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East LoI dated 2010-12-31

Unto Olwyn Laurel, Istvan Wreath, Juliana Pelican, the SCA College of Arms, and all others who do receive this letter, greetings from Lillia de Vaux, Eastern Crown Herald.

This letter contains items from the East's second iLoI of October 2010. As we start the new year, I would like to thank all of the commenters on the behalf of the East's College of Heralds, and to pass on the thanks of our submitters. We appreciate all of the work that you do.

Happy New Year to all!

- Lillia

This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

1: Amy Webbe - New Name & New Device

Argent, a spider and on a chief sable three spiders argent

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound (unspecified) most important.

Amy is found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Names found in Cam, Gloucestershire, Marriage Registers 1569-1600" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/cam.html), dated 1573.

Webbe is a byname found in Aryanhwy's article "Names found in the Berkeley Hundred Court Rolls" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/berkeley100.html).

The device was computer colored, with the sable portions filled in instead of a line drawing. The device is clear of Society for Creative Anachronism (badge, 09/1997), Argent, a spider tergiant sable a chief gules, with one CD for the tincture of the chief and another for the addition of tertiary charges on the chief.


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

2: Anne Gryffyth - New Household Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 2010, via the East

House of the Thistle and Dagger

Argent, two daggers inverted in saltire sable between four thistles in cross proper all within a bordure counter-ermine

Her name was registered in 06/2010 (East).

This household name is intended to follow the pattern of inn sign names. Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada, "English Sign Names From 17th Century Tradesman's Tokens" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/Tokens/XandY_unrelated.shtml) documents the pattern of sign names based on two unrelated animals or items. Dagger is attested, as are various plants: Dagger and Magpie, Hand and Holly Bush, Mitre and Rose, Sword and Ball, Tobacco Roll and Hoop, and Wheat Sheaf and Sugar Loaf.

Signs based on plants are also documented in Margaret Makafee, "Comparison of Inn/Shop/House names found London 1473-1600 with those found in the ten shires surrounding London in 1636" (http://www.contrib.andrew.cmu.edu/~grm/signs-1485-1636.html), which notes signs based on the fleur de lys, olive, rose, vine, and wheat sheaf.

Thistle is a plant used as a heraldic charge. According to Parker's A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry, the thistle appears in the arms of Pembroke College, founded in 1620, and in the arms of Miles Salley, Bp. of Llandaff, 1500-16. The word is found in the submitted spelling in the OED, s.n. thistle, dated 1535 and 1650.


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

3: Anne Gryffyth - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 2010, via the East

Vert, a griffin rampant maintaining in its sinister claw a thistle argent, a chief ermine

Her name was registered in 06/2010 (East). An earlier device was returned in kingdom for conflict.

The device is clear of the following:

Griffin Val Drummond (12/2006, Atenveldt), Per pale purpure and azure, a griffin segreant argent, maintaining in its dexter talon a Morgenstern, and in its sinister talon a targe charged with a tower azure - one CD for the field, and one for adding the chief.

Alexander Caithnes of Wyk (07/1985, East), Vert, in pale a hippogriff rampant and a two-horned anvil argent - one CD for the change from an anvil to a chief, and another for the change in tincture of the secondary.

Balthazar fitz Gryphon (08/1997, Middle), Vert chapé ployé, a griffin segreant contourny argent - one CD for changing the orientation of the griffin, and another for the adding the chief.

Miguel of St. Katherine (12/2003, West), Vert, a griffin argent and a bordure counter-compony sable and argent - one CD for changing from a bordure to a chief, and another for changing its tincture.

Kedivor Tal ap Cadugon (11/2000, Atenveldt), Purpure ermined argent, a griffin segreant argent winged and beaked Or - one CD for changing the field and another for adding the chief.

Ulrich von Rothenburg (03/1994, Atlantia), Per bend vert and gules, a griffin segreant argent a bordure ermine - one CD for the changing the field and another for changing from a bordure to a chief.

Ruthven of Rockridge (01/1973), Gules, a hippogriff passant argent, a chief ermine - one CD for changing the field and another for changing the posture of the primary charge.

