An Tir LoI dated 2017-06-30

Greetings unto the Sovereigns and College of Arms from Rhieinwylydd Lions Blood. This will be my last XLOI as Lions Blood; Baroness Caitrina, who has held this role in the past, will be taking the lead next month. I thank you all for your support and education over the past few years! This has been one of the most educational, challenging and rewarding experiences of my SCA career to date.

This letter also introduces James Irvein of Lions Gate as Tir Righ's new submissions herald. Please welcome him as he begins this new journey. As always, items processed by the Tir Righ College are marked as such below.

1: Æsa Ormr-í-auga - New Device

OSCAR finds the name on the An Tir LoI of September 30, 2016 as submitted.

Argent, a triskelion of dragon's heads vert within a bordure rayonny purpure

Obviously, OSCAR is recognizing the color here as mostly azure. OSCAR tends to have trouble with purple crayola markers, especially because that shade tends to be pretty inconsistent. As their is some purple showing on the color correction, it should be sufficient to register as purpure (per Blue Mountain's kingdom commentary).


2: Aliénor Ysabiau Debois - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound most important.
Language (14th century French) most important.

The name Aliénor with the acute accent appears, dated 15th and 16th c., in "Late Period French Feminine Names" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael at

http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/latefrench.html (scroll to the bottom of the page, where there is a table for names by century). Raw data vol 1 shows it dated to 1574, vol 2 to 1488. The submitter expresses a preference for 14th c (though not an authenticity request); the same spelling but without the accent is dated to 1302 in "Breton Names from the Late 13th Century" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael at http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/late13thcbreton.html.

Ysabiau is found in "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" by Colm Dubh at http://heraldry.sca.org/names/paris.html (full name Ysabiau la clopine, suggesting a feminine name).

For the surname, I quote Blue Mountain from her excellent kingdom commentary:

Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "DRAFT: Names in the 1292 census of Paris" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/1292paris.pdf, image 1) has de Bois-Megre, which may be sufficient for the more generic de Bois. The article also has du Bois and du Bois-d'Arsi. At a later period Ary's "French Names from Chastenay, 1448-1457" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/french/chastenay.html, image 2) shows the use of interchangeable usage of de and du with Colin Dubois/du Bois/de Bois dated 1453, 1454, 1455, 1456. So either spelling (Dubois or Debois) should be fine and probably meet her desire for a 14th C French name.

SENA App A says double given names are found "late" in French, but does not specify that date. The first name is 16th c. which certainly seems late enough; the latest I found for <Ysabiau> was 1313 (http://dmnes.org/2015/1/name/Isabel - language is OF). More commentary on whether this combination is acceptable would be useful.


3: An Tir, Kingdom of - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in December of 1981, via the West.

Checky Or and argent, a catercap sable

This submission is to be associated with Order of the Sable Bonnet

The field is grandfathered to the kingdom.

The cap is based on that worn by Georges de Selve in Holbein's painting The Ambassadors (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ambassadors_(Holbein) - de Selve is the figure on the right).

Uncertain about the best way to describe the charge; submitted blazon was a "scholar's cap" which seems descriptive but not period. Modern academic regalia calls hats like this a 'tam.' Modern Anglican usage (the Anglican church being a place where this cap is still seen) tends toward 'Canterbury cap' (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canterbury_cap) and catercap seems to be the period term. OED has

1588 `M. Marprelate' Oh read ouer D. Iohn Bridges: Epist. 48 You presbyter Iohn Catercap are some man in the land.

?1589 T. Nashe Almond for Parrat 5 a They [Sir Peter and Sir Paul] were none of these Cartercaps, Graduates, nor Doctors.

Blue Mountain in kingdom commentary discussed potential conflicts:

While no difference is generally granted between hats, I suspect this is clear of Tamar of Highmoor (badge, 3/1990, Atenveldt), Gyronny of six per pale gules and argent, a fool's hood of two ears affronty sable, with a DC for the field and another for the differences in the primary charges. Precedent did grant a CD between a jester's cap and a jester's hood, I see no reason why there shouldn't be a DC here, The relevant precedent is:

[a jester's cap vs. a jester's hood] [There is a CD] for the difference between a jester's cap and a jester's hood; the latter has the fabric which would normally extend down over the shoulders and well onto the chest, with large dags, and a hole in the front for the face to show through. It was the consensus of those at the Laurel meeting that the difference was visually equivalent to the difference between a lion and a demi-lion, for which we also grant a CD. (Gautier d'Isigny-sur-Mer, 8/94 p. 3)

A more recent precedent which tends to support a DC between this hat and Tamar's fool's hood:

[Gules, a monk's hood Or] Possible conflicts were called against Catherine the Merry, Azure, a fool's cap Or, and Amata Quentin Motzhart, Gules, a jester's cap lozengy argent and sable. In both cases, a necessary CD must come from the type of the hat. There is a CD between a monk's hood, and either a jester's/fool's hat or a jester's hood. Both these latter charges, according to the Pictorial Dictionary, have tall padded pointed horns ending with bells and cannot be visually confused with the monk's hood. [William Worm, 08/2001, A-Ansteorra]

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=708/2017-07-01/21-14-14_Screen_Shot_2017-07-01_at_7.13.47_PM.png


4: Arnora Grimsdottir - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name on the An Tir LoI of April 30, 2017 as submitted.

