Middle LoI dated 2018-01-26

Unto Juliana Laurel, Alys Pelican, Cormac Wreath, and the rest of the College of Arms, does Konrad Mailander, Rouge Scarpe Herald, send greetings.

This is the Middle Kingdom Letter of Intent for the items on the December 7th ILoI.

My thanks to Iago ab Adam, Michael Gerard Curtememoire, Katherine Coscombe, Christian Jorgensen af Hilsonger, Magnus von Lübeck, Dai Gerdwr, Dorothye Bolton, ffride wlffsdotter, Guillaume Gallatini, Ragna Ulfsdottir, Eglentyne Merryweather, Gawain of Miskbridge, Estelle de la Mer, Jean Yves de Chierebourg, and Ginevra Boscoli for their commentary.

On January 10th we held our first online decision meeting using Slack. My thanks to all who participated in that as well; Dragon, Rouge Scarpe, Eschtcheon, Opinicus, Incunabula, Buckler, Andreas Blackwode, Khawlah bint Yahya ibn Husayn, Estelle de la Mer, Alan Fairfax, Johannes, Katalena Ivaniaia, and Petrona da Manciano.

If you would like to see the documentation or commentary for this letter please go to http://oscar.sca.org/kingdom/kingloi.php?kingdom=4&loi=4872

It is the intent of the College of Heralds of the Middle to register the following items. Unless otherwise noted, the submitter has no desire for authenticity and allows any changes.

1: Angélique de La Rochelle - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 2010, via the Middle.

(Fieldless) A sheaf of three arrows sable surmounted by a tower Or

The original emblazon had the arrow shafts as thin line.[1] It has been redrawn with the submitter's approval.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=515/2018-01-26/10-35-31_Angelique_bagdeX.jpg


2: Gwyneth Cole - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Spelling (submitter prefers the <y> in Gweneth) most important.

[Morgan and Morgan] s.v. Gwynedd "1577, Gwineth ver' Robert". Noted that as spelled Gwyneth as a surname is a form of Gwynedd (principality), but less certain as to the source of the 19th century popularization of the spelling Gwyneth as a female given name. S.v. "Gwyn" is a discussion of the substitution of "i" for "y" in areas with no knowledge of Welsh spelling (specifically "Gwyn" --> "Gwin"). I would not expect a return from "i" to "y" to occur in period without a return from "th" to "dd".

Since "Cole" can be documented as an English name, is it possible to use English byname-to-given-name construction to take documented Gwyneth byname ([Morgan and Morgan] s.v. Gwynedd "1624: Lowry Howell, uxor Thome Gwyneth","1627. Anna Thomas Gwyneth") to given name?

John Gwyneth married Anne Cupper, 15 Dec 1578, Ludlow, Shropshire, England, M00680-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NL96-9ZN : 10 December 2014)

Magnus von Lübeck at 2017-12-09 18:53:51

I think the Order of Gwyneths Harp is based on this line of documentation. As of two LoARs past, this given name can be registered as a lady's name. You are welcome to argue with Pelican over the registration as I do not wish to further debate the issue.

Familysearch Historical Records Welsh marriages

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FGWJ-FTR

Moris William

Spouse's Name Gwineth Robert

Event Date 20 Oct 1577

Event Place Conway, Caernavon, England

Father's Name William

Spouse's Father's Name Robert

Indexing Project (Batch) Number M04948-1

[November 2014 LoAR, A-An Tir] Daygan O'Malley. Name.

The submitter may wish to know that the spelling Daigan would also be registerable (as i/y switches are common in English).

Though pre-SENA, this is probably the best example of the i/y precedent:

http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2010/10/10-10lar.html October 2010 LoAR for An Tir: "Gwyneth Blackthorne. Name and device. Purpure, in pale a dragon dormant and a domestic cat dormant contourny argent. Submitted as Gwyneth Blackthorne, the name was changed at kingdom to Gwineth Blackthorne to match the documented form. The Letter of Intent questioned whether the documented Gwineth justified Gwyneth. It does. There are many examples of i/y used interchangeably in 16th century Welsh, including Griffith and Gryffyth, Llewelin and Llewelyn, Gwenlliana and Gwenllyan, and Morvith and Morvyth. We have therefore changed the name back to the submitted form."

