SCA Laurel Sovereign of Arms
Online System for Commentary and Response

Site News
LoIs
KLoIs
SENA
Prec
AH
Track
Sub Status

Name:

Password:

Create Account

MAIL ME my password.



SEARCH:

[ Site News | LoIs | KLoIs | SENA | Prec | AH | Track | Sub Status ]

East LoI dated 2012-01-19

Unto SCA College of Arms, Laurel, Pelican, Wreath, and their staff, and all others who do receive this letter, greetings from Asa in Svarta, Blue Tyger Herald and Lillia da Vaux, Eastern Crown Herald.



The Eastern College herewith submits for approval and registration the following items, with our thanks.

This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

1: Alanna of Ravenstar - New Name & New Device

Per pall sable, argent, and vert, a rose Or and two dragons combattant counterchanged.

No major changes.

The name was submitted as Alana of Ravenstar, but was changed in accordance with the submitter's wishes.

Alanna is the submitter's legal given name. A copy of the birth certificate was provided. The name should not be obtrusively modern, as the spelling Alana is documented from a prior registration:

The name Alana has since been found in period. Gage's LoC dated 15 Jun 2001 references this information: "Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn cited (1381) [Robertus filius Radulfi] and [Alana filia eius]. This citation is from: Fenwick, Carolyn C. Poll Taxes of 1377, 1379, and 1381, Part 1: Bedfordshire-Leicestershire p. 112. [Morgana of the Mists, 08/2002, R-Meridies]

of Ravenstar is grandfathered to the submitter via her mother, whose registered name is Alesia de Maris of Ravenstar (registered Aug. 1988 via the East). A letter attesting the relationship has been provided:

I, <name>, known in the SCA as Alesia de Maris of Ravenstar, attest that <submitter>, known in the SCA as Alana of Ravenstar, is my legal daughter. <Signed with legal signature>, date: 8/10/11

Commenters did not think that this is a conflict with Alanna of Ravenwood (June 1983 via Ansteorra).

The submitter allows intermediate changes.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

2: Anna Bella di Cherubino - New Name Change & New Device

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in April of 2012, via the East.

Gules, a cherub argent winged Or and in chief three goblets Or

Old Item: Christos di Cherubino, to be retained as an alternate name.
No major changes.
Meaning (keep surname) most important.

Anna and Bella are both found in Arval Benicoeur, "Feminine Given Names in the Online Catasto of Florence of 1427" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/catasto/).

Double given names are found in Italy in period, and can be found in Academy of Saint Gabriel report no. 2660 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/2660/): "[c]ompound given names (double given names, middle names) were common in some parts of Italy in your period [mid-15th cen.] and later." This report cites the following:

[8] Lyneya Fairbowe, unpublished research based on a baptismal register from Palermo 1561-3 that is available from the research library of the Church of the Latter Day Saints. Her data shows many examples of double and triple given names.

[11] James S. Grubb, _Provincial Families of the Renaissance: Private and Public Life in the Veneto_ (Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996), pp.42-7.

di Cherubino is grandfathered to the submitter.

The submitter allows intermediate changes.

This device submission is a resubmission of a kingdom return, but is new to Laurel.

The submitter has permission to conflict from Barony of the Angels:

We, John apGriffin (<legal names>), Flavia Beatrice Carmigniani (<legal name>), Baron and Baroness of the Barony of the Angels, give <legal name>, known in the SCA as Anna Bella di Cherubino permission for her armory "Gules, a cherub argent winger [sic] Or and in chief three goblets Or" and "(Fieldless) A cherub argent winged Or" to look similar to, but not identical to, our badge "Gules, a seraph's head Or faced proper".

We understand that this permission cannot be withdrawn once Anna's armory is registered.

(Signed with legal names), dated 27 Dec 2011


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

3: Anna Bella di Cherubino - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2012, via the East

(Fieldless) A cherub argent winged Or.

The submitter has permission to conflict from Barony of the Angels:

We, John apGriffin (<legal names>), Flavia Beatrice Carmigniani (<legal name>), Baron and Baroness of the Barony of the Angels, give <legal name>, known in the SCA as Anna Bella di Cherubino permission for her armory "Gules, a cherub argent winger [sic] Or and in chief three goblets Or" and "(Fieldless) A cherub argent winged Or" to look similar to, but not identical to, our badge "Gules, a seraph's head Or faced proper".

We understand that this permission cannot be withdrawn once Anna's armory is registered.

(Signed with legal names), dated 27 Dec 2011


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

4: Bakkar al-Bukhari - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister azure and sable, all semy of mullets of four points, an increscent moon argent.

No major changes.
Sound (Bukkar) most important.

Both elements are found in Da'ud ibn Auda, "Period Arabic Names and Naming Practices" (KWHSS Proceedings, AS XXXVIII). An updated version of this article can be found at http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/arabic-naming2.htm.

Bakkar is a masculine ism (given name).

al-Bukhari '[of Bukhara]' is found on the list of masculine cognomens, including both laqabs and nisbas. It is also an element in the name of Muhammad ibn Isma'il al-Bukhari (most often just called al-Bukhari), described in the introduction of Da'ud's article as the author of an early collection of hadith (sayings of the Prophet Muhammad).

The submitter allows intermediate changes.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

5: Brian mac Domhnaill of Coldwood - Resub Name & New Device

Argent ermined, a wolf rampant vert.

Sound (unspecified) most important.

His name was returned on the 11/2007 LoAR (East):

This name conflicts with the registered name Bran mac Domnhail, registered March 1989. The registered form is a misspelling of mac Domhnail, and, per precedent, Bran and Brian are not substantially different in sound and appearance:

This name conflicts with Brian McNaughton (registered June 1986). Bran and Brian are closer in pronunciation than Brian and Brianna, which conflict:

This conflicts with the registered name of Brianna O Duinn. [Brian Ó Duinn, 04/00, R-An Tir]

[Bran McNaughton, May 2002]

Brian is an Early Modern Irish Gaelic male given name in "Index of Names in Irish Annals" by Kathleen O'Brien (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Brian.shtml), in years 1258-1582.

The patronymic particle mac 'son' and the formation of a simple patronym are found in Sharon Krossa, "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/).

Domhnaill is the genitive form of Domhnall, found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Domnall.shtml). This is the standard Early Modern Irish Gaelic spelling of the name, found in years 1202-1592.

of Coldwood is a locative based on the branch name, Coldwood, Shire of, registered 10/1991 via the East.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

6: Caitilin inghean Chainnigh - New Name & New Device

Paly vert and argent, in pale a horse courant and a horse courant contourny sable.

No major changes.
Language (Scots Gaelic, late 1500s) most important.
Culture (Scots Gaelic, late 1500s) most important.

The name was submitted as Caitilin inghean Choinnigh.

Caitilín is found in "Index of Names in Irish Annals" by Kathleen O'Brien as an Early Modern Irish Gaelic female name, in years 1411-1592 (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Caitilin.shtml). inghean is the correct form of 'daughter' for post-1200 orthography, per Sharon Krossa, "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names" (http://medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/). The submitter has omitted the accent.

Chainnigh is the lenited genitive form of a name found in Sharon Krossa, "Scottish Gaelic Given Names" (http://medievalscotland.org/scotnames/gaelicgiven/men/cainneach.shtml). This article gives both the spellings Cainnigh and Cainnich, dated to the 14th to 16th centuries. Kingdom commenters could not verify the submitted spelling of the patronym, Choinnigh, which was supposed to have been found in Black, s.n. Kenneth.

The submitter stated she would accept the earlier form iugen [sic] Chaennaig if necessary to register. It is noted as being from Sharon Krossa's "A Simple Guide to Constructing 12th century Scottish Gaelic Names" (http://medievalscotland.org/scotnames/simplescotgaelicnames12.shtml). This change was not made because she had stated that a late 16th century name was most important to her. As the spelling Chainnigh is closer to what was submitted, the name was changed accordingly.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

7: Caitriona inghean Chalbhaigh - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in September of 2008, via the East

Vert, a saltire and on a chief argent a raven displayed sable

Her prior device submission, Vert, on a bend between six thistles argent, a hawk volant sable, was returned on the Sept. 2008:

This armory is in conflict with the armory of Elizabeth Tremayne of Silverleaf, Vert, semé of thistles slipped and leaved, on a bend argent a peacock tail feather proper. There is but a single CD for the changes to the tertiary charge, from a peacock feather proper to a hawk volant sable. There is no difference granted between six and a semy.

