Æthelmearc LoI dated 2017-10-19

Greetings unto Emma Laurel, Juliana Laurel Rising, Alys Pelican, Cormac Wreath, and the College of Arms of the Known World from Madoc Garnet and Saiman Cornelian. This is Æ197, external letter of intent. It is the intent of the Garnet office to register the following elements:

1: Bolli Gunnarsson - New Name & New Device

Per fess embattled argent and purpure, a bear's pawprint and a dragon counterchanged

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Norse) most important.
Culture (Norse) most important.

Herald of Record: Jehan de la Marche

Bolli Norse male given name Geirr Bassi p. 8.

Gunnarr Norse male given name Geirr Bassi Bassi p. 10.

Gunnarsson patronymic formed according to p.17. Many Gunnarssons. Closest seems to be Blanda Gunnarsson, March 2015 An Tir

Herald of Record: Michael Langley

SFPP for the paw print

There was some discussion on the internal letter regarding the line of division being a bit high. As drawn, the bottom of the embattles is squarely on the fess line. We feel that this is sufficient for a per fess, although it may require an artist's note.


2: Deborah Schmöker - New Name & New Device

Or, a bear rampant sable between three drop spindles sable threaded gules.

No major changes.
Sound (None specified) most important.

Herald of Record: Beatrice Dominici della Campana

Deborah: dated 22 Feb, 1616, Family Search batch C 95748-1, Baden, Germany, in the record of Anna Deborah Thoma (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NZNW-CYY)

Schmöcker: Bahlow, SN Schmöcker, pg 499. The spelling Smugkele is dated to Holstein 1361.

Schmöker: Joannes Fridericus Schmoeker (oe indicates an ö in modern English transliteration) dated 1636 (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NZGK-72X)

Submitted as Schmöcker, but Garnet staff was unable to date that spelling in period. Since the client allows minor changes, and stated that sound was most important, the spelling was changed prior to going external. Client would prefer Schmöcker if it is possible.

Herald of Record: Jeanne de Robin


3: Elena Modarova vnuka - New Household Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in July of 2008, via Atlantia.

Winton Company

Winton: per Family Search web site, name "Annis Winton" attested to 1578, Little Horwood, Buckingham, England; numerous other entries. Batch C14542-1. (https://familysearch.org/search/record/results?count=20&query=%2Bsurname%3Awinton~%20%2Bbatch_number %3Ac14542-1).

Winton is a place name. Watts, s.n. Winton glosses it as meaning 'wind-swept' or 'pasture farm or village' and dates the forms Win- Wynton(ia) - tuna to 1090 - 1663. Reaney and Wilson list William de Winton' in 1202 and Richard Wynton in 1525.

Bardsley [p. 819, sn Winton] says Winton is a locative: "Local, 'of Winton': (1) a township in parish of Kirksby- [sic] Sigston, N. Rid. Yorks; (2) a township in parish of Kirksby-Stephen, co. Westmorland." and cites Thomas de Winetun, co. Kent, 1273; another spelling of the name <de Wintun> is dated to 1576. Alice Wynton and Scudamor Winton are dated to 1645.

Company: SENA Appendix E, item B allow "Company" for household names.


4: Eleonora Pescatore di Seravezza - New Name & New Device

Vert, a dog couchant Or and on a chief wavy argent three fish azure

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for Italian.
Sound (Given name: ele-O-nora) most important.
Culture (Italian) most important.
Meaning (By-name : fisherman from Seravezza) most important.

Herald of Record: Ranolfr Rosamon

Eleonora found in Italy: Latin: 1527 Eleonora (nom) Rome 1527 p 88. Found in DMNES, citing Jaques Bonaparte, Sac de Rome (http://dmnes.org/name/Eleanor).

Pescatóre - "fisher or fisherman" in Florios 1611 Italian/English Dictionary (http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/florio/388small.html). The accent is an editorial mark and is not registered.

"Names from 15th and 16th Century Pisa" By Juliana de Luna (Julia Smith), from the list of occupations, p.120 fisherman, fishmonger. Url http://heraldry.sca.org/kwhss/2014/Juliana_de_Luna/Names_from_15th_and_16th_Century_Pisa.pdf

di Seravezza Locative name of/from Seravezza. <Serauezza> is found in a 1568 edition of Georgio Vasari's _Le vite de' piu eccellenti pittori, scultori, e architettori_ (http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k54558939/f23.image).

