An Tir LoI dated 2017-07-17

Greetings unto the College of Arms!

I am Caitrina inghean Aindrasia, incoming Lions Blood Herald. I look forward to working with you all and beg your patience while I get reacquainted with OSCAR and learn to juggle the duties of Lions Blood with my duties and responsibilities as Baroness of Lions Gate.

Yours in service,

Baroness Caitrina Lions Blood, OP

"Quarterly gules and sable a winged fox sejant argent."

1: Ælfwynn Spearheafoces dohtor - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in September of 2008, via An Tir.

Per bend sinister embattled vert and Or, in bend a weaver's tablet and an arrow both bendwise sinister within a bordure, all counterchanged 

Commentors believe the line of division could have fewer and larger embattlements, to improve identifiability. Hoping an artist's note would suffice.


2: Ærngærðr Ulfs dottir - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 2013, via An Tir.

Sable, in pale a crescent and a wolf's paw print argent.

SFPP for the paw print but no conflicts found.


3: Athanasios Belisarios - New Name Change From Holding Name

OSCAR NOTE: the old name was registered in February of 2014, via An Tir.

Old Item: Athanasius of Madrone, to be released.
Submitter desires a masculine name.
No changes.
Language most important.
Culture most important.

The submitter's branch is Madrone.

A previous version of this name was returned in February 2014 with this text, which he provides now as his documentation:

"Athanasius is a Latinized form of of a Greek name, and Tiberius is a Roman praenomen. The third element, Belisario was not supported by the documentation. The Roman form would be Belisarius, and the Greek form Belisarios.

Documentation was not provided to support the submitted pattern of at least three given names. Green Staff was able to document this pattern using examples from Benet Salway, "What's in a Name? A Survey of Roman Onomastic Practice from c. 700 B.C. to A.D. 700" (Journal of Roman Studies, vol. 84, pp. 124-45).

Evidence of Tiberius as anything but a praenomen was not found, however. We would drop this element, and register the name as Athanasius Belisarius, or change the order to Tiberius Athanasius Belisarius, but either would be a major change which the submitter does not allow. Therefore, we are forced to return this name.

His device has been registered under the holding name Athanasius of Madrone."

The submitted spelling, with both names ending in -os, is the preferred one. If that's not possible, the submitter's second choice is <Athanasius Belisarios>. Failing that, he will accept <Athanasius Belisarius>.

Commentary from Michael Gerard Curtememoire;

... his requested <Belisarios> is the accepted transliteration of <Βελισάριος>, Flavius Belisarius (c. 505-565): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belisarius supported by, e.g., http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195046526.001.0001/acref-9780195046526-e-0707, The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium, ed. Alexander P. Kazhdan (OUP: 1991/2005)--the snippet of the latter that is not behind a paywall suffices. It is also acknowledged in Laurel's return comment, quoted in the headmatter here.

That same comment also supports the construction now submitted.

To place a Byzantine <Αθανάσιος>/<Athanasios> within the required half a millennium of the byname we have Athanasius the Athonite, aka of Athon (c. 920 - c. 1003): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Athanasius_the_Athonite supported by http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195046526.001.0001/acref-9780195046526-e-0553.

Thus the submitted <Athanasios Belisarios> should be sent up.


4: Belisaria Megaris - New Name & New Device

Azure, an oak tree and on a chief argent a roundel between a decrescent and an increscent azure

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Megaris comes from "Common Names of the Aristocracy in the Roman Empire During the 6th and 7th Centuries" by Berret Chavez <http://heraldry.sca.org/names/byzantine/early_byz_names.html>.

Belisarius comes from the same source and is feminized per the table "Feminizing Family Names" in "Personal Names of the Aristocracy in the Roman Empire During the Later Byzantine Era" by the same author.

LB notes: Submitted at Kingdom as Megaris Belisarina, however the name structures from documentation provided "Personal Names of the Aristocracy in the Roman Empire During the Later Byzantine Era" are not appropriate for names dated to the sixth or seventh centuries.