The device has been redesigned. There is an SFPP for the use of a bird displayed that is not an eagle.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

8: Caterina de Vesci - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound (The de Vesci element is more important than Caterina) most important.

Caterina is found in "Feminine Given Names in a Dictionary of English Surnames" by Talan Gwynek (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/reaneyHZ.html), s.n. Katharine. This spelling is dated 1327.

de Vesci is interpolated (with an i/y switch) from de Vescy, found in "An Index to the 1332 Lay Subsidy Rolls of Lincolnshire, England" by Kathleen O'Brien (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/LincLSR/BynU.html). The submitted spelling appears in an original Latin document from 1237:

Rex donavit Willelmo de Vesci quatuorcervos in foresta de Weredal' et mandatum est custodi episcopatus Dunholm' quod eos ei habere faciat. Teste rege apud Westmonasterium, xvj. die Junii. ["The king granted to William de Vesci..."]

From: 'Close Rolls, June 1237', Calendar of Close Rolls, Henry III: volume 3: 1234-1237 (1908), pp. 449-464. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=91500&strquery=Vesci (subscription only)

The submitter allows intermediate changes.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

9: Cellach Dhonn inghean Mhic an Mhadaidh - New Name & New Device

Per chevron azure and sable, on a chevron between a chaplet of trilliums and a hawk trussing a duck argent, two chevronels vert

The name was submitted as Cellach Donn inghean Mhic an Mhadaidh.

Cellach is a header in OC&M, where it is described as the name of a daughter of Donnchad, King of Uí Liathain in East Cork who died in 732. The name is also found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Cellach.shtml), as the name of a woman found in years 726, 729, and 732.

Donn 'brown' is a descriptive byname for someone with brown hair (ibid., http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Donn.shtml). In Middle Irish Gaelic, D- is not lenited, so this is the correct Middle Irish form of the byname. In order to reduce the number of languages in the full name name, the Middle Gaelic Donn was changed by Eastern Crown to the Early Modern Irish Gaelic Dhonn.

The formation of a two-generation patronym using inghean... Mhic is found in Sharon Krossa, "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names" (http://medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/#spelling). This is the Early Modern Irish Gaelic spelling.

inghean Mhic an Mhadaidh is based on the undated header Mac an Mhadaidh, found in Woulfe. This family name would originate from the literal patronymic byname <mac an Mhadaigh>, indicating that the father had the descriptive byname <an Mhadaidh> '[of] the Dog'. From this patronym would derive the family name <Mac an Mhadiadh>. Examples of descriptive bynames similar to <an Mhadaidh> '[of] the dog' can be found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Topic.shtml), which lists the following descriptive bynames referring to domesticated animals:

[of] the Beeves/Cattle (na Mart)

[of] the Milch Cows (na nGamhnach)

[of] the White Horse (in Eich Gil)

The Annals of Connacht, entry 1542.10 (http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G100011.html), mentions the place name <Leim an Madaidh> 'Leap [of] the Dog', showing <Madaidh> is a period form. Connacht uses conservative spellings, which explains the lack of the expected lenition in the element <Madaidh> (the expected form would be <Mhadaidh>).

It should be noted that the name contains at least two steps from period practice for the language combination and another for temporal disparity. This would be grounds for return. However, the entry in OC&M states that "[a] text of the Old Irish period says that this name may be male or female". The submitted spelling is found in "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (op. cit., http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Cellach.shtml) as a masculine name in years 865-1278. As such, it was thought that the same spelling could be plausible for women after 1200, potentially eliminating the step for temporal disparity. Lastly, Cellach is the name of a male saint (Catholic Encyclopedia, http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/09565a.htm). Whether the saint's name allowance can be extended to the feminine name is not known.

The submitter allows intermediate changes.

From prior registrations, it appears that a raptor trussing another bird (a period heraldic motif) is treated as a single charge, so this device does not run afoul of the bans on sword-and-dagger and slot machine heraldry. Trussed charges are considered to be "maintained charges unless explicitly blazoned otherwise" [Lorccán na Túaithe, June 2009, A-Gleann Abhann].

There is an SFPP for the use of the New World trillium.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

10: Connor MacKay - New Name & New Device

Gules, in pale a wolf's head erased contourny and two scimitars in saltire argent.

Sound (unspecified) most important.

Connor is found in "Names Found in Anglicized Irish Documents" by Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/Masculine.shtml) with 36 examples s.n. Connor dated 1598-1612.

MCKAY and MACKAY are found in the IGI Parish Extracts:

ALEXR. MCKAY Male Christening 3 November 1650 Inverness, Inverness, Scotland JOHNE MCKAY JANET MCPHERSONE Batch: C110982

AGNES MACKAY Female Christening 2 January 1645 Saint Nicholas, Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Scotland THOMAS MACKAY ISOBELL SAIDLAR Batch: C111684

Additional forms of the surname are also found in Black, s.n. MacKay, including <McCay> (1506), <Makke> (1538), <McKe> (1538, 1575), and <Mackai> (1619). As such, the submitted capitalization seems unremarkable.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

11: Connor MacKay - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name on the East LoI of January 19, 2012 as submitted.

Per chevron sable and vert, a chevron between a pithon fesswise and a wolf's head erased contourny argent.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

12: Daniel al-Andalusi - New Name

Daniel is a Jewish masculine name found in Arab contexts in Yehoshua ben Haim haYerushalami, "Jewish Names in the World of Medieval Islam" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/Jewish/Cairo/index.html). Hebrew names were transliterated into standardized modern forms by the sources used for the article; however, such forms are registerable by precedent for languages like Hebrew and Arabic.

al-Andalusi is the masculine form of a locative byname found in Juliana de Luna, "Andalusian Names: Arabs in Spain" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/andalusia/).

The combination of Hebrew given names and Arabic-style bynames are discussed in Yehoshua's article (op. cit.). Specifically, he includes locative nisbas: "In the data sets analyzed here there are several examples of a Arabic locative byname such as al-Basri and al-Baghdadi." Examples in the data set are <al-Qu-misi-, Daniel> and <David b. Abraham al-Fa-si-> (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/yehoshua/jews_in_cairo/cairo_authors.html), but these were found in Cairo. Examples specifically from Iberia were not found.

Note: The worksheet states that the submitter allows no changes. However, this information was not transcribed onto the form.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

13: Deo Giotto - New Name & New Device

Per pale argent and sable, a mastiff salient per pale counter-ermine and ermine.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound (Dee-oh) most important.

Both elements are found in Juliana de Luna, "A Listing of all Men's Given Names from the Condado Section of the Florence Catasto of 1427" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/condado/mensalpha.html).

Deo is found 7 times, and Giotto is found once, both as masculine given names.

Unmarked patronyms are registerable in Italian [Isabella Gabriele de Álora, 12/2003, A-West].

The submitter allows intermediate changes.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

14: Dmitri Stephanovich - New Name & New Device

Potent Or and gules, a tyger rampant within a bordure sable.

No major changes.
Sound (unspecified) most important.

Dmitri is found in Wickenden (print edn.), s.n. Dmitrii. It is found in the name of <Dmitri Vasil'evich', Novgorod captain>, dated 1415-21.

Stephanovich is a patronymic byname formed from the masculine given name Stephan, dated to 12th century (ibid., s.n. Stepan). Note that the submitted spelling is not found in the online edition.

The byname is constructed using the suffix -ovich, found on pp. xxi-xxiii (ibid.). Examples of this construction are <Ovram Stepanovich, Novgorod guard captain> (1411) and <Stepanovich' (Iakov Stepanovich')> (1419-20), both found in the online edition of Wickenden, s.n. Stepan. Commenters questioned whether the Stephanovich spelling was plausible, rather than the attested Stepanovich.

The submitter allows intermediate changes.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

15: Drusilla Lupa - New Name & New Device

Argent, a brown mastiff passant proper between three dog's pawprints sable.

