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East LoI dated 2012-04-25

Unto SCA College of Arms, Laurel, Pelican, Wreath, and their staff, and all others who do receive this letter, greetings from Asa in Svarta, Blue Tyger Herald and the Eastern staff.



We would particularly like to take this opportunity to thank Lillia de Vaux for her good work as Eastern Crown Herald for these past three years, and ask you to welcome Mistress Alys Mackyntoich who will now hold that title.



The Eastern College herewith submits for approval and registration the following items, with our thanks.

This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

1: Anastasia da Monte - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in September of 2011, via the East

Purpure, on a pale wavy argent a lizard tergiant vert.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

2: Argus of Sevenhills - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Argus is a 16th and 17th century English surname found in extracted records from the IGI Parish Extracts:

CHRISTOPHER ARGUS Male Christening 9 November 1645 Saint Margaret, Westminster, London, England JOHN ARGUS ANN Batch: P001601

EMERIE ARGUS Male Christening 23 August 1643 Saint Margaret, Westminster, London, England JOHN ARGUS ANNE Batch: P001601

EMRY ARGUS Male Christening 15 October 1647 Saint Margaret, Westminster, London, England JOHN ARGUS ANN Batch: P001601

GEORGE ARGUS Male Christening 23 September 1638 Saint Margaret, Westminster, London, England JOHN ARGUS Batch: P001601

ISABEL ARGUS Female Christening 17 December 1592 Ryton, Durham, England JOHN ARGUS Batch: P000841

JANE ARGUS Female Christening 4 May 1650 Saint Margaret, Westminster, London, England JOHN ARGUS ANN Batch: P001601

JASPER ARGUS Male Christening 17 December 1592 Ryton, Durham, England JOHN ARGUS Batch: P000841

Surnames are registerable as given names in late-period England [Alton of Grimfells, April 2010, A-East]. of Sevenhills is a locative based on Sevenhills, Canton of, registered April 2008 (Atlantia).


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

3: Audrye Beneyt - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 2010, via the East

Per pale sable and argent, a fox and a bear addorsed rampant counterchanged, on a chief vert three arrows inverted argent.

A prior device submission, Per bend vert and sable, a fox rampant argent maintaining in its paw three arrows inverted Or, was returned on the East's Nov. 2011 Letter of Decision:

The device conflicts with Johnathan Crusadene Whitewolf ("registered at some point"), Gules, ermined argent, a wolf rampant argent. There is a CD for changing the tincture of the field from gules ermined argent to per bend vert and sable. There is no CD granted for adding maintained charges. Furthermore, it conflicts with Lothar der Grauwolf (Aug. 1988, Ansteorra), Quarterly gules and pean, a wolf sejant erect reguardant argent, maintaining in the dexter paw a torch and in the sinister a sword Or. There is a CD for the cumulative changes to the field, but nothing for the change from sejant erect to rampant.

If the submitter resubmits, the fox should be drawn larger, to fill the available space.

The device has been redesigned. Commenters should note the following recent precedent:

This month we considered whether or not a charged chief removes the appearance of marshalling with a quartered field. Past precedent states:

[Per pale, a harp and a cross of four lozenges, a chief embattled] The chief was a mark of primary cadency in period (Gayre's Heraldic Cadency, p.153), and it became part of the Stodart system of cadency used today in Scotland. Thus, the addition of a chief to quartered armory would not remove the appearance of marshalling. However, the chief's use as a brisure was never as widespread as the bordure's; where the bordure would be used to cadence all forms of marshalling, the chief would only be used to cadence quartering. In the case of impalement --- which implies a marital coat, not an inherited one --- the addition of the chief is sufficient to remove the appearance of marshalling. [Æthelstan von Ransbergen, A-Ansteorra, Sep 1992]

Further research seems to indicate that the chief was not used as a mark of cadency in Anglo-Norman armory on a marshalled coat, either impaled or quartered, unlike the bordure and the label. The Stodart system of cadency used in Scotland concentrates primarily on the use of bordures. We are therefore overturning past precedent, and allowing chiefs both charged and uncharged to remove the appearance of marshalling on both impaled and quartered fields. Chiefs so used must not add to the appearance of marshalling by having a per pale division with tinctures or dissimilar charges so arranged as to create confusion. [Nov. 2011 Cover Letter, "From Wreath: Marshalling and Chiefs"]


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

4: Briana MacKinnon - New Name & New Device

Or, a pall inverted between three suns gules.

