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East LoI dated 2012-08-26

To Gabriel Laurel, Juliana Pelican, Emma Wreath and the Heralds of the Knowne Worlde, from from Asa in Svarta, Blue Tyger Herald and Alys Mackyntoich, Eastern Crown herald, greetings and every good thing.

The Eastern College herewith submits for approval and registration the following items, with our thanks.

Please note the continuing issue with the appearance of greens, which Eastern Crown's and Blue Tyger's scanners tend to render as teals. All items are colored with Crayola or Rose Art green markers unless otherwise specifically indicated.

Thank you to the following commenters: Ursula Georges, Jeanne Marie Lacroix, Gawain of Miskbridge, Joscelin le esqurel, Tanczos Istvan, Erec le Clair, Lillia de Vaux, Brunissende Dragonette, Solveig Throndardottir, Abdullah ibn Harun, Magnus von Lübeck, Andreas von Meißen, Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada, Marie de Blois, Gunnvor silfraharr, Fridrikr Tomasson, Aryanhwy merch Catmael, Irayari Vairavi, Gisela vom Kreuzbach, Donovan Shinnock and Jaelle.

This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

1: Alric de Bera - New Name & New Device

Argent, a bear rampant and a base indented vert.

Alric is a masculine given name appearing in R&W s.n. Aldrich as a given name with this spelling dated to 1066 and as a surname in this spelling dated to 1346.

de Bera is a surname appearing in R&W s.n. Bear dated to 1168.

Commenters felt that this name is clear of Alric Berard (January 2009 via Atlantia) with two syllables of difference under S.E.N.A. -- one for the de and another for BER-AH vs. BER-ARD.

Commenters beleived that this device is clear of Thorvald of Vulkanfeld (November of 1987 via An Tir): Or, a bear rampant, maintaining an axe, within a bordure embattled vert, with one difference for the change in tincture of the field and a second different for a bordure vs. a base.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

2: Alys Mackyntoich - New Heraldic Title

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2005, via the East

Ogress Herald

The submitter was made a herald extraordinary and granted the right to a personal title by the Brigantia Principal Herald and the Crown of the East on June 23, 2012.

"Heraldic Titles from the Middle Ages and Renaissance: Overview" by Julia Smith (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/HeraldicTitles/) shows heraldic titles based on charge names to be the second most common pattern.

An ogress is a heraldic charge. A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry by James Parker s.n. ogress lists this as another name for a pellet or a sable roundel. Parker s.n. pellet states:

Pellet, or gunstone, (fr. ogresse, but more frequently torteau de sable) is a roundlet sable. The term pellet, spelt in various ways, is found in ancient rolls, and is used by Chaucer, e.g. 'as suyfte as a pellet out of a gonne.' Hence, perhaps, the later name gunstone. The word ogress, borrowed from the French, is also found used by English heralds.

Parker gives as examples the arms of Clarke, Argent, on a bend gules between three ogresses as many swans proper, and Langley Argent, a fess sable, in chief three ogresses.

The OED has a citation for the heraldic term ogress from 1572.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

3: Carillion, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1986, via the East

Order of the Beacon of Carillion

This order name follows the pattern of naming orders after objects or heraldic charges found in "Medieval Secular Order Names" by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/).

A beacon is a standard heraldic charge. A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry by James Parker, s.n. Beacon, identifies "A beacon or, inflamed proper" as a badge of Henry V.

The word "beacon" is found in Shakespeare's Henry IV, Part II (1597), in a monologue by Falstaff in Act IV, scene 3:

The second your excellent sherris is the warming of the blood; which cold and settled, left the liver white and pale, which is the badge of pusillanimity and cowardice; but the sherris warms and makes it course from the inwards to the parts extremes; illumineth the face, which, as a beacon, gives warning to all rest of this little kingdom, man, to arm; and then the vital commoners and inland petty spirits muster me all to their captain, the heart, who, great and puff'd up with this doth any deed of courage--and this valour comes of sherris.

Under S.E.N.A. NPN.3.C, the addition of the phrase of Carillion means that this order name does not conflict with Beacon Principal Herald registered to the Kingdom of Meridies in March 1978.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

4: Carillion, Barony of - Resub Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1986, via the East

Order of the Gules Bell

The April 2012 Cover Letter states: "we are hereby allowing the use of heraldic color terms in order names as well as the everyday terms. However, no convincing evidence has been presented for the use of non-heraldic color names, including the names for particular shades of a color, like scarlet or crimson."