Drusilla is the expected feminine form of Drusus, a masculine given name found at Nova Roma's website (http://www.novaroma.org/via_romana/names2.html). The transcriber's note is that it's also a member of the Julio-Claudian family. The masculine form Drusus is found as a nomen and cognomen, and the feminine form Drusilla found on the list of women's names, in Legion XXIV's article on "Roman Names" (http://www.legionxxiv.org/nomens/).

The feminine form of the name is found in An Epigraphic Commentary on Suetonius's Life of Gaius Caligula by Ruskin Raymond Rosborough (http://books.google.com/books?id=mepJAAAAMAAJ), which states that Drusilla is the name of Caligula's sister:

Drusilla: There are many inscriptions from all parts of the Roman world dedicated to and mentioning the favourite sister of Caligula. One of these dates from her childhood: CIL VI. 5201 = Dessau 1837: C. Papius Asclepiades | Papia Erotis 1., | Iulia Iucunda nutrix | Drusi et Drusillae. She is usually addressed as diva Drusilla, though in at least two inscriptions we find her called Julia Drusilla: CIL V. 5722 = Dessau 194 from Ager Mediolanensis in Cisalpine Gaul, and XII. 1026 = Dessau 195 from Avennio in Gallia Narbonensis. In VI. 8822 = Dessau 1655 we find a dispensator of Claudius with the name of Cinnamus Drusillianus, which would indicate that he took his nomen from the name Drusilla. Cf. VI. 8823. Other inscriptions relating to Drusilla will be given under the several chapters where she is mentioned.

Lupa is the expected feminine form of Lupus (Nova Roma, "Roman Names", http://www.novaroma.org/via_romana/names2.html). Also, A Study of the Cognomina of Soldiers in the Roman Legions by Lindley Richard Dean (http://books.google.com/books?id=MF0KAAAAIAAJ, pp. 75-76) shows Lupus as a masculine cognomen.

The combination of a feminized nomen followed by a feminized cognomen seems to be plausible by the late Republic period, according to Academy of Saint Gabriel report no. 2206 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/2206/):

By the late Republic period, women usually bore a feminized nomen followed by a feminized form or even a feminine diminutive of their father's cognomen. For example, the daughter of <Marcus Livius Drusus> was recorded as <Livia Drusilla>, although <Livia Drusa> would have been equally appropriate. Many variations arose during the imperial period, and by the latter centuries of the empire a woman might have been known by her father's nomen and cognomen (<Aemilia Lepida>, daughter of <Lucius Aemilius Lepidus>), by a combination of her father's and mother's nomina (<Valeria Attia>, daughter of <Marcus Attius Atticus> and <Valeria Sextina>), or by her father's nomen and a personal cognomen. [3]

[3] Mackay, Christopher S. "Roman Names." (WWW: University of Alberta, 1997.) [URL: http://www.ualberta.ca/~csmackay/CLASS_365/Roman.Rep.Names.html].

There is a request on the form to "please change name elements to reflect proper grammar when converting to feminine name".

There is an SFPP for the use of pawprints.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

16: Edmund Robert von Freiburg - New Name Change

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in April of 2012, via the East.

Old Item: Katarina von Freiburg, to be released.

Edmund is a masculine given name found in Withycombe, s.n. Edmond, dated 1086, 1199-1219, etc.

Robert is a header form in Withycombe, with <Robertus> dated 1186-1220 and 1273.

von Freiburg is grandfathered to the submitter.

There is an SFPP for the combination of English and German; however, the name is entirely German. Latinized inflected forms (Edmundus and Edmundum), and the surname Robert are found in the IGI Parish Extracts:

EDMUNDUS HAIN Male Marriage 16 SEP 1610 Evangelisch, Elsoff, Westfalen, Preussen Batch M972471

EDMUNDUS FIEGEN Male Christening 08 FEB 1632 Roemisch-Katholische, Alfter, Rheinland, Preussen Batch C995621

EDMUNDUM GROURE Male Marriage 04 JUL 1624 Sankt Kunibert Katholisch, Koeln Stadt, Rheinland, Preussen Batch M968861

ADAMUS WILHELMUS ROBERT Male Christening 05 APR 1648 Liebfrauen Katholisch, Koblenz Stadt, Rheinland, Preussen Batch C970971

ANNA ROBERT Female Christening 17 MAR 1649 Sankt Aposteln Katholisch, Koeln Stadt, Rheinland, Preussen Batch K968801


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

17: Eoin O Mally - New Name & New Device

Or, a shamrock vert in base two swords in saltire gules.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Meaning (Preserve Eoin) most important.

Eoin is found in Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada, "Names Found in Anglicized Irish Documents" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/Masculine.shtml), s.n. John, which lists an <Eoin dow O Mulgherick> in 1602.

O Mally is an Anglicized Irish surname found in Woulfe, s.n. Ó Máílle. It is an italicized spelling, meaning it dates to the 16th-17th centuries.

The submitter allows intermediate changes.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

18: Esclarmonde al-Andalusiyya - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2010, via the East

(Fieldless) A gauntlet aversant sable within and grasping an annulet Or.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

19: Everard de l'Est - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Meaning (from the East) most important.

Everard is a header spelling in Withycombe, which describes it as a male name introduced into England by the Normans that was fairly common in the 12th and 13th centuries. R&W, s.n. Everard has <William Everard> dated to 1204 and 1255. An <Everardus de Cathal'> is found in Latin in 'Close Rolls, April 1258', Calendar of Close Rolls, Henry III: volume 10: 1256-1259 (1932), pp. 208-217 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=93904&strquery=everardus).

de l'Est is intended as a locative surname meaning 'from the East', to reflect the submitter's kingdom of origin. R&W, s.n. East, gives <Walter Est>, c. 1220. The byname is glossed as meaning 'Man from the east' or 'dweller to the east' [of the village]. Bardsley p. 262 s.n. East also has <del Est> dated to 1273. The submitted spelling of the byname seems reasonable considering the above examples, as well as examples like <de la Lade> (1214), <de la Lande> (1205), and <de la Launde> (1262), found in R&W, s.nn. Lade and Land.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

20: Fionn mac Con Dhuibh - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 2012, via the East

Azure, three orbs argent.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

21: Gianetta Lucia Allegretta - Resub Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 2003, via the East

Old Item: Argent, a bear rampant vert and on a bordure sable three thistles Or, to be released.

Her current device was registered Aug. 1990 (East). This is a resubmission of a device change, Or, a mermaid affronty facing dexter argent tailed vert crined gules, maintaining a threaded needle and a pair of scissors sable, on a chief invected azure a pomegranate Or seeded gules between two escallops inverted argent, that was returned on the 04/2009 LoAR:

This device is returned for excessive complexity. With seven charges (mermaid, thread, needle, scissors, chief, pomegranate, and escallop) and six tinctures (Or, vert, gules, sable, azure, argent), this device has a complexity count of thirteen, which exceeds our rule-of-thumb limit of eight. While this design may very well be good period style for the Tudor era, the submitter must demonstrate this level of complexity in similar Tudor arms in order for this design to be registerable using the documented exceptions clause.

This device is not in conflict with that of Cordelia of Diamond Cove,Argent, a mermaid in her vanity proper, crined sable, on a chief invected azure three lozenges argent. By precedent, maintained charges do not count towards determination of whether X.2 or X.4.j.ii can be used with a device:

Azure, a mermaid proper crined Or maintaining in her dexter hand a shamshir proper and in her sinister hand a gemstone gules, on a chief argent three crescents gules. This device does not conflict with Camilla de la Reynarde la Droitière, Azure, a blonde mermaid proper, tailed argent, maintaining in each hand a garden rose gules, on a chief argent, three foxes passant gules. There is a CD for changing the tincture of half the mermaid and another for substantially changing the type of the tertiaries under RfS X.4.j.ii. Our practice has been to ignore maintained charges when defining a device as simple armory for the purposes of this rule and RfS X.2. [Elise l'Éstrange, 05-2005, A-An Tir]

Since the submitted device meets the requirements for applying X.4.j.ii, having only two types of charge counted on the field and having no overall charges, there is a CD for the change of tincture of the field and another for changing only the type of all the tertiary charges on the chief.

It should be noted that the mermaid's skin was colored with a flesh-colored marker; however, it scanned a little on the purplish side. Eastern Crown is highly amused by the zombie mermaid in the color-corrected emblazon.

