East LoI dated 2007-01-30

Unto Elisabeth Laurel, Jeanne Marie Wreath, Margaret Pelican, the SCA College of Arms, and all others who do receive this letter, greetings from Tanczos Istvan, Blue Tyger Herald!

It is the intent of Easterners to register the following items. Unless otherwise noted, the submitter has no desire for authenticity and allows any changes.

As per the new rules on the Cover Letter dated January 17, 2007, which was attached to the October 2006 LoAR, External submissions heralds who post their Letters of Intent to the OSCAR system may now consider that they have fulfilled their distribution obligations. No paper copies of the Letter of Intent need be mailed to the College, if it appears on OSCAR. This letter is being posted on OSCAR and no paper copies will be distributed.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

1: Adelasia della Corte - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 2005, via the East

Argent, a horse rampant contourny, in canton a sheaf of arrows fesswise reversed sable within a bordure potenty gules

Her name was registered in Mar. 2005 via the East.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

2: Adhemar de Villarquamada - New Name Change

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in December of 2007, via the East.

Old Item: Morgan de Villarquamada, to be released.
Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.

His current name was registered in Apr. 1990 via the East.

Adhemar is found in Juliana de Luna's "Occitan Townspeople in the 14th Century - Masculine Given Names" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/occitan/occitan-given-men.html).

de Villarquamada is grandfathered to the submitter. (Villarquemado appears to be a Spanish town: http://villarquemado.com/)

This lingual mix should be allowable; it's certainly more likely than his current name. (The only precedent involving Occitan or Provençal is one declaring a mix with Old English unregisterable. His surname most certainly isn't Old English.)


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

3: Áedán mac Tigernáin - New Name & New Device

Quarterly azure and vert, a cross between two wolves' heads erased in bend argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (10th century Irish-Scot) most important.
Culture (10th century Irish-Scot) most important.

Both name parts are found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/). Áedán is given as the standard nominative form of this name for both Old (c700-c900) and Middle (c900-c1200) Irish Gaelic. It's found in the annals between 505 and 949 as the name of 24 men.

Tigernáin is given as the standard genitive form of Tigernán for the Middle Irish Gaelic (c900-c1200) period. This name is found in the annals as the name of three men, dated to 980, 1201, and 1313.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

4: Ailill mac Cúáin - New Name & New Device

Per pall sable, gules, and argent, a mullet of four points argent and two stags salient addorsed counterchanged.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (11th century Irish) most important.
Culture (11th century Irish) most important.

[The worksheet has the authenticity request written in the authenticity request section, but the form leaves that section entirely blank.]

Ailill is dated to 802 and 1032 on p. 17 of OCM.

Mac means 'son of'.

Cúán is dated to 1024 on p. 65 of OCM.

Submitted at kingdom as Ailill Mac Cúán, the patronymic has been corrected to mac Cúáin. According to Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn's "100 Most Popular Men's Names in Early Medieval Ireland" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/irish100.html), the genitive of Cúán is Cúáin. (Additional documentation: both Ailill and Cúán appear in this article.)


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

5: Ailionora inghean Ronain - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 2003, via the East

Argent, a quill pen and a trumpet in saltire sable between four trefoils in cross and a bordure nebuly vert.

Her name was registered in May 2003, via the East. Her previous submission of this device was returned at kingdom for a redraw because the bordure was too narrow.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

6: Aislinn Chiabach - New Name Change & New Device

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in May of 2007, via the East.

Purpure, a bat displayed argent, on a chief Or a jester's cap lozengy in bend purpure and argent belled argent.

Old Item: Aislinn Chas, to be released.
Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.
Language (Irish) most important.

Her current name was registered Jul. 97 via the East.

Aislinn has been ruled SCA-compatible (Aislinn inghean Mhaoil bhrighde, 08/2000 A-Atlantia).

Ciabach is found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals: Masculine Descriptive Bynames" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/index.shtml) as a masculine byname meaning 'long-haired'. It's found in the annals as the name of two men, dated 1151 and 1232.

The 'h' is added to the byname for lenition. According to the chart at http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/index.shtml#exceptions1, a byname starting with 'c' following a feminine given name ending in 'n' does indeed lenite.

Some commenters felt that the combination of purple, a jester, and a bat is strongly evocative of the Batman comics and movies. Kingdom is forwarding this for the CoA and Wreath to comment and decide.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

7: Aline Kinneir - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound ('Ay-lean Kin-ear') most important.

Aline is dated to 1428 in Talan Gwynek's "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/reaneyAG.html). Aline is also dated to 1428 in Withycombe (2nd ed.), p. 15 s.n. Aline. The entry notes that this name was "very common" in the 12th to 15th centuries.

Kinneir is dated to 1574 in Black s.n. Kinnear.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

8: Anne Whyte of Sedgewicke - New Name Change From Holding Name

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in May of 2007, via the East.

Old Item: Anne of Whyt Whey, to be released.
No major changes.
Sound most important.

Her previous name submission of 'Anne Whyte' was returned (Mar. 2005, R-East) for conflict with 'Anne De Witte' (reg. Feb. 87 via the East). This submission adds an element to clear that conflict.

Anne is found in Talan Gwynek's "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/reaneyAG.html), dated to 1566 (Thackeray), 1568 (Hamlet), 1576 (Coryat), and 1592 (Vicars).

Whyte is dated to 1419 in Julian Goodwyn's "English Names Found in Brass Enscriptions" ( http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/brasses ). This spelling is also found in "Names from 15th Century York" by Karen Larsdatter (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/york15/index.htm).

Sedgewicke is found on pages lix and lxxiii of References to English Surnames in 1601 and 1602 by F.K. & S. Hitching. The place (in Westmoreland) is recorded as early as c. 1185 (as Sigghiswic), according to Ekwall p. 411 s.n. Sedgwick, but none of the no-photocopy placename books have a later spelling.

Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Naming Practices in 16th Century Gloucestershire: Use of More Than One Byname or Surname" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/GlocNamePractices/MultipleBynames.html) dates numerous 16th c. examples of literal locatives using the format <given name> <family name> of <placename>.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

9: Ardenia Rufa - New Name & New Device

Argent, a rowan tree blasted and eradicated sable between two stags combattant gules.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound ('Ar-den-ee-ah') most important.