Based on this ruling, the Barony withdrew the Order Name Order of the Crimson Bell, which appeared on the East's June 2, 2012 ILoI, and has re-submitted the name as the Order of the Gules Bell. The Barony will also accept Order of the Bell Gules if that is more appropriate.

This order name follows the pattern of [color] + [charge] found in "Medieval Secular Order Names" by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/).

The Middle English Dictionary s.n. belle contains examples of the use of the term "bell" in period:

a1400(a1325) Cursor (Vsp A.3) 12193: A chim or brasin bell..noþer can vnderstand ne tell Wat takens þair aun sune.

?a1425 Mandev.(2) (Eg 1982) 102/17: He knyllez a lytill bell [OF clokette] of siluer þat he hase in his hand.

If registered, this name should be associated with the badge (Fieldless) a bell gules which was submitted by the Barony and appears on the East's June 2, 2012 ILoI.

Correction (2012-Aug-26 22:08:59): Despite Emma Wreath's timely reminder, we failed to change the check box to indicate this is a new submission to Laurel.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

5: Carillion, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1986, via the East

Order of Sante Ruprecht

This Order Name follows the pattern of naming orders after saints, identified as the second most common pattern in "Medieval Secular Order Names" by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/)

Ruprecht is found s.n. Ruprecht dated to c.1390, 1396 in "Medieval German Given Names from Silesia" by Talan Gwynek (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/bahlow_v.htm)

Juliana's article provides the following example of a German order named after a Saint: geselschaft sante Georgen - 'Society of saint George' -1381 German Kruse et al.

Commenters noted that Rupert of Salzburg was a real saint from late 600s Austria (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13229a.htm). However, whether or not there was an actual Saint Ruprecht does not affect registration; the use of fictional saints in Order names is recognized by precedent:

Several commenters noted that the College cannot canonize new saints. However, we feel that registering a name that uses the descriptive Saint does not do this, but rather follows a well documented medieval tradition of local shrines and saints who may or may not be recognized by the hierarchy in Rome. In addition, this would not be the first such registration; the College of St. Bunstable, a group name formed from a fictional saint's name, was registered in August 1981, and in August 1990, the College of Saint Joan was registered although Joan of Arc was not canonized until 1920. While philosophically, it is certainly better recreation to use a real-life saint's name when using this model to create an order name, there is no reason why these sorts of construction should not be allowed the same latitude allowed by our rules for other constructed names. The name William the Cooper is a well-formed English name whose elements can all be documented to period, therefore Saint William the Cooper is an expected construction. [Caer Galen, Barony of. Order name Order of Saint William the Cooper, 7/2006 LoAR, A-Outlands]

Submitted as the Order of Saint Ruprecht, commenters were unable to find support for Saint as a term in period German. The name has been changed to the Order of Sante Ruprecht based on the pattern seen in Juliana's article. However, the Barony would prefer Order of Saint Ruprecht if Saint can be documented in German.

Commenters questioned the use of the English Order of with the German saint's name. S.E.N.A. NPN1.B.2 permits this form:

2. Order and Award Designators: The designators for order names must follow a documented pattern for medieval order names. The standard designators are Order and Award. Any pattern suitable for one such designator is suitable for the other. These designators may take the lingua Anglica form, using the forms above regardless of the language of the substantive phrase. Alternately, they may take the language of the substantive element. A list of some translations of these designators is listed in Appendix E. In general, designators which are used for household and association names cannot be used for orders and awards.

For example, either Order of the Levrier or Ordre du Levrier is registerable for the meaning 'order of the hound', but Order du Levrier and Ordre of the Levrier are not; in each one, the preposition and article do not match the language of the designator.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

6: Çinara Ardan - New Name & New Device

Or goutty de vin, a dance purpure

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Both name elements are found in "Basque Onomastics of the Eighth to Sixteenth Centuries," by Karen Larsdatter (http://www.larsdatter.com/basque/)

Çinara appears as a female given name dated to 1366 (http://www.larsdatter.com/basque/1bc.htm).

