modir mary vurgyn" (1439, MED), "marie, madame, þe milde quene of heuene" (a1375, MED), "O Lady the mother of mercy" (1621, [9]), "queene of heuene, lady of erth, Emperice of hell" (c1475, MED), among others. Furthermore, phrases like "blessed love" and "blessed mercy" can be found in late period English religious books (e.g., The Soules Humiliation, 1638, https://books.google.com/books?id=v3JjAAAAcAAJ).

    Acceleration "the act or process of accelerating, quickening, or hastening" is dated to 1531 in the OED, with the meaning "the condition of being accelerated" (paraphrased) dated to 1534 in the spelling acceleracion. The terms "hasten, haste, and hastened" and "quicken, quickneth, and quickening" are found in Clement Cotton's A Complete Concordance to the Bible of the Last Translation, dated 1635 (https://books.google.com/books?id=ph1eeJk0M_oC), where the latter can have multiple meanings (e.g, related to hurrying, becoming stimulated or inspired, or coming to life). Given the Christian theology around Mary, Mater Dei, taught to us by Sister Mary Stigmata, this term does not seem out of line in some of the more fanciful epitaphs related to her.

    Additional Sources:

    [1] 'File of Viewers' Reports 1509-46 [B]: 1521-29 (nos 47-86)', in London Viewers and their Certificates, 1508-1558: Certificates of the Sworn Viewers of the City of London, ed. Janet Senderowitz Loengard (London, 1989), pp. 21-37. British History Online (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol26/pp21-37)

    [2] 'Premonstratensian houses: Abbey of Coverham', in A History of the County of York: Volume 3, ed. William Page (London, 1974), pp. 243-245. British History Online (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/yorks/vol3/pp243-245)

    [3] 'Premonstratensian houses: Abbey of St Agatha, Easby', in A History of the County of York: Volume 3, ed. William Page (London, 1974), pp. 245-249. British History Online (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/yorks/vol3/pp245-249)

    [4] Lewis Owen, Speculum Jesuiticum, Or, The Iesuites Looking-glasse (https://books.google.com/books?id=h0hPAQAAIAAJ)

    [5] Henri Estienne, A World of Wonders: Or An Introdvction to a Treatise Touching the Conformitie of Ancient and Moderne Wonders: Or A Preparatiue Treatise to the Apologie for Herodotvs (https://books.google.com/books?id=_jE2W6t855gC&pg=PA316)

    [6] Calendar of the Patent Rolls Preserved in the Public Record Office: Elizabeth I (https://books.google.com/books?id=qks_AQAAMAAJ)

    [7] Ave Stella Maris, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ave_maris_stella, which has a 14th century illuminated version of this song

    [8] Joannes Dadraeus, Chronologie historiale des archeuesques de Rouen, 1618 (https://books.google.com/books?id=4xmX0LA18swC&pg=PA288)

    [9] William Crashaw, The Iesuites Gospel. An attack on the doctrines of the Jesuits (https://books.google.com/books?id=B1jpKUvexG8C&pg=PA102)

    The submitters said they were trying to escape black and whites, so didn't provide the outline version. When asked to document this form of wagon, they insisted that it was, "a model made before catalytic converters", so it was clearly not modern. Which is good enough, I suppose, but I wish they'd think what they were trying to do to me.


    16: James Tiberius Kirke - New Name

    Client requests authenticity for early 14th century England.
    Sound (as if said in the dulcet tones of Ricardo Montalban) most important.
    Language (Middle English because it's the best English) most important.

    James is an English masculine given name found in the MED, dated 1306:

    (1306) Close R.Edw.I475 : James le Inkemakere.

    Tiberius is a Roman praenomen, famously used by Emperor Tiberius Claudius Nero. The use of Roman praenomen as late-period English given names is found in Lillia de Vaux, "The Borrowing of Names in Medieval and Renaissance Europe" (article forthcoming). Examples from this article include Gaius (1637), Lucius (1578), and Spurius (1617), citing FamilySearch.

    Tiberius is also found as a literary name in the MED:

    (a1393) Gower CA (Frf 3)1.763 : Themperour Tiberius The Monarchie of Rome ladde.

    Forms of Kirke "church" are found in Middle English marked toponyms such as Attekirke (1209), Attekirck (1301), Ofthekirke (1308), and be ye kyrk (1438), as seen in R&W, s.n. Kirk. The forms del Kirke and de Kirke are dated 1379 in Bardsley, s.n. Kirk.

    Double given names and unmarked locatives are allowed in English under Appendix A of SENA.


    17: Love Letter - New Name

    Submitter desires a feminine name.

    Love is an English feminine given name dated 1208 (in a marked matronym) and 1315 in R&W, s.n. Love, and 1273, 1610, and 1631-2 in Bardsley, s.n. Love.

    Letter is a Scots place name dated 1627 in J. MacDonald, Place Names of West Aberdeenshire (https://books.google.com/books?id=br3NAAAAMAAJ).

