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Atenveldt LoI dated 2018-12-31

ATENVELDT COLLEGE OF HERALDS

Letter of Intent

31 December 2018

A.S. LIII

Unto Juliana Laurel; Alys Pelican; Cormac Wreath; and the commenting Members of the College of Arms,

Greetings of the Nearly New Year from Marta as tu Mika-Mysliwy, Brickbat Herald and Parhelium Herald for the Kingdom of Atenveldt!

The Atenveldt College of Heralds requests the consideration and registration of the following names and armory with the College of Arms. Unless specifically stated, the client will accept any spelling and grammar corrections; all assistance is appreciated.

This item was on the 03-2019 LoAR

1: Batu Kharhvaach - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound most important.
Language (Mongolian) most important.
Culture (Mongolian) most important.

Batu is a Mongolian male name, "loyal, true, confident" ("Mongolian Naming Practices," Marta as tu Mika-Mysliwy, http://heraldry.sca.org/names/mongolian_names_marta.html).

The byname is intended to mean "archer." "Archer" is shown in the Glosbe English-Mongolian dictionary as харваач (https://glosbe.com/en/mn) and it is transliterated as "kharhvaach" in Google Translate (https://translate.google.com/?hl=en#en/mn/archer). While my glossary in An Introduction to Classical (Literary) Mongolian, by Grønbech and Krueger, is very limited, the protheme qarbu-, "to shoot with a bow and arrow," suggests that this an acceptable form of the art and one who practices it (in addition to yet another transliteration).

ffride wlffsdotter comments:

"Die Personennamen und Titel der mittelmongolischen Dokumente, by Volker Rybatzki has:

p. 189 sn. batu: "batu eldest son of Joci"

p. 448 sn. qabuγ: with the gloss "qarbuci `archer, tireur de flèches'"

"Louis Ligeti. 1971. "Fragments Mongols de Berlin" Acta Orientalia Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae Vol. 24, No. 2, pp. 139-164 has p. 143:

"Qabuγ-baliči ekiten ilčin" (where y is a γ-macron, so could also be written as ġ, I think? Eg. https://collab.its.virginia.edu/wiki/tibetan-script/Transliteration%20Schemes%20for%20Mongolian%20Ve rtical%20Script.html)

"I don't know nearly enough about Mongolian to be able to say what to do with this information. I think it's implying the name "Batu Qabuġ" could be used by an archer, but I'm not confident in my analysis."

I don't have an issue with exchanging Q- for Kh-, I'm really at a loss for any exchange with other elements in the byname. At least if we go with Rybatzki's work, we end up with a form Qarbuci, closer to Grønbech and Krueger, and "less long" than that which appears in Ligeti.


This item was on the 03-2019 LoAR

2: Kim Senggum - Resub Name Change From Holding Name

OSCAR NOTE: 'Old Item' should contain the former primary name. The form that is there is not a registered name.

Old Item: Kim Samguk/William of Atenveldt, to be released.

The client's previous name submission, Kim Samguk, was returned by Laurel, August 2018, for the following reasons: "Although Kim is well-attested as a Korean family name, we found no evidence to support the construction of the given name Samguk. The term Samguk in Korean means "three kingdoms" and is a poetical term used to refer to Korea in 13th century Korean writings. We were unable to find evidence of Koreans using such terms as name elements. We were also unable to construct Samguk from period Korean elements. Accordingly, this name must be returned. The submitter's device is registered under the holding name William of Atenveldt." The client's registered device is Sable, a natural tiger rampant Or striped sable, on a chief Or a bow sable.

The client wishes to use a Korean clan name with a Mongolian given name. Current naming practices allow the combination of Mongolian element with Arabic, Hungarian/Romanian, Persian, Russian/East Slavic and Turkish (Appendix C: Regional Naming Groups and Their Mixes, http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html). The client asks that Korean be added to that group based on the following history of interactions between the Mongols and the Koreans:

After the death of the Keraites leader Ong Khan to Chingis Khan's emerging Mongol Empire in 1203, the Keriat leader Nilqa Senggum led his followers into Western Xia. (The Keraites were one of the five dominant Turco-Mongol tribal confederations (khanates) in the Altai-Sayan region during the 12th century.) Part of this attack was on Chingis Khan, and this failed as well as the major assault in the area, and as a result Nilqa Senggum was expelled from the Western Xia territory. There were several invasions by the Mongol Empire against Korea, 1231 to 1259, during which time the Mongols annexed the northern areas of the Korean peninsula into its Empire and its people became vassals to the Mongols. (http://www.fsmitha.com/he/h11mon.htm; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongol_conquest_of_Western_Xia; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kim_Jun_(Goryeo))

ffride wlffsdotter notes that Die Personennamen und Titel der mittelmongolischen Dokumente by Volker Rybatzki (http://ethesis.helsinki.fi/julkaisut/hum/aasia/vk/rybatzki/dieperso.pdf) has: p. 705 sn. senggüm. It also has Samgun on p. 697, although ffride isn't sure that it's a personal name (it could be a title).