Ardan appears as a byname meaning "wine" s.n. Ardan dated to 1137 (http://www.larsdatter.com/basque/appendix3.htm#F)

The submitter prefers the blazon term "goutty de vin" over various suggestions to simply the blazon, for the cant on her byname.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

7: Dalla Óláfs kona - New Blanket Permission to Conflict

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2010, via the East

I, [redacted] known in the SCA as Dalla Olafskona, waive the full protection of my registered armory "Per fess wavy azure and sable, a demi-sun issuant from the line of division Or and an open book argent, a bordure Or." I grant permission to any future submitter to register armory that is at least one countable step different from my registered armory. I understand that this permission can be withdrawn by written notice to the Laurel Sovereign of Arms, but that conflicting items registered while it is in force will remain registered.

Dated 1 July 2012

Signed with legal name.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

8: Dalla Óláfs kona - New Blanket Permission to Conflict

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2010, via the East

I [redacted], known in the SCA as Dalla Olafskona, waive the full protection of my registered name, "Dalla Óláfs kona." I grant permission to any future submitter to register a name that is not identical to my registered name. I understand that this permission can be withdrawn by written notice to the Laurel Sovereign of Arms, but that conflicting items registered while it is in force will remain registered.

Dated 1 July 2012

Signed with legal name.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

9: Díarmaid Ó Bríain - New Name & New Device

Azure, a pall inverted argent hurty between three cups argent

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (16th cen. Irish) most important.
Culture (16th cen. Irish) most important.

This is a standard clan affiliation style byname as set out in "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names," by Sharon Krossa (http://medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/#clanaffiliationbyname).

Diarmaid is the standard Early Modern Irish Gaelic nominative form of a masculine given name found in "Index of Names in Irish Annals" by Mari ingen Briain (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Diarmait.shtml). Note that the form in the "Index" does not contain an accent over the first 'i'.

Briain is the standard Early Modern Irish gentive form of a masculine given name found in Mari's "Index" (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Brian.shtml). Note that the form given in the "Index" does not contain an accent over the first 'i'.

The name was submitted with acute accents over the first 'i' in Diarmaid and the first 'i' in Brian. If these accents cannot be documented, then the submitter prefers to drop all of the accents from the name.

The accents requested by the submitter appear to be supported by the Annals of Loch Cé:

Díarmaid Riabach mac Eogain mic Taidhg Mic Diarmada appears in entry 1570.1 of the Annals of Loch Cé (http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G100010B/text011.html). Diarmaid appears in other portions of the same entry without the accent.

Brían appears in entry 1014.3 of the Annals of Loch Cé (http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G100010A.html)

Murchadh Oc mac Mathghamhna, damhna righ Corca Bascinn, do marbhadh la Sil m-Bríain appears in entry 1359.5 of the Annals of Loch Cé (http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G100010B.html)

Based on these examples, Eastern Crown believes the accent marks requested by the submitter could be reasonable and has forwarded the name as submitted for further commentary.

Kingdom commenters universally suggested that the pall needed to be redrawn to be fatter with fewer hurts. This has been done to allow for registration; the redrawn art is above.

Correction (2012-Aug-26 21:08:26): I mistakenly uploaded the old art. The redrawn art with fewer hurts will be posted momentarily.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

10: Étaín ingen Fháeláin - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (Gaelic pre-1200) most important.
Culture (Gaelic pre-1200) most important.

Étaín is a Middle Irish Gaelic feminine name found in Mari ingen Briain's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Etain.shtml) with Annals dates of 1104, 1188.

Fháeláin is the genitive and lenited form of the Middle Irish given name Fáelán found in OCM s.n. Fáelán, where it is stated to be the name of three kinds of Leinster between the 7th and 9th centuries, and in Mari's "Index" (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Faelan.shtml) with relevant Annals dates of 923, 940, 942, 951, 958, 964, 979, 980, 1010, 1033, 1041, 1042, 1051, 1063, 1069, 1128, 1161.

Originally submitted as Étaín ingen Fhaolán, that form impermissibly combined two different languages in a single name phrase. After consultation with the submitter, and with her express permission, the name was corrected to be entirely Middle Irish and to use the correct grammar.

After much discussion, the name was felt to be clear of Éadaoin ní Fhaoláin (May of 1991 via Atlantia) under S.E.N.A. based on the differences between ingen and ní. The names would not be clear under the RfS, because Étaín and Éadaoin are variations of the same name. There is no meaningful pronunciation difference between Étaín and Éadaoin.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

11: Girsell MacLeoid - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 2011, via the East

Azure, an oak tree eradicated and in chief three triquetras, a bordure argent

Girsell MacLeoid was registered on the November 2011 LoAR via the East.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

12: Irayari Vairavi - New Alternate Name

OSCAR finds the name on the East LoI of March 14, 2009 as submitted.

