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Outlands LoI dated 2012-04-30

From the Office of Rampart Herald



Baron Randal Carrick (Randall Jackson)



rampart@outlandsheralds.org



Unto the Sovereigns and members of the College of Arms of the Society, does Randal Carrick, Rampart Herald send his greetings. What follows is the April 2012 Letter of Intent for the Kingdom of the Outlands. I would like to thank the following heralds for providing commentary for this letter: Mistress Francesca de Pavia, Ray-de-Soleil Pursuivant, Master Louis-Philippe Mitouard, Catspaw Herald Extraordinary; THL Eric Morrison, Hawk's Hollow Pursuivant; Lady Leonor Ruiz de Lison; Lord Andrew von Otelingen; Lady Katelin de Irlande; Lady Khalidah bint Yayah, Castle Herald; Faelan O' Laghlan, Readstan Pursuivant; Ines Alfon, Blanch Tiger Herald; Lady Shoshanah Simkhah bas Ruven; Aryanhwy merch Catmael; Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada, Aldyrne Herald; Tostig Logiosophia, Eclipse Herald; Gunnvor silfraharr; Andreas von Meißen, Nautilus Herald; Alys Mackyntoich, Eastern Crown Herald; Modar Neznanich, (Interim) Gold Falcon Herald; Lady Pipa Sparkes; Lady Rohese de Dinan, Shadowdale Pursuivant; Lord Einarr Grimsson, Gold Falcon Herald emeritus; Ursula Georges, Green Staff Herald; and Gawain of Miskbridge, Green Anchor Herald.



It is my intent to register this April the following items from the Outlands College of Heralds:

This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

1: Akilina Ianikitova - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (Kievon Rus) most important.
Culture (Kievon Rus) most important.

[Akilina] - 'Dictionary of Period Russian Names' by Paul Wickenden of Thanet (http://heraldry.sca.org/paul/a.html)

[Ianikit] - 'Dictionary of Period Russian Names' by Paul Wickenden of Thanet (http://heraldry.sca.org/paul/h-j.html) - Ianikitova being the feminine variant.

Originally submitted as AKILINA IANIKITOVA, name was changed at Kingdom to correct capitalization.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

2: Andrew von Otelingen - New Household Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 2009, via the Outlands

Blue Barrel Inn

Fieldless, a barrel azure hooped argent

Client requests authenticity for A SCA appropriate household name in English.

[Inn] - Per Precedent on the February 2002 LoAR "Inn is an acceptable designator for a household name". (Kathryn atte Unicorn, Feb '02, Ansteorra). (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2002/02/02-02lar.html)

[Blue Barrel] - That same precedent discusses the use of "inn sign names" - names based on the sign's picture. This rule is also discussed in many other precedents though a full RULE for it was not found. As the name matches the Badge to be associated with it, the submitter believes it is appropriate.

Submitter states: 'I desire the household name to fit with its easily-reproducible badge and vice versa. I appreciate any needed attempt to fix either. If either is found un-workable, I request both be returned that I can try to find another alternative.' Submitter will NOT allow the creation of a holding name.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

3: Basseva bat Salamon - New Name & New Device

Argent, a swan naiant sable between three roses purpure barbed and seeded proper

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No changes.
Culture (Jewish - see documentation) most important.
Meaning (Jewish - see documentation) most important.

[Basseva] - 'Jewish Women's Names in 13th to 15th Century Navarre' by Julia Kahan (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juetta/nav_intro.html)

[bat] - 'daughter of'

[Salamon] - Medieval Spanish Jewish Names of the 13th and 14th Centuries' by Julia Smith and Josh Mittleman (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/iberian-jewish/)

While there was some discussion on the internal letter about whether "bat" is the most correct form for submitter's desired region, submitter allows no changes and we believe that sufficient evidence exists that "bat" should be registrable in this name.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

4: Elizabeth Anne Grene - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 2011, via the Outlands

Per pale purpure and vert, a bordure argent

Previous device, Argent, in bend sinister two banners purpure and vert, each suspended from poles fesswise sable, was returned on the May 2010 LoR (http://rampart.outlandsheralds.org/2010-04-lop/1005-lor.html) for absence of a name to go with it then it was returned on the December 2011 LoR (http://rampart.outlandsheralds.org/2010-11-lop/1012-lor.html) stating the following:

{Because banners can be a form of heraldic display, each must be conflict-checked separately, as well as the overall device. In this case, vert is protected as the important non-SCA flag of Libya. Therefore, this device must be returned for conflict.}


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

5: Fontaine dans Sable, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 2004, via the Outlands

Order of the Daffodil

No major changes.