James ap Llywelyn (07/2003, Atlantia), Azure, a gryphon and a chief argent - one CD each for the changes in tincture of the field and chief.


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

4: Ashley Blackmoore - New Name & New Device

Ermine, in pale three hearts gules

The name was submitted as Ashley Blackmore, but was corrected by the submitter's father in commentary.

Ashley is a submitter's legal given name, but a copy of her birth certificate or other legal documentation was not provided. (The submitter is a minor.) The name is also a locative byname, found as a header in Bardsley, Mills, and Ekwall. Although earlier forms of the byname (e.g., Asheley) were found prior to 1600, the submitted spelling couldn't be found until the gray period. For example, it is found in 'August 1643: An Ordinance for naming a Committee for the Associated Counties, of Norfolke, Suffolke, Essex, Cambridge, Hertford, and Huntington.', Acts and Ordinances of the Interregnum, 1642-1660 (1911), pp. 242-245 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=55845), dated 1643. This source does not appear to have normalized the spelling of the names.

The pattern of English surnames being used as given names in the second half of the 16th century and early 17th century is discussed in the introduction of Withycombe. If further documentation is required to justify its use as a given name, kingdom will contact the submitter's father in order to document the submitter's legal name.

Blackmoore is part of the registered name of the submitter's father, Richard fitz Richard Blackmoore (05/1992, East), although documentation of the legal relationship was not provided. The submitted spelling is also found in Hitching & Hitching, 1602, and the spelling Blackmore was found in 1601 and 1602. It was also noted that the word is also a common noun referring to a black-skinned person (see OED, s.n. blackamoor). The submitted spelling is found in this usage in a letter to Sir Robert Cecil in 1593: "What I should have performed by my promise to your blackmoore this day..." ['Cecil Papers: October 1593', Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 4: 1590-1594 (1892), pp. 381-406 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=111598)], although the spelling may have been normalized along with the rest of the letter. A slightly earlier instance of this common noun was found, in a burial record from 1583: "Bastien, a Blackmoore of Mr Willm. Hawkins, Plymouth" [Imtiaz H. Habib, Black Lives in the English Archives, 1500-1677: Imprints of the Invisible, Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2008, p. 198, http://books.google.com/books?id=B2F-SVZD08kC]. As the submitted spelling is found in period and gray period, the submitter should not need to use the grandfather clause.

The device is clear of the following:

Elizabeth Æthelwulfes dohtor (05/2007, Atenveldt), Argent, in pale three hearts gules, each charged with a mullet of four points Or - one CD for changing the field and another for removing the tertiary charges.

Christina of Adiantum (05/1996, An Tir), Ermine, a lion passant guardant between three hearts gules; Aleyd Czypsser (04/2010, Atenveldt), Ermine, in dexter chief a phoenix gules; Claire de St. Giles (06/1985, Ansteorra), Ermine, in pale three lozenges gules between two flaunches pean; and Medraut Beorhtwig (12/1990, Middle), Ermine, three drakkars in pale gules - all clear by X.2.

Christina O Ryan (12/1992, Meridies), Ermine, in bend sinister three hearts azure - one CD each for changing the tincture and arrangement of the hearts.

Brittany (important non-SCA arms, 12/1994), Ermine - clear by X.1.


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

5: Beatrice Buontalenti da Firenze - New Name & New Device

Per pall inverted gules, vert, and Or, two doves rising argent and a dove rising gules

Beatrice occurs once in Arval Benicoeur's "Feminine Given Names from the Online Catasto of Florence of 1427" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/catasto/), and twice in Juliana de Luna's "Names in 15th Century Florence and her Dominions: the Condado" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/condado/womensalpha.html).