"Dizionario di toponomastica. Storia e significato dei nomi geografici italiani." UTET Libreria, 2006, p. 728, "Il toponimo è attestato nell'a. 952 `Sala Vetitia', a. 1186 `Seravetia', a. 1386 `Sala Vetitia' ossia Serevetitia e Seravetia, forme storiche menzionate da Repitti..." A translation: The place name is attested in the year 952 as 'Sala Vetitia, the year 1186 as 'Seravetia', the year 1386 'Sala Vetitia', namely Serevetitia and Seravetia, historical forms mentioned by Repitti ... "

Submitter understands the "di" may need to change to "de" or "da", they would prefer "di". Locative bynames with di are rare but allowed.

CONSTRUCTION: As in SENA App A for Italian: Given+Family+Locative

Client allows adding/deleting a word like "de" or "the" or changing language when the change is small.

Herald of Record: Alys Mackyntoich


5: Emma de Harewude - New Name Change & New Device

OSCAR NOTE: 'Old Item' should contain the former primary name. The form that is there is not a registered name.

Azure, a rabbit rampant maintaining a bow nocked with an arrow, and in chief two oak leaves argent.

Old Item: Caterina da Venezia, to be released.
Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound (byname to reflect sound (no sound specified)) most important.

Herald of Record: Alan Fairfax

Emma: to 1169 in Withycombe, p.103 s.n. Emma.

"de Harewude" is a constructed English byname, based on the documented form "Harewode" and the spelling variant "wude" for "wode" found in MED.

de Harewode: Bernard de Harewode 1242. Reaney, p.219, s.n. Harwood.

"wude" spelling variant: MED s.v. "wode" -wude. The MED s.v. wude dates Alanus de Estwude to 1204.

"Place-Names of Lancashire" by Eilert Ekwall, 1922, p. 72, Great Harwood (on the Calder, town) lists Harewude 1246. https://archive.org/details/cu31924028039588

The Historical Gazetteer of England's Place-names has sn. Harewood (http://placenames.org.uk/id/placename/33/010291) Harewud(e) 1190, 1207, 1208, 1209, 1224, 1252, 1290 and sn. Harworth (http://placenames.org.uk/id/placename/17/002456) Harewude 1242

Client allows adding or deleting a word such as "de" or "the" or changing the language if the change is small.

Herald of Record: Michael Langley

On the forms under Caterina da Venezia, Caterina also submitted a name change to Emma de Harewude. Thus, these two items have been paired. Client has approved this action.


6: Graçia Benitez - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound (ben-EE-tez) most important.

Herald of Record: Thomas Haworth

Graçia: found in "Spanish Names from the Late 15th Century" by Juliana de Luna (Julia Smith) listed as part of the full name 'Graçia Dey' in the list: "Names from the Account Books of Isabel la Catolica (1477-1504, mostly 1483-1504) -- Full Names of Men: F - I"

Benitez -Elsbeth Anne Roth, "16th Century Spanish Names: Masculine Given Names Alphabetically" [http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/spanish/male-given-alpha.html] gives four occurrences of the given name <Benito> from 1560-1574. The article's main page [http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/spanish/index.html] under Name Structure, states:

Patronymic: These are names originally derived from the given name of one's father. For example, if, in the 10th century, Diego's father was Rodrigo, then Diego would be called Diego Rodriguez, where Rodriguez is the patronymic. The form was the same for women: Diego's sister Maria could be called Maria Rodriguez.

Benitez: found in the book "Del origen y milagros de la Santa Imagen de Nuestra Señora de Candelaria", by Alonso de Espinosa, 1594 (https://books.google.com/books?id=HMRchUL-Z64C).

Diez Melcón, pg. 146, s.n Benedictus, lists a Domingo Benitez in 1234.


7: Grim Ulfheðinsson - New Name & New Device

Vert, a savage statant to dexter hooded and cloaked with a wolf skin and maintaining in both hands a spear palewise argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Meaning (enraged or provoked) most important.

Herald of Record: Beatrice Domenici della Campana

Originally submitted as Gremian Ulfheðinsson, internal commenters were unable to document the given name. The client expressed acceptance of the given name Grim if Gremian was not possible.