Morlet Vol. I p. 124 column b dates Ardanius a. 910-27, and Ardennus a. 988. The submitter and her herald believe, based on a pattern of (a) men and women using the same vernacular names with gender-appropriate Latinizations, and (b) the formation of feminine names from masculine ones, that Ardenia is plausible.

10th c. Gauls generally didn't have bynames, but given that our rules require one, a Latin adjective meaning "red" seems as good a choice as any. The masculine rufus shows up as a byname meaning "red, ruddy" in a wide range of times and places, including as a classical Roman cognomen (Meradudd Cethin: "Names and Naming Practices of Regal and Republican Rome", http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/roman/) and in 11th-13th century Germany (Talan Gwynek: "Some Early Middle High German Bynames", http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/Early_German_Bynames.html , s.n. Rôt). It's also used as a byname in 10th-11th c. Normandy, according to a post to SCAHRLDS by Gunnvor silfraharr, quoting from Jean Adigard des Gautries: Les Noms de Personnes Scandinaves en Normandie de 911 à 1066 (Lund: Carl Bloms Boktryckeri A.B., 1954). The names in this document are apparently all masculine; the relevant examples are: Anschitillus rufus 1035x1037, Anffridus rufus 2nd third of 11th c., and Gotmundus Rufus Wascoliensis c.1054x1078. The feminine form of this adjective is rufa.

Submitted as Ardenia Ruad, Frankish or Vulgar Latin (precursor to Old French) and Gaelic combinations have been ruled unregisterable (02/2004, Faílenn de la Maurienne R-Ansteorra). Ruad is listed as the standard Middle Irish Gaelic (c.900-c.1200) nominative form of the byname Ruadh 'red' in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals: Descriptive Bynames" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/index.shtml). The byname is dated to 1039, 1109, and at least a dozen times in every century after that. It has been changed to Latin so it can be registered.

CORRECTION, 21 March 2007: The submitter has objected to the surname on the grounds that a mundane schoolteacher needs to not have a name that sounds like "Roofies". She has indicated that "Ardenia the Red" would be acceptable, based on the Lingua Anglica allowance.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

10: Asgar Roulfs sunu - New Name & New Device

Azure, a mastiff statant erect reguardant sustaining a spear fesswise reversed argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.

The form also says "Keep Asgar!!! Changes to the last name if needed."

Asgar is found in The Pre-Conquest Personal Names of Domesday Book by Olof von Feilitzen, p. 166. Asgar is also found (undated) in Searle, p. 74. The related name Esgar is dated c. 1060 and c. 1100 on p. 235. If we take Searle at face value, Asgar can also be justified as a reasonable constructed Anglo-Saxon name: As- is listed as a common theme (p. xv), and -gar as a common deuterotheme (p. xvi). Also, R&W p. 157 s.n. Esgar dates Esgar and Esgarus to 1066 DB, and derives it from Old Norse Ásgeirr, Old Danish Esger.

Roulfs sunu is intended to mean 'son of Roulf'. Roulf is found in Onomasticon Anglo-Saxonicum by W.G. Searle, p. 573. R&W p. 382 s.n. Rolf dates Roulf to 1066 DB, and Robertus filius Rolui, Roulf to 1086 DB. The entry reads: "O[ld] N[orse] Hrólfr, O[ld] Da[nish], O[ld] Sw[edish] Rolf. Found as the name of a peasant in Danish Linc[oln]s[hire], it must sometimes be Anglo-Scandinavian, but the name was also common in Normandy where it became O[ld] Fr[ench] Roul, Rou, often latinized as Rollo and it is to this that the frequency and variety of the surnames are due. Roulf may be a contracted form of ON *Hróðwulf, the ultimate source of Hrólfr."


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

11: Ben of Brokenbridge - New Name & New Device

Argent, a griffin segreant and on a base azure a pair of rapiers in saltire argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.

Ben is found in R&W p. 39 under Benn. The entry dates Benne de Ecclesille 1246, indicating use as a given name, and Thomas Ben 1275, indicating the possibility of this spelling. Kingdom commenters offered the playwright Ben Jonson (born 1572) as additional documentation for this name.

Brokenbridge is an SCA group, registered 09/2006.

Submitted as Ben of Broken Bridge; the canton's name was submitted as all one word, so the spelling of his byname has been changed to match.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

12: Bruce Murray - New Name & New Device

Azure, a yew tree eradicated between three stags trippant Or.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.

Bruce is the submitter's legal given name. A copy of his state ID card is included, showing Bruce as his legal given name.

Murray is a header spelling in Black; William de Morreve is dated to 1296. Black also dates Murra 1491, Mwrray 1555, and Murrai 1444, so the submitted header spelling is in keeping with period forms.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

13: Cainnech mac Uilliam - New Name & New Device

Per fess azure and Or, in fess a thistle proper sustained by a stag rampant proper armed argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound most important.

Cainnech is a header on p. 43 of OCM, dated to 929. Mari's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/) dates Cainnech (as a masculine name) as late as 1014.

Uilliam is a header on p. 175 of OCM, dated to before the 14th century in Ireland (when the diminutive 'Uillec' appears). The earliest that Mari's Index dates Uilliam is 1302.

This name is one step from period practice (because it combines Old/Middle Irish and Early Modern Irish), but registerable (Tigernach Ó Catháin, 11/01 A-Caid).

Commentary was mixed on the identifiability of these dark charges on the partly azure field. At Pennsic, an onomast was shown the colored submission form from a distance of about 15 feet and accurately identified both the thistle and the stag.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

14: Ceolfara æt Mældune - New Name & New Device

Sable, a fret Or between four crosses patonce argent.

No major changes.
Sound ('kel-fara' and 'at') most important.

Ceolfara is a constructed Anglo-Saxon name, using the prototheme Ceol- (Searle p. 129) and the deuterotheme -fara (Searle p. 240). Kingdom commenters expressed some doubt about the validity of this construction. The prototheme is fine; Marieke van de Dal's "Anglo-Saxon Women's Names from Royal Charters" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/marieke/anglosaxonfem/) has a number of names in Ceol-, and Ælfwyn æt Gyrwum's "Anglo-Saxon Names" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/aelfwyn/bede.html) has the masculine name Ceolwulf. However, Searle's examples of -fara do not make it clear whether this is really an OE name theme. The first example is Irfara (p. 320, a masculine name). There is one other compound in Ir-, Irfrith; here the deuterotheme is fairly common, which provides some support that Irfara may actually be a dithematic name. The second example, Wifare or Wiuara (p. 486, again masculine), is less supportive: if this is a dithematic name, it's unclear whether the prototheme is Wi- or Wif-. If it is Wi-, it may be a reduced form of Wig-, as suggested by the entry "Wiferth, see Wigfrith." The only other example commenters found of "fara" in a name context is an Abbess of Brie named Fara in Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People (Oxford, 1969, 1991; p. iii.8). Eastern Crown is punting this to Laurel for more informed commentary.