Imigla Venture

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Imigla is a female given name found in "Italian Names from Imola, 1312" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/italian/imolafemalph.html).

Venture is a byname found in "Masculine Names from Thirteenth Century Pisa" by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/pisa/pisa-bynames-alpha.html).


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

13: Iron Bog, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2010, via the East

Order of the Sable Compass

This order name follows the pattern of [color] + [charge] found in "Medieval Secular Order Names" by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/).

The April 2012 Cover Letter states: "[W]e are hereby allowing the use of heraldic color terms in order names as well as the everyday terms." Sable is the heraldic color name for black.

A compass or compasses is a common heraldic charge. Parker's A Glossary of Terms Used in Heraldry s.n. compasses cites to the following arms granted in 1473: Sable, on a chevron engrailed between three towers argent a pair of compasses of the first--MASONS' Company [Inc. 1411; arms granted 1473]. Compass is dated 1475 in the OED, under the definition for "Measure, proper proportion, regularity": "1475 CAXTON Jason 92 b, Vignes and trees hyly conduyted by compass." The word appears earlier, in other spellings, like "compas". The spellings for this meaning and other meanings, such as the mathematical tool are consistent, the spelling Compass may be fine without using the lingua anglica allowance.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

14: Iron Bog, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2010, via the East

Order of the Sable Gauntlet

This order name follows the pattern of [color] + [charge] found in "Medieval Secular Order Names" by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/).

The April 2012 Cover Letter states: "[W]e are hereby allowing the use of heraldic color terms in order names as well as the everyday terms." Sable is the heraldic color name for black.

A gauntlet is a common heraldic charge, with examples listed in Parker's A Glossary of Terms Used in Heraldry s.n. gauntlet. Commenters were unable to find evidence of the spelling "gauntlet" in period. However, the MED contains the following examples:

(1449) Metham AC (Gar 141) 991: Hys rerebracys and his gorget, Hys basenet and hys gauntelettys.

c1450 Lond.Chron.Cleo.(Cleo C.4) 150: Asshley had the vectory; for he reysed blood of the lord a forn sayd, in brekyng of the gantlett and reyseng of his vmbray.

(1463-4) Acc.Howard in RC 57 240: Item, in mendynge off gawntletys ij d.

(1465) Paston 4.169: Your gesseren and gaunteletts shall be send hom.

?a1475(?a1425) Higd.(2) Ctn.(Hrl 2261) 485: His horse was founde with his breste plate and gantelettes.

c1500(?a1475) Ass.Gods (Trin-C R.3.19) 346: Mynerue..all in curas clad, Gauntlettes on hyr handys, & sabatouns on hyr fete.

S.E.N.A. NPN.1.C.2.c permits the use of the Lingua Anglica Order of the Sable Gauntlet based on the above examples.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

15: Iron Bog, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2010, via the East

Order of the Silver Gauntlet

This order name follows the pattern of [color] + [charge] found in "Medieval Secular Order Names" by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/).

The May 2008 Cover Letter states: "Silver in order and award names: The August 2005 cover letter says that "orders named for heraldic charges or for items that, while not found in period as heraldic charges, may be used as heraldic charges...may contain the ordinary color names of any heraldic tincture." This includes the use of Silver as the ordinary color name of argent." (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2008/05/08-05cl.html).

A gauntlet is a common heraldic charge, with examples listed in Parker's A Glossary of Terms Used in Heraldry s.n. gauntlet. Commenters were unable to find evidence of the spelling "gauntlet" in period. However, the MED contains the following examples:

(1449) Metham AC (Gar 141) 991: Hys rerebracys and his gorget, Hys basenet and hys gauntelettys.

c1450 Lond.Chron.Cleo.(Cleo C.4) 150: Asshley had the vectory; for he reysed blood of the lord a forn sayd, in brekyng of the gantlett and reyseng of his vmbray.

(1463-4) Acc.Howard in RC 57 240: Item, in mendynge off gawntletys ij d.

(1465) Paston 4.169: Your gesseren and gaunteletts shall be send hom.

?a1475(?a1425) Higd.(2) Ctn.(Hrl 2261) 485: His horse was founde with his breste plate and gantelettes.

c1500(?a1475) Ass.Gods (Trin-C R.3.19) 346: Mynerue..all in curas clad, Gauntlettes on hyr handys, & sabatouns on hyr fete.