    Scots and English are in the same regional naming group under Appendix C of SENA, so can be combined within 500 years.


    18: Paper Tygre - New Name

    Paper is an apparent given name found in the name Thomas filius Paper, dated 1224-5 in Connolly P and Martin G, eds., The Dublin Guild Merchant Roll, c. 1190-1265, p. 50. This source contains names in Middle English as well as Anglicized forms of French, Gaelic, and Scandinavian names. Capitalization has been standardized in this transcription.

    Tygre is a byname dated 1319 in R&W, s.n. Tigar. It is derived from the OFr Tigier and/or the OG Thiodger "people-spear".


    19: Ratte Fynk - New Name & New Device

    Vert, on a stool a pigeon argent

    Sound (Something that will bother the voice heralds) most important.

    Ratte is an English given name found in Family Search:

    Ratte Smith, Marriage: 09 Oct 1597, Bawsey,Norfolk,England; Batch: M04073-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N2PP-V5Z)

    Fynk is an English surname found in the name of the church and parish of St. Benedict (Benet) Fynk, located on Threadneedle Street in London. This church is mentioned in a will dated 1463 in A.A. Sharp, ed., Calendar of Wills Proved and Enrolled in the Court of Husting, London: A. D. 1258 - A. D. 1688, p. 604. (https://books.google.com/books?id=ytUxAQAAMAAJ). The church name does not appear to have been normalized in this transcription, as the modern form of this element is Fink. (It appears as Fynke in Stowe, cited below.)

    It should be noted that the Fynk in the church/parish name refers to the byname of a 13th century benefactor who rebuilt the church at one time (John Stowe, Survey of London, 1598, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/no-series/survey-of-london-stow/1603/pp138-143#highlight-first). It is not the byname of the saint, Benedict of Nursia.


    20: Ratte Fynk - New Household Name

    OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

    Beazar Brotherhood

    Beazar is an English surname found in FamilySearch:

    Elizabeth Beazar, christened 16 Feb 1639, St Andrew, Holborn, London, England, batch # C01051-2 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JS1P-Z4L)

    Late-period English surnames can be used as given names by precedent.

    Brotherhood is a designator found in Alys Mackyntoich's "Simple Guide to Household Names" (http://alysprojects.blogspot.com/2016/10/alyss-simple-guide-to-household-names.html) and in Appendix E of SENA.

    In general, we see the pattern Brotherhood of X in English, where X is a saint's name. An example is the Brotherhood of Saint Katherine, found in John Stowe's A Survey of London (1633, https://books.google.com/books?id=UONBAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA223).

    However, at least one example of the pattern X Brotherhood was found: "the fraternity of All Saints, otherwise called the Charnel Brotherhood" (normalized), which was dissolved in 1548 ['The city of St Albans: The borough', in A History of the County of Hertford: Volume 2, ed. William Page (London, 1908), pp. 477-483. British History Online (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/herts/vol2/pp477-483)]. This religious fraternity appears to have been named after a chantry chapel that was called the Charnel. However, a similar term meaning "fraternity, brotherhood", frairīe, is found in the MED and appears with the pattern X frairie ("graye frerye", 1454-5, referring to the friary or "convent" of Grey Friars). In addition, we find the religious association, "sancte Christofre' Gilde", dated to 1429, and the place name Chapmanegilde, dated c.1230, in the MED.

    Therefore, the submitted order should be registerable.


    21: Shire of Kirk Tribles - New Branch Name & New Device

    Argent semy of brunette perruques proper, a laurel wreath vert

    Kirk - "church", is found English compound place names like Kirk Lounsdalle (t. Henry VIII), Kirk Liston (1298), and Kirke Lethome (1584), all of which are church or parish names. These examples are found in the following references:

  • 'Records of Kendale: Valores ecclesiastici', in Records Relating To the Barony of Kendale: Volume 3, ed. John F Curwen (Kendal, 1926), pp. 33-34. British History Online (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/kendale-barony/vol3/pp33-34)

  • 'Close Rolls, Edward I: July 1298', in Calendar of Close Rolls, Edward I: Volume 4, 1296-1302, ed. H C Maxwell Lyte (London, 1906), pp. 169-171. British History Online (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-close-rolls/edw1/vol4/pp169-171)

  • 'Yorkshire Fines: 1584', in Feet of Fines of the Tudor Period [Yorks]: Part 3, 1583-94, ed. Francis Collins (Leeds, 1889), pp. 14-31. British History Online (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/feet-of-fines-yorks/vol3/pp14-31)

    In addition, there are numerous examples in Watts using this pattern: Kyrk(e)burton(e) (1535-1605), Kirk(e)bandon (1314), Kircandres (1261-1485), all found s.nn. Kirkburton, Kirkbampton, and Kirkandrews-on-Eden.