(Fieldless) On an escallop Or a fleur-de-lys gules


5: Ataias Paralates - New Name & New Device

Gules, three wolves couchant in annulo Or

Language (Greek (4th century BCE)) most important.
Culture most important.

Ataias is in the LGPN with one occurrence in volume 4.

Paralates - from Herodotus, the tribe Παραλάται (Paralatae) - the example in Herodotus is in the plural, would need to be the masculine singular for an 'ethnic' byname. Herodotus, Histories, Book 4 section 6. http://www.sacred-texts.com/cla/hh/hh4000.htm. This was submitted as 'Paralataes;" Ursula Palimpsest corrected my grammar in kingdom, for which I am grateful. :-)


6: Breaca ingen Flannabhra - New Name & New Device

Vert, a peacock and on a chief argent three cinquefoils purpure

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Breaca is the name of a saint of Ireland and Cornwall. This spelling of the name is dated to 1246 in "An Index to the Historical Place Names of Cornwall: Vol 1 - A to K" s.n. Breage <https://books.google.com/books?id=fxGkBAAAQBAJ>. It is probably a Cornish spelling, but Cornish may be used with Gaelic per Appendix C of SENA. St. Breaca or Breage is also mentioned in Farmer, The Oxford Dictionary of Saints, 5th ed. rev., https://books.google.com/books?id=Ry3TCQAAQBAJ, s.nn. Breaca, Breage.

Flannabhra is a name from the "Annals of the Kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters," ed. Mícheál Ó Cléirigh, s.n. Flannabhra. The latest person to have the name is dated to 1025, but the book itself was written in the 1630s. <https://books.google.com/books?id=4jlNAAAAcAAJ>. It's unclear whether the spellings have been normalised.

This was submitted with the patronymic marker <inghean>; if Flannabhra is an 11th c. spelling, I believe the Middle Gaelic <ingen> is more appropriate, and I have updated the name accordingly.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=708/2017-07-01/16-59-52_Breaca_name_0002.jpg
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=708/2017-07-01/16-59-53_Breaca_name_0003.jpg
#3 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=708/2017-07-01/16-59-55_Breaca_name_0004.jpg
#4 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=708/2017-07-01/16-59-56_Breaca_name_0005.jpg
#5 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=708/2017-07-01/16-58-51_breaca_name_0006.png


7: Brynjólfr Hausakljúfr - New Name & New Device

Per pale sable and vert a wolfs head erased and on a chief argent a bearded axe sable.

Both names are from Geirr Bassi. Brynjólfr is a masculine given name found on p 9. hausakljúfr is a byname glossed as "skull-cleaver" found on p 22.

This name was submitted as <Brynjolf>, without the accent or the terminal R; no documentation was offered for this spelling, so we have changed it to the documented form. As the submitter uses the accent in the byname, we have restored it to the given name as well.


8: Elspeth Farre - New Name & New Device

Purpure, a pale sable fimbriated argent, a dragon sejant affronty with wings displayed and expanded Or.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound most important.

Tir Righ submission

Elspeth is found in A List of Feminine Personal Names Found in Scottish Records : Post 1400 by Talan Gwynek (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/scottishfem.html) where it is listed as a variation of Elizabeth dated to 1539-48.

Farre is found in A dictionary of English Surnames by Reaney & Wilson sn Farr which dates this spelling to 1381.

Commenters were unsure if `sejant affronty wings displayed' carries the same SFPP for non-eagle displayed, in addition to the SFPP for having an overall charge with a fimbriated ordinary.

Redrawn in kingdom to widen the fimbriation. Submitter has approved.


9: Fin Ris Christianson - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 2014, via An Tir.

Per saltire vert and sable, in pale two Latin crosses formy and in fes two wolves respectant ululant within an orle of chain argent.

Submitter became a Knight in An Tir on May 22, 2016 (http://op.antirheralds.org/index.php?who=6975).

SFPP for ululant posture.

Recolored in kingdom as the original used pencil which color corrected to argent; submitter has approved.


