Palimpsest Rules Letter dated 2017-12-02

Juliana Laurel, Cormac Wreath, Alys Pelican, and the College of Arms, pleaseth you the Sovereigns and my right worthy colleagues to consider the following proposals.

This letter elaborates on a proposal from Sǫlveig Þrándardóttir, Keystone Herald: that we allow the augmentation of fielded badges.

1: Change to SENA A. Armory - New Rule Change

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Because the distinction between primary armory and fielded badges is merely administrative, it does not make sense to restrict the augmentation of badges with a field. Augmenting a badge might be desirable in the case when the badge represents arms for an alternate persona, or when the primary armory was registered using an Individually Attested Pattern that is not compatible with a more complex design.

This proposal, as written, does not restrict augmentation of badges owned by branches. Should we do so formally, or should this be handled on a case-by-case basis?

I propose changing the first paragraph of section A, Armory, as follows.

Current Rule

A. Armory

Armorial submissions fit into four categories: primary armory, fielded badges, fieldless badges, and augmentations of honor. The first two follow identical rules and are just administrative categories. Primary armory refers to the single main armorial device for an individual or branch. Fielded badges are similar secondary items; they may function as badges or as devices for alternate personas. Fieldless badges, which can be displayed on any background, are more typical of period badges. They have some special rules for style and conflict, discussed in the relevant sections. Augmentations of honor are additions to existing pieces of primary armory to reflect an honor bestowed by the Crown of an individual kingdom. See A.3 for discussion of the rules which apply specifically to augmentations of arms. There is no separation between personal armory and non-personal armory for style, conflict or presumption. The Ordinary and Armorial contains some other types of items, such as flags of important non-SCA entities; these are also considered armory for the purposes of conflict and presumption.

Proposed Rule

A. Armory

Armorial submissions fit into four categories: primary armory, fielded badges, fieldless badges, and augmentations of honor. The first two follow identical rules and are just administrative categories. Primary armory refers to the single main armorial device for an individual or branch. Fielded badges are similar secondary items; they may function as badges or as devices for alternate personas. Fieldless badges, which can be displayed on any background, are more typical of period badges. They have some special rules for style and conflict, discussed in the relevant sections. Augmentations of honor are additions to existing pieces of primary armory or fielded badges to reflect an honor bestowed by the Crown of an individual kingdom. See A.3 for discussion of the rules which apply specifically to augmentations of arms. There is no separation between personal armory and non-personal armory for style, conflict or presumption. The Ordinary and Armorial contains some other types of items, such as flags of important non-SCA entities; these are also considered armory for the purposes of conflict and presumption.

Insert/Delete Version

A. Armory

Armorial submissions fit into four categories: primary armory, fielded badges, fieldless badges, and augmentations of honor. The first two follow identical rules and are just administrative categories. Primary armory refers to the single main armorial device for an individual or branch. Fielded badges are similar secondary items; they may function as badges or as devices for alternate personas. Fieldless badges, which can be displayed on any background, are more typical of period badges. They have some special rules for style and conflict, discussed in the relevant sections. Augmentations of honor are additions to existing pieces of primary armory or fielded badges to reflect an honor bestowed by the Crown of an individual kingdom. See A.3 for discussion of the rules which apply specifically to augmentations of arms. There is no separation between personal armory and non-personal armory for style, conflict or presumption. The Ordinary and Armorial contains some other types of items, such as flags of important non-SCA entities; these are also considered armory for the purposes of conflict and presumption.


2: Change to SENA A.3.A.3. Augmentations of Honor - New Rule Change

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Should a person who receives multiple augmentations be allowed to apply them to different armorial items?

A.3.A.3

Current Rule

3. Augmentations of Honor: An augmentation is a mark of honor bestowed by the Crown that is added to an existing device. An augmentation may not be added to a badge. An augmentation may take many forms, including but not limited to a charged canton, a charged chief, charges in canton or chief, a charge associated with the Crown, or a charge associated with the individual receiving the honor.