æt is the A.S. preposition 'at'.

Mældun is dated to 913 in Ekwall p. 297 s.n. Malden. The placename should be in the dative case after 'æt'. Neither Ekwall nor Mills give the prepositions (if any) to go with their citations, but Watts p. 393 s.n. Maldon gives (to, æt, at) Mældune c. 925.

Submitted as æt Mældun , the byname was changed to the dative æt Mældune at kingdom.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

15: Christophe Lejeune - New Name & New Device

Paly argent and vert, two arms counterembowed and interlaced within a bordure embattled sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Christophe is given as a 14th-15th c. given name in Morlet Picardie, p. 20.

Lejeune is dated to 1475, ibid p. 405 s.n. Le Jeune.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

16: Conall O'Rylan - New Name & New Device

Gules, on a chevron Or between three lions rampant argent, five fleurs-de-lys gules.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound ('Rylan') most important.

Conall appears in OCM p. 56 s.n. Conall, which lists two Saint Conalls and several legendary Conalls. It also appears in Mari's Index of Names in Irish Annals (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/) dated to 1501-1600.

O'Rylan is an italicized Anglicized form s.n. Ó Roitleáin in Woulfe p. 634; the name is described as "an attenuated form of Ó Rotláin." Woulfe actually has O Rylan (no apostrophe), but given the number of O'Somethings in Woulfe, the submitted form seems plausible.

The combination of Gaelic and Anglicized Gaelic is considered a step from period practice, but registerable (Banbnat MacDermot, 09/01 A-Calontir).

This device is clear of Garth Brandon (Apr. 1998 via the Middle), Gules, on a chevron between three escallops inverted Or, five fleurs-de-lys sable, with one CD for changing the type and another for changing the tincture of the secondary charges.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

17: Corwin Silvertongue - New Household Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in September of 2006, via the East

Whitloup Taverne

(Fieldless) A wolf's head erased ululant sustaining a tankard fesswise argent.

His name was registered via the East on the September 2006 LoAR. His previous household name submission, House Argent Lupe, was returned at kingdom for grammar issues and lack of documentation.

Whitloup is an inn sign name constructed along the pattern of [color] + [animal], such as Whithors 1358, found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "English Sign Names" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/inn/). Combinations of English and French in descriptive bynames can be found for example in Jönsjö: Blancheye 1327, Blanchman 1379. Loup is French for 'wolf' (Dauzat, Dubois & Mitterand: Nouveau Dictionnaire Etymologique; Librarie Larousse, Paris).

Submitted as Whitloup Tavern_, The OED s.v. tavern dates tauerne to 1286, 1297, 1303, 1340, c1440, and 1593, and taverne to 1570. These all retain a final 'e', so the submitted Tavern  has been changed to Taverne.

His previous household badge submission, Sable, a wolf's head erased ululant argent, was returned at kingdom for conflict with both Fandral Silverfox (Sep. 1973): Sable, a fox's mask argent, and William of Hoghton (Aug. 1982 West): Sable, a grey wolf's head erased proper [Canis lupus]. This submission clears those conflicts by addition of the tankard and by being fieldless.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

18: Corwin Silvertongue - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in September of 2006, via the East

Sable, a winged wolf rampant argent charged at the shoulder with a heart gules, a chief rayonny argent.

His name was registered in September 2006, via the East. His previous device submissions were all returned at kingdom. The most recent, Sable, a winged wolf rampant between three wolves' heads couped ululant argent, was returned for conflict with Eric Foxworthy (Aug. 1980 via the West): Sable, a winged fox rampant, wings addorsed, argent. His first device submission, Sable, a winged wolf rampant and a chief rayonny argent, was returned for conflict with both the badge (above) and device of Eric Foxworthy (Nov. 1982 West): Sable, a winged fox rampant within a bordure argent. This submission adds the tertiary heart to clear these conflicts.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

19: Cristyne Landebertin - New Name & New Device

Azure, three panthers argent spotted sable, flames Or.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Client requests authenticity for 15th century German time period and language/culture..
Language (15th c. German) most important.
Culture (15th c. German) most important.

Cristyne is from Talan Gwynek's "15th c. German Women's Names" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/germ15f.html)

Lampert is dated to 1262 in Brechenmacher s.n. Lambert, Lampert. According to Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Women's Surnames in 15th- and 16th-century Germany" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/womenssurnames.html), the possibilities for a feminine form of this surname include Landebertin, Landebertyn, Landeberten, or Landebertz.

Academy of S. Gabriel report 3108 (http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi/3108.txt) identifies Cristyne as a West Middle German spelling, and recommends a feminine suffix over a possessive for this region (citing Socin, mostly). The submitted Cristyne Landebert_ has therefore been changed to Cristyne Landebertin in order to comply with the authenticity request and with Laurel precedent (Elisabeth Trostin, 10/05 A-An Tir).


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

20: David Erbe von Bärau - New Name & New Device

Per pale fleury counter-fleury vert crussily couped and argent a bear rampant sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound ('David Erb von Bahr-au') most important.

The form says it's OK to change Bärau if a different form is found in period.

The worksheet was done either in pencil or a very light pen, it is difficult to make out the photocopies. It appears that the submitter is using the Mundane Name Allowance for the David Erbe part, which is his mundane name.

David is dated to 1275 as a given name in Brechenmacher s.n. David(s). It's also found in Talan Gwynek's "Medieval German Given Names from Silesia" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/bahlow_v.htm), dated to 1356, 1425, and 1586, and in his "Late Period German Masculine Given Names" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/germmasc.html), dated to 1551-1600 in Plauen.

Bahlow s.n. Erbe says that this was "a popular personal name in the Upper Rhine area 1100-1400", and dates Joh. Erbe, Konstanz 1320 (among others).