Cole - Found in the article "Bynames Found in the 1296 Lay Subsidy Rolls for Rutland, England (sorted alphabetically)" by Karen Larsdatter (Karen Harris).
http://heraldry.sca.org/names/Rutland/bynamesalphabetically.htm


3: Haraldr inn hávi - New Name & New Device

Gyronny Or and gules, a dragon in annulo vorant of its own tail sable

Meaning (unspecified) most important.

Haraldr, masculine name, Geirr Bassi p. 11

inn hávi, Geirr Bassi, p. 22, a descriptive byname meaning "tall, impressive."

Submitted as <Heraldr inn hávi> but <Haraldr> was the spelling the submitter and commneters documented. The Sumbitter was contacted and is fine with the attested spelling.


4: Khawlah bint Yahya ibn Husayn - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 2016, via the Middle.

Per chevron inverted Or and sable, alotus in profile purpure and a lit Arabic lamp Or

The previous submission was returned on the June 2016 LoAR for a redraw of the per chevron inverted field division: http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2016/06/16-06lar.html#259.

Some of the commenters thought that the Or bordered on tenné.[1] One of the commenters recolored the emblazon and the submitter approved it's use.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=515/2018-01-26/10-45-03_Khawlah_deviceX.jpg


5: Laurentius Le Rous - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Culture (12th Century English) most important.

Submitter provided a link to online commentary at https://www.facebook.com/groups/SCAHeraldryChat/permalink/10155973680969203/

Laurentius - Latin form of "Laurence" found in England c. 1155 according to "Dictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources," http://dmnes.org/name/Laurence.

The documentation for the given name is: Emil Franz Rössler, editor. Deutsche Rechtsdenkmäler aus Böhmen und Mähren, eine Sammlung von Rechtsbüchern, Urkunden und alten Aufzeichnungen zur Geschichte des deutschen Rechtes, volume II: Die Stadtrechte von Brünn aus dem XIII. und XIV. Jahrhundert. Prague: J. G. Calve'sche Buchhandlung, 1853. Adam Alberti Alberto Albertum pg 12 (1351)

le Rous - desc, from ME, AFr rous(e) 'red'. 1 instance documented in Billingsgate in 1292. "Index of Names in the 1292 Subsidy Roll of London: Surnames" by Sara L. Uckelman (Anyanhwy merch Catmael), http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/surlondon1292.html.


6: Owen MakDonald - New Name

Submitter has no desire as to gender.
Sound most important.

Owen - IGI Family Search dates this name to 1584 in England, batch C06293-2

"England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N5V5-YZS : 30 December 2014, Owen Cawson, 17 Jan 1584); citing DALLINGHOO,SUFFOLK,ENGLAND, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 919,570.

MakDonald - Black, Surnames of Scotland, s.n. MacDonald dates this spelling to 1571.


7: Philippe de Lyon and Konrad Mailander - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name (Philippe de Lyon) registered exactly as it appears in September of 1999, via the Middle.
OSCAR finds the name (Konrad Mailander) registered exactly as it appears in June of 1994, via the Middle.

Argent, on a pale gules a coin die set argent

This is the first instance of a die set. The college has previously registered a punch which is the part referred in the articles below as a trussel. The Pic Dic 3rd ed has the foloowing. http://mistholme.com/?s=punch

A punch is a coiner's tool, consisting of a solid slug of steel with a flattened end for hammering. It's used to either shape the coin into a more circular form, or as a die to stamp the design in relief on its surface. It's a period artifact, dating to at least 1568 [Amman 39], but no examples have been found in heraldry. See also rivet.

The Moneyers Guild of An Tir bears: Argent, a goat clymant maintaining in its dexter forehoof a hammer and in its sinister a punch sable within a bordure sable bezanty.

This article talks about period coining and discusses dies and has images. http://www.grunalmoneta.co.uk/history.html

The Dies

The early dies were cut in either bronze or iron, and the designs were engraved into the die surface. The lower die (known as a pile) usually having the more complex design (usually the head) whilst the upper die (also known as the trussel) had the simpler reverse or tails.