Neither the Catasto (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ferrante/catasto/family_names.html) nor the Condado (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/condado/familyalpha.html) has the submitted family name, but they both have multiple names in Buon- (e.g. Buoncristi, Buonmandati), along with Talenti (occuring twice in the Catasto, and four times in the Condado), showing that the spelling is plausibly period. Assistance justifying the construction of the name is appreciated.

da Firenze is discussed in Academy of Saint Gabriel report no. 2744 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/2744): "As you noted, the Italian name for Florence is <Firenze>. A woman from Florence might have been identified as <da Firenze> 'of Florence' or, more often, <la Fiorentina> 'the Florentine [woman]'", citing the Tratte ["Florentine Renaissance Resources: Online Tratte of Office Holders 1282-1532", edited by David Herlihy, R. Burr Litchfield, and Anthony Molho (http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/tratte/doc/SURNAM1.html)] and de Felice.

The pattern given name + family name + locative byname is rare, but attested in the Condado: e.g., Girolamo Chanbi da inpoli, Piero Chasconi da Spichio, per Juliana de Luna, "Names in 15th Century Florence and her Dominions: Complete Names from Declarations" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/condado/completenames.html). It is also found in Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada, "Italian Men's Names in Rome, 1473-1484" (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/Studium/Construction.shtml), e.g., Francesco Pellati da Padova.


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

6: Elspeth of Shepton Mallet - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (unspecified) most important.
Culture (unspecified) most important.

Elspeth is found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "English Given Names from 16th and Early 17th C Marriage Records" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/english/parishes/parishes.html) as the name of a woman married 1607. If this name cannot be registered, the submitter's second choice is Elsebethe, dated 1569 in Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada, "Feminine Given Names in the Registers of the Church of St. Mary's, Dymock (Gloucestershire, England: 1538-1600/1)" (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/Dymock/dym_women.shtml).

of Shepton Mallet is a locative byname based on a parish in the UK. The locative appears in the submitted spelling in a letter dated 1537 in 'Henry VIII: January 1537, 1-5', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 12 Part 1: January-May 1537 (1890), pp. 1-16 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=103350). It could not be determined if the names had been normalized in this source, although the overall text certainly had been.

Another source, 'Somerset', Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 (2005; http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=40433) states that there were market fairs in Shepton Mallet as early as the 1200s and that the town paid a certain amount in the 1334 Lay Subsidy, but that doesn't tell us anything about what the place was called at those times. Mills, Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names, s.n. Shepton mentions that its meaning is glossed 'sheep farm' (from the OE scēap + tūn), and has examples with manorial affixes. Scheopton Malet is dated 1228, with the manorial affix of the Malet family.

The locative was found as Shepton Malet in records written in Latin, dated 1284-5, 1346, and 1428, in Inquisitions and Assessments Relating to Feudal Aids, with Other Analogous Documents Preserved in the Public Record Office; A.D. 1284-1431: Northhampton to Somerset (http://books.google.com/books?id=LyoMAQAAIAAJ; pp. 294, 349, 365). A 1428 mention of the "Ecclesia de Schepton Malet" was also found in the same source (p. 397). Furthermore, Bardsley, s.n. Mallet, gives the spellings Malet (1273-1379), Mallett (1586), and Mallet (1619), so the submitted spelling seems plausible for late-period England even if the entire locative could not be found in the submitted spelling.


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

7: Finán mac Bressail - New Name & New Device

Azure, a goblet argent enflamed Or and a chief invected argent

Language (10th century Irish) most important.
Culture (10th century Irish) most important.

An earlier name was returned in kingdom.

Finán is found 28 times in Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn, "100 Most Popular Men's Names in Early Medieval Ireland" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/irish100.html). The names in this article are from the pre-Norman period (roughly pre-12th century).

Bressail is the genitive form of Bressal, which was found 43 times in Tangwystyl's article. Bressal is also found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Bressal.shtml), with a count of 27 in annals for years 435-1044. The submitted spelling is the standard Old Irish Gaelic (c. 700-c. 900) and Middle Irish Gaelic (c. 900-c. 1200) genitive form of the name.

The construction of a simple patronym using mac 'son' and the father's given name in the genitive case is found in Sharon Krossa, "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names", 3rd edn. (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/#simplepatronymicbyname).