Bärau is a town in Switzerland. Printouts are attached from http://www.traveljournals.net/explore/switzerland/map/m3512935/barau.html .

Commenters could find no information about Bärau in period, and Eastern Crown found a website for "Heimstätte Bärau" (http://www.heimstaette-baerau.ch/05_WeitereInformationen/S04Index222J.html) which mentions a 222nd anniversary celebration in 2006. This would seem to indicate that the place is post-period. No good translation was available, so it is entirely possible that the website might be for some institution located in the town. Even if the submitter allowed major changes, the locative couldn't be dropped from his name: the result would be identical to the name he uses outside the Society, violating AH III.A.9. We are forwarding this in the hope that someone in the CoA can turn up better information on the locative.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

21: David Erbe von Bärau - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name on the East LoI of January 30, 2007 as submitted.

(Fieldless) On a vol sable a crescent argent.

His name is submitted elsewhere on this letter.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

22: Dieter Velkener an dem Platz - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Meaning most important.

Dieter is a header on p. 77 of Bahlow, dated in this spelling to 1486 as a given name.

Velkener is a surname meaning 'falconer' dated to 1399, ibid. p. 113 s.n. Falkner.

an dem Platz is a locative surname dated to 1328, ibid. p. 376 s.n. Platz.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

23: Dieter Velkener an dem Platz and Kirstyn Velkener an dem Platz - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name (Dieter Velkener an dem Platz) registered exactly as it appears in May of 2007, via the East
OSCAR is unable to find the name (Kirstyn Velkener an dem Platz) , either registered or submitted.

Vert, a red-tailed hawk close to sinister head affronty perched on a branch argent.

Both names are submitted elsewhere on this letter.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

24: Draguin atte Maeldun - New Household Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 1990, via the East

Martiall Company of Athenry

(Fieldless) A wyvern erect sustaining a pole axe Or.

Meaning ('from Athenry, Ireland') most important.

His name was registered in Apr. 1990 via the East.

Martiall Company is a designator dated to 1629 in "Naming the Honourable Artillery Company", found in Duncan's Cavalier Webpages (http://victoria.tc.ca/~godwin//duncanweb/documents/hacname.html ).

Athenry is an Irish town name, found as a header and an undated Anglicized spelling in A. Room's A Dictionary of Irish Place-Names, p. 17. It's located in County Galway.

This badge is clear of Collach O'Choda (May 1992 via the East), (Fieldless) A wyvern erect supporting by its hub a wheel Or, with one CD from the fieldless bribe, and another for changing the type of half the charge group.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

25: Efa verch Cynan - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 2006, via the East

Per pale azure and vert, a greyhound's head erased contourny Or and a chief ermine.

Her name was registered in June 2006, via the East.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

26: Eibhlín an Fraoich - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.

If her name must be changed, she cares most about the spelling. The form says, "Change if needed to be registered, keep the spelling as close as possible."

Eibhlín is found in OCM p. 84, dated to 1274 and after.

Fraoch is found undated s.n. Freaghill in Room A Dictionary of Irish Place-Names, p. 58. The phrase an Fraoich is found in "Onomasticon Goedelicum" (http://www.ucc.ie:8080/cocoon/doi/locus/F); the form says it means 'de Fraoch'.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

27: Emma MacMinn - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister indented azure and vert, a harp bend sinisterwise and an arrow bend sinisterwise Or.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.

Emma is dated to 1186-1219, 1316, and 1401 in Withycombe s.n. Emma.

MacMinn is one of the header spellings in Black (first header MacMin); dated forms include M'Men 1426 and Mcmyane or Makmyane 1509.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

28: Enoch MacBain - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 2002, via the East

(Fieldless) An elephant rampant argent sustained atop a barrel palewise proper.

His name was registered in Oct. 2002, via the East. His previous badge submission, (Fieldless) An elephant statant bearing on its back a tower argent, was returned at kingdom for conflict with Andrew Castlebuilder (Sep. 79): Per chevron purpure and Or, overall an elephant trumpeting passant proper, on its back a carpet purpure, fimbriated Or, supporting a tower argent, masoned sable, with just one CD for the field(lessness). This submission should be well clear of that device.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

29: Finnian Mac Ailein - New Name & New Device

Argent, three staffs in pale fesswise sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Meaning (White-Headed (S.N. least important) Scottish.) most important.

The worksheet has the authenticity request checkbox marked, but the corresponding section of the submission form is blank.

Finnian: OCM p. 102-3 s.n. Finnén states "This gives the early Latin form Vennianus and such Irish forms as Finnio and Finnian." Two saints (a bishop and an abbot) are mentioned by the name of Finnén, undated, and Finnian is given as an (undated) Anglicized form.

Mac Ailein is given as the Gaelic spelling of MacAllen in Black p. 451; the name is dated to 1376 in the spelling M'Alayne. Black's Gaelic forms are generally modern (and thus not necessarily registerable) Scottish spellings, unless he gives a date. Woulfe p. 305 has entries for Mac Ailín and Mac Aileáin, and says the former is a mid-16th century import from Scotland; he gives the late-period Anglicized spellings M'Aline, M'Alline and M'Elean, M'Elane, M'Ilean, M'ellen, M'Kilan. He also has entries on p. 220 for the unmarked patronymics Ailín (late-period Anglicized Alwine, Allyne), which he derives from Anglo-Saxon Æthelwine; and Ailéin (Angl. Aleyne, Alleyne, Allaine), which he derives from Breton Alan. OCM's Aillén is also probably relevant. The conclusion that kingdom has reached is that this is period in some form, and we're asking the College's help in figuring out what the actual form should be.

There is a possible conflict with Raymond Norgate (Mar. 1975), Argent, billetty sable. There is one CD for the number of primary charges, but these staves are essentially elongated billets, so there may not be another CD for type or orientation of the charges. Other commenters said that the staves are hard to identify as such, since they're drawn essentially as black dowels.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

30: Gormlaith ingen Lugdach - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Client requests authenticity for 8th century Irish Gaelic language and/or culture and time period.
Language (8th century Irish Gaelic) most important.
Culture (8th century Irish Gaelic) most important.

Gormlaith is dated to c. 815 in OCM. It's also found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/), dated to 810, 840, 946, and 948. ingen: Old Irish patronymic.