The submitter was given several choices supplied by Ursula Georges in commentary and has chosen Belisaria Megaris, placing the feminized version of her father's name before her personal name. A construction mentioned briefly at the end of Ursula Georges Roman names article: http://heraldry.sca.org/names/roman.html#byzantine ) 

No conflicts found for name or device.


5: Caitriona inghean Tomais - New Name & New Device

Per bend azure and argent, a mullet of eight points Or and a peacock feather bendwise vert

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Meaning (Caitriona daughter of Tomais) most important.

All elements of this name are discussed in St. Gabriel Report #2195: http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi/2195.txt

Commentary from Conall an Doire (Blue Talbot);

Caitriona- O'Brien's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" shows Caitriona as the standardized early modern Irish nominative form of a feminine name associated with annalistic dates of 1360, 1363, 1412, 1417, 1427, 1440, 1470, 1475, 1477, 1490, 1492, 1493, 1498, 1507, 1516, 1525 and 1607 (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Caiterina.shtml)

<Tomás> is an Early Modern Irish masculine given name found in "Index of Names in Irish Annals" by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Tomas.shtml), with Annals dates of 1257-1596.

The Early Modern Gaelic pattern of "<given name> + inghean + <genitive of father's name>" is listed in SENA Appendix A as not requiring any further documentation.

No conflicts found for name or device.


6: Cler of Cieux - New Name

Lord Colm Dubh's "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/paris.html) includes the name "Cler de Compigne".

Commentary from Michael Gerard Curtememoire;

The article at http://www.vivre-a-cieux.fr/lacommune/histoire, "Petite histoire de Cieux", tells us that the learned dispute the origin of the name, but it may come from the Occitan "ciu (ciou)", from "civitas", Latin for 'city', which in the modern Limousin language is pronounced "cii". So its modern name "Cieux", 'Heavens', seems to have that meaning only coincidentally.

That site further says the commune's name appears in the history by Maleu* as <Syoux>, but I cannot find that confirmed elsewhere. However, it derives an alternate name, <Silis>, on the basis of a Latin reference, "d'Adhémar de Vauris dominicellus in parocchio de <Silex>".

Sure enough, in https://books.google.com/books?id=Zv4YAAAAYAAJ, Inventaire-sommaire des archives départementales antériures a 1790**, ed. Alfred Leroux &; Camille Rivain, on p. 7, first image below, there's a listing of "Ademar de Vauris, damoiseau de la paroisse de <Silis> (Cieux ?)", 'squire in the parish of <Silis> (Cieux?)'--parentheses and question mark theirs, not mine--among items variously dated 1309, 1295, and 1296. And on its p. 8, second image, we have "Ademarus de Vauris, domicellus de parocchia de <Silis>", rendering homage for lands in 1296, "Anno Domini Mo CCo nonagesimo sexto".

So it looks like the gentle can be <Cler of Cieux> using Lingua Anglica or take a period place name closely contemporary with her given name and be <Cler de Silis>;.

Name put forward as Cler of Cieux to give the submitter something as close to her desired name as possible.


7: Francis de Northetone - New Name & New Device

Barry wavy Or and azure, on a pile gules a salmon haurient argent

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language most important.
Culture most important.
Meaning most important.

Document from medievalsolider.org shows <Francis> and <de>, undated, among other names dated to the 14th century. The search may be reproduced here: http://www.medievalsoldier.org/database/maindbsearch.php

Another document, from the British History Museum website, dates <Northetone> to 1327: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/suss-record-soc/vol10/pp184-205#highlight-first

Commentary from Coblaith Muimnech;

The source cited for "Francis" is the The Soldier in Medieval England database. 48 records with the given name "Francis" returned when I ran a search there, including one for Francis de Court, a knight who issued a Letter of Protection dated 1404-12-18 indicating his intention to serve in Wales and Francis Martin, an archer listed in a muster roll dated 1438-09-15 who served in Rouen. I could find no statement on the site regarding editorial practices, but a search with the "first name variations" box checked returned listings for "France", "Frank", "Frankyn", "Franchkyn", "Francois", "Franquet", and "Franket", among others, so it doesn't seem they've normalized all the entries.