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Briana is registerable as an English given name using the literary name allowance [12/2001 Cover Letter, "From Pelican: Changes to the Registerability of the name Briana"], and is also found in the IGI Parish Extracts in late-period England:

BRIANA BULL Female Christening 20 March 1599 Surfleet, Lincoln, England GUILIELMI BULL Batch: C031902

BRIANA LAMBERT Female Christening 21 May 1615 Snaith, Yorkshire, England THOMAS LAMBERT Batch: P009231

MacKinnon is an undated header in Black, s.n. MacKinnon. Dated spellings include <Makkynnon> (1536), <Mackiynnann> (1545), and <Makkynine> (1506). The spellings <McKinnon> and <McKynnon> are found in 1642 in The Register of the Privy Council of Scotland (Scotland Privy Council, Vol. VII, 1638-1642, published 1906, p. 199 and 583; http://books.google.com/books?id=qFkMAQAAIAAJ):

...and for this effect ordans letters to be direct chargeing Sir Donald Gorim of Slait, Sire Lauchlaine McClaine of Dowart, John McCleud of Dunevagan, John McRannald of Moydert, McLaine of Coil, McKynnon of that ilk, and Hector McLaine of Lochbuy to compeir personallie before the saids Lords the day forsaid...

and

...witnesses, William Lindsay, post in Edinburgh; William Boog, servitor to William Bruce; Donald McKinnon, baker in Potterrow, and Robert Malcome, burgess of the Cannogait.

The first instance is in Scots. For the latter instance, the overall text has been normalized, but the bynames do not appear to have been modified. At any rate, i/y switches are found in Scots, so the submitted spelling is considered to be plausible.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

5: Cailte Crobderg mac Scandal - New Name & New Device

Sable, on a fess between three cat's heads caboshed argent three triquetras vert.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language ((Irish Gaelic)) most important.

All elements are found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/).

Cailte is a Middle Irish Gaelic masculine given name with an Annals date of 828 (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Cailte.shtml).

Crobderg is a Middle Irish Gaelic descriptive byname meaning '[of the] Wine-red Hand], with relevant Annals dates of 1185-1199 (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Crobderg.shtml).

Scandal is the nominative form of a Middle Irish Gaelic masculine given name with Annals dates of 885 and 886 (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Scandal.shtml). No genitive form is given, and assistance forming the genitive case is requested. However, it should be noted that the CELT Archives has a <Maol Caich mc. Scandal, rí Cruithne> in entry FA 37 (year 666) of "Fragmentary Annals of Ireland", written in late Middle Irish and Early Modern Irish (http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G100017.html). The pattern [given name] + [descriptive byname] + [patronymic byname] is found in Sharon Krossa, "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names" (http://medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/#descriptivewithpatronymic).

The instance of <Maol Caich mc. Scandal, ríl Cruithne> seems to indicate the Scandal is both the nominative and genitive spelling. As such, the spelling has not been modified.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

6: Cassandra Hobbes - New Name & New Device

Sable, three pairs of rib bones issuant from the edge and on a chief argent three human skulls gules.

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Cassandra is found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "English Given Names from 16th and Early 17th C Marriage Records" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/english/parishes/parishes.html), dated 1595.

Hobbes is found in Hitching & Hitching, pp. xlii and lxx, dated 1601-2.

Documentation for rib bones as period charges was previously provided in connection with the submission of Lianor da Costa on the Artemesia 8/30/2010 LoI(http://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=14044).

Lianor's submission was returned on the November 2010 LoAR for the following reasons:

Lianor da Costa. Device. Per pale gules and sable, three rib bones in pale Or.