Bosworth Toller Anglo Saxon Dictionary shows Gremian as a verb meaning to provoke or rage (http://www.bosworthtoller.com/051184). The submitter would very much appreciate the assistance of the College in documenting this verb as an Anglo Saxon (or compatible) given name. Should that not be possible, he will accept registration as Grim, documented as a header spelling in PASE.
SMP sn. Grim has: (http://arkiv.sprakochfolkminnen.se/Display.aspx?form=smp-sok&item=/Nordiskt/Osammansatt/Mansnamn/Gri m/Grim.pdf)

*Grim, mid 1100s

*Grember i Forsæ 1405

*Grimbir i Forsa 1410

Ulf-heðinn is found on pg 245 of Cleasby/Vigfusson, header Heðinn, with the meaning wolf-coat, the name of a berserker. Ulfheðinsson is a constructed patromymic of the the aforementioned given name.

Client allows adding/deleting a word like "de" or "the" or changing language when the change is small.

Herald of Record: Michael Langley

Client has sent reference photo of picture of armored wolf to Beatrice.


8: Harun ibn Hassan al-Gharbi - New Name & New Device

Gules, on a pale sable fimbriated between in chief two lion heads erased, a tower argent

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Client requests authenticity for 8th century Iberian Moor.
Language (Iberian region around Portugal) most important.
Culture (Iberian region around Portugal) most important.

Herald of Record: Dai Gerdwr

Harun: Period Arabic Names and Naming Practices, Da'ud ibn Auda (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/arabic-naming2.htm).

ibn Hassan: ibid al-Gharb: locative, "The West", Spelling: (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/Jewish/Cairo/cairo_women.html)

Ḥassān can be found in the early 8th century, as a general in Ifrīqiya; from volume 3 of the Encyclopaedia of Islam (see packet.)

Sitt al-Gharb southernmost portion of Portugal (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gharb_Al-Andalus)

There was a place known simply as "Gharb"; specifically, a portion of the Moroccan coast (see packet.)

Byname formation of this name would be al-Gharbi, per Juliana de Luna

Herald of Record: Melodia Beaupel

There was some discussion during internal commentary as to whether or not the fimbriation was too thick. The consensus was that it was acceptable.


9: Hrafn askmaðr - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Meaning (Hrafn the viking) most important.

Herald of Record: Rhiannon Morgaine

Originally submitted as Hrafn askasmiðr, it appears as though the person filling out the form pulled the wrong name (but the correct definition) from GB. The entries are right next to each other, and client has confirmed that he intended askmaðr as his by-name.

Hrafn: Geirr Bassi p. 14 shown as an italicized male name indicating a variation found in the Landnamabok.

askmaðr: Geirr Bassi p. 19 - meaning "viking, pirate".

ask-maðr m. shipman, viking, pirate; cf. askr. : Zoëga sn ask-maðr

askr (-a, -ar), m. (I) ash, ash-tree; (2) ash-spear; (3) small ship : Zoëga sn askr http://lexicon.ff.cuni.cz/png/oi_zoega/b0020.png

CONSTRUCTION: given+descriptive according to Gierr Bassi p. 5-6.


10: Hrǫngviðr Vegandi - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Norse) most important.
Culture (Norse) most important.

Herald of Record: Jehan de la Marche

Hrǫngviðr Norse given name Geirr Bassi p.11

Vegandi nickname "the battler" Geirr Bassi p.29


11: Jodocus van Cleeff - New Name & New Device

Per chevron azure and vert, a point pointed ployé argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (Low countries, especially Netherlands but will accept German) most important.
Culture (Low countries, especially Netherlands but will accept German) most important.

Herald of Record: Solveig Throndardottir

Jodocus - Jodocus Krines (1619) Prussian name, FamilySearch Historical Records M97127-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JHW6-VZW).

Jodocus -- Family Search lists the name in Holland in the late 16th century (for example, https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QL6S-6YSS) but not with the standard batches; instead it cites Netherlands, Archival Indexes, Miscellaneous Records. The cite for the name is at https://www.openarch.nl/show.php?archive=brd&identifier=2566f4fd-3861-5080-9e11-b10e3b0da9df which looks to be a valid cite, but serious name heralds should look at it first.

The name can also be found in Talan Gwynek, "Medieval German Given Names from Silesia" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/bahlow_v.htm), with Joducus cited in 1400. Appendix C of Sena allows Dutch and German within 300 years.

Van Cleeff -- Family search lists the following:

Nelletgen Van Cleef, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 1593, Batch M01224-6 (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FNQ1-LQ6)

Micaesijus Van Cleff, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 1591, Batch M00705-9 (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FN8H-3QG)

This would give us Van Cleeff as a reasonable interpolation. Given that Family Search over capitalizes, this may actually be van Cleeff.