The device is clear of Kathleen Erin-go-burne-the-Bragh (01/1974), Vert, a chalice argent containing flames Or, with CDs for changing the field and adding the chief.


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

8: Galiana da Montali - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for 14th century Italy.
Language (14th century Italian) most important.
Culture (14th century Italian) most important.

Galiana is found twice in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Italian names from Imola, 1312" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/italian/imolafemalph.html).

da Montali is a locative byname based on the contrata Montalis and Montalis Superioris (genitive form for both). The article states that, "[t]he records are arranged via contrata, which appears to correspond to a region of the city or the surrounding lands under the control or ownership of a certain family. I have listed the contrata (in Latin genitive case) where each name is found" (ibid., http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/italian/imola.html).

Assistance finding evidence for the use of contrata in locative bynames would be appreciated.


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

9: Grim the Skald - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (unspecified) most important.
Culture (unspecified) most important.

Grim appears in R&W, s.n. Grime, with instances as a given name in 1066 and 1175, and as a byname dated 1066, 1170, and 1183. The entry also notes that the name is from the ON Grímr, ODa, OSw Grim. The submitter stated that he would accept the standard Old Norse spelling Grímr if necessary for registration. This spelling is found in Geir Bassi (p. 10), which notes that it appears 32 times in the Landnámabók.

Skáld- 'skald, poet' is a prefixed nickname appearing five times (ibid., p. 27). Additional names using skáld- or -skáld are <jarlsskáld> 'skald of earls', <Kolbrúnarskáld> 'skald with black eyebrows, <skáldaspillir> 'skald-dispoiler, plagiarist', and <vandræðiskáld> 'difficult skald' (ibid., pp. 24, 27, and 29).

A fully "Old Norse" form of the name would be Skáld-Grímr but it was thought that Grim the Skald would be a likely Anglicized form of the name. However, the earliest citation of skald in English in the OED was from a. 1763. Assistance justifying the name is appreciated.


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

10: Gryffyd ap Rhys - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (Welsh) most important.
Culture (Welsh) most important.

Both name elements and the pattern <given name> ap <father's name that starts with a consonant> are found in Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn "A Simple Guide to Constructing 13th Century Welsh Names" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/tangwystyl/welsh13.html). The names in this article are from the Merioneth Lay Subsidy Roll, 1292-3.

According to that article, Rhys is the standardized form of the patronym, with the forms Reis, Reys, and Res found in the medieval records. However, the submitted spelling is found in Bardsley, s.n. Lewis, with Lewis ap Rhys, dated 1502.

There is an historical Gruffydd ap Rhys (d. 1137) who was Prince of Deheubarth, Wales (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deheubarth). He fought in a rebellion against the Normans and won at least one significant victory (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gruffydd_ap_Rhys). As he does not appear in Encyclopedia Britannica, and he ruled over only part of a petty kingdom (the rest having already been conquered by the Normans), it was not considered likely that his name is important enough to protect.


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

11: Isobel of Werchesope - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language (unspecified) most important.
Culture (unspecified) most important.

Isobel is dated 1548 in Talan Gwynek, "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames", s.n. Isabel (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/reaneyHZ.html).

of Werchesope is a locative byname derived from a place name found in the Domesday Book. The submitted spelling is found in Mills, s.n. Worksop, dated 1086.

The form originally had the name Isobel of Wechesope as the filing name. The consulting herald confirmed that this was a typographical error, and the spelling has been corrected accordingly.


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

12: Ivan Sergeevich Scherbatskoy - New Name & New Device

Azure, a ram's head couped checky argent and gules, in base a shamshir fesswise argent

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (unspecified) most important.
Culture (unspecified) most important.

The name was submitted as Ivan Sergeavich Scherbatskoy. It was changed to match the available documentation (see below).

Ivan is dated to 1181-2 in Wickenden (online ed., http://heraldry.sca.org/paul/h-j.html) s.n. Ioann, which states that the name is "[t]he Russianization of John ('God is gracious') and one of the most common given names. Both the older form (Ioann) and the newer (Ivan) are common in period."