S.E.N.A. NPN.1.C.2.c permits the use of the Lingua Anglica Order of the Silver Gauntlet based on the above examples.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

16: Iron Bog, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2010, via the East

Order of the Sable Martlet

This order name follows the pattern of [color] + [charge] found in "Medieval Secular Order Names" by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/).

The April 2012 Cover Letter states: "[W]e are hereby allowing the use of heraldic color terms in order names as well as the everyday terms." Sable is the heraldic color name for black.

A martlet is a common heraldic charge. Parker's A Glossary of Terms Used in Heraldry s.n. martlet dates arms bearing martlets to the reigns of Henry III, Edward II and Edward III of England. The OED dates the spelling "martlet" to 1596. The OED dates the spelling "martlet" to 1596.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

17: Iron Bog, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2010, via the East

Order of the Silver Martlet of Iron Bog

This order name follows the pattern of [color] + [charge] found in "Medieval Secular Order Names" by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/).

The May 2008 Cover Letter states: "Silver in order and award names: The August 2005 cover letter says that "orders named for heraldic charges or for items that, while not found in period as heraldic charges, may be used as heraldic charges...may contain the ordinary color names of any heraldic tincture." This includes the use of Silver as the ordinary color name of argent." (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2008/05/08-05cl.html)

A martlet is a common heraldic charge. Parker's A Glossary of Terms Used in Heraldry s.n. martlet dates arms bearing martlets to the reigns of Henry III, Edward II and Edward III of England.

Under S.E.N.A. NPN.3.C, the addition of the phrase of Iron Bog clears any conflict with the Order of the Silver Martlet, registered to the Principality of Insula Draconis in December 2011 (via Drachenwald).


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

18: Iron Bog, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2010, via the East

Order of the Silver Compass of Iron Bog

This order name follows the pattern of [color] + [charge] found in "Medieval Secular Order Names" by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/).

The May 2008 Cover Letter states: "Silver in order and award names: The August 2005 cover letter says that "orders named for heraldic charges or for items that, while not found in period as heraldic charges, may be used as heraldic charges...may contain the ordinary color names of any heraldic tincture." This includes the use of Silver as the ordinary color name of argent." (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2008/05/08-05cl.html)

A compass or compasses is a common heraldic charge. Parker's A Glossary of Terms Used in Heraldry s.n. compasses cites to the following arms granted in 1473: Sable, on a chevron engrailed between three towers argent a pair of compasses of the first--MASONS' Company [Inc. 1411; arms granted 1473]. Compass is dated 1475 in the OED, under the definition for "Measure, proper proportion, regularity": "1475 CAXTON Jason 92 b, Vignes and trees hyly conduyted by compass." The word appears earlier, in other spellings, like "compas". The spellings for this meaning and other meanings, such as the mathematical tool are consistent, the spelling Compass may be fine without using the lingua anglica allowance.

Under S.E.N.A. NPN.3.C, the addition of the phrase of Iron Bog means that this order name does not conflict with the Award of the Silver Compass registered to the Barony of Stierbach in April of 2008 (via Atlantia).


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

19: Joscelin le esqurel - New Alternate Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2010, via the East

Pinke Pie

No major changes.
Sound (should sound like Pinkie Pie) most important.

Pinke is found as a masculine given name in the IGI Parish Records (extracts) for England:

Pinke Thomas Male Marriage 15 Apr 1619 Brown Candover and Chilton Chandover, Hampshire, England Batch: M060751

Pye appears as a surname in the IGI Parish Records (extracts) for England:

Agnes Pye Female Marriage 11 Jul 1540 Saint Margaret, Westminster, London, England Batch: M001601

Agnes Pye Female Christening 25 Feb 1576 Haughton, Stafford, England Batch: C010971

Ales Pye Female Marriage 14 Aug 1558 Saint Martin Pomeroy, London, London, England Batch: M022652

The i/y swap in English is well-documented.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

20: Leo Rennari Thorsson - New Name

Culture (wants 'English usage of names in period') most important.

Leó appears as an Old Norse name in Geirr-Bassi at p. 13. Accents may be omitted from Old Norse names as long as it is done consistently.

Rennari meaning 'runner, messenger' is a nickname in Geirr Bassi, p. 26. The April 2012 Cover Letter (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2012/04/12-04cl.html) allows descriptive bynames in Old Norse to be capitalized.