The source cited for "Northetone" is British History Online's digitization of The Three Earliest Subsidies For the County of Sussex 1296, 1327, 1332, ed. William Hudson (London, 1910). The Sussex Subsidy of 1327, rape of Pevensey, contains the names "Alic' a Northetone" (at the cited URL), "Willo de Northeton", and "Johe de Northeton" (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/suss-record-soc/vol10/pp152-168). Makes "de Northetone" a no-brainer for that context.

Incidentally, British History Online also hosts a digitization of An Abstract of Feet of Fines For the County of Sussex: Vol. 3, 1308-1509, ed. L F Salzmann (Lewes, 1916). Within that, Sussex Fines: 1-5 Edward II dates "Francis de Aldeham" to 1328.

No conflicts found for name or device


8: Gustav Anderson - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.
Meaning most important.

The submitter's branch is Dragon's Mist.

* Gustav is found in Sweden from the 13th century onward, per St. Gabriel report 312 and referenced in reportss 244 and 2766 http://www.s-gabriel.org/312, http://www.s-gabriel.org/244, and http://www.s-gabriel.org/2766.

* Ander, and the the patronymic pattern to produce Anderson, are found in St. Gabriel report 2296 http://www.s-gabriel.org/2296.

Commentary from ffride wlffsdotter;

Gustav Horn, married 1643, Stockholm, Sweden. Batch no. M41986-1

(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FKJS-1HQ)

Nils Anderson, male, married 1643, Stockholm, Sweden. Batch no. M41974-2

(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FK6X-725)

No conflicts found.


9: Hánefr Ragnarsson - New Alternate Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in September of 2003, via An Tir.

Lars Gunnarson

Commentary from Iago ab Adam and ffride wlffsdotter;

DMNES has a 'Lars' in Early Modern Swedish dated to 1584: http://dmnes.org/cite/Lars/1584/Hiiumaa

SMP sn. Gunnar (http://130.238.4.107/SMP/pdf/Gunnar.pdf) has on page 3:

Laurencius Gunnarsson, Gunnarson, 1349

(Which, as Iago has noticed with the DMNES link, is the Latinised version of Lars's name!)

SMP sn. Godse (http://130.238.4.107/SMP/pdf/Godse.pdf) has:

her Lars Godsesson [1409] 1561 (I think that means it's a copy of a document dated 1409, re-written in 1561.)

No conflicts found.


10: Ihon Makfulchiane - New Name & New Device

Per fess Or and gules, in fess three ravens displayed sable and a ram's head cabossed argent 

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Ihon and Makfulchiane are both found in "13th and 14th century Scottish Names" by Symon Freser of Lovat, found via St. Gabriel:

Ihon - https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/symonFreser/scottish14/scottish14_given.html

Makfulchiane - https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/symonFreser/scottish14/scottish14_sur.html

Commentary from Michael Gerard Curtememoire;

I am concerned by the statement in the surname section apparently applicable here: "Editor's Note: These Scots renderings of Gaelic bynames are all used in this text as chiefly titles, not as simple patronymics. These examples cannot be taken as typical of how Gaelic bynames were rendered into Scots in the late 14th century."

This leaves me wondering whether or not the source can be used at all for our purposes.

Forwarded for Laurel consideration.

There is a SFPP for having non-eagles dispayed.

No conflicts found for name or device.


11: Isobella Forbes - New Name

Both elements are found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Names of women mentioned in the Perth Guildry Book 1464-1598" <http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/scots/perthdata.html>. Isobella dates to 1594, Forbes to 1588.

No conflicts found.


12: Judith de Northumbria - New Name & New Device

Gules semy-de-lys Or, a bend sinister sable fimbriated Or

Submitter desires a feminine name.

http://dmnes.org/name/Judith

B. Schneidmüller: Di Welfen. Herrschaft und Erinnerung (819-1252). (Stuttgart, 2000), pp. 119-123

I.S. Robinson, Henry IV of Germany, 1056-1106 (Cambridge, 2003).