Correction (2012-Jan-20 11:01:59): The blazon was accidentally omitted. It should be Or, a mermaid proper crined and tailed on a chief invected azure a pomegranate slipped and leaved Or between two escallops inverted argent


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

22: Gwenhwyvar verch Ieuan - New Name & New Device

Or ermined azure, on a lozenge ployé azure a dragon segreant reversed Or.

No changes.

All three elements and the name pattern are found in Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn, "A Simple Guide to Constructing 16th C. Welsh Names (in English Contexts)" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/welsh16.html).

Commenters were not sure if the name conflicts with Gwenhwyvar verch Owein (Oct. 2005, Caid).


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

23: Heinreich Wächter - New Name & New Device

Per chevron gules and sable, in pale three mullets of six points in fess and a cock rousant Or.

No major changes.
Language (German) most important.
Culture (German) most important.

Heinreich is a given name found in Bahlow/Gentry, s.n. Heinrich. The submitted spelling is dated 1340.

Wächter 'watchman' is an undated header form in Bahlow/Gentry; however, this theme can be seen in the surname <Slupwachter>, dated 1344. The spelling <Wachter> is also found 22 times in the IGI Parish Extracts, dated 1571-1646:

ANNA MARIA WACHTER Female Christening 12 March 1640 Katholisch, Assamstadt, Mosbach, Baden ADAMI WACHTER ANNAE Batch: C950051

Anna Wachter Female Birth 10 March 1617 Engen, Konstanz, Baden Joannes Georg Wachter Agnes Batch: C940911

Anna Wachter Female Christening 1 August 1640 Evangelisch, Konigsbronn, Jagstkreis, Wuerttemberg Hans Wachter Catharina Batch: C922291

APOLLONIA WACHTER Female Christening 14 December 1578 Evangelisch, Fellbach, Neckarkreis, Wuerttemberg MATTHIS WACHTER CATHARINA Batch: C956271

(and others)

The submitter specifically approves removal of the diacritical mark from the surname if necessary for registration, and allows intermediate changes. The name was forwarded without changes in the hopes that commenters could justify the submitted form.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

24: Horst Adelger - New Name & New Device

Per pale azure and sable, four spears fretted in saltire between three Maltese crosses argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Meaning (surname 'spearman' in German) most important.

Horst is found in Dietric Engelhus, Weltchronik according to Siebecke, s.n. Horst. This 1424 primary source is a Low German chronicle mentioning the Anglo-Saxon Horsa (Hors) of Germanic and Arthurian legend. Thus, the literary name allowance may apply. In addition, the given name is found in a non-literary context in the IGI Parish Extracts:

HORST ENGELHARDT Male Marriage 29 June 1642 Katholisch, Donaustetten, Donaukreis, Wuerttemberg CATHARINA BALIER Batch: M958791

Adelger is found in Bahlow/Gentry, s.n. Adelger, dated 1138 and 1374.

The submitter allows intermediate changes.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

25: Ibrahim al-Rashid ibn Musa - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 2008, via the East

(Fieldless) A goutte per saltire gules and argent.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

26: Ignacia la Ciega - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 2003, via the East

A bear statant contourny Or ermined gules.

This is a resubmission of a kingdom return, but is new to Laurel.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

27: Illana de Londres - New Name & New Device

Per fess argent goutty gules and azure, a sun azure and a Paschal lamb passant guardant argent.

Sound (closest to Ilya) most important.

The submitter allows all changes to the first name, but not to the last name.

Illana is found in Talan Gwynek, "A glossary of the personal names in Diez Melcon's Appellidos Castellano-Leoneses" (KWHSS Proceedings, 1993), dated to 1245.

de Londres is found in Colm Dubh, "An Index to the Given/Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/paris.html), with <Matelin de Londres, pastéer>.

The combination of Spanish and French is an SFPP.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

28: Jason de Londres - New Name & New Device

Per fess gules masoned Or and azure, in base a Paschal lamb passant guardant argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound (unspecified) most important.

Jason is a given name dated 1570 in the IGI Parish Extracts:

JASON FOSBROOKE Male Christening 28 March 1570 Saint Leonards, Bridgnorth, Shropshire, England RICHARD FOSBROOKE Batch: C085821

de Londres is the byname of <Matelin de Londres, pastéer>, found in Colm Dubh, "An Index to the Given Names of the 1292 Census of Paris" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/paris.html).

Elmet also found <de Londres> in a modern English translation of a French-language document:

Enrolment of deed testifying that whereas John de la Broke, parson of Dycherigg church, has granted to Thomas Sewale of Wykham the moiety of the manor of Great Lynton for life with remainder to John de Knovyll and Margaret his wife, as is contained in a fine levied in the king's court, John de Knovyll grants that he will not challenge Thomas for any waste or exile of the tenants of the said moiety. Dated at Lynton, co. Cambridge, on the quinzaine of Martinmas, 17 Edward III. Witnesses: John de Londres, John le Engleys, Gilbert de Berdefeld. French.

'Close Rolls, Edward III: November 1343', Calendar of Close Rolls, Edward III: volume 7: 1343-1346 (1904), pp. 248-252 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=100858&strquery="de Londres"

The bynames in this source do not appear to have been normalized.

The device may conflict with Chlurain, Clan (reblazoned Nov. 2010, Atenveldt), Per fess gules and Or, a sheep passant argent, maintaining under its sinister foreleg a tub sable. There is a CD for the field, but nothing for the change in the maintained charge. There may be a CD for arrangement, as the move is not forced. Alternatively, the Paschal lamb is a distinct period charge, different from a normal sheep, and it was thought that there might be a CD on that basis.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

29: Jehanne Johnstone - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister embattled vert and Or, a rosary Or and a thistle purpure.

No major changes.
Sound (unspecified) most important.

Jehanne is found in Withycombe, s.n. Joan, which states that Jehanne or [Jehanne] was common in the 12th century in the south of France.

Johnstone is found in Johnston, Place-Names of Scotland (p. 213). Perth was known as <Sanct Johnstoun> a. 1220. However, Eastern Crown couldn't tell from the form and worksheet if the submitted spelling is actually found in this source, and in what year.

Thankfully, both the given name and surname are also found in IGI parish extracts. The given name is found as a feminine name used by French women living in England, and the surname was found in Scotland and England:

JEHANNE BORRE;Female;Christening;31 January 1613;Threadneedle Street French Huguenot, London, London, England;;Batch: C049031.

JEHANNE BOURRELLE;Female;Christening;7 August 1622;Walloon, Southampton, Hampshire, England;;Batch: C049471.

JEHANNE CHRISTMESSE;Female;Christening;13 October 1622;Walloon, Southampton, Hampshire, England; Batch: C049471.

JEHANNE CORDONNIER;Female;Christening;21 June 1612;Threadneedle Street French Huguenot, London, London, England;;Batch: C049031.

JEHANNE DE LA LANDE;Female;Christening;27 November 1625;Walloon, Southampton, Hampshire, England;;Batch: C049471.

JEHANNE DE NOLEM;Female;Christening;12 May 1618;Threadneedle Street French Huguenot, London, London, England;;Batch: C049031.

JEHANNE DE ROUBAY;Female;Christening;21 April 1616;Threadneedle Street French Huguenot, London, London, England;;Batch: C049031.

JEHANNE DES QUIENS;Female;Christening;18 March 1610;Threadneedle Street French Huguenot, London, London, England;;Batch: C049031.

JEHANNE DOIGNET;Female;Christening;15 April 1621;Walloon, Southampton, Hampshire, England;;Batch: C049471.

JEHANNE DU BOIS;Female;Christening;29 October 1622;Threadneedle Street French Huguenot, London, London, England;;Batch: C049031.

JEHANNE DU CRO;Female;Christening;18 August 1611;Threadneedle Street French Huguenot, London, London, England;;Batch: C049031.

JEHANNE FORTERESSE;Female;Christening;1 September 1611;Threadneedle Street French Huguenot, London, London, England;;Batch: C049031.

JEHANNE GILLET;Female;Christening;20 September 1612;Threadneedle Street French Huguenot, London, London, England;;Batch: C049031.