This device is returned because the charges are not identifiable. All of the sets of rib bones found in period armory issued from both sides of the field in pairs, which would aid the identifiability of the charges. The charges also do not closely match either of the period versions of the charges.

The ribs in Cassandra's submission more closely match the period examples than Lianor's. If Cassandra's submission is registered, it would be the defining instance of rib bones in the Society.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=449/2012-04-25/10-05-52_Rib Bones 1.JPG
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=449/2012-04-25/10-05-52_Rib Bones 2.JPG


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

7: Cedric of Thanet and Moira Fennor of Argyll - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name (Cedric of Thanet) registered exactly as it appears in August of 1989, via Atlantia
OSCAR finds the name (Moira Fennor of Argyll) registered exactly as it appears in September of 2002, via the East

Per pale argent and gules, a trillium gules, leaved vert, seeded Or.

This submission is to be associated with the household name Thanet House, which was registered Oct. 2011 (East). The prior badge submission, Per pale argent and gules a trillium flower inverted gules leaved vert and seeded Or, was returned on the East's May 2011 Letter of Decision:

This badge conflicts with the device of Deirdre ingean Dhomhnaill (Jan. 2003, Æthelmearc), Per pale sable and Or, a trillium inverted gules barbed vert. There is a single CD for changes to the field, but nothing for placement because the position of Cedric's trillium is forced, i.e., it cannot be placed on the gules portion of the field.

It was thought that changing the orientation of the flower would grant the second CD needed to clear the prior conflict.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

8: Dabíd Docair - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 2011, via the East

Per fess sable and azure, two torches in saltire Or and a closed book palewise argent.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

9: Daithi Dubh - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Dáithí is found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Daithi.shtml), with an Annals date of 1594. The submitter prefers the omit the accents, which is permitted in Gaelic names by precedent, as long as they are omitted in the entire name.

Dubh is a masculine descriptive byname with Annals dates of 1230-1590 (ibid., http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Dub.shtml).


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

10: Donna Le Queux - New Name & New Device

Vert, a grayhound statant regardant argent charged on the shoulder with a fleur-de-lys sable.

Donna is the submitter's mundane given name, as confirmed by her driver's license by Mistress Alys Mackyntoich (Eastern Crown Herald) and Dominus Galefridus Peregrinus. No photocopy was provided. The name should not be considered to be obtrusively modern, as <Dona> is found as an English given name in the IGI Parish Extracts:

DONA ROADES Female Marriage 3 September 1628 Penistone, Yorkshire, England FRANCISIUS MORTOWN Batch: M042484

Le Queux is a surname found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "French Names from Paris, 1421, 1423, & 1438" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/french/paris1423surnames.html).

Correction (2012-May-09 21:05:02): Grayhound in the blazon is simply a typo that no one caught.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

11: Eithne ingen Fháeláin - New Name & New Device

Argent, a chevron cotised sable and in base a triskelion of spirals gules.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language ((8-10th C Irish)) most important.
Culture ((8-10th C Irish)) most important.

Eithne is a feminine given name found in Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/). It is the standard Old and Middle Irish Gaelic nominative form, found in years 763-1016.

Fáeláin is the standard Old and Middle Irish Gaelic genitive form of the masculine given name Fáelán (ibid.), found in years 628-1423. ingen 'daughter' is the patronymic particle appropriate for a Middle Irish Name (see Sharon Krossa, "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names", http://medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/#spelling).

Although the byname was submitted as ingen Fáeláin, according to "The Spelling of Lenited Consonants in Gaelic," by Sharon Krossa (http://medievalscotland.org/scotlang/lenition.shtml), even in pre-1200 orthography names beginning in F must be lenited when used to form a patronymic. Therefore, the byname was changed at Kingdom to ingen Fháeláin.

There is a step from period practice for the use of a triskelion of spirals [Cormac Ó Treassaigh, November 2010, Lochac-A].