10: François Legrand de Lyon - New Name & New Device

Argent, on a fess gules between two tankards and a fleur-de-lis sable five plates

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (French) most important.
Culture (French) most important.

Tir Righ Submission

Submitted as Francois LeGrand De Lyon, the documentation did not support that spelling & capitalization.

Francois and LeGrand are both found in Names from Artois, 1601 by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/french/french1601.html). This article lists the spelling François under masculine names with a count of 8 and Legrand under surnames with a count of 1.

De Lyon is discussed in the Academy of St. Gabriel report #2904 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/2904) which says "<de Lion> found in the 1446 census, as the byname of a very rich, possibly noble, man. [4] The name of the city is also spelled <Lyon> in this source, so <de Lyon> is also a reasonable byname." The source given is "[4] De/niau, Jean, Les Nomme/es des Habitants de Lyon en 1446 (Lyon: A. Rey, 1930)."


11: Giuila Stanizi - New Name & New Device

Per fess argent and purpure, issuant from the line of division two fleurs-de-lya and a fleur-de-lys inverted counterchanged

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.

Giulia is a feminine given name from "Late Period Italian Women's Names: Florence" by Juliana de Luna at http://medievalscotland.org/jes/Nuns/Florence.shtml.

Stanizi is from "Surnames from a 16th-Century Italian Armorial" by Coblaith Muimnech; see specifically this table: http://coblaith.net/Names/ItSur/ST.html.

This was submitted blazoned 'fleury counterfleury,' and kingdom discussed in detail whether this design was reproducible from that blazon. Most examples of fleury counterfleury we're familiar with have a much greater number of smaller fleurs. I've gone with this alternate blazon, as I think it's more likely to result in the design the submitter intends. Michael Gerard Curtememoire offered the following from Siebmacher, plate 96, Die Hilinger, showing a similar design.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=708/2017-07-01/17-51-09_giulia_device_0001.jpg


12: Glymm Mere, Barony of - New Order Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 1993, via An Tir.

Orden des Schildes of Glymm Mere

Or, on a sun azure a round shield Or.

Sound most important.
Language (German) most important.

This was submitted as <Ordnung des Schildes von Glymm Mere>. German speakers suggested that 'ordnung' means 'order' as a verb, in the sense of 'to organize.' We have updated to "Orden" which seems to match the submitted intent, and "of Glymm Mere" as per SENA NPN1C2f.

The Early New High German-English dictionary (see http://www.germanstudies.org.uk/enhg_dic/enhg_dics.htm) gives the following for schild:

schild das

shield

Dasypodius Dictionarium Strasbourg 1535 191v2 Scutum, Ein schilt.

Serranus Dictionarium Nuremberg 1539 reference Textcitation

L 2:737;

For orden it gives

orden der -s; -Ø

a rank or class, an order

Maaler Die Teütsch Spraach Zurich 1561 313r1 Orden (der) Gwüsser stand vnd waͤsen eins yeden. Ordo.


13: Glymm Mere, Barony of - New Order Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 1993, via An Tir.

Order of the Hunting Hound

(Fieldless) Conjoined in pale a greyhound passant argent collared azure and an arrow fesswise argent

Submitter suggested this pattern was supported by Juliana de Luna's article "Medieval Secular Order Names: Standard Forms of Order Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/order/new/ListingOfStandardForms.html#AllPerson), which does include Other adjective + Charge.

However, the Other Adjective + Charge examples in JdL's article are: Double Crown (Spain) Crowned Ibex (Germany) Pale Horse (Germany) Prisoner's Iron (France)

I'm not sure these examples support *any* adjective + charge. They're cited in precedent most recently as support for the motif "winged charge" in order names, and talk about the above order names being ways to convey more specific details about heraldic charges. (The last example, prisoner's iron is not so much 'adj + charge' as it is a description of a specific type of fetter or handcuff.) It is possible that 'hunting' conveys more specific details about the charge hound; I don't know enough about period dog breeds and their purpose and appearance to make a definitive statement.

Both words are documented to period via the MED.

For "Hunting": http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/m/mec/med-idx?type=id&id=MED21513&egs=all&egdisplay=open found in the submitted spelling: a1375 WPal.(KC 13) 414: I hent þis at hunting, swiche hap god me sent.

For "Hound": http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/m/mec/med-idx?type=id&id=MED21338&egs=all&egdisplay=open found in the submitted spelling: (a1393) Gower CA (Frf 3) 3.2077: He..tok the dede cors And let it drawe awey with hors Unto the hound and to the raven.

The collar on the dog is fairly sketchy in the line art, although I can see it is delineated. As it's only an artistic detail I don't think it should be an issue.


14: Glymm Mere, Barony of - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 1993, via An Tir.