The submitted spelling of the patronym was not found, although the spellings Sergeevich (1579) and Sergeevich' (15th century) are attested (ibid., s.n. Sergei, http://heraldry.sca.org/paul/sa.html). The spelling was changed to use one of the attested forms.

Scherbatskoy is the submitter's legal surname. A copy of his driver's license was included. Kolosvari Arpadne Julia thought that Scherbatskoy could be related to Shcherbatoi, a header in Wickenden glossed as 'pock-marked'. Examples of that name are <Olferko Shcherbatoi> (c. 1495) and <Ivan Mikhailov syn Shcherbatov> (1594-7) (http://heraldry.sca.org/paul/sa.html).


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

13: Jenna Childersley - New Name & New Device

Per chevron inverted purpure and vert, in chief a winged human head and in base three arrows palewise inverted argent

Jenna is extrapolated from forms of Jennet and Jane. The former is found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "English Given Names from 16th and Early 17th C Marriage Records" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/parishes/parishes.html), s.n. Jennet. The article gives the forms Jennet, Jenneta (Latinized), Jenne, and Jenny. In the same article, s.n. Jane, the forms Jana (Latinized), Jania (Latinized), and Janne are found. Aryanhwy's article "Names found in Frocester, Gloucestershire Marriage Registers 1559-1600" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/frocester.html), s.n. Joan, Janna is dated 1578. Based on these examples, the submitter believes that Jenna is a plausible variant. Assistance justifying the submitted spelling is appreciated.

If Jenna is not registerable, the submitter prefers Jennet, found 133 times between 1538 and 1618 (Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "English Given Names from 16th and Early 17th C Marriage Records", http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/parishes/jennet.html).

Childersley is found in Aryanhwy's article "Index of Names in the 1582 Subsidy Roll of London" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/english/engsurlondon1582a-m.html).

The device was redrawn in kingdom to correct the depiction of the per chevron inverted field. The submitter approved the new artwork.


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

14: Kalisfena Greenwood - New Name & New Device

Vert, a dragon displayed and on a chief argent three mullets of six points azure

Kalisfena 'of good strength' is a feminine given name and the name of a 14th century saint found in Wickenden (http://heraldry.sca.org/paul/ka.html).

Greenwood is found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Index of Names in the 1582 Subsidy Roll of London" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/english/engsurlondon1582a-m.html). In addition, it is the registered surname of her husband; a letter attesting the relationship has been included with the documentation.

Russian can be combined with Elizabethan English with one step from period practice [Tatiana Todhunter, 03/1993].

The use of a dragon displayed is a step from period practice.

The device is clear of the following:

Antonio Giordano da Firenze (02/2002, West), Vert, a dragon segreant and on a chief argent three crosses formy gules, and Darerca Wilric (11/1990, East), Vert, a wyvern passant to sinister and on a chief argent three towers vert - one CD for the posture of the monster and another for the change in type and tincture of the tertiaries.

Achbar ibn Ali (07/1991, Atlantia), Vert, a dragon statant erect affronty, wings displayed argent, pierced through the chest with a sword sable within a bordure engrailed argent - one CD for changing the bordure to a chief and another for the addition of tertiary charges.


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

15: Katerine atte Wyshe de la Rye - New Alternate Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 2010, via the East

Sugawara Isoko

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No changes.

Her name was registered 11/2010. She has two other alternate names, Katryn Blak and Catherine de Sant Martí, registered 05/2005 and 06/2010, respectively, via the East.

Sugawara is a uji/clan name (reference year 845) found in NCMJ (rev. ed.), p. 396.

Isoko is a feminine given name (year 1183) found on p. 242 (ibid.).


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

16: Kathryn Perry - New Name Change & New Device Change

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in March of 2011, via the East.

Azure, three pears Or

Old Item: Kathryn of Oldenburg, to be released.
Old Item: Per fess gules and Or, a sun Or and a falcon displayed sable, to be released.
Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound (unspecified) most important.