    Tribles is a locative found in the name Thomas de Tribles, dated 1242-3 in Connolly P, Martin G, eds. The Dublin Guild Merchant Roll, c. 1190-1265, p. 79. This source contains names in Middle English as well as Anglicized forms of French, Gaelic, and Scandinavian names. Capitalization has been standardized in this transcription.

    Shire is one of the standard place name designators found in Appendix E of SENA. A petition is being transported to us and will be uploaded to the packet.

    Artist's Note: We had some trouble with this. The semy might be more identifiable if it contained more repetitions of the charge, but we were worried that it was crowding out the laurel wreath and everything else.


  • 22: Slaywright Rings - New Name

    Slaywright is an occupational byname found in the MED, referring to one who makes weaver's reeds (sleys):

    (1400) in Davenport Nrf.Manorp.lxxii : Johannes Slaywryght.

    It is also a late-period English surname found in FamilySearch:

    John Jack and Margaret Slaywright, 30 Oct 1581; Greystoke, Cumberland, England, batch M00225-1 (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N2LM-327)

    Late-period English surnames can be used as given names by precedent.

    Rings is an inn-sign- or occupational-derived surname dated 1646 in FamilySearch (editors notes in brackets):

    [no given name] Rings, christening and death date: 28 Nov 1646, CHESHUNT, HERTFORD, ENGLAND, father: Nicholas Rings, batch C07225-2 (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NR4C-V6Y)

    Tho[mas] Rings and Ann Honner, 28 Jun 1610; Potsgrove, Bedford, England, batch M00380-1 (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N2KS-CPG)


    23: Tin Manin - New Name

    Culture (West African) most important.

    Tīn is found in the name Tīn Yazāmārin...of the people of Gazūla, as included in Kitāb al-Masālik wa-al-Mamālik by Al-Bakrī, the 11th century Andalusian historian and geographer. This source includes accounts of his travels to West Africa. [Transcriptions were pulled from Corpus of Early Arabic Sources for West African History, Markus Wiener Publishers, 2011.]

    Manīn is found as the apparent byname for Tunkā Manīn, king of Ghāna (ibid.).

    The submitter prefers to drop the macrons, as allowed under Appendix D of SENA.


    24: Venus Fly Trapp - New Name

    Venus is a English given name found in "Names from Classical History and Mythology" by Alys Mackyntoich (2014 KWHSS Proceedings, https://heraldry.sca.org/kwhss/2014/Alys_Mackyntoich/Names_from_Classical_History_and_Mythology.pdf), dated to 1566 and 1573.

    Fly is a gray period English surname found in FamilySearch:

    Elizabeth Fly, Female, Mar 1609, SAINT MARGARET, WESTMINSTER, LONDON, ENGLAND, Batch: P00160-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JWFQ-43K)

    Trapp is a surname found in "Middle English Bynames in Early Fourteenth-Century London" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/english/bynames1319.pdf) and also in FamilySearch, dated to 1571:

    William Trapp, Male, 04 Nov 1571, DEFFORD,WORCESTER,ENGLAND, Batch: P01450-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NL2C-ZXT)


    25: Virginia of Inverness - New Name & New Device

    (Tinctureless) A cross pointed and overall a lion statant, all within an orle of porpoises

    Virginia is a late period English given name found in Withycombe, s.n. Virginia, dated to 1587. Virginia Dare was the first person of English parentage born in the New World, in what is now Roanoke, VA.

    Inverness is a Scots place name found in this spelling in 1587 in Records of the Parliaments of Scotland to 1707 (http://www.rps.ac.uk/mss/1587/7/3). Locative phrases using the pattern of <place name> can be found in the same source (e.g., schireffdome of Inverness, dated 1545, http://www.rps.ac.uk/mss/1545/9/2/8).

    The submitter gives permission for each of her 4 and 19 sisters to conflict with her name.


    Do you really want to know what the salutation says? Do you really think I'll do your work for you when the MED is sitting right there, online, waiting for you?? And I even made it short!

    ...

    Ok, you've got me. Very roughly:

    Salutations to all scholars, speakers of idle tales, and loafers that tarry thus here. Hold us we together close when we must needs make end of our day work.

    This official letter will be fully humorous to read, therefore it seems (to me to be) most easily read.

    The substitute standard bearer of the East,

    Dame Lillia de Vaux, Butterscotch Crampet Herald Imaginary

    Special thanks to Alys Mackyntoich (Taisez-vous), Lilie Dubh, Mathghamhain Ua Ruadháin (Gummi Bear), Sláine ben Rónáin meic Robeird, Jethro Stille (just visiting from the Outlands), and anyone else I may have forgotten who helped me pull this off in just a handful of days.


    OSCAR counts 18 New Names, 1 New Alternate Name, 3 New Household Names, 1 New Order Name, 2 New Branch Names, 8 New Devices and 4 New Badges. These 37 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $148 for them. There are a total of 37 items submitted on this letter.

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