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East LoI dated 2010-10-31

Unto Olwyn Laurel, Istvan Wreath, Juliana Pelican, the SCA College of Arms, and all others who do receive this letter, greetings from Ása in Svarta, Blue Tyger Herald and Lillia de Vaux, Eastern Crown Herald.



It is the intent of Easterners to register the following items. Unless otherwise noted, the submitter has no desire for authenticity, allows any changes, and allows a holding name. I've used the "language" checkbox to correspond with the "language/culture" box on the name submission form, and the "culture" checkbox for "spelling".

This letter includes submissions received just prior to Pennsic and those received from Heralds Point through 10 August 2010.

"Intermediate changes" are changes such as the addition or deletion of elements like 'de' and 'the', or changes in language, as long as the effect of the changes is small. Secondly, for the Pennsic submissions, common sources that are readily available, such as articles from the Academy of Saint Gabriel website, were granted a special no-photocopy status, even if they are not listed in Appendix H of the Administrative Handbook.

This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

1: Aennlin Ulrich - New Name & New Device

Per fess argent and paly argent and vert, an eagle vert and a rose gules

No major changes.

Aennlin is a feminine name found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "German Names from Rottweil, Baden-Württemberg, 1441" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/rottweil1441.html), s.n. A[e]nnlin, where it appears with a count of 66. The letter in brackets in the attested form of the given name, A[e]nnlin, indicates that the letter was superscripted above the previous letter.

Ulrich is the submitter's legal surname, as attested by the consulting herald and Eastern Crown. It is also found twice in this spelling as a masculine given name in Aryanhwy's article (cited above). <Vlrich> is found as a surname in Aryanhwy's "German Names from 1495" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/surnames1495t-z.html). Unmodified surnames (i.e., those that don't have a suffix to indicate the relationship with a parent or spouse) are found in Aryanhwy's article "Women's Surnames in 15th Century Germany" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/womenssurnames.html, so the construction is plausible without using the legal name allowance.

The submitter will accept intermediate changes.

Correction (2010-Nov-01 22:11:16): As J-M noted in the comments, the images can be seen at http://oscar.sca.org/emblazons/East/2010-10/aennlin.gif and http://oscar.sca.org/emblazons/East/2010-10/aennlinC.gif.

Correction (2010-Nov-01 22:11:18): As J-M noted in the comments, the images can be seen at http://oscar.sca.org/emblazons/East/2010-10/aennlin.gif and http://oscar.sca.org/emblazons/East/2010-10/aennlinC.gif.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

2: Altani Khatagi - New Name & New Device

Azure, a cloud and three chevronels braced within a bordure Or

No major changes.

Both elements are found in Heather Daveno, "Names of the Secret History of the Mongols" (http://www.laohats.com/studypages/mongol_names.htm). This source cites names from The Secret History of the Mongols by Paul Kahn.

Altani is a feminine name noted as being found on p. 136 of Kahn's book.

Khatagi is noted as being found on p. 5, as the byname of <Bughu Khatagi>.

Altani is the most important element to the submitter.

One commenter noted that one instance of the byname was the founder of the Khatagin Clan of Mongolia, who may have been legendary or mythical. The question of whether this name is worthy of protection, or whether it cannot be used due to this uniqueness (i.e., it was not used by normal humans), is up to Pelican to decide.

A question was raised about whether the cloud and chevronels were co-primary charges. As this was the way it was blazoned when submitted, it has not been altered.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

3: Alys Treeby - New Name & New Device

Argent, a tree blasted sable issuant from a base vert and beset by bees sable and Or, winged sable

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound (long-e sound of Treeby) most important.

Alys is found in R&W, s.n. Alis, as a byname dated to 1221. Withycombe dates the name in this spelling to the 15th century. The submitted spelling of the given name is also found four times in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "English Given Names from 16th and Early 17th C Marriage Records" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/parishes/parishes.html), dated 1580 and 1585.