(Fieldless) On a goutte de larmes a rapier Or


15: Gwenllian inghean Bhrain - New Name & New Device

Argent, two ravens addorsed regardant sable and in base a crescent, on a chief azure a hound courant argent

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Meaning (Daughter of Bran) most important.

Tangwystyl's article "A Simple Guide to Constructing 16th Century Welsh Names (in English Contexts)" at http://heraldry.sca.org/names/welsh16.html has, sn the modern spelling of <Gwenllian>, both <Gwenllyan> and <Gwenlliana>. The submitted Gwenllian seems a reasonable interpolation.

"Index of Names in Irish Annals: Bran" by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan at http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Bran.shtml gives <Brain> as the EMIG genitive of <Bran>; kingdom commentary suggested it should lenite to Bhrain post 1600. This was submitted with the patronymic in the nominative form (Bran); we have updated for appropriate grammar/construction.


16: Helene d'Anjou - New Name & New Device

Helene d'Anjou

Per chevron, Or and sable, three quill pens each transfixing a scroll, counterchanged.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Spelling most important.

Tir Righ submission

Helene: Academy of Saint Gabriel Report 1787 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/1787) which says "we have found <Helene> used in Normandy and Picardy between the 13th and 16th centuries.". It also says "A noblewoman of your period, living in Brittany, would probably have a surname based on the name of a village, town, or manor rather than for the entire province. For example, <Helene> from the town of Auray, the site of a church endowed by <Anne de Bretagne>, might be called <Helene d'Auray>. However, by your period these descriptive bynames had often been converted to inherited surnames. That is, if your father was <Jean d'Auray> then you would probably be <Helene d'Auray>."

d'Anjou is a byname with two occurrences, dated between 1517 and 1551, from "Late Period French Surnames (used by women)" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael athttp://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/latefrenchsurnames.html

This was submitted in all caps and without the contraction, as HELENE DE ANJOU. All commenters expected that the name would contract; as the submitter allows all changes we have updated the case and the byname.

Commenters wondered about possible presumption with Saint Helen of Anjou, Queen of Serbia by marriage, and a Saint of the Serbian Orthodox Church. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helen_of_Anjou

This was redrawn in kingdom to put the field division higher; submitter has approved the redraw.


17: Keith Teðion - New Name & New Device

Per pale argent and azure, two dragons addorsed counterchanged.

Keith is the submitter's modern name (Oregon driver's license confirmed by Oddr Black Lion in 2014).

Teðion: An unmarked patronymic from "Cornish (and Other) Personal Names from the 10th Century Bodmin Manumissions" by Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn <https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/tangwystyl/bodmin/celtic.htm>.

App A doesn't discuss patterns for Cornish, but does state unmarked patronymics are acceptable in English and Welsh.


18: Kimberlie of Ramsgaard - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Spelling most important.

Tir Righ Submission

Kimberlie is the submitter's legal given name (proof has been provided)

Ramsgaard is a branch name. "Ramsgaard, Shire of" was registered in July of 1988 (via An Tir).


19: Klaus Warmund - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (14th century German) most important.
Meaning most important.

Klaus is a masculine given name with 2 occurrences sn Klas in "German Names from Nürnberg, 1497" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael. http://heraldry.sca.org/names/german/nurnberg1497.html

Warmund is a masculine given name with 2 occurrences, dated 1170 and 1228, found in "Medieval German Given Names from Silesia" by Talan Gwynek. https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/talan/bahlow/bahlowMasc.html

App A supports unmarked patronymics in German.


20: Lionessa de Compostella - New Name & New Device

Azure, a ram statant and on a chief argent, three escallops inverted azure.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound most important.

Submitter indicates that she has previously submitted "Lyonesse;" no date was given and we haven't found record of this name making it to Laurel in the past.

Lionessa Barrueco married Antonio Ruiz in Valladolid, Spain, on 19 Aug 1584 - https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FFNY-G2C, Batch M87115-4. Submitter has been using Lyonesse (Leo-ness) for a long time - is happy with the Lionessa spelling, doesn't care how it should be pronounced

St. Gabriel report 2822 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/2822), discussing Iberian naming patterns in the Americas, notes Compostella as a period Spanish placename also used for a town in Colombia. SENA App A supports locative bynames with the pattern de X in Castilian and Catalan.

Submitter would like to match the spelling of her husbands surname (Lourenco de Compostella)


21: Louisa of Lorne - New Device

OSCAR finds the name on the An Tir LoI of September 30, 2016 as submitted.

Per chevron inverted gules and Or, a dog rampant regardant Or maintaining in its forepaws a weaver's shuttle argent, in base two needles in saltire azure.

Kingdom commentary was concerned with the small size of the shuttle impacting identifiability; submitter provided a redraw.