JEHANNE HERSENT;Female;Christening;17 August 1617;Walloon, Southampton, Hampshire, England;;Batch: C049471.

ADAM JOHNSTONE;Male;Marriage;18 April 1620;Saint Martin In The Fields, Westminster, London, England; Batch: M001452.

AGNES JOHNSTONE;Female;Marriage;3 March 1614;Prestonpans, East Lothian, Scotland; Batch: M117182.

AGNES JOHNSTONE;Female;Marriage;10 December 1616;South Leith, Midlothian, Scotland; Batch: M195041.

ANDREW JOHNSTONE;Male;Marriage;2 December 1617;South Leith, Midlothian, Scotland; Batch: M195041.

(and so forth)

In addition, <Jehane Kenedy> was a servant of Mary Queen of Scots for whom a passport was issued according to 'Elizabeth: August 1587', Calendar of State Papers, Scotland: volume 9: 1586-88 (1915), pp. 457-481 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=44980&strquery=Jehanne). The names are not modernized. Secondly, a <Humphrey Johnston> (also spelled as <Johnstone>) is found in 'Cecil Papers: August 1578', Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 2: 1572-1582. (1888), pp. 191-199 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=109884&strquery=Johnstone ). The bynames do not appear to have been normalized.

The submitter allows intermediate changes.

The uppermost charge was blazoned as a paternoster, but was reblazoned in kingdom as a rosary to aid in reproducibility.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

30: Joiha de Moncado - New Name & New Device

Quarterly purpure and azure, an ankh argent charged on each arm with a mascle purpure.

No major changes.
Sound (Joiha, sound of <de Moncado>) most important.

Joiha is dated to 1200 in the Academy of Saint Gabriel report no. 3009 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/3009), which cites Withycombe, s.n. Joy.

de Moncado is dated 1370 in Juliana de Luna, "Occitan Townspeople in the 14th Century" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/occitan/occitan-bynames.html).

To clarify the checkboxes, the submitter "really wants <Joiha>, Keep sound of <de Moncado>". The submitter allows intermediate changes.

The combination of English and Occitan/Provencal is registerable with a SFPP. [Aliénor of Essewell, 08/2006 LoAR A-Lochac].


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

31: Katryne Morgant - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister gules and sable, two dragonflies in annulo argent

No major changes.

The name was submitted as Katryne Morgaine, but the surname was changed to meet the submitter's request.

Katryne is a feminine name found in Black, s.n. Scarth, dated 1528.

Morgant is the submitter's preferred surname, if it could be documented. Elmet found it in 1515:

25 May. Calig. D.VI. 269. B.M. 506. The "GENS DES CHANCELERIE ET GRANT CO[NSEIL"] OF BRITANNY to HENRY VIII.

Demand restitution to be made to two merchants of the city of Lantriguer in Britanny, named Yuon de Begaignon (?) and Oliver Le Bleiz, whose ship "La Marie de Lantriguer," (Yuon Hamon master,) freighted by them on the 20th Sept. when there was peace between England and France, was attacked and robbed in the harbour of Falmouth by an English ship of war, of which John Brigandin was captain, and Yuon Morgant master. The complaint of the merchants has been referred to certain judges who have made due inquiry. Other actes et enseignements transmitted herewith. Nantes, 25 May 1515.

The names do not appear to have been normalized, although the rest of the text has been.

The name would conflict with Kathryn Morgan, registered 12/1982 via the East. However, that name was changed to Emma la Rousse d'Argentan in 04/1996. The disposition of the old name was not stated in the 1996 LoAR, but the request to release the old name was stated on the Letter of Intent, and releasing is the default unless specified otherwise.

However, in the event that the name was not actually released, the submitter allows the locative of Mowill to be added in order to clear the conflict. This place name is found in Johnston, Place-Names of Scotland, s.n. Mull, dated 1542. Other than the change in surname and the addition of the locative if necessary, no other changes are authorized.

As we were not sure how we could define the arrangement further, we decided to leave it out instead. Blazoning the precise arrangement of animals in annulo is optional:

[Argent, a thistle proper between in pale two crocodiles statant in annulo vert.] When animals are in annulo they are not given arrangement difference from other animals which are also in annulo. Thus, in pale two crocodiles statant in annulo would thus not be considered heraldically different from in fess two crocodiles statant in annulo. Therefore, explicit blazon of the arrangement of animals in annulo is optional. Here we have elected to retain the in pale blazon provided by the submitter in order that a reconstructed emblazon will more closely match the submitted emblazon. [Giovanni Orseolo, Aug. 2005]


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

32: Kira Asahi - New Name Change

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in April of 2012, via the East.

Old Item: Solveig Anderhalfholt, to be released.
No major changes.
Meaning ('light of the morning') most important.

Both elements are found in NCMJ (revised edn.).

Kira (p. 232) is a surname dated to 1332.

Asahi (p. 374) is a feminine given name dated to before 1600.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

33: Lassar ingen Aeda - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 1995, via the East

Argent, a bend sinister sable, overall a triskele of boar's heads azure.

This is a resubmission of a kingdom return, but is new to Laurel.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

34: Lassar ingen Aeda - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 1995, via the East

(Fieldless) In pale a raven displayed sable sustaining a fish argent.

There is a step from period practice for the use of a bird displayed that is not an eagle.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

35: Lucete la tabouréesse - New Name & New Device

Per chevron potenty gules and argent, in base a lyre sable.

Meaning (Lucinda of the drum, either in French or Spanish) most important.

Lucete is found in "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" by Colm Dubh (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/paris.html) as a feminine given name. The example is <Lucete (une) chamberiere>.

la tabouréesse is a possible feminine form of the byname le tabouréeur, found in the name <Jehan, le tabouréeur>, in Colm Dubh, "Occupational By-Names in the 1292 Tax Role of Paris" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/parisbynames.html). The submitted form was considered to be the likely feminine form, considering the examples <afeteeur/afeterresse>, <afinneeur/afineresse>, and <cerenceeur/cerenceresse>, among others (ibid.). The accent may have been a modern editorial addition, but we are giving it the benefit of the doubt and not removing it.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

36: Madelaine de Mortaigne - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2010, via the East

Argent, four hedgehogs two and two and on a chief sable a crocodile statant argent.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

37: Madelaine de Mortaigne - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2010, via the East

(Fieldless) A bat-winged hedgehog rampant sable.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

38: Magnús œðikollr - New Device Change

OSCAR thinks the name is registered as Magnús oeðikollr in April of 2010, via the East.

Per bend sinister argent and gules, a bear passant and in canton a paw print sable.

Old Item: Gules, an open book azure en soleil Or, on a chief argent a bear passant sable, to be retained as a badge.

His current device was registered in 02/2011 (East).

There is an SFPP for the use of a paw print.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

39: Maria de Moura - New Name & New Device

Per pale wavy azure and Or, a boar and a mastiff combattant counterchanged.

No major changes.
Language (Portuguese, 14th century) most important.
Culture (Portuguese, 14th century) most important.

Maria is a feminine given name found in Juliana de Luna, "Portuguese Names 1350-1450" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/portuguese.htm).

de Moura is a locative byname found in the same article, in the name <Alvoro Gonçallvez de Moura>. The place name also is found in "Moorish Place-names in Portugal" by Pedro de Alcazar (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/portplacenames.html).


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

40: Milissent de Haithwait - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 2004, via the East

Gules, a unicorn passant on a chief argent three fleurs-de-lys gules.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

41: Pagan Graeme - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 1999, via the East

(Fieldless) On an oak leaf per pale sable and argent a heart gules.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

42: Ragnar Tillson - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister argent and sable, a blacksmith's hammer and a mullet voided and interlaced counterchanged.

No changes.

Ragnar is a masculine personal name found in Lind, s.n. Ragnar.

Tillson is an interpolated form of <Tylson>, a byname meaning 'son of Till (Matilda)' found in R&W, s.n. Tilson, dated 1609. The consulting herald notes that i/y and l/ll switches are common in English.