Lugdach isthe genitive form of Lugaid, which is a header in OCM. It's dated to 612 and 954 in Mari's Annals Index (op. cit.), and it's also found in "100 Most Popular Men's Names in Early Medieval Ireland". (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/irish100.html)


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

31: Hans Krüger - New Name & New Device

Vert, a tau cross throughout and in chief a fox courant and a Maltese cross argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language ("Hans Kruger.") most important.
Culture ("Hans Kruger.") most important.

Hans is a header in Bahlow (Gentry) p. 190; the entry says this is a short form of Johannes, the most popular first name in the Middle Ages. There are 1171 instances of Hans in Aryanhwy's "German Names from Nürnberg, 1497" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/nurnberg1497.html).

Bahlow, p. 251 s.n. Johannes says "Numerous short forms show that Johannes was the most frequent Christian (baptismal) name at the end of the Middle Ages (thus "Hans and Grete")

Krüger is a header in Bahlow (op. cit.), p. 287, undated. Brechenmacher p. 119 s.n. Kruger dates Krug. to 1340, and Chrüger to 1362. Ary's article also has three instances of the surname Kruger. Given Brechenmacher's citation with the umlaut, the submitted spelling seems plausible. Bahlow says the name means 'tavern keeper' in the Lower German area, or 'jug dealer' in Upper German.

Some commenters noted that Hans Kruger was a Nazi party member and official in WWII Germany. He was tried, but not convicted, for war crimes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hans_Kr%C3%BCger)


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

32: Hieronymus Ullrich - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Both elements are header forms in Bahlow (Gentry).

Hieronymus is dated to 1530 in Talan Gwynek's "Medieval German Given Names from Silesia" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/bahlow_v.htm), and to 1401-1450 in Plauen in his "Late Period German Masculine Given Names" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/germmasc.html).

Ullrich is found four times (as a given name) in Aryanhwy's "German Names from Nürnberg, 1497" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/nurnberg1497.html); it should be fine as a patronymic as well.


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33: Hugh Tauerner - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Meaning ('Hugh, innkeeper'.) most important.

Hugh is a header form dated to 1273 in Withycombe p. 157-8.

Tauerner is dated to 1175 in R&W p. 440 s.n. Taverner.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

34: Hugh Tauerner - New Alternate Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 2007, via the East

Abu Yusuf Hasan

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Meaning (Hasan, father of Yusuf'.) most important.

His primary name is submitted elsewhere on this letter. If his name must be changed, he cares most about the meaning 'Hasan, father of Yusuf'.

Abu is Arabic for 'father of', an honorific. It is also in Schimmel, p 111, dated to 669.

Yusuf is found on p. 129 of Schimmel, dated to Biblical times (Joseph son of Jacob son of Isaac son of Abraham).

"Hasan: ibid p. 111, dated 669."

The submitted name is one of the examples in Da'ud ibn Auda's "Period Arabic Names and Naming Practices" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/arabic-naming2.htm): "When using a person's full name, the kunya precedes the personal name: Abu Yusuf Hasan [the father of Joseph, Hasan]."


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35: Isabeau de Valle - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 2003, via the East

(Fieldless) On a plate fimbriated gules a hare courant sable.

Her name was registered in Nov. 2003, via the East.

The SCA considers simple-edged roundels to be a medium for heraldic display, and does not register badges that start "(Fieldless) On a roundel..." The most recent precedent is from April 2002 (Solveig Throndardottir, 04/02 A-Æthelmearc): "Note that this does not change our long-standing policy about such "shield shape" charges used in fieldless badges if the tincture is not plain (thus, divided or with a field treatment), or if the charge is itself charged." Thus this needs to be re-interpreted as fielded armory. There are multiple possible ways to do this. If we see it as Argent, a hare courant sable and a bordure gules, the device looks clear. However, if we re-interpret it as Gules, on a plate a hare courant sable, it conflicts with Germany (Dec. 1994 via Laurel), Gules, on a plate a cross gammadion saltirewise sable, with but a single CD for the change of type of the tertiary charge. Which interpretation is correct is unclear, so we're forwarding this to Laurel for the benefit of CoA commentary.


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36: Johannes Kranich - New Name & New Device

Argent, a wolf rampant to sinister gules, and on a chief embattled gules masoned argent three boar's heads erased argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (German) most important.
Culture (German) most important.

Johannes: Bahlow s.n. Johannes indicates that this was the most frequent Christian name at the end of the Middle Ages. Johannes is the most frequent given name between 1451 and 1550 in "Late Period German Masculine Given Names" by Talan Gwynek (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/germmasc.html). It's also found in his "Medieval German Given Names from Silesia" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/bahlow_v.htm), with dates ranging from 1261 to 1525.

Kranich: Brechenmacher s.n. Kranch - Kranich dates a Joh. dictus K. to 1291.


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37: Johannes Teufen - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound most important.

Johannes is a header in Bahlow p. 251; the entry says this was "the most frequent Christian (baptismal) name at the end of the Middle Ages..." Johannes is the most frequent given name between 1451 and 1550 in "Late Period German Masculine Given Names" by Talan Gwynek (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/germmasc.html). It's also found in his "Medieval German Given Names from Silesia" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/bahlow_v.htm), with dates ranging from 1261 to 1525.

Teufen is a placename mentioned in Bahlow p. 504 (p. 513 in the German edition) s.n. Teuf(f)ert. It's undated, but the entry mentions a medieval poet named Wernher of Teufen.


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38: Jonathan Blaecstan - New Household Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 1990, via the East

Blaecstan Keep

No major changes.
Sound most important.

Blaecstan is the submitter's registered surname (June 1990 via the East).

Keep is a valid household designator by precedent (Seeker's Keep - Aelfric se Droflic, Sep. 1992 A-Ansteorra).


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

39: Jonathan Blaecstan and Melisande of the Gryphon Wood - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name (Jonathan Blaecstan) registered exactly as it appears in June of 1990, via the East
OSCAR finds the name (Melisande of the Gryphon Wood) registered exactly as it appears in November of 1991, via the East

Sable, on a bend sinister vert, fimbriated argent between two gryphons sejant to sinister three pine trees couped Or.

Jonathan's name was registered in June 1990 via the East. Melisande's name was registered Nov. 1991 via the East


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

40: Katharine Whytton - New Name & New Device

Purpure, a bend wavy argent between a brazier Or and a dove argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.

Katharine is a header in Withycombe, p. 186, dated to 1148 in England.