22: Louisa of Lorne - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name on the An Tir LoI of September 30, 2016 as submitted.

(Fieldless) Two needles in saltire azure

Submission had no blazon; we confirmed with the submitter that her intent was a fieldless badge.


23: Lucia Roberts - New Name & New Device

Per pale vert and Or, in fess two arrows counterchanged, a chief triangular purpure

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Both name elements from familysearch.

Lucia Cross, female, christened18 Nov 1575, Bishops Castle, Shropshire, England batch C03733-1 https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JWCL-GJT

Dennis Roberts, Male, buried 08 Dec 1562, St. Botolph, London, England batch B02101-3 https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NRXC-56J


24: Pernell Camber - New Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 2008, via An Tir.

Azure, a tricorporate lion argent within an orle ermine.

Old Item: Argent, a pall cotised azure between three oak sprigs inverted proper., to be released.

The submitter's branch is Dragon's Laire.


25: Rose inghean Laisre - New Name & New Device

Argent, a rose slipped and leaved purpure and on a chief sable, a rapier fesswise argent.

No major changes.
Meaning (unspecified) most important.

Tir Righ submission

Rose is documented to 1316 England in Withycombe s.n. Rose; Rose is also found in Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames by Talan Gwynek (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/reaneyHZ.html) which provides the following for the spelling Rose: "1202 Austwick; 1277 Walsh; 1279 Hussey; 1309 Brach; 1316 Stock; 1325 Stock; 1332 Geffen; 1379 Daughters; 1525 Medhurst"

inghean is the appropriate patronymic formation for post-1200 Gaelic patronymics (SENA Appendix A)

Laisre Laisre is found in The Martyrology of Donegal: A Calendar of the Saints of Ireland translated from the original Irish by John O'Donovan. Page 131 lists "MACLAISRE, Abbot of Bennchor, A.D. 645; p. 209 lists "LONAN, son of Laisre"; p. 433 lists "Laisre, of Druim-liacc"; p. 439 lists both "Mac Laisre, abbot of Bennchor, ... 16 May." and "Mac Laisre, bishop and abbot of Ard-Macha, ... 12 Sept."; and p. 512 lists "Laisre, s. of Colum, of Druimliag" (scan on the last of these will be added into comments).

https://books.google.com/books?id=4jlNAAAAcAAJ, John O'Donovan,* ed. & trans., Annals of the Kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest times to the year 1616, 2d ed. (Dublin: 1856) which has "Mac <Laisre>, the Learned" and "Eirmbeadhach, St., abbot of Craebh-<Laisre>"** among its hits.

English and Gaelic can be combined as per SENA Appendix C.


26: Sebalt Ungeheuer - New Name & New Device

Per chevron inverted argent and vert fretty argent, a chevron inverted sable, and in chief a seeblatt vert.

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Sebalt: masc given name with 8 occurrences s.n. Sebolt, "German Names from Nürnberg, 1497", Sara L. Uckelman/Aryanhwy merch Catmael. <http://heraldry.sca.org/names/german/nurnberg1497.html>

Ungeheuer: Laurentii Ungeheuer, male, christened 27 Feb 1593, ROEMISCH-KATHOLISCHE,BINGEN STADT,RHEINHESSEN,HESSE-DARMSTADT, Batch C99470-5 <https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NFFJ-SHP>


27: Seraphina Ferris - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 2014, via An Tir.

Per saltire sable and azure, in pale two ravens argent and in fess two domestic cats Or, all statant counterstatant.

Recolored in kingdom as the original used pencil and the sable corrected to argent; submitter approved.


28: Seumas Mac Gille Andreis - New Name & New Device

Per pale azure and argent, two demi-wolves erased addorsed, in base a ford counterchanged

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (Scottish gaelic) most important.
Spelling (Spelling on the given name for Scottish gaelic) most important.

Tir Righ Submission

Originally submitted as Seumas MacGill'Andreis, commenters believed that the appostrophe was a scribal abbreviation.

Both name elements are found in The Surnames of Scotland, Their Origin, Meaning and History by George F. Black (1962 edition) - Seumas is found on pages 382 (s.n. JAMES) and 719 (s.n. SEUMAS); MacGill'Andreis is found on pages 452-453 (s.n. MACANDREW) and 498 (s.n. MACGILLANDERS)

Tir Righ Submission

Redrawn to correct the erasing; submitter has approved.


29: Shazade Nisaburi the artist - Resub Name & Resub Device

Sable, a bengal tiger rampant contourny Or marked sable and an orle Or.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for not specified.
Sound most important.
Culture (Persian/Sassanian) most important.