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

12: Godric of Hamtun - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 1998, via the East

Per pale vert and Or, a pheon inverted counterchanged.

His prior badge submission, Per pale vert and Or, a pheon counterchanged, was returned on the East's Nov. 2011 Letter of Decision:

Unfortunately, this badge conflicts with England (August 1997, important non-SCA royal badge), (Tinctureless) A pheon. There's one CD for adding the field, but the second CD must come from something other than tincture, per RfS X.4.d.

If the submitter resubmits (e.g., using a pheon inverted), the pheon should be drawn larger, to better fill the space.

This badge is clear of Robin Arthur Kyrke (Mar. 2003, Middle), Per pale Or and vert, a pheon inverted counterchanged. There are CDs for changing the tinctures of the field and charge.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

13: Griffin inn rauði - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.

The name was submitted as Griffin inn Raud. The submitter wants a Norse name, but wants to use his legal given name.

Griffin is the submitter's legal given name, as attested by his mother:

I, <submitter's mother's legal name> (known in the SCA as Lady Creatura Christi of Oakes) do hereby attest that my son's legal name is <submitter's legal name>.

Signed with legal name, dated 1/7/2012 (Witnessed by Istvan)

inn Raud is the submitter's preferred spelling of inn rauði 'the red', found in Geirr Bassi, p. 26.

No support was found for the submitted spelling inn Raud. The name was been changed to the attested inn rauði.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

14: Guillaume le Mettere - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound (("Met-air")) most important.

Both elements are found in Luana de Grood, "Flemish Given Names from Bruges" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/docs/bruges).

Guillaume is a given name dated to 1400-1550 and 1600.

Le Mettere is a surname dated to 1571.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

15: Guy de Glastonbury - New Name & New Device

Per pale per bend sinister grady Or and gules and argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language ((11th-12th century Norman England)) most important.
Culture ((11th-12th century Norman England)) most important.

Guy is a header in Withycombe, with dated forms <Gwydo> (1273), <Guido> (1285), and <Gy> (1273). R&W, s.n. Guy notes that <Why> is the Norman form, and is found in Old French. The submitted spelling is found as a byname dated 1384 (ibid.). As a given name, it is also found in the MED:

(1394) Doc.in Collect.Topogr.3 256: Martyn Ferres and we..by feffement of Sir Guy de Briene..som tyme were confeffes.

a1500 GRom.(Add 9066) 283: Hy knytte it [the cord] fast about his arse, and Guy drew hym out.

c1475 Guy(1) (Cai 107/176) 1781: There did Guy Heraude in herbes bathy, And with good metes him comforte hertly.

de Glastonbury is a locative byname. The submitted spelling of the place name is found in the MED:

(c1419) Proc.Chanc.in Cal.PCEliz. 1.p.xvi: The abbot and the convent of Glastonbury ymaginith a foe zenst the forseid person and wrongfully feynyth..actions of trespas.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

16: Isabel Chamberlaine - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 2010, via the East

Per chevron gules and barry wavy argent and azure, in chief a fess couped sable.

Examples of low-contrast ordinaries include:

plate 25 of the Armorial Breton, which has a sable canton on a gules field (possibly gules papellony argent)

plate 31 (ibid.) has has gules pappelony argent, a chevron sable

The Wapenbuch Beyeren has Gules ermined argent, two fish haurient addorsed argent, a label azure (http://www.kb.nl/bladerboek/wapenboek/browse/page_050v.xml)

Wapenbuch Beyeren has Sable, a fess argent and a label gules (http://www.kb.nl/bladerboek/wapenboek/browse/page_055v.xml)

Wapenbuch Beyeren has Sable, a lion rampant agent, overall a bend gules charged with three annulets sable (http://www.kb.nl/bladerboek/wapenboek/browse/page_038r.xml)

Wapenbuch Beyeren has Sable, two towers argent, on a canton gules a comb argent (http://www.kb.nl/bladerboek/wapenboek/browse/page_042r.xml)