Kathryn is a feminine given name extrapolated from Kathrin, dated 1608 in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "English Given Names from 16th and Early 17th C Marriage Records" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/parishes/parishes.html), s.n. Katherine, as well as on the general interchangeability of i and y in later-period English, as demonstrated by <Katherin/Katheryn>, <Katherine/Katheryne>, <Catherine/Catheryne>, etc. (ibid.). The submitted spelling was found in '1541 London Subsidy roll: Lime Street Ward', Two Tudor subsidy rolls for the city of London: 1541 and 1582 (1993), pp. 95-96 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=36114), with the name "Kathryn Dygbye wydowe". The name is also grandfathered to the submitter.

Perry is found in Hitching and Hitching, 1602. The book also includes Perrye (1601), and Pery, Perrie, and Perrye (1602).

The device forms got wet in the mail, and some of the marker bled onto the black and white copy.


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

17: Lisette la Vinhala de Cotignac - New Name & New Device

Per pale argent and purpure, two bunches of grapes counterchanged

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language (unspecified) most important.
Culture (unspecified) most important.

Lisette is dated 1528 in Talan Gwynek, "Late Period Feminine Names from the South of France" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/latefrenchfem.html).

la Vinhala 'vine keeper' is an occupational byname dated 1514 (ibid.).

de Cotignac is a locative byname based on a town in the Var region of France. Examples are Guiaume de Cotignac (1180-1245) and the troubadour Arnaud de Cotgnac [sic] (1260), according to http://www.beyond.fr/villages/cotignac.html. A mention of "le sieur de Cotignac" is found in Thomas de Fougasses' 1608 book Histoire Generale De Venise: Depvis La Fondation De La Ville, iusques la present : Extraicte tant de plusieurs Autheurs, que Memoires Latins, François, & Italiens (http://books.google.com/books?id=4OE_AAAAcAAJ, Vol. 2, p. 728).

The name is clear of Lisette la Vinhala, registered 12/2002 via Ansteorra, for adding an element.

Correction (2011-Jan-04 20:01:44): The 1608 book's pagination is weird if you download the PDF. The pertinent page of the PDF is 451. It is 728 if you view the book within Google's interface.


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

18: Mabbe atte Eye - New Name

Mabbe is found in Talan Gwynek, "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/reaneyHZ.html), s.n. Mabel, dated 1293.

atte Eye is a locative byname found in Bardsley, s.n. Ey, temp. Edward III (1327-1377).


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

19: Marieke van de Dal - New Augmentation of Arms

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1981, via the East

Sable, on a bend argent a bendlet voided azure, thereon five beech leaves palewise vert, for augmentation in sinister chief on an escutcheon Or, on a pile between two roses purpure an Eastern crown Or

Her name and device were registered 05/1981 via the East. The augmentation of arms was granted by Andreas II and Isabella II in 11/2002, and was designed by Duchess Isabella. The submitter has been a duchess since 2000 (see http://op.eastkingdom.org/Awards/Ducal.html).


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

20: Matteo Ragni da Verona - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Italian) most important.

Matteo is found as a given name with 2609 instances in David Herlihy, R. Burr Litchfield, Anthony Molho, and Roberto Barducci (eds.), "Florentine Renaissance Resources: Online Tratte of Office Holders 1282-1532" (http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/tratte/doc/TLNAME1.html).

Ragni is found as a family name with 4 instances (ibid.; http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/tratte/doc/TLSURNAM1.html).

Verona is a place name (ibid.; http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/tratte/doc/NORIGINS.html).

da is the normal locative preposition in Italian, according to Talan Gwynek, "15th Century Italian Men's Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/italian15m.html).

Examples of the name pattern <given name> + <inherited surname> + <locative byname using the particle da> can be found in Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada, "Italian Men's Names in Rome, 1473-1484" (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/Studium/Construction.shtml).


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

21: Michael Christian Longstryde - New Name & New Device

Per fess vert and argent, two axes addorsed in saltire and a turtle counterchanged

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (unspecified) most important.
Culture (unspecified) most important.
Meaning (unspecified) most important.

The name was submitted as Michael Longstryder, but was changed in kingdom (see below).