A previous submission, Shazade Nisaburi, was returned at the Laurel level in November 2014. The text of that return is as follows:

'Shazade means "child of the Shah" and is protected as an alternate Turkish title for prince/princess. Under PN4B1 of SENA, a given name that is identical to a title or form of address may be registered if it is clear that the name as a whole is not making a claim to rank. For example, Regina the Laundress is allowed, but Regina of England is not. In the present submission, the byname is an adjective meaning "person from Nishapur". In 2005, Laurel ruled:

Submitted as Annaka Regina Poznanska, the submitter requested an authentic Polish name and accepted all changes. As submitted, the name is a claim to be queen of Poznanska. Nebuly notes, "The submitted name means "Anna, queen of Poznan", a violation of RfS VI.1. It does not matter whether the locative is constructed using the preposition z or the adjectival ending -ska; there will still be an issue of presumption when the element Regina (Latin for "queen") is placed in front of the locative." We have dropped the middle element and registered the name as Annaka Poznanska. [Annaka Poznanska, May 2005, A-An Tir]

This decision overturned without further comment prior precedent stating that ethnic adjectival bynames such as Nisaburi are not the same as locative bynames using the form of [place name]:

Regardless of whether or not any of the kings of Poland named Wladyslaw were known as Wladyslaw z Poznania, they would not conflict with a submitted name of Wladyslaw Poznañski because Poznañski is a descriptive byname referring to a person's ethnicity, not a locative byname. This issue, upheld as recently as November 2001 (Eiríkr inn danski, Atlantia-A), has been addressed in these rulings:

[<name> Lietuvos, meaning <name> the Lithuanian] While prior Laurel precedent has returned the form '{Name} the {Nationality}', we do not find this presumptuous of the ruler of the country in the same way or to the same degree that, say, '{Name} of {Nation}' would. Hence, we do not find that this name conflicts with <name>, King of Lithuania. (LoAR 12/91 p.12).

<Given Name> the Breton should no more conflict with <same Given Name>, Duke of Brittany, than Richard the Englishman would with Richard, King of England. [Note that this overturns a precedent of Master Baldwin's regarding Wladislaw Poleski] (LoAR 10/90 p.2).

The submitter's previously submitted name Wladyslaus Polonus was returned by Laurel in July 2000 for conflict with various kings of Poland of that name. Polonus is a Latin byname which could be translated as either 'the Pole' or 'of Poland'. As one of the translations has the form [monarch's given name] of [area the monarch ruled], it was a conflict with the kings of Poland named Wladyslaw. As of the October 1990 ruling cited above, the Polish form Poleski 'the Pole' would not conflict with these kings. [Wladyslaw Poznañski, 03/2002, A-Æthelmearc]

We are hereby upholding the current precedent from 2005 and ruling that the two types of locative bynames should be treated the same way. Under this precedent, Shazade Nisaburi creates the appearance of a claim to be princess of Nishapur. Thus, this name must be returned under PN4B1 of SENA."

The documentation with this submission is as follows:

Shahzade (well Şâhzâde - Şāzāde, of which this is a simplified transliteration) is found in an unpublished article by Ursula Georges "Feminine Ottoman Names from 1546." Attaching scans from said document. The name, while documented from Turkish context, is Persian in origin. "Shâhzâda" is also listed on https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ursula/persian.html (Aryanhwy verch Catmael and Ursula Georges "Persian Feminine Names from the Safavid Period" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ursula/persian.html) for documentation of that fact.) LB note - Arabic names are not my strength and I could not comment on the submitter's transliteration or whether the submitted spelling can be supported.

The byname Nisaburi (without the al-) can be found in Persian names in the Cairo Geniza documents: for example, in a footnote on p. 455 of S. D. Goitein's A Mediterranean Society: Economic foundations (http://books.google.com/books?id=g13-owKVXY4C). Locative bynames used in medieval Persian are not marked for gender; see Aryanhwy verch Catmael and Ursula Georges "Persian Feminine Names from the Safavid Period" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ursula/persian.html) for documentation of that fact.

Submitter has added the byname the artist to avoid claiming royal status. App A supports occupational bynames for Arabic, using the formation "al-X;" this would be using a lingua anglica form. In "Persian Masculine Names in the Nafah.ât al-uns" by Ursula Georges (https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ursula/nafahat/bynames.html), we see bynames based on occupation including "perfumer, druggist' (though the article notes this may be metaphorical) and 'the painter or engraver, so called because he promised to engrave the image of God on his listeners' hearts' - so also metaphorical. Whether this is sufficient to support "the artist" I'm not sure.

Basil Lions Heart noted in kingdom commentary: "Wehr's Dictionary has "fannāna" defined as "woman artist" which might be enough to give the submitter the benefit of the doubt, though it would help to show that "the artist" fits the pattern of bynames in Arabic (given how wide a variety of bynames are documentable, I don't think that will be much of a problem)."