During the Roman period a new innovation was tried: hinged coin dies which were pairs of dies joined together in a similar manner to tongs. This method continued into the Byzantine period but the concept seems to be confined to the Roman world.

The designs were cut into the die faces using either graving tools or simple punches such as a wedge, line, curve, dot or ring (annulet) These simple elements could be used to produce all the different letters and design elements on the die.

Lower die from 10th century York [image 1]

Anglo-Saxon dies were made from iron (steel) and were the traditional separate dies with the lower die set into a large wooden block (probably a section of tree trunk) and the upper die positioned by hand and hit with a hammer. The upper dies wore down quickly due to the action of hitting them with the hammer. A set of dies (two trussels and one pile) should produce on average £100 struck coin, that is 24,000 pennies.

The shape of the dies during the Anglo-Saxon period seems fairly standardised. Either round or square in cross section, but with parallel sides allowing the use of a 'striking collar' (used as a guide for the dies not the coin blank). This enables production of a well-struck coin, as is born out by the surviving specimens of coins from the period.

Later, during the Norman period the shape of the dies altered from parallel sided to tapered. These dies are easier to manufacture but the coins produced from this type of die tend to be poorly struck because a guide collar cannot be used with them. This is borne out by the lamentable condition of the copious surviving specimens of Angevin and early Plantagenet coins.

Coin dies from the reign of Edward I, 1272-1307AD [image 2]

With the introduction of the groat and the halfgroat, these larger coins required greater striking pressure and thus greater wear to the trussel so the die sets for the larger denominations was three trussels to every pile. During the later medieval period the simple lettering and portraiture of the earlier period was replaced by the introduction, in the reign of Edward I, of complex punches, using single punchs to make one letter or portrait. By the reign of Henry VII (1485 - 1509) a realistic portrait of the king was being produced and by this time also the principal of producing a master matrix from which the working dies were made in total.

Another article about coin dies. http://www.royalmintmuseum.org.uk/history/making-money/making-money-in-the-past/the-middle-ages/inde x.html

Up until the 1660s, English coins were struck between a pair of hand-held dies. The pile, or lower die, had a spiked end to enable it to be driven firmly into a block of wood; a blank was placed on top of the pile and above it was held the trussel or upper die. The trussel then received blows from a hammer, causing the blank to be impressed with the obverse and reverse designs.

Hand-held coinage dies of the mid-14th century [image 3]

Additional medieval coin die image.[4]

This badge is for use by the Middle Kingdom Moneyers Guild. (The Middle no longer has official guilds and so does not register badges directly for the kingdom for them.)

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=515/2018-01-26/10-51-44_10-28-26_10thCenYorklower_die.jpg
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=515/2018-01-26/10-51-44_10-28-27_Coin_dies_from_the_reign_of_Edward_I,_1272-1307AD.jpg
#3 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=515/2018-01-26/10-51-45_10-28-27_Medieval-1.jpg
#4 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=515/2018-01-26/10-51-45_10-28-27_37adda0915e43c42ebaa3a26e589101b.jpg


8: Red Spears, Barony of - New Order Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 1997, via the Middle.

Golden Shoe, Order of the

(Fieldless) A boarspear head within and conjoined to a horseshoe Or

Meaning most important.

This order name follows the meta-patterns for Orders as listed on the August 2005 Laurel Cover Letter; the specific pattern followed here is "Orders named for heraldic charges".

http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2005/08/05-08cl.html


"The Pictoral Dictionary of Heraldry 3rd Edition" by Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme http://mistholme.com/?s=shoe discusses shoes as charges and mentions several period types.


The OED says that shoe with the meanings of a lower foot covering and an iron horseshoe dated to late Middle English.


The spelling <golden> can be found as early as 1375, according to the MED (https://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/m/mec/med-idx?type=byte&byte=68144837&egdisplay=open&egs=68149552) which cites the following usage, "He golden apples rafte of the dragoun."


9: Red Spears, Barony of - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 1997, via the Middle.

(Fieldless) A rapier bendwise sinister gules

This submission is to be associated with Épée Rouge, Order of l'

The Order name is registered to the Barony as <Épée Rouge, Order of l'> (Jul 1996).