Order of the Daffodil is meant to be an Order Name based on the pattern "charge" listed in Juliana de Luna's article, ' Medieval Secular Order Names' (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/)

Daffodil is a heraldic charge used in the SCA.

Gunnvor silfraharr at 2012-03-31 19:11:20 noted this spelling can be dated to at least 1597:

daffodil, n. http://www.oed.com/viewdictionaryentry/Entry/46852

Pronunciation: /ˈdæfədɪl/

Forms: Also 15 daffodyll, 15-16 daffodill, daffadill, 15-17 daffadil. (18 daffodel): see also daffodilly n., and daffadowndilly n.(Show Less) Etymology: A variant of affodill n., q.v. The initial d has not been satisfactorily accounted for.

It has been variously suggested as due to childish or playful distortion, as in Ted for Edward, tante for aunt; to union of the article th' (compare Cotgrave, Affrodille, Th' Affodill, and northern English t' affadil); to final d of and, in (e.g.) `fennell an-d affodil'; to union of the Dutch or Flemish article, as de affodil = the affodil; and to French prep. d' as in fleur d'aphrodille. It is noteworthy that as in English the word has gained a letter, in 16th cent. French it sometimes lost one: Littré (s.v. asphodèle) quotes from De Serres (16th cent.), `Des racines d' afrodille', and also `Decoction de lapace, de frodilles'. A third form dafrodille is quite conceivable. Affodill and its popular variants daffodil, daffadilly, were originally and properly the Asphodel; then by popular misconception, due apparently to the application to both plants, at their first introduction to England, of the fanciful name Laus tibi (see Turner Libellus B 3 b), it was applied, especially in the popular variations, to species of Narcissus, etc. Botanists, after resisting this misapplication, compromised the matter by retaining affodil for the Asphodel, and accepting the more popular daffodil for Narcissus. Finally affodil was `rectified' to asfodyl and asphodel, and daffodil restricted in popular use to the Yellow Narcissus or Yellow Daffodil of English fields and gardens.

†1. The same as affodill n.; the genus Asphodelus (formerly including some allied plants). Obs. [1538 W. Turner Libellus de re Herbaria at Asphodelvs, A latinis hasta regia & albucum dicitur, a barbaris & latine lingue corruptoribus aphrodillus & affodillus, ab anglis Affadyll & Daffadilly.] 1548 W. Turner Names of Herbes sig. A.vjv, Asphodillus groweth‥in gardines in Anwerp, it maye be named in englishe whyte affodil, or duche daffodil. 1567 J. Maplet Greene Forest f. 40, Daffadill, some call Anthericon, the Romanes Kings spare. 1578 H. Lyte tr. R. Dodoens Niewe Herball v. lxxix. 649 This herbe [Asphodelus in 3 species] is called‥in English also Affodyl, and Daffodyll. 1607 E. Topsell Hist. Fovre-footed Beastes 390 Asphodelus, Englished by some Daffadill.

†2. The genus Narcissus, of which it is the common English name in the Catalogue of Gerard's Garden 1599, where twelve Daffodils or Narcissuses are distinguished, the white daffodil being the common White Narcissus or Poet's Lily ( N. poeticus) of English gardens, the `White Lily' of Scotland; the yellow daffodil ( N. pseudo-Narcissus) the plant to which the name is now restricted. 1548 W. Turner Names of Herbes sig. A.vjv, This that we take for daffodil is a kinde of Narcissus. 1578 H. Lyte tr. R. Dodoens Niewe Herball ii. l. 211 These pleasant flowers are called‥in Englishe Narcissus, white Daffodill, and Primerose pierelesse [In Lyte's own annotated copy in the Brit. Mus. Libr. he has written over the figure of N. poeticus on p. 210 `White primrose pyerles, Laus tibi, and of some Daffodille']. 1597 J. Gerard Herball i. 111 The double white Daffodill of Constantinople was sent into England vnto the right Honorable the Lord Treasurer, among other bulbed flowers. 1629 J. Parkinson Paradisi in Sole iv. (1656) 8 Many idle and ignorant Gardiners‥do call some of these Daffodils Narcisses, when as all know that know any Latine, that Narcissus is the Latine name, and Daffodil the English of one and the same thing.