Whytton is a variant of several names in R&W: Whitton (p. 489), Witton (p. 498), and Wyton, Whyton (p. 506). Dated forms include Whyttun (13th c.), Whitton (1378), Wyton (1245), and Wytton (1440).

The device is clear of both Mór Fhionn (Dec. 2000 via Atlantia), Azure, a bend wavy argent between two mullets Or and Evelyn Macewan of Kynblathmund (Jun. 2005 via the East), Azure, a bend wavy between a fox passant argent and a weeping willow tree Or. In each case there is one CD for changing the type and another for changing the tinctures of the secondaries.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

41: Kathryn Elizabeth Lyons Ramsey - New Name & New Device

Per chevron sable and gules, two lions rampant combattant and a ram's head cabossed argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.

The form says the element 'Elizabeth' may be dropped if necessary for registration.

Kathryn is believed to be a reasonable variant based on Katheryn, dated to 1570 in R&W p. 127 s.n. Daughters, and Katryn, dated to 1569 in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Feminine Given Names in the Registers of the Church of St. Mary's, Dymock", s.n. Kateren (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/dymock/dym_women.html).

Withycombe s.n. Elizabeth says that by 1600, this name accounted for over 20 percent of female baptisms.

Lyons is dated to 1602 in Hitching. R&W s.n. Lyon dates Henry de Lyons to 1296.

Ramsey is dated to 1602 in Hitching. R&W s.n. Ramsey dates Simund de Ramesie to 1175.

Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Index of Names in the 1541 Subsidy Roll of London" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/english/london1541.html) has one example of Kathryn, five of Elizabeth, one of Lyons, and two of Ramsey as names of English men and women. In addition, Julian Goodwyn's "English Names found in Brass Enscriptions" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/brasses/) has Elizabeth (no specific date), Lyon (1592), and Ramsey (1510). So the only question remaining is how to justify putting all of these parts into one name. Per precedent, in English "double given names were a rare very late practice" (Gwenhevare Cordelia Maynard, 09/01 A-Ansteorra), but this still leaves one element too many: commenters found no support for unmarked double surnames in English. Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Naming Practices in 16th Century Gloucestershire: Use of More Than One Byname or Surname" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/GlocNamePractices/MultipleBynames.html) says "All records that include more than once surname or byname for a single person fall into two categories: "alias" style surnames [and] true locatives. There are no examples of unmarked double surnames in these records." Since Ramsey is a placename (according to R&W p. 371 s.n. Ramsay, there's one in Essex and one in Huntingdonshire), either ... Lyons of Ramsey or ... Lyons alias Ramsey (or variants on same, such as de or als) would be plausible. However, Kingdom is not certain whether adding "of" or "alias" counts as a minor or major change, so has left the name as submitted.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

42: Kirstyn Velkenerin an dem Platz - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Meaning most important.

Kirstyn is dated to 1381-83 in Talan Gwynek's "Medieval German Given Names from Silesia" s.n. Christine (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/bahlow_v.htm).

Velkener is a surname dated to 1399 in Bahlow p. 113 s.n. Falkner. an dem Platz is a locative dated to 1328, ibid. p. 376 s.n. Platz.

Current precedent (Elisabeth Trostin, 10/05 A-An Tir) requires patronymic, descriptive, and occupational bynames in German feminine names to be in a feminine or possessive form, so Eastern Crown changed this from Velkener  to Velkenerin


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

43: Laurencie La Martre - New Name & New Device

Azure, a winged monkey passant argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound (Laurencie (or Laurencia) La Martre) most important.

Laurence is in Dauzat, s.n. Laurent, undated. The masculine name Laurent is dated to 1548 and 1550 in Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn's "Given Names from

Brittany, 1384-1600" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/tangwystyl/latebreton).

La Martre is dated to around 1200 in Morlet Noms de Famille, p. 670 s.n. Martre(s).

Submitted as Laurencie La Martre, the submitter was using the placename Laurencie from the Dauzat citation.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

44: Laurens de Vitrolles - New Name & New Device

Per saltire azure and Or, three fleurs-de-lys and a unicorn's head couped counterchanged

No major changes.
Language (Vitrolles - near Marseille) most important.
Culture (Vitrolles - near Marseille) most important.

Laurens is found under Masculine Given Names in Cateline de la Mor's "16th C. Norman Names" (KWHS Proceedings 1994, p. 74).

Vitrolles is found under Verreries in Dauzat & Rostaing. The spelling Vitrola is dated to 1200, 994-1032, and 1274. Dauzat p. 597 s.n. Vitrac has Vitrolles as an alternate header (undated).


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

45: Malise Lauird - New Name & New Device

Purpure, on a bend between two triquetras argent three forget-me-nots purpure.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound (Malise sounds like ma-lise, wants to keep 'e' in Malise) most important.
Language (13th c. Scots) most important.
Culture (13th c. Scots) most important.

Sound, spelling, and language and/or culture are all marked as most important. The specifics say "Malise sounds like ma-lise, wants to keep 'e' in Malise, 13th c. Scots."

Both the submission form and the worksheet clearly have Mailse as the "name submitted", but the name is equally clearly documented as Malise: it's a masculine given name found as a header in Black. The spelling Malis is dated to 1210. Black s.n. Bane has Malise Bane 1320. Both he (p. 578 s.n. Malise) and Withycombe (p. 204 s.n. Malise) derive it from the Gaelic name Mael Iosa.

Lauird is a surname dated to 1257, ibid. s.n. Laird.

This device has some close calls for conflict. It's probably clear of Etain Winterbourne (Oct. 1991 via the Outlands), Purpure, on a bend between two escallops argent, three violet plants palewise vert, flowered purpure: there's one CD for changing the type of the secondary charges, and likely another for changes to the tertiaries, because Etain's blazon seems to imply that the violets are mostly plant rather than flower. More problematic is Isabella Catharini (Jul. 1997 via Atlantia), Purpure, on a bend cotised argent three irises purpure: there's one CD for changing the type of secondary charges (cotises vs. triquetras), but the needed second CD must come from a substantial change in type of tertiary charges (RfS X.4.j.ii). Wd have no idea whether irises are substantially different from forget-me-nots, so are forwarding this for Wreath to decide.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

46: Marguerite de Saint Nazaire - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in September of 2006, via the East

Vair, on a pale sable three escallops argent.