Joannes An Cleeff (1591), Prussian name, FamilySearch, Batch Number: M96512-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JHHQ-MQH)

van is the Low German form of the locative preposition von [Elzebeth van Rostock, 12/2014, A-Calontir].

This is documented as a Prussian name, but the submitter prefers it to be Dutch if possible. Prefers Jodocus Van Der Clooff or Jodocus Van Der Cleeff, but will accept: Jodocus Van Cleeff, Jodocus Van Cloof, Jodocus Cleeff, or Jodocus Cloof. The submitter has no preferences as to capitalization of the preposition.

Client allows adding/deleting a word like "de" or "the" or changing language when the change is small.

Herald of Record: Beatrice Domenici della Campana


12: Katryne Whyt of Kings Crossing - New Name & New Device

Argent, a frog vert and in base a rose proper

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for Scottish.
Sound (Sound: CATH-rin White) most important.

Herald of Record: Ranolfr Rosamon

Katryne: "A List of Feminine Personal Names Found in Scottish Records" by Talan Gwynek (Brian M. Scott, scott@math.csuohio.edu), Section: A List of Feminine Personal Names Found in Scottish Records : Post-1400 Names,

Heading: Katherine, Entry: Katryne 1528 [SCARTH, 712] (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/scottishfem.html)

Whyt: Bardsley, s.n. White, lists a Magota Whyt in 1379, and the article "Surnames of Illegitimate Children in the Registers of the Church of St. Mary's, Dymock" by Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/Dymock/IllegitimateChildrenSurnames.shtml) lists a Jane Whyt as the mother of a daughter baptised in 1551.

Whyt: Blacks "The Surnames of Scotland" under heading White, at the end of the enrty is "Whyt 1646, Whytt 1677."

Whyt, there are more period English examples of the Whyt spelling in the Calendar of Patent Rolls, such as Edward II Vol.3 (1317-1321) p.362 John Whyt in a commission dated March 20, 1319 and Edward III Vol.9 (1350-1354) p. 244 Richard Whyt as holding a power of attorney for William de London Mar.21, 1352. There are several other examples using the equivalent form "Le Whyt." While these are English rather than Scottish, both Edward II and Edward III claimed and sometimes exercised overlordship over Scotland, and the linguistic distinction between northern England and southern Scotland was very slight.

Kings Crossing: This branch-name was registered to Shire of Kings Crossing in February of 2003 (via AEthelmearc).

CONSTRUCTION: Per SENA Appendix A under English/Welsh: Scots: given+pat+loc

Client allows adding/deleting a word like "de" or "the" or changing language when the change is small.

Herald of Record: Muirenn ingen Dunadaig


13: Roderick Longschaunk - New Name & New Device

Per fess embattled argent and gules, a warhammer fesswise sable and a tankard argent en soleil Or.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound (Sounds like Roderick Longshank(s)) most important.

Herald of Record: Galefridus Peregrinus

Roderick: Per Academy of St Gabriel's Report 1229 by Arval Benicoeur (http://s-gabriel/1229); states: "Roderick is an English or Scots form of a name brought to Britain by the Normans. The name ultimately derived from Germanic roots, and forms of it survived in several western European languages; but Roderick is found only in Britain [1]." The footnote cites Withycombe. Also Roderick Thomas, male, 20 Oct 1588, Bishops Castle, Shropshire, England. Batch #M03733-1. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NKCC-MQN)

Longschaunk: Per Reaney and Wilson, p. 284 SN Longshank, Longschaunk attested to 1307.

Herald of Record: Muirenn ingen Dunadaig

The forms uploaded for internal commentary has a mismatch between the B&W and the color sheets. That has been corrected for external. Client has approved the new artwork.


14: Rollo Bastardson - New Name & New Device

Gules, on a bend sinister sable fimbriated between two crosses couped, three wolf's heads bendwise contourny erased argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound (None specified) most important.

Herald of Record: Alan Fairfax

Rollo: Withycombe, 256, s.n. Rolf, notes Rollo as Latinized form of Rolf. Rolf is dated to 1086 and 1273.

Bastardson: constructed byname with pattern <father's byname> + <-son>. Pattern is referenced in the introduction to R&W, p. xx. Examples are "filius fabri" (1219) and "filius clerici" (1185). Also references subsidy rolls from 1296, 1327, 1332: "In all these sources there are additional examples of Reveson, Smithson, etc. Occassionally the surname is based on the father's surname. In Cambridgeshire John Brunisson and William Broun occur in the same parish as do Richard and William Lawisson and Henry Law. In Cumberland, Hugh Moserghson was presumably the son of Thomas de Mosergh."