3. Now restricted to Narcissus pseudo-Narcissus (also called Lent Lily), found wild in various parts of England and cultivated as an early spring flower. [1562 W. Turner Seconde Parte Herball f. 62, Our comen daffadil is one kynde of Narcissus.] 1592 R. Greene Quip for Vpstart Courtier sig. B, The yellow daffadil, a flowre fit for gelous Dottrels. a1616 Shakespeare Winter's Tale (1623) iv. iii. 1 When Daffadils begin to peere, With heigh the Doxy ouer the dale. 1648 R. Herrick Hesperides sig. K8v, Faire Daffadills, we weep to see You haste away so soone. 1746-7 J. Hervey Medit. (1818) 129 Who emboldens the daffodil‥to trust her flowering gold with inclement and treacherous skies? 1855 Tennyson Maud xxvi. i, in Maud & Other Poems 96 When the face of night is fair on the dewy downs, And the shining daffodil dies.

4. chequered daffodil: the Fritillary or Snake's head, Fritillaria Meleagris. Still known as the daffodil in Hants. (Britten and Holland). 1597 J. Gerard Herball i. 122 The checkered Daffodill or Ginny hen flower, hath smal narrow grassie leaues. 1599 J. Gerard Catal. Arborum sig. B2v, Frittillaria, Checkerd Daffodil.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

6: Fontaine dans Sable, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 2004, via the Outlands

Order of the Fleur and Fountain

No major changes.

Order of the Fleur and Fountain is meant to be an Order Name based on the pattern "two charges" listed in Juliana de Luna's article, 'Medieval Secular Order Names' (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/)

Fleur-de-lys is a heraldic charge used in period and in the SCA. Fountain is a heraldic charge used in the SCA.

While commenters suggested that a wholly-English or wholly-French version of this order name would be better, submitter asks for no major changes, and the mixing of English and French in this context would at most be one step from period practice, and thus registrable as-is.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

7: Gottfried von Zollern - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound (God-free) most important.

[Gottfried] - Ref. the German poet and romancer, Gottfried von Strassburg (1165-1215)

[Von Zollern] - Ref. Berthold von Zollernm, Prince Bishop of Eichstätt. (1320-1365)

Cawley's site [http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWABIAN%20NOBILITY.htm] is somewhat above the average genealogical website, since he does cite his sources, and also quotes from period records. In particular, chapter 37 references Fragmenta Necrologii Stettensis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 212, noting the death of "Schwester Udelhild com de Zollern fundatrix huius loci" in the 13th century. This provides sufficient support for <Zollern> as a period form of the place name.

<Gottfried> is dated to before 1300 Plauen in Talan's "Late Period German Masculine Given Names" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/talan/germmasc/).

(thanks to Aryanhwy for the additional documentation)


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

8: Hélène Boudin - New Household Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in September of 2006, via the Outlands

Smiling Bull Inn

Client requests authenticity for A SCA appropriate household name in English.

[Inn] - Per Precedent on the February 2002 LoAR "Inn is an acceptable designator for a household name". (Kathryn atte Unicorn, Feb '02, Ansteorra). (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2002/02/02-02lar.html)

[Smiling Bull] - This follows the pattern of <adjective> + <noun> set forth in the precedent for "Inn of the Weeping Unicorn", Feb '02 via Ansteorra (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2002/02/02-02lar.html). Precedent states: "As weeping was documented as meaning 'crying' in period, and a weeping unicorn is an image that could be visually depicted on a sign, this name is registerable." Smiling is an adjective that can be depicted visually on a sign and therefore this fits the pattern.

The submitter would like the following badge associated with this name:

Argent, a bull statant gules maintaining on its back a lantern sable, a chief checky sable and argent. The badge was registered on the September 2011 LoAR (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2011/09/11-09lar.html) via the Outlands.

As there was a pretty even split among commentators as to whether a bull could be depicted as "smiling" on an inn sign (someone noted that the Mecklinburg bull would be an example, https://oscar.sca.org/cImages/523/2012-03-15/06-03-46_800px-Flag_of_Mecklenburg_(1992_proposal).svg.png) we are sending this to Laurel for a final determination.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

9: Jehennette van Mynden - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 2012, via the Outlands

Argent issuant from dexter chief a schnecke vert, in sinister canton a martlet azure

Submitter's name was registered on the January 2012 LoAR (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2012/01/12-01lar.html) via the Outlands.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

10: John Vyse of York - New Name & New Device

Ermine, a hound's head erased gules

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Culture (14th Century English) most important.