Her name was registered in September 2006, via the East.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

47: Marguerite de Saint Nazaire - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in September of 2006, via the East

(Fieldless) A magpie proper.

Her name was registered in September 2006, via the East. This badge has several close calls for conflict: Serlo of Litchfield (Dec. 1985 via Atenveldt), Gyronny gules and Or, a vulture close sable; Dafydd Wallraven (Jun. 1998 via Lochac), Per fess argent and purpure masoned argent, in chief a raven close sable; and Thorolf Oddson Villannen (Aug. 1973), Per pale argent and ermine, in dexter base a raven close proper. In each case, there is one CD for the field(lessness), but likely nothing for the type of bird (magpies are corvids, so there's almost certainly no type difference between a magpie and a raven), and nothing for placement/arrangement involving a fieldless badge. As submitted, the bird was black with white markings, which commenters felt was not enough white to get the needed second CD from changing half the tincture of the primary charge. At the submitter's request, the badge has been re-colored with a greater proportion of white, which will hopefully clear these conflicts.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

48: Nicodemus Sewere - New Name & New Device

Quarterly gules and Or, two torches in saltire sable enflamed counterchanged.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Meaning (sewer = feast attendant) most important.

Nicodemus is dated to 1579 in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Given Names in Chesham" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/chesham/).

Sewere is a header dated to 1279 in G. Frannson, Middle English Surnames of Occupation 1100-1350, p. 112. This spelling is also found in R&W p. 402 s.n. Sewer, definition (ii), in the parenthetical (and cryptic) remark "(a13., NED, with forms sewere, sawere, sewre)." Presumably, a13. means 'ante 13--', i.e. 'before 13-something'.

There is a gap of exactly 300 years between the documented elements of this name, which is a borderline step from period practice, though registerable. The surname continued in use well after 1279, of course (Sewer is found on p. lxxiv of F.K. & S. Hitching, References to English Surnames in 1601 and 1602, but we can't find the spelling he wants.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

49: Oram y Maer - New Name & New Device

Vert, a stag's head erased affronty argent and on a point pointed ployé Or an oak sprig fructed vert.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Welsh) most important.
Culture (Welsh) most important.
Meaning (Oram of the stone) most important.

He'd actually like Oran as his given name, but we couldn't find any documentation for that, beyond a statement that it's mentioned in passing in the Bible somewhere.

Orum is dated to 1175 in R&W p. 331 s.n. Orme as a masculine name; the entry says "Oram and Orum are due to the strongly trilled r." He prefers the -a- but will accept -u- if needed.

y Maer is intended as a Welsh byname meaning 'of the stone', along the pattern of names like 'of the axe', 'of the chair', and 'of the horseshoes', found in Compleat Anachronist #66. The word maer meaning 'stone' was found in Y Geiriadur Mawr (The Complete English-Welsh, Welsh-English Dictionary) by H. Meurig Evans and W.O. Thomas, p. 270.

The originally requested Oran may be the name of an Irish saint (http://www.namenerds.com/irish/saint.html; see also http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/sainto44.htm and http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/sainto45.htm). This of course doesn't help with a Welsh name.

This device is clear of Fáelchú an Stalcair (Nov. 1997 via the Middle), Vert, a stag's head cabossed and on a chief argent, three Bowen crosses vert, with one CD for changing the type of peripheral charge and another for the changes to the tertiary charge(s).


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

50: Oswyn æt Mældune - New Name & New Device

Barry wavy argent and gules, a wyvern erect maintaining an axe and on a chief wavy sable three crosses patonce argent.

Sound ('at' or 'atte' for the locative.) most important.

Oswyn is a constructed Anglo-Saxon name, using the parts Os- (Searle p. 370) and -wyn (ibid. p. 523). Commenters documented it as an existing Anglo-Saxon masculine name; it's found in Ælfwyn æt Gyrwum's "Anglo-Saxon Names" (http://www.s-gabriel/org/names/aelfwyn/bede.html), and discussed in Academy of S. Gabriel report 3107 (http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi?3107+0): "The name <Oswyn> is derived from the Old English masculine name <Oswine>. Like many Old English names <Oswine> fell out of common use after the Norman invasion" (Withycombe p. 236 s.n. Oswin).

æt: Anglo-Saxon preposition 'at'.

Mældun is dated to 913 in Ekwall p. 297 s.n. Malden. The placename should be in the dative case after 'æt'. Neither Ekwall nor Mills give the prepositions (if any) to go with their citations, but Watts p. 393 s.n. Maldon gives (to, æt, at) Mældune c. 925.

Submitted as æt Mældun , the byname was changed to the dative æt Mældune at kingdom.

There is a letter of permission to conflict included from his father, Draguin atte Maeldun, who bears Barry wavy argent and gules, a wyvern erect maintaining an axe within a bordure sable (reg. Jan. 1991 via the East). [As far as I can tell, the permission is unnecessary, as there is no conflict between these devices...]


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

51: Reina fille Calixte - New Name & New Device

Per pale purpure and vert, a fret Or and a bordure argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Reina is dated to the 13th century in Withycombe s.n. Regina. It's noted as a name of French origin. Reina is also found in R&W s.n. Rain, dated to 1214.

fille is an article meaning 'daughter of'. She is willing to drop the fille. Commenters didn't turn up any names using fille exactly this way, but there is an Avelot, fille de Guillaume Biau-Douz in Colm Dubh's "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/paris.html). Also, Michel Popoff's Armorial du Dénombrement de la Comté de Clermont en Beauvaisis (which is a collection of blazons from Picardy during the years 1373-1376) has Tassine fille Jehan du Quesne p. 23 and Jehanne fille Oudart Baudescot p. 30. These all use the father's full name, rather than just his given name. On the other hand, Academy of S. Gabriel report 2857 http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi?2857+0) endorses either la fille X, Latin filia X, or an unmarked patronymic (X) for a late 12th century Norman woman (where X is her father's given name). The first option is based on the masculine equivalent le fuiz or le fiz, found in R&W s.nn. FitzSimon and Hugh (among others)

Calixte is a header in Dauzat. It is a personal name, and more rarely a family name; it is derived from the Latin Calixtus, borne by a 3rd century pope and martyr. Calix is listed as a variant of Calixte.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

52: Rosalind atte Rylle - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 1999, via the East

Vert, a pomegranate slipped and leaved argent seeded gules a bordure Or.