Michael is found in Talan Gwynek, "Given Names from Early 13th Century England" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/eng13/eng13m.html). The given name is also found in the submitted spelling in Bardsley, s.n. Michael, dated 1379.

Longstryder was intended as a constructed byname following the pattern of names such as Liftfot ('left foot', 1284), Baresanke ('bare legged', 1221), Courtpe ('short footed', 1393), Langstirap ('long stirrup', 1183), Longerbayne ('long bone', 1296), all found in Jeanne Marie Lacroix, "Misplaced" Names in Reaney & Wilson" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/misplacednamesbyname.htm). Other examples of bynames derived from one's gait or step are Stepesoft 'step soft' (1260); Lyghtfot (1296), Lyghtefote (1274?), and Litefot (1274) 'light foot'; Stride (1642) and atte Stryd (1296) 'stride, pace'; and Bonpas (1175) and Bompase (1616) 'good pace' (R&W, s.nn. Steptoe, Lightfoot, Stride, and Bompas).

However, commenters thought that Longstyde or Longstride would be a more probable construction. A possible closer example is Ambeler, which R&W (s.n. Ambler) state could mean 'keeper of the stable', or it could be either a nickname for someone with an ambling gait or for a fuller (from the occupational byname Walker 'fuller'). An example is <John Ambeler, dated 1440. Another possibility is Stepper, dated 1408 in 'Close Rolls, Henry IV: June 1408', Calendar of Close Rolls, Henry IV: volume 3: 1405-1409 (1931), pp. 393-397 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=102464). A "John Brymley alias Stepper" is found in 'Henry VIII: November 1538 26-30', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 13 Part 2: August-December 1538 (1893), pp. 378-409 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75809).

Although we had two possible examples of similar bynames, Stepper and Ambeler, it seemed as though bynames ending in -er were occupational (e.g., Walker 'fuller'). The name was changed to Longstryde to better match the attested examples.

The submitted name conflicted with Michael Longstride (07/1983, West). The submitter was contacted and indicated that his second choice was Michael Christian Longstryder. Christian is a header form in Withycombe, where it is described as being used as a male given name from about 1200, but uncommon in England. The entry for Christian(a), states that the feminine given name in the submitted spelling is found from the end of the 12th century, and was more common than Christina, and that the submitted spelling was common in the 17th C. R&W, s.n. Christian, has <Christianus> (1201), <Thomas filius Christian> (1228), and <Robert Chrestien> (1163-9). It's found as a surname (in the submitted spelling), dated 1605, in Julie Kahen, "Surnames in Durham and Northumberland, 1521-1615" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juetta/parish/surnames_c.html). Bardsley, s.n. Christian also has it as a surname in the submitted spelling, dated 1591. In accordance with the submitter's wishes, this element was added to clear the conflict.

The intro of R&W ("Heredity of Surnames: Yorkshire Names") gives examples of double bynames: William Willson Johanson, Benedict Willeson Johnson, William Robynson Hudson, all apparently from 1379, and John Dyson de Langeside, c. 1369. Note that these aren't exactly applicable to the submitter, as these are mostly marked matronyms or patronyms.


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

22: Morgaine de Beaumont - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 2010, via the East

Argent, a cross of four ermine spots within a double tressure azure

Her name is on the East Kingdom 08/21/2010 External Letter of Intent. A prior device was returned in kingdom for conflict.

A possible conflict was noted: Costança Daguiar (05/2002, Atlantia), Argent, a cross of Calatrava and a double tressure azure. There needs to be X.2 difference between the types of cross to clear this submission. This has not yet been ruled upon.


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

23: Rafael de Ayala de Santiago - New Name & New Device

Gules, a sea-bull argent and a bordure argent semy of barnacles gules

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (unspecified) most important.
Culture (unspecified) most important.

The name was submitted as Rafael de Ayala de Santiago de Compostela, but was changed (see below) with the submitter's permission.