While the right to an augmentation is bestowed by the Crown, its specific form must be determined through the normal registration process. Both the augmentation itself and the augmented device must follow the style rules and restrictions on charges. Because an augmentation adds complexity, augmented devices are often allowed to violate certain style rules, such as allowing charges on tertiary charges or a complexity count of greater than eight, as long as the identifiability of the design is maintained. However, they may not violate the rules on contrast.

For example, the arms of a branch may not be granted as an augmentation, because they contain a laurel wreath, which cannot be registered to an individual.

An augmentation that appears to be a display of independent armory, such as a charged canton or a single charged escutcheon, must also be evaluated as if the augmentation itself were a submission of independent armory for purposes of style, conflict, offense, and presumption. Kingdoms may designate a badge as a standard augmentation for its subjects who receive augmentations. Such a badge is considered to be subject to the Existing Registration Allowance and does not need to be further checked for style, conflict, offense, or presumption. However, it must maintain good contrast with the field or charge that it is on.

Proposed Rule

3. Augmentations of Honor: An augmentation is a mark of honor bestowed by the Crown that is added to an existing device or fielded badge. An augmentation may take many forms, including but not limited to a charged canton, a charged chief, charges in canton or chief, a charge associated with the Crown, or a charge associated with the individual receiving the honor.

While the right to an augmentation is bestowed by the Crown, its specific form must be determined through the normal registration process. Both the augmentation itself and the augmented device or badge must follow the style rules and restrictions on charges. Because an augmentation adds complexity, augmented armory is often allowed to violate certain style rules, such as allowing charges on tertiary charges or a complexity count of greater than eight, as long as the identifiability of the design is maintained. However, it may not violate the rules on contrast.

For example, the arms of a branch may not be granted as an augmentation, because they contain a laurel wreath, which cannot be registered to an individual.

An augmentation that appears to be a display of independent armory, such as a charged canton or a single charged escutcheon, must also be evaluated as if the augmentation itself were a submission of independent armory for purposes of style, conflict, offense, and presumption. Kingdoms may designate a badge as a standard augmentation for its subjects who receive augmentations. Such a badge is considered to be subject to the Existing Registration Allowance and does not need to be further checked for style, conflict, offense, or presumption. However, it must maintain good contrast with the field or charge that it is on.

Insert/Delete Version

3. Augmentations of Honor: An augmentation is a mark of honor bestowed by the Crown that is added to an existing device. An augmentation may not be added to a device or fielded badge. An augmentation may take many forms, including but not limited to a charged canton, a charged chief, charges in canton or chief, a charge associated with the Crown, or a charge associated with the individual receiving the honor.

While the right to an augmentation is bestowed by the Crown, its specific form must be determined through the normal registration process. Both the augmentation itself and the augmented device or badge must follow the style rules and restrictions on charges. Because an augmentation adds complexity, augmented devices are armory is often allowed to violate certain style rules, such as allowing charges on tertiary charges or a complexity count of greater than eight, as long as the identifiability of the design is maintained. However, they it may not violate the rules on contrast.

For example, the arms of a branch may not be granted as an augmentation, because they contain a laurel wreath, which cannot be registered to an individual.

An augmentation that appears to be a display of independent armory, such as a charged canton or a single charged escutcheon, must also be evaluated as if the augmentation itself were a submission of independent armory for purposes of style, conflict, offense, and presumption. Kingdoms may designate a badge as a standard augmentation for its subjects who receive augmentations. Such a badge is considered to be subject to the Existing Registration Allowance and does not need to be further checked for style, conflict, offense, or presumption. However, it must maintain good contrast with the field or charge that it is on.


Written at the Barony of Cynnabar on the feast of Saint Eusebius in the year of grace mmxvii.

Ursula Georges, Palimpsest Herald.


OSCAR counts 2 Rule Changes. These 2 items may or may not require payment. There are a total of 2 items submitted on this letter.