DBA, p. 49, Header "2 bard betw" has "Gu 2 bars Sa betw 3 annulets Arg" listed for Rekell, Wyllm, of Kent. MY 199; Rokelys. PLN 851, and Rukhill. PT 803. and "Gu 2 bars Sa betw 3 owls Arg" - Rekett, William, of Kent. WB III 110,5 (a cadenced version of the previous instance)

The term bar seems to be reserved for multiple diminutives:

[Sable, a foot couped and in chief a bar argent.] The submitter requested that the fess be blazoned as a bar as a cant on her name. Single diminutives of ordinaries aren't normally blazoned as such. Only if there are multiple diminutives (e.g. three bendlets) or if the charge is otherwise reduced in importance (e.g. a bendlet enhanced) would the diminutive term be used. Because of the cant -- and the enhanced nature of the fess -- we have blazoned it as a bar. [Emma Barfoot, 06/05, A-Atlantia]

As such, the ordinary has been reblazoned as a fess couped.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

17: Ivyeinrust, Bailiwick of - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1981, via the East

(Fieldless) An ivy leaf quarterly vert and argent.

The prior badge submission, (Fieldless) An ivy leaf inverted proper, was returned on the 09/2005 LoAR (East):

This conflicts with Bela of Eastmarch, (Tinctureless) A grape leaf inverted dependent from a tendril. There is not a CD between a grape leaf and a ivy leaf. The tendril in Bela's badge is equivalent to a maintained charge. Thus there is a single for fieldless/tinctureless per RfS X.4.a.iii.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

18: Joyce Vignault - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Joyce is found in Julian Goodwyn, "English Names from Pre-1600 Brass Inscriptions" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/brasses/women.html), dated to 1470.

Vignault is found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael and Talan Gwynek, "Names Found in Commercial Documents from Bordeaux, 1470-1520" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/bordeaux.html), s.n. Anthony. English and French can be combined without a step from period practice.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

19: Leopold Draco - New Household Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2009, via the East

House of Draco

Argent, a lion sable and a dragon gules combattant maintaining between them a trident Or.

The submitter wants House of Draco or House Draco, but not Draco House. [Note: the second option is currently not registerable, unless evidence for this pattern can be found.]

Draco was documented in the submitter's name submission as a French unmarked locative in Morlet Dictionnaire, s.n. Dragon. This household name follows the <House of + surname> pattern, but no source was provided.

A pattern of [House of Surname] or [House Surname] is found in late-period France, according to Juliana de Luna, "Inn Signs and House Names from 15th Century Paris" (KWHSS Proceedings, 2011). The list of designators includes (la) maison de and hostel de 'house/hotel of'. There are also two examples of houses named after their owner's surname: <hostel d'Alegre> and <Housse Gilet>. Others are named after the owner's full name, e.g., <la maison Eudeline de Macer> and <l'ostel de Y. Gregoys>. The use of the English designator House of is allowed by precedent:

Evidence was found to support Casa da Cavalla as a house or manor name in Italian in late period. As we traditionally allow designators to be rendered in English via Lingua Anglica, this household name is also registerable as House of Cavalla. [Arabella da Siena, House of Cavalla, May 2010, A-Caid]


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

20: Leopold of Lakenheath - New Name & New Device

Per chevron azure and argent, two lozenges Or and a wolf rampant contourny sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Leopold is found in French in the IGI Parish Extracts:

LEOPOLD BOUCHARD Male Christening 13 September 1649 Badonviller, Meurthe-Et-Moselle, France M. BOUCHARD Batch: C800611

LEOPOLD BRASY Male Christening 19 September 1642 Badonviller, Meurthe-Et-Moselle, France Batch: C800611

Lakenheath is a place name found in Watts, s.n. Lakenheath. This spelling is dated 1610. French and English can be registered without a step from period practice.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

21: Magdelena Caminante - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language ((14th C Spanish)) most important.
Culture ((14th C Spanish)) most important.

Magdelena is found in Juliana de Luna, "Spanish Names from the Late 15th C" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/isabella/WomensGivenAlpha.html). This spelling appears once as a variant.