[John] - 'Masculine Given Names Found in the 1332 Lay Subsidy Rolls for Lincolnshire, England' by Kathleen M. O'Brien http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/LincLSR/GivenMasculineFreq.html

[Vyse] - 'Surname Database: Vyse' (http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Vyse) English Surname of Old French Orgin, variant of Vise. Vise is dated to 1327.

[of York] - Locative surname. City in England. 'History of medieval York - Origins and early growth' (http://users.trytel.com/tristan/towns/york1.html)

'The City of York - Origin of York' (http://www.yorkshire-england.co.uk/YorkCity.html)

Correction (2012-May-03 16:05:51): The submitter requests that this submission be withdrawn at this time

Castle Herald's Note: Submitter states that the ermine spots on the device are intended to be 'sable' although they look 'azure' on paper and on the scan.

Correction (2012-May-03 16:05:05): The submitter requests that this submission be withdrawn at this time


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

11: Liepa Jonaite - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for Lithuanian 12c-15c.
Culture (Lithuanian 12c-15c) most important.

Submitter's prior name, Liepa Jonaskaite, was returned on the June 2011 LoR (http://rampart.outlandsheralds.org/2011-05-lop/1106-lor.html) stating the following:

{Returned for lack of documentation for the patronymic. We don't know enough to say whether the argument for the first name is solid, but it's not clear where the 'k' in the patronymic comes from. The examples given formed from names ending in -s drop the -s and add -ite, so we would expect Jonas - s + ite = Jonaite. Where does the interpolated 'k' come from? "Jonaskaite" implies a father named "Jonaskas", which no documentation is provided for.}

Submitter has opted for the suggestion of Jonaite.

The submitter has provided pages of summary with cited sources (http://tinyurl.com/liepajonaite). Scans of the her summary are included on this entry.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=413/2012-05-01/14-30-00_21-39-35_liepa1.jpg
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=413/2012-05-01/14-30-01_21-39-36_liepa2.jpg
#3 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=413/2012-05-01/14-30-02_21-39-37_liepa3.jpg
#4 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=413/2012-05-01/14-30-03_21-39-38_liepa4.jpg


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

12: Ölüsküleng Ötege - New Name & New Device

Azure, within horns of a crescent argent, a bear dormant Or

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Culture (Yuan Dynasty Mongol man) most important.
Meaning (hungry bear) most important.

Ölüsküleng Ötege

Format: [Adjective + Noun] was a common name format in the Mongol Empire (http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi?3375+0).

Ölüskuleng: In Middle and Classical Mongolian, there was little distinction between adjectives and nouns. A noun placed in front of another noun served as a modifier, e.g. <altan> 'gold' in <altan ordu> 'golden horde' (Groenbech and Krueger, 1955). As there are no grammars for Middle Mongolian, this citation is for a grammar of Classical Mongolian, the literary language of the 16th and 17th centuries. Grammar, vocabulary and spelling were very similar between the two, and in the absence of a Middle Mongolian source, a Classical Mongolian source is the best best thing. The example cited, <altan ordu>, appears in Middle Mongolian sources as wel.

The noun <öleskülen> 'hunger' appears in the 14th century Rasulid Hexaglot, a multilingual dictionary including Middle Mongolian (Golden, 2000). In the spelling <ölösküleng>, it also appears in Classical Mongolian (http://linguamongolia.com/noun2.html). It is derived from the verb <ölös-> 'to starve' plux the nominal suffix <-küleng>. The spelling <ölüs-> also appears in Classical Mongolian (http://linguamongolia.com/cgi-bin/searchDb3.pl?search_param=%C3%B6l%C3%BCs&cmdSubmit=Search&langsele ct=mongolian), so <ölüsküleng> would also seem to be a plausible spelling.

Ötege: <ötege> 'bear' and variant spelling <ötöge> appear in numerous Middle Mongolian sources throughout the Middle Empire. Although not known as a name element, numerous other animals appear in names, often modified by adjectives (http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi?3375+0).