Lacking definitive commentary, I am sending this up for broader discussion.

Correction to Device (2017-Jul-02 00:07:12): This device is new to Laurel, not a resub.


30: Sværri Bjornhjarta Tjorkilsson - New Name & New Device

Per chevron throughout argent and gules, two ravens striking respectant sable and a stag rampant contourny argent

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.

Sværri is a given name found in Geirr Bassi. The submitter would prefer Sverre if an appropriate source can be found.

Bjornhjart is a constructed descriptive byname meaning "bear-heart." This follows a pattern of Norse names formed of an animal type and a body part or attribute -- some literal, some figurative. Here are a few examples from "Viking Bynames found in the Landnámabók" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael: dove-nose, bear-warmth, foal-forehead, hawk-nose, horse-head, whale-might, whale-calmness, crow-nose, fish-back, serpent-tongue, fox-beard, and ox-might <http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/vikbynames.html>.

The meaning of "bjorn" is given in GB p. 5. The definition of "hjarta" as "heart" is found in a dictionary of Old Norse hosted by The University of Texas at Austin Linguistics Research Center <https://lrc.la.utexas.edu/eieol_base_form_dictionary/norol/18>.

Patronymic is based on the constructed name Torkill; this was submitted as Tjorkill, and the submitter would prefer that if it can be supported. The protheme <Tor-> is found in GB in the masculine names <Torfi>, <Torráðr>, and <Tortryggr>. Deutertheme <-kill> also in GB, in the masculine name <Hœkill>. GB has <Askell>, a variant of which appears as <Eskil> in FJ. FJ also has <Ekkill> sn Ekkill. We hope this is sufficient to justify <Torkill>.

The general pattern of given name + descriptive byname + patronymic is included under Scandanavian names in Appendix A of SENA. The submitter would prefer to use both bynames, but if either is found unregisterable, he will accept just one.

Correction to Name (2017-Jul-02 00:07:04): Name as passed up to Laurel was intended to be Sværri Bjornhjarta Torkilson, not Tjorkilsson. Apologies for not catching these in time.

Correction to Name (2017-Jul-02 00:07:46): Torkilsson. No J, one L, two S.


31: Þora Þorkelsdottir - New Name & New Device

Gyronny arrondi azure and argent, a domestic cat dormant gardant Or and in chief a cinquefoil sable between two cinquefoils argent

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound most important.

Þóra,, feminine given name, Geirr Bassi p. 16

Patronymic based on masculine given name Þórkell, Geirr Bassi p. 16

Kingdom discussed whether this conflicts with Thyra Thorkillsdottir (May 1998, Middle). Certainly O vs. Y in the first syllable of the first name is quite different; commenters were less certain whether 'kel' vs 'kill' is sufficiently distinctive.


32: Tyr Gullinson - New Device

OSCAR finds the name on the An Tir LoI of September 30, 2016 as submitted.

Azure, three boars rampant argent


33: Tyrfingr Rǫgnvalldarson - New Name & New Device

Per chevron embattled sable and argent, two griffins combattant Or and a tower sable, a bordure counterchanged.

Sound most important.

Tir Righ Sumbmission

Originally submitted as Tyrfingr Rǫgnvaldrson, commenters offered either Tyrfingr Rǫgnvalldarson (early period) or Tyrfingr Rǫgnvalldsson (late period) as correct declensions of the surname.

Both Tyrfingr and Rǫgnvaldr are found in Viking names found in Landnámabók (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/landnamabok.html)


34: Vulcanfeldt, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2008, via An Tir.

Award of Dragons Flame

This was submitted with an apostrophe (Dragon's) but commenters agreed this was a post-period artifact. <Dragon> is a late period English surname used as a given name; Eydeth Dragon, married Dec 1597, Wiltshire England, batch M15349-1. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NVD2-TL9

The Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry says that flames are found in period arms like the 15th century arms of de la Fiama and the arms of Wells.

The pattern of Saint Name + Charge is found in names such as Saint Georges Shield or Saint Williams Shield in Juliana's article on "Medieval Secular Order Names" (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/OrderNames/).


35: Vulcanfeldt, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2008, via An Tir.

Award of Poisson d'Or

Submitters assert that Poisson is the French word for fish and that Or is the French word for gold. The online Dictionary of Middle French (1330-1500) seems to support this although I don't speak french so I may be vastly misinterpreting this!

For Poisson: http://atilf.atilf.fr/scripts/dmfAAA.exe?IDF=dmfXgXrmXphgg;ISIS=isis_dmf2015.txt;MENU=menu_dmf;OUVRI R_MENU=1;ONGLET=dmf2015;OO1=2;OO2=1;s=s030b1df8;LANGUE=FR;FERMER;AFFICHAGE=2;MENU=menu_dmf;;XMODE=S TELLa;FERMER;XXX=4;; says "Animal vivant dans l'eau et muni de nageoires, poisson" : Il meuvent aussi et debatent Com poisson vif hors de riviére. (Mir. emper. Romme, 1369, 259).