As documented, this name has 2 SFPPs: one for the language combination and one for the temporal disparity. However, both elements are found as surnames in the IGI Parish Extracts from England:

RICHARD RAGNAR Male Christening 28 November 1630 Saint Katherine By The Tower, London, London, England NICHOLAS RAGNAR Batch: P001441

William Tillson Male Marriage 7 May 1575 Coningsby, Lincoln, England Dorothie Eastwood Batch: M027643

WILLIAM TILLSON Male Christening 14 May 1615 Saint Dunstan, Stepney, London, England RICHARD TILLSON Batch: C055765

WILLM TILLSON Male Christening 23 January 1602 Gedney, Lincoln, England JOHN TILLSON Batch: C028501

(And others)

Precedent allows the use of surnames as given names in late-period England, so this name should be registerable as submitted.

Despite the checkboxes being filled out for 'no changes', the submitter specifically allows the addition of a final -r or "du Dragonet" [sic] (branch name locative) to clear conflict. The correct branch name is Le Fief des Dragonets, Shire of, registered 11/2006 (East).

The question was raised whether this runs afoul of the ban on voided charges that are not in the center of the design. It is the opinion of the East's College of Heralds that this design is registerable because, although the mullet is not at the center of the escutcheon, it is still part of the primary charge group and easy to identify. It was thought that this device is clear of Úlfr sleggja Bjarnarson (Oct. 2002, Meridies), Per bend sinister argent and sable, a Thor's hammer and a wolf rampant counterchanged, with a CD for changing the wolf to a mullet, and a possible second CD for changing the orientation of the hammer.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

43: Raymond Pélerin - New Name

No major changes.
Sound (Raymond, Pelleran) most important.
Language (French) most important.
Culture (French) most important.

Raymond is a masculine given name found in "Commercial Documents from Bordeaux, 1470-1520" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael and Talan Gwynek (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/bordeaux.html).

Pélerin is dated to 1609 as a byname in Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada, "Names found in Ambleny Registers 1578-1616" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/Ambleny).

The submitter allows intermediate changes.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

44: Reuben the Curious - New Name & New Device

Gules, on a chalice Or three lozenges vert, within a bordure wavy Or.

No major changes.
Meaning (the curious) most important.

Reuben is the submitter's legal first name, as attested from his driver's license by Eastern Crown and Elmet. The name is not obtrusively modern, as the spelling Ruben is found in the MED:

c1230(?a1200) *Ancr.(Corp-C 402) 78b: Ruben, þu reade þoht, þu blodi delit, ne waxe þu neauer!

(a1398) * Trev. Barth.(Add 27944) 165b/a: Þe whiche londe afterwarde was possessioun to Ruben and gadde.

c1300 SLeg.Judas (Hrl 2277) 8: As þis Ruben bi his wyf ani3t ileye hadde, Harde metinge his wyf mette, whar of he sore adradde.

(Reuben is more modern transliteration of the Hebrew name, but such transliterations are registerable by precedent. As such, the submitter does not have to rely on the legal name allowance.)

the Curious is the lingua anglica form of the descriptive byname le Qwointe/le Coynte/le Queynte (1254-67, 1256), found in R&W, s.n. Quant and in the introduction:

The main difficulty with nicknames lies in the interpretation of them. There may be more than one possible meaning, e.g. Quant, from ME quoint, queynte, had various meanings in medieval England, 'strange, curious, ingenious, clever, crafty', and we can rarely tell which sense is intended in any particular case.

(R&W, Introduction: Nicknames)

Multiple hits for the word were found in the MED as well, such as the following:

Definition: Of persons: (a) careful, meticulous; fastidious; (b) skillful, ingenious, expert, learned; (c) solicitous, concerned (about sth.); zealous, eager (to do sth.), intent (upon); (d) inquisitive, curious; prying (as a busybody).

a1450 Castle Persev.(Folg V.a.354) 320: Coryows Criste, to 3ou I calle.

(a1398) * Trev. Barth.(Add 27944) 73a/a: A good seruaunt is wijs and ware and curious to 3eue acountis..of what he haþ I fonge.

(c1387-95) Chaucer CT.Prol.(Manly-Rickert) A.577: Maistres..That weren of lawe expert and curious.

(a1470) Malory Wks.(Win-C) 626/32: Because he was a coryous harper men harde hym synge the same lay that sir Dynadan made.

As such, the submitter is being given the benefit of the doubt that the name is a plausible lingua anglica form.

The combination of a Hebrew given name and a Middle English byname would normally be a step from period practice, but this can be eliminated via the legal name allowance.

The submitter allows intermediate changes.

Commenters thought that the lozenges could be viewed as mere decorations on the cup, but did not find any conflicts under either interpretation.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

45: Ro Honig von Sommerfeldt - New Name & New Device

Sable, a peacock in his pride and a chief Or.

No major changes.
Spelling (Honig) most important.

Ro is found as a feminine given name in "German Names from 1495" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/german1495.html).

Honig is the surname found in the IGI Parish Extracts, dated between 1614 and 1645:

BALTHAS HONIG Male Marriage 24 April 1636 Evangelisch, Aldingen Ludwigsburg, Neckarkreis, Wuerttemberg ANNA MARIA FREY Batch: M969001

MARGARETHA HONIG Female Marriage 18 November 1625 Katholisch, Gissigheim, Mosbach, Baden CASPER SCHNARBERGER Batch: M944061

MARIA HONIG Female Christening 12 October 1614 Evangelisch, Hattingen, Westfalen, Preussen ROTGER HONIG ELSEN Batch: C983201

OTTILIA HONIG Female Marriage 17 November 1615 Katholisch, Gissigheim, Mosbach, Baden MATHAEUS MACKERT Batch: M944061

WILHELM HONIG Male Christening 25 August 1645 Evangelisch, Hoechst Odenwald, Starkenburg, Hessen MICHEL HONIG REGINAE Batch: C931801

von Sommerfeldt is found in Brechenmacher, s.n. Sommerfeld, dated 1649.

The submitter allows intermediate changes.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

46: Robert de Londres - New Name & New Device

Per fess sable and azure, an annulet Or and a Paschal lamb passant guardant argent.

No major changes.
Sound (unspecified) most important.

Robert is a masculine given name found in Colm Dubh, "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/paris.html), with the example <Robert le berchier>.

de Londres is the byname of <Matelin de Londres, pastéer> (ibid.).


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

47: Sakura'i no Kesame - New Name

No major changes.
Language (Heian period Japanese) most important.
Culture (Heian period Japanese) most important.

All elements are found in NCMJ (revised edn.).

Kesame is a feminine given name found on p. 378, Heran date 1147.

Sakura'i is an uji (clan name) found on p. 396, GR101 Ancient.

The use of no is described on p. 27.

Assistance justifying the name pattern is appreciated.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

48: Síle Dhubh inghean Mhic an Mhadaidh - New Name & New Device

Per fess wavy gules and sable, a fess wavy between a roundel and an eagle trussing a duck argent.

No major changes.

Síle is a feminine given name, described as a borrowing of the Latin name Caecilia, brought into Ireland by the Anglo-Normans. It is a header form in OC&M. It is also the name of 12 woman found in years 1471-1589 in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Sile.shtml).

Dhubh 'black' is a descriptive byname for someone with black hair (ibid., http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Dub.shtml). It is the lenited form used in a woman's name in Early Modern Irish Gaelic.

The formation of a two-generation patronym using inghean... Mhic is found in Sharon Krossa, "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names" (http://medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/#spelling). This is the Early Modern Irish Gaelic spelling.

inghean Mhic an Mhadaidh is based on the undated header Mac an Mhadaidh, found in Woulfe. This family name would originate from the literal patronymic byname <mac an Mhadaigh>, indicating that the father had the descriptive byname <an Mhadaidh> '[of] the Dog'. From this patronym would derive the family name <Mac an Mhadiadh>. Examples of descriptive bynames similar to <an Mhadaidh> '[of] the dog' can be found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Topic.shtml), which lists the following descriptive bynames referring to domesticated animals:

[of] the Beeves/Cattle (na Mart)

[of] the Milch Cows (na nGamhnach)

[of] the White Horse (in Eich Gil)

The Annals of Connacht, entry 1542.10, mentions the place name <Leim an Madaidh> 'Leap [of] the Dog', showing <Madaidh> is a period form. Connacht uses conservative spellings, which explains the lack of the expected lenition in the element <Madaidh> (the expected form would be <Mhadaidh>).