Originally submitted as Ulūs Ötegedai, based on commentary at Kingdom, this name was not plausible as a Mongol name. Lady Leonore Ruiz de Lison provided this alternative construction, and submitter wants to go with it.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

13: Ölüsküleng Ötege - New Alternate Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in July of 2012, via the Outlands

Étienne Navarre de Lyon

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Spelling (As close as possible to Étienne Navarre de Lyon) most important.

Submitter's name is submitted on this letter.

[Étienne] - 'Sixteenth Century Norman Names' by Triste Elliot (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/cateline/norman16.html)

[Navarre] -'French / Occitan Names from the XIII Century (B)' (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ramon/occitan/occitan_b.html)

[de Lyon] - Academy of Saint Gabriel Report 2904 (http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi/2904.txt) "Instead, we recommend <de Lion> found in the 1446 census, as the byname of a very rich, possibly noble, man. [4] The name of the city is also spelled <Lyon> in this source, so <de Lyon> is also a reasonable byname."

Submitter states: 'I specifically prefer Étienne over Estienne which is permissible per the October 2010 LoAR (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2010/10/10-10lar.html) - "The spellings Etienne and Étienne seem to both appear in the 16th century; however, Estienne remains the most common form of the name until well after the end of our period." (Étienne Renard d'Argent; Oct 2010 via ÆTHELMEARC)'


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

14: Ölüsküleng Ötege - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in July of 2012, via the Outlands

Fieldless, a bear dormant Or

Submitter's name is submitted on this letter.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

15: Sabyn Edwards - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 2009, via the Outlands

Per pale vert and purpure a dragonfly within a bordure argent

Submitter's previous device, Per pale vert and purpure, a dragonfly argent, was returned on the November 2009 LoAR (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2009/11/09-11lar.html) stating the following:

{This device is returned for conflict with the device of Mairghread Maire Draigdaimhalachd, Per saltire azure and vert, a dragonfly tergiant displayed argent, orbed Or. There is a single CD for the changes to the field.}

Submitter added a bordure to add another CD.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

16: Stigr Robertsson - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Culture (1000AD Norse) most important.

All names found in Geirr-Bassi Heraldsson's 'Old Norse Name'

[Stigr] - pg. 15

[Robert] - pg. 15

[Robertsson] - patronymic formed as per examples on pg. 17


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

17: Vvillequin Maquereau - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language (13th C France) most important.
Culture (13th C France) most important.

[Vvillequin] - 'An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris' by Scott Catledge (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/paris.html#V)

[Maquereau] - 'French Names from Two Thirteenth Century Chronicles' by Josh Mittleman (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/crusades/)

For ease of reference, portions of the Kingdom commentary supporting this name are below:

Aryanhwy merch Catmael at 2012-02-10 04:24:40

The entry for <Vvillequin> is an error in Colm's article. The name is <Willequin> (it appears on p. 117 of Geraud's edition of the census, in the entry <Willequin, de Verdelay>, 2nd from the top of the right-hand column).

<de> in French only elides before vowels, so <d' Maquereau> is not grammatically correct. Further, Arval's article is not acceptable as documentation since it provides only the standard modern forms of the names. (Not only that, but I can't even find <Maquereau> in the article.)

The modern byname <Maquereau> derives from Old French <macherel>, <maquerel> 'mackerel', MDu <makelare> 'broker', or ME <makerel> 'a bawd, a pimp'. Period forms of it include <Maquerele> 1256 Picardy, <Maquerel> 1292 Paris, 13th C, 1384, 14th C, 1404, 1438 Picardy, <Makerel> 1295, 1318 Picardy, and <Macquerel> 1423 Picardy. (The Picardy citations are from Morlet Picarde; the 1292 Paris citation is from the Paris census; see http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/1292paris.pdf). <Willequin Maquerel> would be a very awesome 13th C French name, perhaps a rendition of Dutch <Willekin Makelare>.

Ursula Georges (Green Staff) at 2012-02-10 08:26:24

<Vvillequin> is a spelling of the name that appears in the French of our period. It's used in the 1566 book Les Croniques Et Annales De France, for instance, which is available on Google Books:

http://books.google.com/books?id=zYBDAAAAcAAJ&q=vvillequin#v=snippet&q=vvillequin&f=false

Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada (Aldyrne) at 2012-02-10 15:01:31

Holy Cow! It really does appear like that! Even with the v's in different cases!