Submitted as Thorson the patronym was documented as a hypothetical Scandinavian or Anglo-Scandinavian patronym, based on filius Thor, dated 1133-53 in Fellows Jensen, s.n. þorr. The patronym was changed to Thorsson based on the following precedent:

The patronymic was submitted as Thorrason on the LoI, changed at kingdom from Thorson. It is clear from the data given by Fellows Jensen (Scandinavian Personal Names in Lincolnshire and Yorkshire, s.n. þrr) that the given name Thor was used in England, and (Black, s.n. Thor) has Scottish examples. Fellows Jensen labels the name Anglo-Scandinavian and notes that there is no clear evidence of its use by human beings in Scandinavia. The given name, on the other hand, is clearly Scandinavian: her data and notes on spelling indicate that in the English setting it would have been indistinguishable from its Old English and Continental Germanic cognates, becoming Tedric, occasionally Thedric, and perhaps rarely Theodric. However, there was certainly enough medieval traffic between northeastern England and Scandinavia to justify combining an Anglo-Scandinavian patronymic with a Scandinavian given name. We have therefore restored the submitter's original patronymic, slightly modifying the spelling to conform to normal Scandinavian practice.

[Thjodric Thorsson, 1/1996 LoAR, A-Atlantia].


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

21: Mabel Fortune - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Culture (16th century English) most important.

Mabel appears in "16th Century Gloucestershire Names" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/late16.html), and in "Names found in Quedgeley, Glouchestershire Marriage Registers 1559-1600" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/quedgeley.html), dated in 1559.

Fortune appears in R&W s.n. Fortune with surnames in this spelling dated to 1524 and 1641.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

22: Magnus Morte - Resub Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2010, via the East

Per pale azure and argent, a snake nowed in a Cavendish knot palewise and in chief a mullet argent

This submission is to be associated with Knot and Snake House

The household name Knot and Snake House was registered on the April 2010 LoAR.

The original badge submission for the household, Per pale azure and argent, a snake nowed in a Cavendish knot, was returned on the April 2010 LoAR for conflict with the devices of Frewin Finnbogason, Per saltire gules and sable, a Norse serpent nowed argent, and Asbjorn Gustavsson of Roed, Azure, a Norse Jelling-beast nowed, erect and reversed argent, with only a single CD for the field as against each. The mullet was added to the design to clear these conflicts.

Submitted as Per pale azure and argent, a snake embowed erect and in dexter chief a mullet argent, the blazon was changed to reflect more accurately the positioning of the snake.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

23: Máirghréad Ghearr - Resub Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2010, via the East

Gules, a thistle and on a chief argent three dragonflies vert

Old Item: Per bend gules and vert, a bend between a thistle and a dragon argent, to be released.

The submitter's device Per bend gules and vert, a bend between a thistle and a dragon argent was registered in April 2010 via the East. A change of device appeared on the 11-20-2011 Eastern LoI. That change was returned for conflict on the January 2012 LoD:

19: Máirghréad Ghearr - New Device Change returned

Gules, a thistle and on a chief argent three dragonflies vert.

Old Item: Per bend gules and vert, a bend between a thistle and a dragon argent, to be released. Her name and currently registered device were registered April 2010 via the East. The form didn't state the disposition of the old device. The submitter was emailed for this information.

This device conflicts with Daniel Colquhoun (Nov. 1991, Meridies), Gules, a thistle and on a chief argent a saltire engrailed sable. There is a single CD for the changes to the tertiaries. It should be noted that, under the draft rules currently under consideration by the SCA Board of Directors, this would not be a conflict. However, as the rules are not in place yet, this must be returned at this time. If this design is resubmitted, the charges should be larger to fill the available space.

With the adoption of SENA, this device has been resubmitted.

Correction (2012-Aug-27 13:08:21): Drat it all. This is new to Laurel as well.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

24: Michael of Rutherford - New Name & New Device

Argent two wolf's heads erased respectant sable and in base a phoenix gules

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Michael is a masculine given name dated to 1518 in "English Names Found in Brass Enscriptions" by Julian Goodwyn (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/brasses/men.html)

of Rutherford is the Lingua Anglica form of the documented form de Ruthirford found in R&W s.n. Rutherford dated to 1296.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

25: Óláfr inn ǫrvi Haraldsson - New Name Change From Holding Name & New Device

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in November of 2012, via the East.