Commentary from Coblaith Muimnech;

The overall construction doesn't require further documentation (http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html#AppendixAEnglish), but you still have to show the place name is (a) of a type plausible for naming people and (b) in a period form.

The Online Middle English Dictionary shows a few toponymics based on regions on the island. Most of those I've found take an adjectival form (see the entries Corn-walish (adj.), Devenish (adj. & n.), Kentish (adj.), and Welsh (adj.) for examples) but I did find Ricardo Scot de Scottelande, dated to 1439, s.n. Scot (n.(1)). (I'm assuming he's the Scottishest Scot who ever Scotted.)

The same source dates "My said Lord of Northumbria" to 1443 (s.n. oversight (n.)) and "Quidam fatui de Northumbria" to a1350 (s.n. shavaldǒur (n.)).

Commentary from Michael Gerard Curtememoire;

It's been often stated that a region as large as <Northumbria> is unlikely for a byname--but the evidence of "Scottelande" used in a parallel way indicates it's not impossible.

We also have Scotorum historiae a prima gentis origine, ..., by Hector Boece or Boethius, dated 1527 by Google Books at https://books.google.com/books?id=iW_w2XSupY8C. In its Liber XIII on the second page of FO[lio?] CCXCI Boethius mentions dwellings in <Northumbria>, in case we need to show it inhabitable in period: "Itaque omnibus abunde instructus castella in Northumbria, quae Anglorum praesidia habebant, ...", which between us Google Translate, http://latin-dictionary.net/, and I make: 'And so, being supplied out of the castles(villages?) in Northumberland with an abundance of all things, the English garrisons they held, ..." Image below.

No conflicts found for name or device.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=175/2017-07-10/16-36-28_19-55-46_castella_in_Northumbria.PNG


13: Kaðall Himinnaúga - New Name & New Device

Sable, a sun argent within a bordure parted bordurewise indented azure and Or

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.
Meaning most important.

Kaðall - "Viking Bynames found in the Landnámabók" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael <http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/vikbynames.html>.

Himmelaúga - Constructed byname "sky/heaven-eye" --

Quoting the August 2016 LoAR sn. Hrafn Isauga.

Submitted as Hrafn Is-augu, the constructed byname Is-augu was intended to mean "ice-eyes". In commentary, ffride wlffsdotter found examples such as hrakauga ("crack-eye"), járnauga ("iron-eye"), and krókauga "hook-eye" in Tilnavne i den islandske oldlitteratur by Finnur Jónsson (http://heimskringla.no/wiki/Tilnavne) and in Lind Personbinamn. However, all of these examples use the singular form "eye". Therefore, we have changed the byname to the singular form Isauga ("ice-eye") to register this name.

Per ffride, himinnauga would be "heaven-eye, sky-eye."

NB - form has submitted name as "Himmelauga" but this is Lion's Blood's error in trying to do too many things at Crown consult. :) Submitter confirms that he is okay with, and in fact prefers, "himinnauga."

No conflicts found for name or device.


14: Kára Bjarnardóttir - New Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in September of 2003, via An Tir.

Quarterly Or and purpure ermined Or, a unicorn rampant to sinister argent gorged with a pearled coronet gules within a bordure counterchanged.

Old Item: Quarterly Or semy of roses purpure and purpure, a swan contourny argent within a bordure quarterly purpure and Or semy of roses purpure., to be released.

Court baroness: Jan 10, 2004

No conflicts found.

Although some commenters expressed concern that the purpure looks sable, it is absolutely purpure on Lions Blood's monitor. I felt no need to request a new form and re-scanning washed out the Or. For Laurel consideration.


15: Kári Smiðjudrumbr Leiknisson - New Name & New Device

Per chevron inverted gules and paly sable and Or, an anvil Or

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Old Norse 9th to 10th century) most important.

