Palimpsest Rules Letter dated 2018-03-01

Worthy and worshipful heralds, I recommend me to you.

This letter proposes that we change lingua Anglica to lingua societatis, making literal modern translations available to SCA participants who aren't from English-speaking countries.

We will consider changes to the rules for non-personal names once the changes for personal names are finalized.

1: Change to Admin Handbook Appendix D - New Rule Change

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

In this item, I propose adding the following form letter of attestation to Appendix D, for use in connection with submissions using lingua societatis in situations where the appropriate modern language is not obvious.

Attestation of language and citizenship or residence

I, [Legal name], known in the Society as [Society name], hereby attest that I am a [citizen/resident] of [country] and that [language] is a language of that country.

[Date] [Signature of [Legal name]]


2: Change to SENA PN.1.B.2.c - New Rule Change

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Current Wording:

c. Lingua Anglica Allowance: We allow the registration of translations of attested and constructed descriptive and locative bynames into standard modern English. We call this the lingua Anglica rule. We allow this because the meanings of these bynames would have been clear to the speakers of these languages, but may be unclear to modern speakers. The translation of descriptive bynames must be a literal and plausible translation. Under lingua Anglica, locative bynames use standard modern English forms rather than period spellings of the placenames. Under no circumstances will translations of the meanings of given names or placenames be registerable under this rule.

For example, the Norse byname inn rauð may be translated as the Red. It may not be translated as the bloody, the scarlet, or the like, as these are not literal translations. For example, the Middle English descriptive byname le nymell may be translated as the Nimble, as the original term may be unclear to modern speakers, even though it is in an earlier form of English.

For example, the Spanish byname de Castilla may be translated as of Castile. The Arabic byname al-Dimashqi may be translated as of Damascus or the Damascene. However, while Cairo is derived from a word which means "the victorious", its lingua Anglica form is of Cairo, not of The Victorious, as "The Victorious" is a translation of the meaning. Additionally, while al-Qahira is the Egyptian spelling of the city, of al-Qahira is not registerable as the lingua Anglica form, as it is not the standard modern English form either.

Proposed Wording:

c. Lingua Societatis Allowance: We allow the registration of translations of attested and constructed descriptive and locative bynames into standard modern language forms. We call this the lingua societatis rule. The language used may be the language of the submitter's country of citizenship, the language of the submitter's country of residence, or English. We allow this translation because the meanings of these bynames would have been clear to the speakers of these languages, but may be unclear to modern speakers. The translation of descriptive bynames must be a literal and plausible translation. Under lingua societatis, locative bynames use standard modern forms rather than period spellings of the placenames. Under no circumstances will translations of the meanings of given names or placenames be registerable under this rule.

For example, the Norse byname inn rauð may be translated into English as the Red. It may not be translated as the bloody, the scarlet, or the like, as these are not literal translations. For example, the Middle English descriptive byname le nymell may be translated into modern English as the Nimble, as the original term may be unclear to modern speakers, even though it is in an earlier form of English.

For example, the Spanish byname de Castilla may be translated into modern English as of Castile. The Arabic byname al-Dimashqi may be translated as of Damascus or the Damascene. However, while Cairo is derived from a word which means "the victorious", its lingua Anglica form is of Cairo, not of The Victorious, as "The Victorious" is a translation of the meaning. Additionally, while al-Qahira is the Egyptian spelling of the city, of al-Qahira is not registerable as the lingua societatis form, as it is not the standard modern English form either.

Each name phrase registered under the lingua societatis rule must use a consistent modern language.

For example, a submitter residing in Canada, where both French and English are national languages, could register either the modern French phrase le beau or the modern English phrase the handsome as a translation of the Norse byname inn fagri. However, le handsome would not be registerable under the lingua societatis rule, as this name phrase combines modern French and English.

If a submitter wishes to use a lingua societatis translation into a language other than English, the dominant language of their country of residence, or another language officially designated in legal documents of that country, the submitter must provide a letter attesting to their right to use this language. If the submitter's country of residence differs from their mailing address, attestation may also be required. A form letter for this purpose may be found in Appendix D of the Administrative Handbook.

Insert/Delete Version:

c. Lingua AnglicaSocietatis Allowance: We allow the registration of translations of attested and constructed descriptive and locative bynames into standard modern English. language forms. We call this the lingua Anglicasocietatis rule. The language used may be the language of the submitter's country of citizenship, the language of the submitter's country of residence, or English. We allow this translation because the meanings of these bynames would have been clear to the speakers of these languages, but may be unclear to modern speakers. The translation of descriptive bynames must be a literal and plausible translation. Under lingua Anglicasocietatis, locative bynames use standard modern English forms rather than period spellings of the placenames. Under no circumstances will translations of the meanings of given names or placenames be registerable under this rule.

For example, the Norse byname inn rauð may be translated into English as the Red. It may not be translated as the bloody, the scarlet, or the like, as these are not literal translations. For example, the Middle English descriptive byname le nymell may be translated into modern English as the Nimble, as the original term may be unclear to modern speakers, even though it is in an earlier form of English.