Argent goutty de sang, a wolf courant regardant azure

Old Item: Óláfr of Northern Outpost, to be released.
Submitter desires a masculine name.
Culture (Viking Age) most important.
Meaning (Olaf, Harald's son) most important.

Óláfr of Northern Outpost was a holding name created on the April 2010 LoAR. The submitter's original name submission, Óláfr Haraldsson, was returned for conflict with Óláfr Haraldsson, King of Norway from 1015 to 1028. This submission adds a descriptive byname not associated with the King of Norway to clear the conflict.

Óláfr is a masculine given name found in Geirr-Bassi at p. 13 and also found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Viking Names found in Landnámabók" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/landnamabok.html).

Haraldsson is a patronymic based on the masculine given name Haraldr, found in Geirr-Bassi at p. 11. The patronymic is formed according to the rules set out in p. 17 of Geirr-Bassi.

inn ǫrvi is a descriptive byname meaning "speedy" found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Viking Bynames found in the Landnámabók" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/vikbynames.html)

For Scandinavian names, the pattern [given name] + [descriptive byname] + [patronymic} is found in Appendix A of SENA (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/sena.html#AppendixA)


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

26: Roland Archer - New Name

Roland is a masculine given name, with this spelling appearing in "Late Sixteenth Century English Given Names" by Talan Gwynek (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/eng16/eng16alpha.html).

Archer is a surname appearing in Bardsley p. 58 s.n. Archer with this spelling dated to 1567, and in "English Names found in Brass Enscriptions" by Julian Goodwyn(http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/brasses/lastnameAH.html) dated to 1514.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

27: Shelby of Sark - New Name & New Device

Vert, an escallop argent between three bees Or

Language (unspecified) most important.
Culture (unspecified) most important.

Shelby is the submitter's legal given name. A copy of the submitter's Pennsylvania driver's license was provided.

The given name is not obtrusively modern. Shelby appears in the IGI Parish Records (extracts) as a 16th cen. English surname which, by precedent [Alton of Grimfells, April 2010 LoAR, A-East], could be used as a given name. To give one example:

Thomas Shelby Male Christening 10 Jun 1562 Saint John the Baptist, Chester, Cheshire, England Batch: C036571.

Sarke appears as the name of a Channel island is found at p. 161 of "Le Monde, ou La description générale de ses quatre parties . Avec tous ses empires, royaumes, estats et républiques..." by Pierre d'Avity, published in 1643 (http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k5768550f/f198.image).

Sark appears as the modern place name of a Channel island in the Encyclopedia Britannica, which states in relevant part:

Sark, French Sercq, one of the Channel Islands, a dependency of Guernsey, located in the English Channel, south of England's coast. Sark lies 7 miles (11 km) east of Guernsey and about 25 miles (40 km) west of the Cherbourg Peninsula of France. . . . Sark first appears in history as a gift by William of Normandy (later William I, the Conqueror) to the Mont-Saint-Michel abbey about 1040. A century later it was in the hands of the Vernon family, lords of Néhou, who endowed the priory of St. Magloire as a dependency of the abbey of Montebourg. Sark reverted to the English crown in 1204 by Richard de Vernon's forfeiture. Sark was governed by a royal provost who presided over a court of six jurats (magistrates chosen for life). The island was captured by the French in 1549 but was in English hands again by 1558. Thereafter, it remained under English control, except for a period of German occupation during World War II. To prevent the island from becoming a nest of pirates, it was colonized by Hélier de Carteret, seigneur of St. Ouen in Jersey, under a patent of Elizabeth I (Aug. 6, 1565). . .

"Sark". Encyclopedia Britannica. Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Encyclopedia Britannica Inc., 2012. Web. 08 Jul. 2012 (http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/524362/Sark).

This evidence is sufficient to support the Lingua Anglica of Sark.

Originally blazoned as Vert, an escallop argent between three bees volant to chief Or, the blazon was simplified to reflect that the bees are in the standard tergiant to chief position for bees.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

28: Svoi Ivanov - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2012, via the East

Gules, on a chief triangular argent a bear head contourny issuant from the line of division sable

Svoi Ivanov was registered on the April 2012 LoAR via the East Kingdom.

Kingdom commenters were divided on whether the head was sufficiently identifiable as a bear's head.


This item was on the 11-2012 LoAR

29: Wolfram Bernhard - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (German) most important.
Culture (German) most important.