Senggum (appearing with the slight spelling variation of Sengum in Phillip's history The Mongols) is shown as a male given name in "Mongolian Naming Practices," Marta as tu Mika-Mysliwy, http://heraldry.sca.org/names/mongolian_names_marta.html.

Kim, "gold," is a family name of a group that rose to power and became the rulers of Silla for seven centuries (https://www.britannica.com/story/why-are-so-many-koreans-named-kim). The name is not considered presumptuous, as the clan was so huge that it remains the most common family name in Korea today.


This item was on the 03-2019 LoAR

3: Maria Sahira di Sant'Angelo - New Name & New Device

Maria Sahira di Sant'Angelo

Per pale vert and azure, a horse and a dragon combatant, on a point pointed argent, a wooden wagon wheel proper.

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Maria is a female Italian given name ("Names from an Early 16th C Census of Rome: Feminine Names," Sara L. Uckelman, http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/italian/leofemfreq.html),

Sahira is a feminine Arabic name, "alert, wakeful, unsleeping; moon, moonlight" (unfortunately, the source is a baby-name site, Quranicnames: Authentic Islamic Baby Names, http://quranicnames.com/sahira/). The Islamic name is based on the Moors occcupying Italy in 827; this occurred in Sicily and in some areas of Southern Italy. The root shows up just once in the Qurʼān: http://corpus.quran.com/qurandictionary.jsp?q=shr. With further consultation with the client, she says that it is indeed mention in the Quran verse 79:14. Again, we run into the issue of the Quran not being an acceptable source.

Basil Dragonstrike comments: The closest to "Sahira" found are al-Sahartī, al-Zāhirī, al-Zahrā' (https://s-gabriel.org/names/basil/battuta/Nickbynames.html)and al-Ṣaḥrāwī (https://s-gabriel.org/names/basil/ibnalbanna/Nickbynames.html). Except for al-Zahrāʼ those are masculine, and would need to be changed into feminine forms. He also comments that one could base a locative on al-Ṣaḥrāʼ, the Sahara Desert; the form al-Ṣaḥrāʼiyya should be OK.

di Sant'Angelo means "of Sant'Angelo". Maridonna Benvenuti comments: According to `Dizionario di toponomastica. Storia e significato dei nomi geografici italiani.' UTET Libreria, s.n. Monte Sant'Angelo, it was always called that in and out of period. In 1177 it was a fief, p.499 - `Nel 1177 il feudo di Mante Sant'Angelo, comrendente gran parte del Gargano, fu assegnato da Guglielmo II a sua moglie Giovanna d'Inghilterra, poi passò agli Svevi ed agli Angioni.' In 1177 the fief of Monte Sant'Angelo, most of the Gargano, was assigned by William II to his wife Joan of England, then passed to the Swabians and Angevins. From the same book there are several locatives of <Sant'Angelo> + <word>. Sant'Angelo a Scala was known as Sancto Angelo in aa. 1150-1168. `Documentato in `Catalogus Baronum (aa. 1150-1168) `de Sancto Angelo, il toponimo riflette il culton dell'Arcangelo Michele, patron del paese [source], spesso associate ad antica presenza di Longobari. La specifiazione a Scala, da tempo is uso, è tratta dalla `conformazione dei monti circostanti' [source]. Page 703. Documented in 'Catalogus Baronum (year 1150-1168)' de Sancto Angelo, the toponym reflects the cult of the Archangel Michael, patron of the country [source], often associated with the ancient presence of Longobards. The Scala specifiation, which has long been used, is taken from the 'conformation of the surrounding mountains' [source].

According to SENA Appendix A, double given names in Italian are permitted. SENA Appendix B allows combination of Italian and Arabic name elements.


This item was on the 03-2019 LoAR

4: Rayyan al-Rashid - New Name & New Device

Sable, a simurgh close and issuant from base a demi-sun Or eclipsed sable.

The name is Arabic. The client is Lebanese-American by birth and desires a Lebanese/Persian/Arabic name, something similar to his legal given name (Ryan). In the Hadith (a collection of traditions containing sayings of the prophet Muhammad), there is a gate of Paradise called the Rayyan Gate, one that only those who regularly fast may enter. In modern times, Al Rayyan is a city in Qatar, and Reyyn and Rayan are the given names of several Saudi, Tunisian, and Lebanese-American athletes. However, we're at a loss to find Rayyan/Rayan/Reyan as a masculine given name/'ism.