The submitter allows intermediate changes.

From prior registrations, it appears that a raptor trussing another bird (a period heraldic motif) is treated as a single charge, so this device does not run afoul of the bans on sword-and-dagger and slot machine heraldry. Trussed charges are considered to be "maintained charges unless explicitly blazoned otherwise" [Lorccán na Túaithe, June 2009, A-Gleann Abhann].


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

49: Soleina Adelger - New Name & New Device

Per chevron Or and purpure, three needles bendwise sinister in fess and a pair of zils in fess counterchanged.

No major changes.
Meaning (last name needs to mean 'spear' or 'spearman') most important.

Soleina is a name header dated 1362 in "Jewish Women's Names in 13th-15th cent. Navarre" by Julie Kahan (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juetta/nav_intro.html). The given name is also found in "Pedes finium; of fines, relating to the County of Cambridge, levied in the King's court from the seventh year of Richard I. to the end of the reign of Richard III" at p. 11 (http://books.google.com/books?id=d5g0AAAAIAAJ). This source mentions a <Soleina wife of Ralph de Burgh> dated to the 4th year of the reign of Henry III of England. The names do not appear to have been modernized.

Adelger is a header form in Bahlow, with <Hans Adelger> found in Rutlinger in 1374.

The combination of either Spanish and German, or English and German is a step from period practice.

The submitter allows intermediate changes.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

50: Sorcha Chathasach - New Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in September of 1990, via the East

Argent, in pale three foxes courant gules within a bordure dovetailed vert.

Old Item: Argent, a harp vert between three foxes courant gules within a bordure dovetailed vert, to be released.

The current device was registered Sept. 1991 (East).


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

51: Svoi Ivanov - New Name

No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for 10th-11th century Novgorod.

Svoi is a given name dated 1078 in Wickenden (http://heraldry.sca.org/paul/).

Ivanov is a patronymic byname formed from Ivan, dated to before 1147 (ibid.).

The submitter allows intermediate changes.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

52: Takiyama Yoshiatsu - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 2012, via the East

Gules, six arrow fletchings conjoined, shafts to center, within an annulet argent.

After Pennsic, the device was redrawn at the request of the submitter. He has approved the new art.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

53: Þóðrekr ógæfa - New Name

No major changes.
Language (Old Norse) most important.
Culture (Old Norse) most important.

Þóðrekr is found three times in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Viking Names found in Landnámabók" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/landnamabok.html). Geirr Bassi gives the spelling Þjóðrekr, so the submitted spelling may be incorrect.

ógæfa 'unlucky' is found once (ibid.). It is also found in Geirr Bassi.

The submitter allows intermediate changes.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

54: Thomas mac Bryan - New Name & New Device

Per pale vert and Or, two phoenixes counterchanged.

No major changes.
Sound (Bryan is preferred to Brian) most important.

Thomas is a given name dated between 1528 and 1639 in "Names Found in Anglicized Irish Documents" by Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/Masculine.shtml). In addition, the abbreviation Tho. is dated between 1583-4 and 1602, the abbreviation T. is found in 1597-8, the hypocoristic form Thom is found in 1570.

Bryan is a given name dated between 1570/1 and 1628 (ibid.).

The mac X pattern occurs in Anglicized Irish. The same article includes the examples <Brian mac Felim> (1628), <Bryen mac Connor Ohein> (1612), <Cahir mac Hugh Duffe> (1628), and <Daniell mac Richard> (1639). As such, the name was forwarded without changes.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

55: Tjolnir Egilsson - New Name & New Device

Per fess argent and gyronny arrondy of six azure and argent, a knarr sable.

Client requests authenticity for turn of millenium Iceland.
Sound (pronunciation of Tjolnir) most important.

Tjolnir is a Norse-era masculine given name in William Charles Green, Translations from the Icelandic (http://books.google.com/books/?id=PRUuAAAAMAAJ), p. 26. Tjolnir is a legendary name, found as Tjölnir in the cited source. Evidence of its use by normal humans was not found. Elmet suggested the name <TóliR> or <Týlir> as an alternative, both found in Lena Peterson, "Nordiskt runnamnslexikon" (http://www.sofi.se/servlet/GetDoc?meta_id=1472). However, those names do not have the submitter's desired sound. Therefore, we are bumping this up for further assistance by the College of Arms.

Egilsson is a patronymic byname formed from Egill, found as a masculine given name in Geirr Bassi, with 11 instances in the Landnámabók (p. 9).

Formation of a patronym is discussed on p. 17 (ibid.).

The submitter allows intermediate changes.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

56: Úlfarr gylðir - New Name & New Device

Úlfarr gylðir

No major changes.
Language (Old Norse) most important.
Culture (Old Norse) most important.
Meaning (wolf) most important.

Both elements are found in Geirr Bassi.

Úlfarr is a masculine given name found on p. 15.

gylðir 'howler, wolf' is found on p. 22. The submitter allows intermediate changes.

The form originally stated that the desired meaning was 'berserker' and 'wolf'. However, the former should not have been included and was not requested, per the consulting herald. As a result, the form was corrected.

There is an SFPP for the use of a wolf ululant.

Correction (2012-Jan-24 19:01:05): The blazon was inadvertently omitted. It is Per pale vert and argent, a wolf courant ululant contourny counterchanged.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

57: Vibeke Steensdatter aff Broen - New Name & New Device

Argent, two pink flamingo's wings conjoined proper within a bordure sable.

No major changes.
Culture (15th century Denmark, 'v' to 'w' switch ok) most important.

Vibeke is a woman's name found in a 1403 entry in Diplomatorium Danicum (http://diplomatarium.dk/en_dd/index.html). It is found in Latin: <Wibeken relicta Hinrici Waghen> ['Wibeken widow of Hinric Waghen'] (http://diplomatarium.dk/en_dd/diplomer/03-159-2.html). The Danish above the Latin at the same site provides the submitted spelling: "Vibeke, enke efter Henrik Vogn". It is not known if this was a modern translation/spelling.

Steensdatter is a patronymic byname derived from the masculine given name Steen, found in the 1406 example <her Steen Beyntsøns> ['Herr Steen Beyntsøns'] (http://diplomatarium.dk/en_dd/diplomer/06-202.html).

-datter and examples of forming the genitive of the father's name are found in Academy of Saint Gabriel report no. 1774 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/1774):

This brings us to the last element of the name, the word for 'daughter'. As you may know, this was <do/ttir> in Old Norse and is now <datter> in Danish and Bokma*l and <dotter> in Swedish and Nynorsk. [9, 10] (Here <a*> stands for the letter a-ring.) The Bokma*l <datter> is undoubtedly the result of Danish influence, the Nynorsk <dotter> representing the normal Norwegian development. More precisely, the Nynorsk form represents especially the normal development in the western dialects. But since Swedish also has <dotter>, it seems likely that this was the normal development in the eastern dialects as well. Finally, though modern Danish has <datter>, we found the word given as <dottær> in an edition of the _Gesta Danorum_. According to the notes, the selection is in the Old Danish dialect of Seeland and reflects the language of the early 14th century. [11] From this we conclude that in your period the vowel of the first syllable was normally written (and probably still pronounced) as <o>.

We don't know exactly when the unstressed vowel of the second syllable was lowered from <i > to <e> or <æ>. However, a selection from _Fagrskinna_ based on two Old Norwegian manuscripts written c.1250 and at the beginning of the 14th century uses <bro/ðer> instead of the older <bro/ðir>. [12] Moreover, there was a general tendency in 13th century Old Norwegian to replace <i > by <e> in unstressed syllables following stressed <o/>. [13]

On the other hand, actual Norwegian documents show the following forms from the 13th and early 14th centuries [14]:

[snipped other forms for length]

datter:

1309 (Bergen)

daatter:

1309 (Bergen)

(The last two occur in the same record and probably represent a sound similar to that of <a*> in <a*tte> 'eight'.)

[snipped further discussion]

Finally, we note that in most of the documentary citations the word for 'daughter' is separated from the father's name, e.g., <Brighit Barðar dotter> 1308 (Bergen). There are a few examples of the joined form, including one from Oslo, <Jngibiorg Gunnarsdottir> 1302. The more copious data for masculine patronymics show a similar variation, though with a higher proportion of joined forms.