The first page your link brings up has:

"Vvillequin ou Guillaume de Hollande, frere du feu de Comte d'Auennes"

and

"Vvillequin, ou Guillaume de Hollande, Roy de Rommains"

and

"Vvillequin"

Originally submitted as "Vvillequin d'Maquereau", the article was dropped per commentators note that Maquereau is not actually a placename.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

18: William de Kingsley - New Name & New Device

Argent on a cross azure between four eagles displayed sable, a cross crosslet Or

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.
Culture most important.

[William] - ' Normans at the Battle of Hastings' (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/hastings.html)

[de Kingsley] - 'Richard de Kingsley' (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/M1GS-B9J)

[Kingsley] - found on an IGI search under Catherine Kingsley, batch number T991230


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

19: Yildiz of Misrian - New Name & New Device

Per bend argent and vert, a magpie proper and a mullet of 8 points argent

Submitter desires a feminine name.

[Yildiz] - 'Yildiz' (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/y%C4%B1ld%C4%B1z)

The King's Dictionary The Rasûlid Hexaglot, pg. 133. Scans included.

[Misrian] - Was a major settlement in Dehistan, a major stop on the Silk Road. Further information available with the summary scan but no exact documentation provided.

I have been assured by my Mongol naming expert that she has supporting documentation for this use of a Turkic noun as part of a valid Mongol-Turkic naming practice, which will be provided in commentary, so I am going to go ahead and send this up.

Additionally, submitter does not care about the surname, so if it must be changed for registerability, a preferred alternative would be the lingua Anglica "the Traveller" (which is what she normally goes by).

with regard to magpies proper:

There is evidence that birds that are black and white in nature are depicted as black and white birds when proper, even if their markings in the heraldic depictions are not quite correct for the species. The black and white stork with red legs and beak in the arms of Die Dobrzinsky on f. 73 of Siebmacher (from Silesia) is depicted very much like a European stork. There are two types of European stork, the White Stork and the Black Stork. Both are black and white birds with red beak and legs. Siebmacher's depiction is closer to a White Stork. Rietstap's blazon for this family indicates that the bird there depicted is intended to be a stork proper (beaked and membered gules, although this would, as stated, also be proper for a stork). Siebmacher also gives us the arms of von Atzelndorf (from Meissen) on f. 156 using a black and white bird. Atzel is the German word for magpie, and a magpie is a black and white bird, so it seems logical to conclude that the bird in these arms is meant to be a magpie. The Siebmacher rendition does not do a good job of duplicating a magpie's natural markings, but its proportions and general black and white coloration are correct for a magpie. A more accurately marked magpie proper may be found in the 15th C Milanese Stemmaria Trivulziano, p. 67, in the arms of de Bertis. The magpie there is black and white and the markings mostly follow the natural markings of a magpie. The editors inform us that the word berta means magpie (although it is not the most common Italian word for that bird) and de Bertis thus has canting arms. [Líadan Arundel, Ansteorra-R]

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=413/2012-05-01/18-47-47_00-12-56_yildizdoc1.jpg
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=413/2012-05-01/18-47-48_00-12-57_yildizdoc2.jpg
#3 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=413/2012-05-01/18-47-49_00-12-58_yildizdoc3.jpg


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

20: Yildiz of Misrian - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in July of 2012, via the Outlands

Fieldless, on a mullet of 8 points argent fimbriated vert, a magpie proper

This submission is to be associated with Yildiz of Misrian

Submitter's name is submitted on this letter.

in Kingdom commentary,

Aryanhwy merch Catmael at 2012-03-22 02:51:24 called a conflict:

Reblazon: "(Fieldless) On a mullet of eight points argent fimbriated vert, a magpie proper". This conflicts with Anthony the Sinister (reg. 01/1980 via the West), "(Fieldless) On a mullet of ten points argent a pheon sable." There is a CD for fieldlessness, but none for the number of points or for the fimbriating, and only the type of tertiary has been substantially changed, which is not sufficient for a second CD.

However, we believe that the change of type of tertiary does constitute a second difference sufficient to clear conflict, if not under the old rules, at least under the new Standards for Evaluation.


Respectfully submitted,



Baron Randal Carrick, Rampart Herald



Kingdom of the Outlands



rampart@outlandsheralds.org


OSCAR counts 10 New Names, 1 New Alternate Name, 2 New Household Names, 2 New Order Names, 7 New Devices and 3 New Badges. These 25 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $75 for them. OSCAR counts 1 Resub Device. This item is not chargeable. There are a total of 26 items submitted on this letter.

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