10: Red Spears, Barony of - Resub Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 1997, via the Middle.

(Fieldless) On a boar's head erased Or a heart gules

This submission is to be associated with Boar's Heart, Order of the

Original submission was returned by Laurel in May 1999 (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/1999/05/lar.html). This is a redesign.

Konrad Mailander (Rouge Scarpe) at 2017-12-15 23:29:33

As Baron of Red Spears I would also request that the designation in the registration of the award name be changed from Order to Award. We recently made this change so that we could give this award repeatedly (rather than create a new award).

Konrad, Baron Red Spears since June 23, 2017


11: Red Spears, Barony of - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 1997, via the Middle.

(Fieldless) On a Roman vexillum Or two boar spears in saltire surmounted by another palewise gules

This submission is to be associated with Hastati, Order of the

The design on a charged banner in armory needs to be checked for conflict. In this case the emblazon on the banner is a badge owned by the Barony.

Red Spears, Barony of The following badge associated with this name was registered in January of 2011 (via the Middle): Or, two boar spears in saltire surmounted by another palewise gules. for the populace

This would perhaps not be the defining instance of a vexillum for us; Thomas d'Orleans's registered badge (May 1991) is Azure, upon a Roman vexillum issuant from base Or the letters A E T I sable. Since that registration is well more than a decade old, it might be worthwhile for the Barony to document their emblazon as showing a classical form. My image search finds some on ancient coins that survived through our period, e.g., the first two at http://www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v18n09a21.html (first two images below) and a silvered follis of Licinius II, third image, from https://www.vcoins.com/en/stores/forum_ancient_coins/62/product/forvm_licinius_ii_silvered_follis_vi rtvs_exerciti_captives_at_base_of_vexillum/816307/Default.aspx. Unfortunately, the closest match seems presently to be displayed online only on eBay as "CRISPUS son of CONSTANTINE the GREAT 320AD Ancient Roman Coin Vexillum", fourth image below; perhaps a print catalog at a numismatist's would show the same.

The OED shows the word as not used in English until after our gray period, but the etymology there does show this sense in classical Latin.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=515/2018-01-26/10-59-10_20-45-41_Aylesbury_Vexillum.jpg
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=515/2018-01-26/10-59-10_20-45-41_Rhesaena_Vexillum.PNG
#3 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=515/2018-01-26/10-59-10_20-45-41_Licinius_Vexillum.jpg
#4 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=515/2018-01-26/10-59-10_20-45-41_Crispus_Vexillum.jpg


12: Red Spears, Barony of - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 1997, via the Middle.

Or, a boarspear within a bordure embattled gules

This submission is to be associated with Boarsbane, Order of

This order already has one badge designated to it but it is given in two distinct ways within the Barony and this badge is for those who receive it for the second.

Red Spears, Barony of The following badge associated with this name was registered in January of 2011 (via the Middle): Or, a boarspear within a bordure gules.[1]

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=515/2018-01-26/11-01-05_Boarsbane.png


13: Saint Brutus, College of - New Branch Name & New Device

Gules, two squirrels combatant argent maintaining swords proper crossed in saltire, in base a laurel wreath Or.

Sound most important.

Brutus - an English given name. IGI Family Search Batch C10993-1 shows Brutus Bestricke was christened in England in 1590.

"England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J3FT-DB7 : 30 December 2014, Brutus Bestricke, 19 Jul 1590); citing MONKS RISBOROUGH,BUCKINGHAM,ENGLAND, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 919,247.

For evidence of colleges named after saints, see "Names of English Colleges" by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (Kathleen M. O'Brien) and Juliana de Luna (Julia Smith).

http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/Colleges/Colleges.shtml


Please see also the July 2006 registration of Order of Saint William the Cooper [Outlands, Caer Galen, Barony of] at http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2006/07/06-07lar.html, as well as the July 2016 Cover Letter (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2016/07/16-07cl.html#2).


Petitions of populace support will be included in documents packet.