Caminante is a byname meaning 'walker/traveller' (ibid., http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/isabella/surnames-other.html).


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

22: Mary Theophania Hunn - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2005, via the East

Pean, a bear sejant erect supported on a bee skep Or.

Although beehive is the normal term used in SCA blazon, the submitter is attached to the term skep. As it is a period term, it did not seem to be a problem to leave it blazoned as the submitter wishes.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

23: Morgon d'Auray - New Name Change

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in July of 2012, via the East.

Old Item: Morgan Deorcwulf, to be released.
Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound (unspecified) most important.

Morgon is found as a given name in the IGI Pairsh Extracts dated 1603, 1614, 1624, and 1638:

MORGON FOYER Male Marriage 1603 Ridgmont, Bedford, England DORATHIE SMITH Batch: M035611

MORGON MASON Male Christening 12 March 1614 Bredon, Worcester, England MASON Batch: C021762

MORGON MATHEWES Male Marriage 3 November 1624 Kington, Worcester, England JOHAN CROWLEY Batch: M023352

MORGON THOMAS Male Marriage 14 January 1638 Monkleigh, Devon, England ELIZABETH HOYLE Batch: M051491

d'Auray is a locative byname based on a region of Brittany. Dauzet & Rostaing, s.n. Avrey give <Alrae> (1069), <Alrai> (1168), Breton <Alre'}>. It is also the name of a pursuivant in 1420, found in Juliana de Luna, "Heraldic Titles from the Middle Ages and Renaissance" (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/HeraldicTitles/dictionary.shtml#Auray_Pursuivant). Lastly, it is found in the title of La grande et miraculeuse dévotion de sainte Anne d'Auray en Bretagne . Par un religieux carme réformé de la province de Touraine, by Hugues de Saint-François, Le P. (carme), published in 1638 (http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k5725172m/f2). The submitter allows a change to English if needed.

The combination of English and French is registerable without a step from period practice.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

24: Nicole de Briolay - New Name & New Device

Per fess Or and vert, in pale a brown otter statant proper and an open book Or.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Meaning ((Location of origin - French town)) most important.

Nicole is a feminine given name found in Colm Dubh, "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/paris.html#N), and as a masculine and feminine given name in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "French Names from Paris, 1421, 1423, & 1438" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/french/paris1423.html).

de Briolay is a locative byname derived from a French place name found in Les secrets des noms de communes et lieux-dits du Maine-et-Loire by Pierre-Louis Augereau (http://books.google.com/books?id=9YLf27Ka0NYC&pg=PA39), p. 39, dated 1306 and 1596. A similar spelling is found in the name of a religious institution, <Cure de Martial de Briollay>, on p. 84 of Pouillé général, contenant les bénéfices de l'archevêché de Bordeaux, et des diocèses d'Agen, Condom, Engoulesme, Luçon, Maillezais, Perigueux, Poictiers, Xaintes, Sarlat.... published by G. Alliot in 1648 (http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k5824742g/f211).


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

25: Østgarðr, Crown Province of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 1984, via the East

Order of the Silver Lantern

The order name follows the pattern [color] + [heraldic charge] set out in Juliana de Luna, "Medieval Secular Order Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/ListingofStandardForms.html#AllColorCharge). According to the May 2009 Cover Letter, "Order names which follow the <color> + <charge> pattern must using the ordinary color term for a heraldic tincture appropriate for the language of the order name." According to the May 2008 Cover Letter, "silver" may be used in an award or order name as "the ordinary color name of argent". The lantern is a standard heraldic charge, registered over 30 times in the SCA. The term "lantern" is also found in period, as evidenced by the MED:

lantern(e (n.) Also launtern(e, la(u)ntren, lantarne & la(u)nter & la macron brevetern(e.