In period, we have at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_de_Dunois, the "Bastard of Orléans" (bâtard d'Orléans), [which] was a term of respect, since it acknowledged him as a first cousin to the king and acting head of a cadet branch of the royal family during his half-brother's captivity.

Also at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthony,_bastard_of_Burgundy, "the Bastard of Burgundy or Le grand bâtard ('the Grand Bastard')", at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Neville the Bastard of Fauconberg, and at several places the Bastard of Polignac, killed by King Charles VI de Valois, called "the Mad".

Bastard: Reaney & Wilson, s.n. Bastard. Robert Bastard (1086), William le Bastard (1297). Although it's not relevant to the documentation, the submitter is the son of Nicholas the Bastard (unregistered), generally called "Bastard", so he developed this constructed name in a period fashion. Name is intended to be from late 12th-century England.

Herald of Record: Elsbeth Anne Roth


15: Shait ben Mikha'el - New Badge

OSCAR thinks the name is registered as Shait ben Mikha'el in January of 2008, via Æthelmearc.

Azure, a batwinged bison passant between in chief two clouds Or, a base indented argent.

This submission is to be associated with Flying Buffalos, House of the

Herald of Record: Elsbeth Anne Roth


16: Shirin al-Susiyya - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for Persian.
Sound (None specified) most important.

This name combines a Persian given name and an Arabic byname. Originally submitted as Shirin al-Susiyya, the article was changed to al- following internal commentary to match it up with the additional documentation for the town of al-Sūs (see below.) Client has approved the change.

Shirin: the modern Persian form of the name of a Persian queen who died in 628 and is a character in the medieval Persian epic Shah Nameh. Shirin was also used by medieval Persian people; it is found in Ursula Georges, "Some Persian feminine names and etymologies from the Timurid dynasty" (yarntheory.net/ursulageorges/names/timuridpersian.html).

The submitter would like a locative byname for someone from the ancient Persian city of Susa. The Arabic byname al-Susi is dated to 1221 on p. 226 of Jonathan Glustrom Katz, Dreams, Sufism and Sainthood, on Google Books at books.google.com/books?id=pYM0rdQLXR0C. The spelling as- is an alternative transliteration representing the pronunciation of the name, and the change from -i to -iyya is a feminization. We do not know whether al-Susi referred to the Persian city.

There's the Persian city known in Arabic as al-Sūs (image 1.) Note that while Muḳaddasī claims it was destroyed, neither al-Balādhurī nor al-Ṭabarī have any such statement in their writings, and the presence of coins from there argues against its destruction, or at least show it was rebuilt.

Correction to Name (2017-Nov-07 06:11:27): I made an error on entry. Per the client's submission form, this is a name change. Old name (Sigrid Wilhelm), to be released.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=837/2017-10-13/20-42-09_alsus.jpg


17: Skjǫldr skjótandi - New Name & New Device

Vert, within an increscent a wolf's head erased argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (old Norse) most important.
Culture (old Norse) most important.

Herald of Record: Thomas Haworth

Skjǫldr is a masculine form found in Geirr Bassi on p. 14.

skjótandi is found in Geirr Bassi, p. 27 as a nickname.

The name pattern Given name + descriptive/occupational byname is documented in SENA, Appendix A.

Allows adding/deleting a word like "de" or "the" or changing language when the change is small.

Herald of Record: Michael Langley

Consider Álfdís Úlfviðardóttir (device registered June 2017 via Lochac): Vert, a wolf's head couped within an orle argent. In this submission, the primary charge is the increscent (the wolf's head is less than 50% of the visual weight of the increscent) and is therefore clear under SENA A.5.E.2.


It's said that All Hallows' Eve is one of the nights when the veil between the worlds is thin - and whether you believe in such things or not, those roaming spirits probably believe in you, or at least acknowledge your existence, considering that it used to be their own. Even the air feels different on Halloween, autumn-crisp and bright. --Erin Morgenstern

Madoc Garnet

Saiman Cornelian


OSCAR counts 14 New Names, 1 New Name Change, 1 New Household Name, 11 New Devices and 1 New Badge. These 28 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $112 for them. There are a total of 28 items submitted on this letter.