Lyn Whitewolfe (Twin Palms Pursuivant) commented: "I have found a variant spelling of a real person in period: Abū Rayḥān Muḥammad ibn Aḥmad Al-Bīrūnī was a medieval Muslim scientist and scholar. He lived in Khwarazm (973-1050)and was renowned for his knowledge of physics, mathematics and natural sciences during the Islamic Golden Age. I did not look further than Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al-Biruni."

Basil Dragonstrike commented in reply: a better source for al-Bīrūnī (as he's usually called) is The Encylopaedia of Islam. Note, however, that both this source and the Encyclopaedia Britannica (https://www.britannica.com/biography/al-Biruni) say this name was Abū al-Rayḥān. As metaphorical kunyas are known, this might argue against Rayḥān.

OTOH, the Encyclopaedia Iranica lists this person as "BĪRŪNĪ, ABŪ RAYḤĀN MOḤAMMAD b. Aḥmad" (http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/biruni-abu-rayhan-index)

There is also page 157 of: https://books.google.com/books?id=raKRY3KQspsC, which calls him Abū Rayḥān Muḥammad ibn Aḥmad al-Bīrūnī. Basil suggests using this as the documentation, as the simplest way to get Rayḥān,"and I'd also say, I don't think there's anything closer that Rayḥān."

al-Rashid is a laqab, a combination of words into a byname relating to nature, a descriptive, or of some admirable quality the person had (or would like to have); it means "the Rightly-guided" ("Period Arabic Names and Naming Practices," Da'ud ibn Auda, http://heraldry.sca.org/names/arabic-naming2.htm). He will accept spelling variations to the given name, particularly if a period form can be found.


This item was on the 03-2019 LoAR

5: Rummana Arora - New Name & New Device

Purpure, a unicorn's head couped and on a chief argent three hearts gules.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language (Urdu) most important.
Culture (Urdu) most important.
Meaning most important.

Rummana is a female given name; Rummana Hussain (1952-1999) was a modern Muslim artist from India (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rummana_Hussain). The name comes from the Urdu, meaning either a plum-purple color or a pomegranate. In the Quran Chapter 55, The Beneficent: "Which then of the bounties of your Lord will you deny? Therein are fruits and palms and pomegranates." The pomegranate is used as a food and a dye in the Middle East and India, making it a valuable "bounty of the Lord," much like a daughter. Were the Quran to be considered as an acceptable name source (revealed to Mohammad over the years 609 through 632), this would definitely be compatible as a period name.

As far as finding this as a period name rather than depending on the Quran alone, Rumayla is seen as an Arabic feminine 'ism ("Son of the Hot-Tempered Woman": Women's Names in Arabic Bynames, Juliana de Luna, http://medievalscotland.org/jes/ArabicMatronymics/).

Arora is a Hindu and Sikh name based on the name of a mercantile community of the Punjab. It is derived from a place name, Aror (now known as Rohri, in Sind, Pakistan). According to legend, the Aroras are of Kshatriya stock, but denied their Kshatriya origin in order to escape persecution by Paras Ram, calling themselves Aur, which means `someone else' in Hindi and Punjabi. (https://www.ancestry.com/name-origin?surname=arora)

Basil Dragonstrike provides a very reasoned possibility for the use of Rummana as a feminine Arabic given name (https://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=100&loi=5557).

There was some commentary on the unicorn head's "extravagance" (https://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=100&loi=5557, Michael Gerard Curtememoire), and that it might be too modern to be registered. Given the variation of unicorn heads previously registered, I think this is mostly an example of an animate creature or monster stumbling into the halls of armory and expressing itself in a number of variations.


There are 4 New Names and 3 New Devices. These 7 items are chargeable, and Laurel should receive $ 28 for them. There is 1 Holding Names change; and there is no charge for this. There are a total of 8 items submitted on this letter.

I was assisted in the preparation of this Letter with Commentary by Basil Dragonstrike (Lions Heart), ffride wlffsdotter, Iago ab Adam, Lyn Whitewolfe (Twin Palm Puruivant) and Michael Gerard Curtememoire.

Thank you to those who provide your wisdom and almost-endless patience, your expertise and your willingness to share it. Wishing you all good thing in the coming year,

Marta as tu Mika-Mysliwy

c/o Linda Miku

2527 East 3rd Street; Tucson AZ 85716

atensubmissions.nexiliscom.com

brickbat@nexiliscom.com


OSCAR counts 4 New Names and 3 New Devices. These 7 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $28 for them. OSCAR counts 1 New Holding Name Change. OSCAR counts 1 Resub Name Change. These 2 items are not chargeable. There are a total of 9 items submitted on this letter.

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