Her name was registered in Mar. 1999 via the East.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

53: Rúadhnait inghean Ruaidhrí - New Name & New Device

Azure, a squirrel sejant erect, on a chief potenty argent, three rowan leaves proper.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound most important.

The specifics line says "Also OK with spelling Ronnait."

Rúadhnait is found s.n. Rúadnat in OCM, p. 158; it's the female form of Rúadán. In the legends of the saints, St. Rúadnat is sister of St. Rúadán of Lorrha.

Ruaidhrí: ibid. p. 158 s.n. Ruaidrí says this was a favorite name in medieval Ireland. Mari's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/) has Ruaidhrí as the post-1200 nominative and genitive spelling; the pre-1200 form drops the 'h'. Given that Rúadhnait is an early saint's name, the spelling ingen Ruaidrí would be more temporally consistent with it, but the submitted form should be registerable.

 


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

54: Sarah bas Mordechai - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 2004, via the East

(Fieldless) A furison vert.

Her name was registered in May 2004 via the East.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

55: Tabitha Johnstone of Annandale - New Name & New Device

Per chevron vert and azure, two winged spurs Or winged and an increscent argent.

Tabitha is a header in Withycombe; the entry says this is the Aramaic equivalent of Dorcas. "Both names appear in Acts ix for the charitable woman who was raised up by St. Peter. Tabitha, like Dorcas, was common in the 17th century..." It is dated to 1584 in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Names in Chesham, 1538-1600/1" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/chesham/).

Johnstone is submitted as a plausible variant spelling, based on Black s.n. Johnston, which dates Johnestoun 1493 and Jonhstone 1499.

Annandale is a header in Johnston's Place Names of Scotland; the entry dates Annanderdale to 1487, but there's no indication of when the modern spelling was adopted.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

56: Tiberius Iulius Rufus - New Name & New Device

Gyronny of sixteen Or and gules, a roundel Or fimbriated and on a chief sable a lightning bolt Or.

No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for Roman AD 165.
Language (Roman AD 165) most important.
Culture (Roman AD 165) most important.

According to Meradudd Cethin's "Names and Naming Practices of Regal and Republican Rome" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/roman/names.html), Tiberius is one of the 16 praenomina used most commonly by the Romans. Iulius is listed among the nomina, and Rufus among the cognomina, in the same article.


This item was on the 05-2007 LoAR

57: Tyrvaldr berserkr - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 2002, via the East

Sable, two wolf's heads erased respectant and in chief a mullet of four points elongated to base argent.

His name was registered in Aug. 2002, via the East.


By my count, this is 39 names, 1 alternate name, 3 household names, 36 devices, and 9 badges. This totals 88 items, all of which are new. A check for $352 will be sent separately from the packet.

(Note to self: add a mechanism to automatically generate this count!).

Until next month, I remain,

Istvan Blue Tyger


Bibliography (Sources in boldface are on the No-Photocopy list.)

Bahlow, Hans; Deutsches Namenlexikon; Germany, 1967.

Bahlow, Hans; Dictionary of German Names, translated by Edda Gentry; University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, 1993.

Black, George F; The Surnames of Scotland; New York Public Library, New York, 1946.

Brechenmacher, Josef Karlmann; Etymologisches Wörterbuch der Deutschen Familiennamen; Limburg a.d. Lahn, C.A. Starke-Verlag, 1957-60.

Dauzat, Albert & Charles Rostaing; Dictionnaire Étymologique des Noms de Lieux de la France; Paris, 1963.

Dauzat, Albert; Dictionnaire Étymologique des Noms de Famille et des Prénoms de France; Larousse, Paris, 1987.

Ekwall, Eilert; The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names, Fourth Edition; Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1989.

Fransson, Gustav; Middle English Surnames of Occupation 1100-1350; C.W.K. Gleerup, Lund, 1935, reprinted by Kraus Reprint Ltd., Nendeln, Liechtenstein, 1967.

Hitching, F. K., and S. Hitching, References to English Surnames in 1601 and 1602. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1998.

Johnston, James B.; Place-Names of Scotland; John Murray, London, 1934.

Jönsjö, Jan; Middle English Nicknames: I. Compounds; Lund Studies in English 55, Sweden, 1979.

Morlet, Marie-Thérèse; Dictionnaire Étymologique des Noms de Famille.

Morlet, Marie-Thérèse; Les Noms de Personne Sur Le Territoire de L'Ancienne Gaule du VIe au XIIe Siècle, Volumes I & II; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris, 1967, 1968.

Morlet, Marie-Therese; Etude d'anthroponymie picarde, les noms de personne en Haute Picardie aux XIIIe, XIVe, XVe siecles; Amiens, Musee de Picardie, 1967.

ÓCorraín, Donnchadh & Fidelma Maguire; Irish Names; The Lilliput Press, Dublin, 1990.

Popoff, Michel; Armorial du Dénombrement de la Comté de Clermont en Beauvaisis; Leopard d'or, Paris, 1999.

Reaney, P.H. & R.M. Wilson; A Dictionary of English Surnames, Revised Edition; Routledge & Kegan Paul, New York, 1991.

Room, Adrian; A Dictionary of Irish Place-Names; Appletree Press, Ireland, 1988.

Schimmel, Annemarie; Islamic Names; Edinburgh University Press, 1989.

Searle, William George; Onomasticon Anglo-Saxonicum; Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1897.

Socin, Adolf; Mittelhochdeutsches Namenbuch nach Oberrheinischen Quellen des Zwoelften und Dreizehnten Jahrhunderts; Hildesheim: Georg Olms Verlagsbuchhandlung, 1966.

Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn; "100 Most Popular Men's Names in Early Medieval Ireland"; (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/irish100.html).

Von Feilitzen, Olof; The Pre-Conquest Personal Names of Domesday Book; Uppsala, 1937.

Withycombe, E.G.; The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names, 3rd ed.; Oxford University Press, 1977.

Woulfe, Patrick; Irish Names and Surnames; Irish Genealogical Foundation, Box 7575, Kansas City, Missourri 64116.


OSCAR counts 36 New Names, 2 New Name Changes, 1 New Alternate Name, 3 New Household Names, 36 New Devices and 9 New Badges. These 87 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $348 for them. OSCAR counts 1 New Holding Name Change. This item is not chargeable. There are a total of 88 items submitted on this letter.