For Or: http://atilf.atilf.fr/scripts/dmfAAA.exe?IDF=dmfXhgYrmXart.revusYoXdh;ISIS=isis_dmf2015.txt;MENU=men u_dmf;OUVRIR_MENU=1;ONGLET=dmf2015;OO1=2;OO2=1;s=s030b1df8;LANGUE=FR;FERMER;AFFICHAGE=2;MENU=menu_d mf;;XMODE=STELLa;FERMER;XXX=4;; has ""Métal précieux, jaune brillant, or" : Après ce, vint une merdaille Fausse, traïtre et renoïe : Ce fu Judée la honnie, La mauvaise, la desloyal, Qui bien het et aimme tout mal, Qui tant donna d'or et d'argent .... (MACH., J. R. Nav., 1349, 144)"

The Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry says that fish are a period charge - for example fish fretted in triangle as found in Guillim.

Juliana's article on "Medieval Secular Order Names" supports the pattern color + charge (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/OrderNames/).

Kingdom commentary asked if this conflicted with Toison d'Or, Ordre de la (March 2009) or Toison d'Or King of Arms. P vs T is clear; Ursula Palimpsest commented that "The ss in <Poisson> is pronounced like 's', while the s in <Toison> is pronounced like 'z'. That gives a second difference in sound, and might be just enough to clear the names." If these are ruled to conflict, the Barony will accept <Order of Poisson d'Or of Vulcanfeldt>.


36: Vulcanfeldt, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2008, via An Tir.

Award of the Alerion of Vulcanfeldt

The Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry says that the alerion is a variant of an eagle recognized as such by the end of our period, citing de Bara (see http://mistholme.com/dictionary/eagle/). Thus this follows the pattern of awards created from a charge (see Juliana's article on "Medieval Secular Order Names (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/OrderNames/).)

This was submitted as "Award of the Alerion," which conflicts with the identical award registered to the Barony of Lochmere in Dec 2015. Submitters have authorized addition of branch name.


37: Vulcanfeldt, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2008, via An Tir.

Order of Ember of Vulcanfeldt

Ember Mason was married in August 1649, Shropshire England, familysearch batch M01575-1; https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N285-KQC

Juliana's article on Medieval Secular Order Names (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/OrderNames/) supports the pattern of orders named after saints/people.

This was submitted as "Order of Ember," which conflicts with "Ember Herald" (April 1981). The barony has authorized addition of the branch name.


38: Vulcanfeldt, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2008, via An Tir.

Order of the Argent Owl

The Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry says that owl is a period charge dating to c. 1295 in the arms of Seyville (see http://mistholme.com/?s=owl). The April 2012 Cover Letter states: "we are hereby allowing the use of heraldic color terms in order names as well as the everyday terms." The use of <Argent> instead of Silver is consistent with this precedent.

Juliana's article on "Medieval Secular Order Names" supports the pattern color + charge (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/OrderNames/).


39: Vulcanfeldt, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2008, via An Tir.

Order of Vulcans Flame

This follows the pattern of "Saint + charge" from Juliana's article on Medieval Secular Order Names (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/OrderNames/). The examples there are a few Saint's Shield or the single Saint George with the Pelican.

Per August 2005 precedent, we can use the names of non-Christian deities or 'saints' in Order Names, as long as the name phrase is a form known in the literature of the time (see SENA NPN1Cd1). The Roman god Vulcan is cited in the OED:

1579 T. Lodge Protogenes 20 Al lame men are not Vulcans, nor hooke nosed men, Ciceroes.

1637 Milton Comus 22 Though he and his curst crew Feirce signe of battaile make, and menace high, Or like the sons of Vulcan vomit smoake, Yet will they soone retire, if he but shrinke.

The Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry says that flames are found in period arms like the 15th century arms of de la Fiama (see http://mistholme.com/?s=flame).

This was submitted as "Vulcan's Flame;" we have dropped the apostrophe to match period practice.


40: Vulcanfeldt, Barony of - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2008, via An Tir.

Per chevron gules and Or, a sun counterchanged within a bordure embattled sable

This submission is to be associated with populace


gratefully,

Rhi


OSCAR counts 20 New Names, 8 New Order Names, 22 New Devices, 1 New Device Change and 7 New Badges. These 58 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $232 for them. OSCAR counts 1 Resub Name and 1 Resub Device. These 2 items are not chargeable. There are a total of 60 items submitted on this letter.