Wolfram - Academy of St. Gabriel Report 2924 dates Wolfram to 1332 as a German name. (http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi?2924+0):

Around 1200 there was a famous poet Wolfram von Eschenbach; we find his name recorded as <Wolfran von Eschelbach> in the first quarter of the 14th century [5]. In 1271 and 1285 we find the Latin form <Wolframmus>, and we find <Wolfram> in 1332, <Wolferam> in 1393, and <Wolveram> in 1316 and 1322. We also found a man whose surname was <Wolfram> in the second half of the 14th century, and another whose surname was <Wolferan> in 1395; it is possible that these men's father's names were <Wolfram> and <Wolferan>, respectively. [1,2,4,6] <Wolfhram>, <Wolfram>, <Wolframmus>, and <Wolferam> are all Bavarian forms from the 12th C or earlier. [7] The name is most appropriate for the first half of your period; we did not find any clear evidence for the name after 1400.

[1] Bahlow, Hans, _Dictionary of German Names_, tr. Edda Gentry (German-American Cultural Society, 1994 ISBN: 0924119357). s.nn. Draa(c)k, Wolfram

[2] Talan Gwynek, "Medieval German Given Names from Silesia", revised edition (WWW: Academy of Saint Gabriel, 1999). http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/talan/bahlow/

[3] Brechenmacher, Josef Karlmann, _Etymologisches Woerterbuch der deutschen Familiennamen_ (Limburg a. d. Lahn, C. A. Starke-Verlag, 1957-1960). s.nn. Drachenfels, Drachenhand, Drack, Drackenstein, Wolfauer, Wolfinger, Wolfrath, Wolfsberg, Wolfurt(er)

[4] Socin, Adolf, _Mittelhochdeutsches Namenbuch. Nach oberrheinischen Quellen des 12. und 13. Jahrhunderts_ (Basel: Helbing & Lichtenhahn, 1903; Hildesheim: Georg Olms Verlagsbuchhandlung, 1966). p. 42

[5] _Die Miniaturen der Manesseschen Liederhandschrift und andere Bildquellen_ (WWW: Tempora Nostra, no date). http://www.tempora-nostra.de/manesse/manesse_start.shtml

[6] Schwarz, Ernst, _Sudetendeutsche Familiennamen aus vorhussitischer Zeit_ (Koeln: Boehlau Verlag, 1957). s.n. Wolfram

[7] Mu"ller, Gunter, _Studien zu den Theriophoren Personennamen der Germanen_ (Ko"ln: Bo"hlau Verlag, 1970). pp. 7, 55

The byname was originally submitted as von Bernhard, but there was no evidence of Bernhard as a place name. The submitter consented to the removal of the "von" if necessary for registration.

Bernhard is found in the IGI Parish Records (extracts) as an unmarked German surname:

Jacob Bernhard Male Christening 30 May 1594 Ulm, Donaukreis, Wuerttemberg, Batch: C396060

David Bernhard Male Christening 16 Dec 1596 Evangelisch, Bietigheim, Neckarkreis, Wuerttemberg Batch: C952991

Jacobus Bernhard Male Christening 07 Dec 1587 Evangelisch, Bietigheim, Neckarkreis, Wuerttemberg Batch: C952991

Anna Bernhard Female Christening 07 Jun 1589 Hüffenhardt, Mosbach, Baden Batch: C934842

(and many more)

Based on this evidence, with the submitter's permission, the name was changed to the registerable, entirely German Wolfram Bernhard.


[Bardsley] Bardsley, Charles. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames.

[Geirr Bassi] Geirr Bassi Haraldsson. The Old Norse Name.

[MED] The Middle English Dictionary.

[OCM] Ó Corrain, Donnchadh & Maguire, Fidelma. Irish Names.

[Parker] Parker, James. A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry.

[R&W] Reaney, P.H. and R. M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames.

[Watts] Watts, Victor, ed. Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names, Based on the Collections of the English Place-Name Society.


OSCAR counts 10 New Names, 2 New Alternate Names, 8 New Order Names, 1 New Heraldic Title and 8 New Devices. These 29 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $87 for them. OSCAR counts 1 New Holding Name Change. OSCAR counts 1 Resub Order Name, 1 Resub Device Change and 1 Resub Badge. These 4 items are not chargeable. OSCAR counts 2 Blanket Permissions to Conflict. These 2 items may or may not require payment. There are a total of 35 items submitted on this letter.

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