For example, the Spanish byname de Castilla may be translated into modern English as of Castile. The Arabic byname al-Dimashqi may be translated as of Damascus or the Damascene. However, while Cairo is derived from a word which means "the victorious", its lingua Anglica form is of Cairo, not of The Victorious, as "The Victorious" is a translation of the meaning. Additionally, while al-Qahira is the Egyptian spelling of the city, of al-Qahira is not registerable as the lingua Anglicasocietatis form, as it is not the standard modern English form either.

Each name phrase registered under the lingua societatis rule must use a consistent modern language.

For example, a submitter residing in Canada, where both French and English are national languages, could register either the modern French phrase le beau or the modern English phrase the handsome as a translation of the Norse byname inn fagri. However, le handsome would not be registerable under the lingua societatis rule, as this name phrase combines modern French and English.

If a submitter wishes to use a lingua societatis translation into a language other than English, the dominant language of their country of residence, or another language officially designated in legal documents of that country, the submitter must provide a letter attesting to their right to use this language. If the submitter's country of residence differs from their mailing address, attestation may also be required. A form letter for this purpose may be found in Appendix D of the Administrative Handbook.


3: Change to SENA PN.1.B.2.f - New Rule Change

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

This submission allows for the construction of bynames based on branch names using modern languages other than English under certain circumstances.

Current Wording:

f. Branch Name Allowance: Name phrases may be created from the registered forms of SCA branches. Only the exact registered form of the branch name may be used, and they are registered in the lingua Anglica form, 'of Branchname'.

Translated forms will not be registered under this allowance, even if it matches the intended origin of the submission or of the branch.

For example, this would allow the bynames of the East or of Fontaine dans Sable, as these are the expected lingua Anglica forms. However, this would not allow von Osten as a German translation of "of the East", even if the given name was German. It would also not allow de la Fontaine dans Sable as a fully French version of "of Fontaine dans Sable" under this rule as it is not the lingua Anglica form of the branch name, even though the branch name is French. If Fontaine dans Sable can also documented as an attested or constructed French name, de Fontaine dans Sable could be used in forming a fully French name; however that would not be through the use of the branch name allowance.

Proposed Wording:

f. Branch Name Allowance: Name phrases may be created from the registered forms of SCA branches. Only the exact registered form of the branch name may be used, and it is registered in a lingua societatis form. In English, the lingua societatis form is 'of Branchname'.

Translated forms will not be registered under this allowance, even if the translated form matches the intended origin of the submission or of the branch.

For example, this rule would allow the bynames of the East or of Fontaine dans Sable, as these are the expected lingua societatis forms, using standard modern English. A submitter residing in Canada, where both French and English are national languages, could also register de Fontaine dans Sable as a French lingua societatis form. However, this rule would not allow von Osten as a German translation of "of the East", even if the given name was German. It would also not allow of the East Ridge based on the registered Shire of East Ridge, because the East Ridge is not the precise registered name of the branch. If Fontaine dans Sable can also be documented as an attested or constructed French name, de Fontaine dans Sable could be used in forming a fully French name, no matter the submitter's country of citizenship or residence; however, that would not be through the use of the branch name allowance.

If a submitter wishes to use the branch name allowance to create a name phrase in a language other than English, the dominant language of their country of residence, or another language officially designated in legal documents of that country, the submitter must provide a letter attesting to their right to use this language. If the submitter's country of residence differs from their mailing address, attestation may also be required. A form letter for this purpose may be found in Appendix D of the Administrative Handbook.

Insert/Delete Version

f. Branch Name Allowance: Name phrases may be created from the registered forms of SCA branches. Only the exact registered form of the branch name may be used, and they are registered in the it is registered in a lingua Anglica form, societatis form. In English, the lingua societatis form is 'of Branchname'.

Translated forms will not be registered under this allowance, even if it the translated form matches the intended origin of the submission or of the branch.

For example, this rule would allow the bynames of the East or of Fontaine dans Sable, as these are the expected expected lingua Anglica forms. societatis forms, using standard modern English. A submitter residing in Canada, where both French and English are national languages, could also register de Fontaine dans Sable as a French lingua societatis form. However, this rule would not allow von Osten as a German translation of "of the East", even if the given name was German. It would also not allow de la of the East Ridge based on the registered Shire of East Ridge, because the East Ridge is not the precise registered name of the branch. If Fontaine dans Sable as a fully French version of "of Fontaine dans Sable" under this rule as it is not the lingua Anglica form of the branch name, even though the branch name is French. If Fontaine dans Sable can also be documented as an attested or constructed French name, de Fontaine dans Sable could be used in forming a fully French name; however name, no matter the submitter's country of citizenship or residence; however, that would not be through the use of the branch name allowance.

If a submitter wishes to use the branch name allowance to create a name phrase in a language other than English, the dominant language of their country of residence, or another language officially designated in legal documents of that country, the submitter must provide a letter attesting to their right to use this language. If the submitter's country of residence differs from their mailing address, attestation may also be required. A form letter for this purpose may be found in Appendix D of the Administrative Handbook.


Written in the Barony of Cynnabar on the feast of Saint Eudocia in the year of grace mmxviii.

Ursula Georges

Palimpsest Herald.


OSCAR counts 3 Rule Changes. These 3 items may or may not require payment. There are a total of 3 items submitted on this letter.