Originally submitted as Kári Smiðjudrumber Leiknirsson

Kári - "Viking Names found in Landnámabók" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael <http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/landnamabok.html>.

Smiðjudrumbr - The name <Smiðjudrumbr> appears in "Viking Bynames found in the Landnámabók" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael <http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/vikbynames.html>.

Leiknisson - Leiknir is given in GB. See also "A Simple Guide to Creating Old Norse Names" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael <http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/sg-viking.html>.

Commentary from ffride wlffsdotter;

Lind col. 735 sn. Leiknir notes the genitive is expected to become Leiknis, so Kári Smiðjudrumbr Leiknisson.

No conflicts found for name or device.


16: Leiknir kolbrúnarskáld - New Name & New Device

Per pall inverted argent, sable, and barry wavy azure and argent, in chevron inverted a natural dolphin sable and another argent respectant.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Client requests authenticity for 9th century Scandanavian/Icelandic.

<Leiknir> and <kolbrúnarskáld> are both from GB.

No conflicts found for name or device.


17: Morewenna Noble Face - New Name & New Device

Azure, between two hawks rising respectant argent a spear, a bordure Or

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound most important.

* Anna Noble - IGI - married 29 July 1555 - batch M00749-1 England

* Ric Face- IGI - christened 21 Sept 1577 - batch C05487-1 England

Personal name submitted at Kingdom as Merewyn using St. Gabriel report 2544 as support. Changed to Morewenna to forward to Laurel as the device looks to be free of conflict. However the Submitter would prefer <Merowyn> if possible.

Morwenna - found in Withycombe, p. 223; dated 1478; Cornish saint mentioned by William of Worcester begun under Vitae Sancti Neetani. The name also appears in Nicholas Orme's The Saints of Cornwall with the cited Morewenna dated to the 14th c. and Morwinna to 1478.

The submitter thinks her name may have been previously submitted via the Outlands, but we found no records of it.


18: Nakagawa Aki - New Name & New Device

Argent, a volcano couped within an annulet of eight cherry blossoms azure

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language (Japanese) most important.

The name Aki is found in a letter from the ACADEMY OF SAINT GABRIEL REPORT 3001, <http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi/3001.txt>, dated 3 Apr 2005, which is listed in / supported by Reference 1: Solveig Throndardottir, _Name Construction in Mediaeval Japan_

(Carlsbad, N. Mex.: The Outlaw Press, 1994; Potboiler Press, 1999 [Box

30171, Columbia, MO 65205])

She has chosen Nakagawa as her family name because of marriage. The same is supported by http://www.sengokudaimyo.com/miscellany/chart_surnames.html, a site owned by SCA Baron Edward of Effingham, OP/OL, aka Hiraizumi Torokuro Tadanobu (MKA writer Anthony J. Bryant).

Commentary from Eglentyne Merryweather (Rivers Bend)

Both names can be found in Name Construction in Mediaeval Japan by Solveig Throndardottir (on the Citations-only list). The surname Nakagawa is found on page 321 sub Nakagawa, dated to 1568. The feminine personal name Aki is found on page 372 sub Aki, dated to 1600.

No conflict was found for this name.

* Device intended to be used as a Japanese Mon.

Commentary from Eglentyne Merryweather (Rivers Bend);

3 examples of a mon depicting Mt. Fuji (very much like the submitted one) are found on page 219 of O-umajirushi, A 17th-Century Compendium of Samurai Heraldry, Translated and Anotated by Xavid "Kiho"Pretzer. This book was published in 2015 by The Academy of the Four Directions in Cambridge, MA. The mon belongs to "Aoki, Provincial Governor of Kai, i.e. Aoki Shigekane, 1606-1682" This date falls into the grey period, but could be useful.

Images below. No conflicts found for this device.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=175/2017-07-10/20-33-53_T-15-44-03_Japanese_Heraldry1.jpg
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=175/2017-07-10/20-33-53_T-15-44-04_Japanese_Heraldry2.jpg
#3 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=175/2017-07-10/20-33-53_T-15-44-04_Japanese_Heraldry3.jpg


19: Oddr Þiálfason - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 2013, via An Tir.