[9] Cleasby, R., G. Vigfusson, & W. Craigie. An Icelandic-English Dictionary (Oxford: At the University Press, 1975); s.v. <do/ttir>.

[10] Bjo|rnskau, Kjell. Langenscheidts Praktisches Lehrbuch Norwegisch (Berlin: Langenscheidt KG, 1975; glossary. [Here <o|> stands for slashed-o.]

[11] Gordon, op. cit., pp. 165, 325. The spelling has been normalized by the editor, but the normalization clearly retains characteristically Old Danish features.

[12] Ibid., p. 158. The accent may be editorial, and the editor may have replaced an original thorn with an edh, but the vowels undoubtedly reflect the original.

[13] Ibid., p. 319f.

[14] Bjerke, Robert. A Contrastive Study of Old German and Old Norwegian Kinship Terms. Indiana University Publications in Anthropology and Linguistics, Memoir 22 of the International Journal of American Linguistics (Baltimore: Waverly Press, Inc., 1969); pp.154-6. The list includes all instances before 1310 in the Diplomatarium Norvegicum.

Numerous instances of the conjoined 'daughter' can be found in Diplomatorium Danicum, such as <Christinæ Iacobzdatter>, <Benedicta Magnidotters>, <Benedicta Magnusdotter>, and <Kristina Iacobzdotter> (http://diplomatarium.dk/dd/diplomer/07-010-1.html).

aff Broen is intended to mean 'of the bridge' (broen is the genitive of bro 'bridge'), a toponymic referring to the submitter's group, Barony of the Bridge (without using the branch name allowance). Aff is a locative preposition (also found as af) found in Duecholms Diplomatarii (Google book) by O. Nielsen, entries dated 1371 - 1539, with <Magnes Anderssen aff Nees>, dated 1418 (item 12).

As no one in kingdom was able to translate the documentation, Gunnvor silfraharr assisted us with the translations below.

Kjøbenhavns diplomatarium: Samling af dokumenter, breve og andre kilder til oplysning om Kjøbenhavns ældre forhold før 1728, Volume 1 (http://books.google.com/books?id=TbQLAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=Kj%C3%B8benhavns+Diplomatarium& hl=en&ei=-SqeTovFFY6CsgLKwtzHCQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CDAQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q= broen&f=false), Oluf August Nielsen, Copenhagen (Denmark). Kommunalbestyrelse, page 167, entry #127, 14 Okt. 1443 ---- "8. Item skall ængen gæst selghe sit gotz vdi skip, eller vppa broen, han schall...." ["if (any?) visitor sells his goods out of his ship, or (on? above?) the bridge, he shall..."]

page 174, entry # 127, 14 Okt. 1443

--- "44. Item hwosom tagher timber eller fiæle aff broen, thet som henne tilhører, han bøthe sex marc oc bugge brown igen met." ["Whoever takes timber or (somethings) from the bridge (literally 'off of' the bridge) that belongs to it, he is fined six marks or (must put it?) back on the bridge (? 'brown' ==> broen?)"]

--- "45. Item ... the bøthe broen igen, oc bøthe.." ["...(they? missing verb here) bridge fine again, and the fine...(this is 'fine' as in toll, fee, penalty)"]

--- "46. Item ængen maa skibe timber eller swart gotz eller weeth vppa broen, thet... som therres skip belegge vp til broen" ["(anyone?) must (missing verb here) ship-timber or black (?) goods either (prepositional phrase) the bridge, (the?)....as their ship (lies?) (preposition)"]

One of the same instances of aff Broen was found in in Danske gaardsretter og stadsretter by Janus L. A. Kolderup-Rosenvinge (http://books.google.com/books?id=v6lFAAAAcAAJ, p. 159). It appears in a transcription of a text that seems to be from the reign of "Kong Christopher af Bayerns Stadsret for Kjöbenhavn. 1443."

Gunnvor noted that the prepositions in Danish are highly idiomatic, and aff Broen might be more accurately glossed as 'off of the bridge'. However, locative bynames based on place names also use the preposition af or aff. As such, the submission has been given the benefit of the doubt. However, assistance justifying toponymic bynames and double bynames in Danish is appreciated.

If the name cannot be registered with aff broen, the submitter allows this element to be dropped.

A possible conflict was called with Bjarni Kenhelm (Nov. 1991, Outlands), Argent, two eagle's wings conjoined gules, holding in saltire two axes, within a bordure sable. It was thought that there is no difference between pink and gules, so the only CD would need to come from Bjarni's axes being sustained. We are attempting to obtain a letter of permission to conflict, but are forwarding this in order to request that Bjarni's emblazon be checked so that it can be reblazoned if necessary in order to clarify the relative sizes of the charges


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

58: Vibeke Steensdatter aff Broen - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2012, via the East

(Fieldless) A triskelion of pink sinister flamingo's wings proper.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

59: Wynefryde Bredhers - New Name & New Device

Vert, a fern within a bordure Or.

No changes.

Wynefryde is dated 1603 in "English Given Names from 16th and Early 17th C. Marriage Records" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/parishes/parishes.html). Winefride is also the Anglicized name of a legendary Welsh saint, martyred in the 7th century, which eliminates the step from period practice for temporal disparity. She has a shrine in Holywell, North Wales, according to the Catholic Encyclopedia (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07438a.htm), and two 12th century accounts of her life are extant (Margaret Jean Cormack, Saints and their cults in the Atlantic world, p. 203, http://books.google.com/books?id=Ker_beVinJ8C&pg=PA203).

Bredhers is a byname dated 1137 in R&W, s.n. Blackers.


This item was on the 04-2012 LoAR

60: Ysemay of Staffordshire - New Name & New Device

Vert, a loop of thread in a Stafford knot maintaining on its dexter end a needle bendwise sinister Or within an orle and a chief argent.

No major changes.
Sound (Ysemay is most important) most important.

Ysemay is found in Withycombe, s.n. Ismay, citing HR 1273.

Staffordshire is a locative byname, with <Thomas Staffordshire> found in 1473-4 in R&W, s.n. Staffordshire.

The submitter allows intermediate changes.

The question was raised whether an orle could be placed below a chief. It can, per precedent:

This is the correct placement of an orle with a chief: the orle runs parallel to the edge of the chief, and is not surmounted by it. See the arms of the Worshipful Company of Musicians, used by them c.1590. (Bromley & Child, Armorial Bearings of the Guilds of London, p.180). [Guillaume de la Rapiere, August 1992, pg. 4]


[Bahlow/Gentry] Bahlow, Hans. Deutsches Nameslexikon.

[Black] Black, George F. The Surnames of Scotland.

[Brechenmacher] Brechenmacher, Josef Karlmann. Etymologisches Wörterbuch der Deutschen Familiennamen.

[Geirr Bassi] Geirr Bassi Haraldsson. The Old Norse Name.

[Johnston] Johnston, James R. Place-Names of Scotland.

[Lind] Lind, E. H. Norsk-Isläändska Dopnamn ock Fingerade Namn från Medeltiden

[MED] The Middle English Dictionary.

[NCMJ] Solveig Throndardottir. Name Construction in Mediaeval Japan.

[OC&M] Ó Corrain, Donnchadh & Maguire, Fidelma. Irish Names.

[OED] The Oxford English Dictionary.

[R&W] Reaney, P.H. and R. M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames.

[Siebicke] Wilifred Siebicke. Historisches Deutsches Vornamenbuch.

[Wickenden] Paul Wickenden of Thanet, A Dictionary of Period Russian Names.

[Withycombe] Withycombe, E.G. Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names.

[Woulfe] Woulfe, Patrick. Sloinnte Gaedheal is Gall: Irish Names and Surnames.


OSCAR counts 38 New Names, 3 New Name Changes, 38 New Devices, 2 New Device Changes and 9 New Badges. These 90 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $270 for them. OSCAR counts 1 Resub Name, 1 Resub Device and 1 Resub Device Change. These 3 items are not chargeable. There are a total of 93 items submitted on this letter.

[ Site News | LoIs | KLoIs | SENA | Prec | AH | Track | Sub Status ]


Site Copyright © 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2011, Lewis Tanzos