(a) A lantern; a lamp; lemen (shinen) as lanternes, to shine like lanterns; holden the ~, act as guide, lead the way; loken lik a ~, be hollow-cheeked; light of (the) ~, lantern light (as a guide or as a sign of human habitation); (b) in proverbial expressions and sayings; (c) ~ horn, a pane of horn for a lantern; (d) in surnames.

a1325(?c1300) NPass.(Cmb Gg.1.1) 453: In lanternes þei brothen lytht, For hit was in þe nitht.

(1421) Will York in Sur.Soc.45 64: Pro j bowet, alias lantern, de arg., pond. x unc.

c1450(?a1400) Wars Alex.(Ashm 44) 5398: A grete grysely god..Þat li3t lemand e3en as lanterns he had.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

26: Raven de Witte - New Name & New Device

Argent, two bars gules platy and in chief two ravens proper.

No major changes.
Sound ((Raven + de Wit)) most important.

Raven is a given name found in R&W, s.n. Raven. The names <Leduuinus filius Reuene> is dated 1086, and <Rauen de Engelbi> is dated 1185. As a byname, <Godric, William Raven> is dated 1130-60.

de Witte is a byname interpolated from <de Wyte> (1279), <le Whyte> (1284), <atte Whyt> (1296), and <le Wytt> (1327) all found in R&W, s.n. White.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

27: Rebecka Wallis - New Name & New Device

Bendy argent and azure, a musical note vert.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Client requests authenticity for 16th C English.

Rebecka is a feminine given name found in Bardsley, s.n. Bosworth, dated 1570.

Wallis is dated 1463 in R&W, s.n. Wallis.

Wallis is also found in the IGI Parish Extracts:

... WALLIS Female Christening 6 March 1575 Saint Columb Minor, Cornwall, England JOHN WALLIS Batch: C023441

ABRAHAM WALLIS Male Christening 21 October 1570 Woburn, Bedford, England THOMAS WALLIS Batch: P005111

ABRAHAM WALLIS Male Marriage 26 September 1598 Ashby De La Zouch, Leicester, England ANN MORRIS Batch: M064501

(and others)

Thus, the name appears to be authentic for the submitter's desired language and culture.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

28: Riocard Docair - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 2011, via the East

(Fieldless) A torch enflamed gules.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

29: Tomás an Bhogha Ó Néill - New Name

Submitter desires a male name.

Tomás is an Early Modern Irish masculine given name found in "Index of Names in Irish Annals" by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Tomas.shtml), with Annals dates of 1257-1596.

an Bhogha 'of the bow' is an Early Modern Irish descriptive byname based on the word "boga" 'bow', found in EDIL. The formation of this byname is based on an e-mail exchange between Alys Eastern Crown and Mari Aldyrne (included in the packet). Although past registration is no guarantee, an Bhogha was previously registered as a byname based on Mari Aldyrne's documentation and commentary:

Submitted as Seamus in Boghanna Bernaig Mac an tSaoi, the submitter requested authenticity for Gaelic and allowed any changes. The submission form indicated that the submitter desired the meaning 'Seamus of the broken bows, Mac an tSaoi'. However, the LoI stated that "The submitter would prefer the singular 'of the broken bow', please."

The byname in Boghanna Bernaig was submitted as a constructed byname meaning '[of] the Broken Bow'. This phrase combines elements in Middle Irish Gaelic (c. 900 to c. 1200) forms (in and Bernaig) with an element in an Early Modern Irish Gaelic (c. 1200 to c. 1700) or Modern (c. 1700 to present) form (Boghanna). The name Seamus was brought into use in Ireland by the Anglo-Normans. By the time it came into use among Gaels, the language in use was Early Modern Gaelic (c. 1200 to c. 1700). Therefore, we have changed this byname to a fully Early Modern Irish Gaelic form to meet his request for authenticity.

Additionally, the submitted Boghanna means 'bows'. All of the period descriptive bynames found so far refering to a weapon (axe, spear, etc.) use a singular word for a weapon rather than a plural. The Early Modern Irish Gaelic word for 'bow' is Bogha. Effric Neyn Ken3ocht Mcherrald explains:

Since Early Gaelic <in> (Strachan, _Old-Irish Paradigms_) and modern Scottish Gaelic <an> (Dwelly) in genitive masculine singular lenite, EMIr <an> should also lenite what follows.