Rafael is found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Portuguese Masculine Names from Lisbon, 1565" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/portuguese/masc1565.html), and <Rafaell> is dated 1534 in Juliana de Luna, "Portuguese Names from the 16th Century" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/portugal16/portugal16data.html#list).

de Ayala is a surname that appears once, dated 1540, from Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Late-Period Spanish Men's Names from Seville" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/spanish/silversmiths.html). de Ayala is also found in Juliana de Luna, "Spanish Names from the Late 15th Century" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/isabella/locative.html).

de Santiago is a locative byname derived from the Santiago de Compostela. The full name of the town Santiago de Compostela is not registerable by precedent:

No documentation was presented, nor could the College of Arms find any, that de Santiago de Compostela was used in a locative byname. Previous precedent states:

This name is returned because no documentation can be found for the name de Compostela. People from Santiago de Compostela were known as de Santiago. [Livia Teresa de Compostela, 09/99, R-Atlantia]

Lacking documentation that compound forms of placenames like Santiago de Compostela were used in locative bynames, this cannot be registered. [Beatriz de Santiago de Compostela, Caid-R, 01/2002]

The name was changed accordingly, with the submitter's permission. It was noted, however, that Juliana de Luna, "Spanish Names from the Late 15th Century" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/isabella/locative.html) also includes the locatives <de Castro de Oro de Espanoche>, <de Castro de Oro>, and <de Olea de Reynoso>; commenters were not sure if these were instances of multiple locatives or just compound locatives.

Spanish and Portuguese can be combined without a step from period practice [Lianor de Najera, 02/2009, A-An Tir].

The device is clear of Kieran Storn (01/1990, Meridies), Gules, a seabull rampant argent, tail nowed Or, with one CD for adding the bordure and another for adding the tertiary charges.


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

24: Robert of Werchesope - New Name & New Device

Per bend Or and vert, a sheaf of six arrows inverted bendwise sinister counterchanged

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (unspecified) most important.
Culture (unspecified) most important.

Robert is found first dated 1331 in Julian Goodwyn, "English Names found in Brass Enscriptions" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/brasses/men.html). The forms <Rob'> and <Robertus> are found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Index of Names in the 1292 Subsidy Roll of London" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/london1292.html), the latter being the Latinized form. The submitted spelling also appears in R&W, s.n. Robert, dated 1086 and 1292, the latter being a byname.

of Werchesope is a locative byname derived from a place name found in the Domesday Book. The submitted spelling is found in Mills, s.n. Worksop, dated 1086.


This item was on the 03-2011 LoAR

25: Úlfr Steinsson - New Name & New Device

Paly argent and azure, a wolf courant and a bordure sable semy of mullets of six points argent

Úlfr is a masculine given name found in Geirr Bassi, p. 15.

Steinn is a masculine given name found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Viking Names found in Landnámabók" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/landnamabok.html), with a count of 14.

The formation of the patronymic byname is based on the pattern found in Geirr Bassi (p. 17), -nn > -ns: Sveinn > Sveinsson.

The device was redrawn with the submitter's permission to make the posture identifiable.


[Bardsley] Bardsley, Charles. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames.

[Ekwall] Ekwall, Eilert. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place-names.

[Geirr Bassi] Geirr Bassi Haraldsson. The Old Norse Name.

[Hitching & Hitching] F. K. & S. Hitching, References to English Surnames in 1601 and 1602.

[Mills] Mills, A. D. A Dictionary of English Place-Names.

[NCMJ] Solveig Throndardottir. Name Construction in Mediaeval Japan.

[OED] Oxford English Dictionary. Compact edn.

[R&W] Reaney, P.H. and R. M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. 3rd edn.

[Wickenden] Paul Wickenden of Thanet, A Dictionary of Period Russian Names. 2nd edn.

[Withycombe] Withycombe, E.G. Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names.


OSCAR counts 19 New Names, 1 New Name Change, 1 New Alternate Name, 1 New Household Name, 14 New Devices, 1 New Device Change, 1 New Badge and 1 New Augmentation of Arms. These 39 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $117 for them. There are a total of 39 items submitted on this letter.

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