(Fieldless) A monster consisting of the head and attires of a reindeer, the body of a nude man, and the tail of a wolf, statant affronty head to dexter, sustaining to dexter a wooden trumpet inverted argent.

No conflicts found.


20: Sage Templar - New Name & New Device

Argent, a Latin cross clechy gules and in canton a sage leaf vert

No major changes.
Sound (Templar) most important.

The submitter's branch is Wastekeep.

Sage Streach married 18 Feb 1640 England batch M03752-2

Margret Templar married 1592 batch M05807-2

No conflicts found for name or device.


21: Selene Potamou - New Name & New Device

Or, a scorpion sable fesswise and on a chief sable three roses argent

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Selene (Σελήνη) appears with 8 instances across 3 volumes in the LGPN database online; dates are between 1st c. AD and 446 AD. http://clas-lgpn2.classics.ox.ac.uk/cgi-bin/lgpn_search.cgi?namenoaccents=%CE%A3%CE%95%CE%9B%CE%97%C E%9D%CE%97

Potamou is the genitive form of Potamos (Πόταμος), which appears with 6 instances in the LGPN, dates between 575 BCE and 112 CE: http://clas-lgpn2.classics.ox.ac.uk/cgi-bin/lgpn_search.cgi?namenoaccents=%CE%A0%CE%9F%CE%A4%CE%91%C E%9C%CE%9F%CE%A3

LB notes - submitted as Potamaes, which is the genitive fem sg, Ursula Green Staff confirms the genitive would agree with the father's name in gender and not change to match the gender of the given name. As the submitter allows all changes, this should not be an issue.

No conflicts found for name or device.


22: Stefano Francesco - New Name & New Device

Bendy sinister vert and Or, on a chief sable a bezant

No changes.

Stefano is listed under given names in "Names from Arezzo, Italy, 1386-1528" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael <http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/italian/arezzo.html>.

Francesco is given in "Italian Names from Florance, 1427" by Ferrante la Volpe <https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ferrante/catasto/>.

As per Maridonna Benvenuti;

No conflicts found. Docs check out.

Stefano is found 3 times in Ary's article. Francesco is found 442 times, plus Stefano is found 69 times as a given name in Ferratne's article. SENA allows unmarked patronymics for Italian. Nice name!


23: Thadeus Waldner - New Device

OSCAR finds the name on the An Tir LoI of March 31, 2017 as submitted.

Pily Or and vert, a beaver sable charged on the shoulder with a heart Or

No conflicts found.


24: Thomas Fleming - New Name

Thomas is dated to 1434 and 1437, and Fleming to 1453 and 1454, in Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "15th Century Scots Names from Dunfermline" <http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/scots/dunfermline/>.

No conflicts found.


25: Þórhalla in danska - New Name & New Device

Per chevron azure and sable, a mermaid seated to dexter on the base horn of an increscent and in chief two lozenges ployé argent

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Client requests authenticity for 9th century Scandinavian/Icelandic.
Culture (9th century Scandinavian/Icelandic) most important.

<Þórhalla> is a feminine given name from GB 2nd ed.

<in danska> is the feminine for <inn danski>, "the Dane," descriptive byname from GB 2nd ed.

Commentary from Conall an Doire (Blue Talbot)

Þórhalla is found in Geirr Bassi Haraldsson. The Old Norse Name pp 16

inn dasnski i have found however my pdf of GB im not sure reflects correct pg number.

No conflicts found for this name or device. It was noted that the lozenges are too small but it is hoped an artist's note will suffice.



OSCAR counts 18 New Names, 1 New Alternate Name, 16 New Devices, 1 New Device Change and 2 New Badges. These 38 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $152 for them. OSCAR counts 1 New Holding Name Change. This item is not chargeable. There are a total of 39 items submitted on this letter.