In the original color emblazon the swords were colored with blades that were too dark shades of grey to be considered argent and the hilt was a dark gold that looked brown. It has been recolored with the permission of the submitter.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=515/2018-01-26/11-03-13_St_Brutus_DeviceX_(1).jpg


14: Severin Rheinländer - New Name & New Device

Per pale sable and Or, two flanged maces in saltire counterchanged

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Client requests authenticity for 14th century German, Rhein River area.
Language (unspecified) most important.
Culture (unspecified) most important.

Severin - m. A derivative of Latin Severus, a Roman gens, from Latin severus 'serious, grave'.

The name of two 5th C saints, a 6th C saint, and a 7th C pope. Cited in "Dictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources."

http://dmnes.org/name/Severin

Germany

Latin

● 1173 Seuerinus (nom) quix-vol1 99

Liége is near or on the Rhine and French, German, and Dutch are spoken. I am not sure which group Collar Severin Alias Honet belongs to.

Familysearch Historical Records

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FV43-QLZ

Collar Severin Alias Honet

Gender Male Christening Date 03 Aug 1567 Christening Place Herstal, Liége, Belgium

Indexing Project (Batch) Number C00436-0

Cited in "Dictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources.

Severin m. A derivative of Latin Severus, a Roman gens, from Latin severus 'serious, grave'.

The name of two 5th C saints, a 6th C saint, and a 7th C pope.

Belgium

Dutch 1597x1598 Severyn BoonenGes p. 338

Estonia

Middle Low German 1592 Seuer Tiik1977 p. 288

France

Latin 1270 Severinus (nom) NDParisII 2-XLI

Germany

Latin 1173 Seuerinus (nom) quix-vol1 99

Rheinländer - FamilySerch Historical Records: Hans Christoff Rheinlander Male Marriage Date 14 Jun 1607 Geislingen (Oa. Geislingen), Württemberg, Germany Father's Name Hainrich Rheinlander Batch M01973-4 https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4KR-YXK

The documetation found in internal commentary shows the name authentic for late period. DMNES shows the Latin form of the name was was used as early as 1173 in German. We suspect but cannot yet prove it would be authentic for 14th Century.


15: Troika Bronnikova - New Name

Meaning (Byname should mean) most important.

Submitter indicates this is a feminime Russian name.

Troika - a header form in "A Dictionary of Period Russian Names" by Paul Wickenden of Thanet. The variant spelling "Troyka" is dated to 1281.
(http://heraldry.sca.org/names/paul/)


Bronnikov - an occupational byname dated to 1588-9 in "Occupational Bynames in Medieval Russia" by Paul Wickenden of Thanet. "Bronnikova" is the feminine form.

http://www.goldschp.net/archive/jobnames.html

Also a header form in "A Dictionary of Period Russian Names" by Paul Wickenden of Thanet. http://heraldry.sca.org/names/paul/bl.html

Bronnikov (byn) -- "armorer."

Nekras Semenov syn Bronnikov. 1538. [Tup 271]


16: Vilhjálmr Skytja - New Name & New Device

Gyronny of twelve sable and argent, a boar rampant gules and an orle azure

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Client requests authenticity for Old Norse.
Language (Old Norse) most important.

Vilhjálmr - one instance documented on pg. 23. "The Old Norse Name" by Geirr Bassi Haraldsson (G. Fleck).

Skytja - descriptive byname meaning "marksman, shooter". Found in "The Old Norse Name" by Geirr Bassi Haraldsson (G. Fleck) and in "Viking Bynames found in the Landnámabók" by by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (Sara L. Uckelman).

http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/vikbynames.html.


The April 2012 Cover Letter permits Old Norse descriptive bynames to be registered in either capitalized or uncapitalized forms.

http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2012/04/12-04cl.html

The original emblazon [1] there was some identification issues due to the gules and azure marker being rather dark on the sable, especially on the thumbnail. It has been recolored for better identifiablity.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=515/2018-01-26/11-21-17_Vilhalmr_deviceX.jpg


In Service to the Client, Kingdom, and College,

Meister Konrad Mailander, OP

Rouge Scarpe Herald


OSCAR counts 7 New Names, 1 New Order Name, 1 New Branch Name, 4 New Devices and 6 New Badges. These 19 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $76 for them. OSCAR counts 1 Resub Device and 1 Resub Badge. These 2 items are not chargeable. There are a total of 21 items submitted on this letter.