Therefore, a byname meaning '[of] the bow' in Early Modern Irish would be an Bhogha, with '[of] the broken bow' being an Bhogha Bhearnaigh. Effric also provided a rough approximation for a pronunciation of this byname. We have included it her as a courtesy for the submitter:

It would be pronounced very roughly ahn VOH-ghah VAIR-nee (or with a vowel rather like the one in <egg> or <vet> instead of AI; in very late period <-ghah> can also get pronounced as -ah, ahn VOH-ah VAIR-nee).

[Seamus an Bhogha Bhearnaigh Mac an tSaoi, Nov. 2003, A-An Tir]

Examples of descriptive bynames based on weapons are found in "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (op. cit., http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Topic.shtml#Weapons):

[of] the Axe/Battle-Axe/Hatchet (na Tuaighe)

[of] the Broken Spear (in Gai Bernaig)

[of] the Large Spear (in Gai Móir)

[of] the Short Shield (in Scéith Girr)

Ó Néill is a clan affiliation-style byname formed from the genitive form of the Early Modern Irish masculine given name Niall, found with Annals dates of 1201-1611 (ibid., http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Niall.shtml).


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

30: Tullia Tranquilla - New Name & New Device

Azure fretty Or, on a chief Or three drop spindles azure.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language ((Latin)) most important.
Culture ((Roman)) most important.

Tullia is the feminine form of the nomen Tullius. The masculine form is found in Lindley Richard Dean, "A Study of the Cognomina of Soldiers in the Roman Legions" (http://books.google.com/books?id=MF0KAAAAIAAJ), pp. 88, 209.

Tranquilla is the feminine form of the cognomen Tranquillus found in the name of the author Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus (born c. 69 AD), a "Roman biographer and antiquarian whose writings include De viris illustribus ("Concerning Illustrious Men"), a collection of short biographies of celebrated Roman literary figures, and De vita Caesarus (Lives of the Caesars). The latter book, seasoned with bits of gossip and scandal relating to the lives of the first 11 emperors, secured him lasting fame." (Encylopedia Britannica, http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/571641/Suetonius).


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

31: Wulfgang Gruenwald - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 2011, via the East

Per fess indented gules and sable, a winged boar salient and a roundel argent


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

32: Ysmay de Lynn - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2010, via the East

Per bend sinister gules and azure, between two triskelions of human legs, a bend sinister cotised Or.


This item was on the 07-2012 LoAR

33: Zhelana Tomeslavitsa - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 2010, via the East

Argent, a dragon's head cabossed, in chief three mullets of six points sable, a bordure counter-compony argent and azure.


Standard Bibliography:



[Bardsley] Bardsley, Charles. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames.

[Black] Black, George F. The Surnames of Scotland.

[Dauzat & Rostaing] Dauzat, Albert and Rostaing, Charles. Dictionnaire Etymologique des Noms de Lieux de la France.



[DBA] Dictionary of British Armorials.

[DIL] Royal Irish Academy. Dictionary of the Irish Language based mainly on Old and Middle Irish materials.

[Geirr Bassi] Geirr Bassi Haraldsson. The Old Norse Name.

[Hitching & Hitching] F.K.& S. Hitching. References to English Surnames in 1601 and 1602.

[MED] The Middle English Dictionary.

[Morlet Dictionnaire] Morlet, Maire-Therese. Dictionnaire Étymologique de Noms de Famille.

[R&W] Reaney, P.H. and R. M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames.

[Watts] Watts, Victor, ed. Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names, Based on the Collections of the English Place-Name Society.

[Withycombe] Withycombe, E.G. Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names.


OSCAR counts 18 New Names, 1 New Name Change, 1 New Household Name, 1 New Order Name, 19 New Devices and 5 New Badges. These 45 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $135 for them. There are a total of 45 items submitted on this letter.

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