Treeby is a header form in R&W, dated 1642. This citation notes that it is from Treby in Yealmpton (Domesday Book). The submitted spelling of the byname could only be found in the gray period instance cited above. It is found as <Treby> in 1428 (Inquisitions and Assessments Relating to Feudal Aids: Bedford to Devon.- Vol. 2. Dorset to Huntingdon.- Vol. 3. Kent to Norfolk.- Vol. 4. Northampton to Somerset.- Vol. 5 Stafford to Worcester.- Vol. 6. York and additions; http://books.google.com/books?id=Gn9nAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA453; p. 453).

The later instance of the given name means that there is no step from period practice for temporal disparity.

The client specifically does not want the single 'e' due to possible incorrect pronunciation. The submitter wishes to retain the Alys spelling and the long-e sound of "Treeby". The submitter will accept intermediate changes.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

4: Barbara de Vries - New Name & New Device

Gules, a bend between three steins and a domestic cat dormant, on a chief argent a threaded top-weighted drop spindle between two clews of yarn gules

No major changes.
Sound (Spelling; prefers the spelling without the terminal -e, if justification can be found.) most important.

Barbara is the submitter's legal given name on her driver's license, as attested by Ursula Georges. It is also found in Guntram von Wolkenstein's "Vlaamse Vrouwennamen - Flemish Feminine Names 1259-1530" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/vlaamse.htm).

de Vriese is in Luana de Grood, "Flemish Bynames from Bruges, 1400-1600" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/docs/bruges/byname-list4.html), dated 1541-1578, and in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Dutch Names 1358-1361" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/dutch/bynamesE14.html). The submitter prefers the spelling without the terminal -e, if justification can be found. Luckily for the submitter, the Wapenboek Beyeren, a Dutch armorial from c. 1405 (http://www.kb.nl/bladerboek/wapenboek/wb_transcripties.pdf), includes the armory of a man called <Vries van Ostende> in fol. 39v, and <Vriese van Ostende> in fol. 16r. This gives justification for the lack of the terminal -e.

The device has a complexity count of eight, which is the rule-of-thumb limit. Commenters expressed concern about the identifiability of the drop spindle; most thought it looked like an inverted, cup-hilted rapier. Identifiability of the clews of yarn was also questioned.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

5: Bella Delabarge - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound (submitter is the sister of Melina Delabarge, she would prefer the same surname) most important.

Bella is found in Rhian Lyth of Blackmoor Vale, "Italian Renaissance Women's Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/italian.html), and in Juliana de Luna, "Names from Sixteenth Century Venice" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/16thcvenice.html).

Delabarge is a surname found once in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Names from Artois, 1601" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/french/1601sur.html). It is the registered surname of her sister, Melina Delabarge (04/2010, East).

The combination of Italian and French is a step from period practice [Tessa Cheval, 11/2000].


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

6: Briana Douglase - New Name

No major changes.
Sound (unspecified) most important.

Briana is registerable as an English or Spanish given name using the literary name allowance [12/2001 Cover Letter, "From Pelican: Changes to the Registerability of the name Briana"]:

The name Briana has been found as the name of a human character in period Spanish literature, specifically the Espejo de Principes y Cavalleros.

Names of human characters in period literature are registerable with certain restrictions. (See the Cover Letter for the November 1999 LoAR for details.) Since Briana is the name of a human character in the Espejo, which was written in Spanish, it meets these requirements and is registerable as a Spanish feminine given name.

The first part of the Espejo was translated into English in 1578. The complete title (of the English version) is The mirrour of princely deedes and knighthood: wherein is shewed the worthinesse of the Knight of the Sunne, and his brother Rosicleer, sonnes to the great Emperour Trebetio: with the strange loue of the beautifull and excellent princesse Briana, and the valiant actes of other noble princes and knightes. Now newly translated out of Spanish into our vulgar English tongue, by M.T. Therefore, since Briana is the name of a human character in period literature available in English, the name Briana is registerable as an English feminine given name.

In commentary on a current submission (Briana MacCabe, Caid xLoI dated 6/29/2010), Edelweiss found two instances of the given name in late-period England:

BRIANA BULL Female Christening 20 March 1599 Surfleet, Lincoln, England GUILIELMI BULL Batch: C031902

BRIANA LAMBERT Female Christening 21 May 1615 Snaith, Yorkshire, England THOMAS LAMBERT Batch: P009231

(IGI Parish Record extracts)

Douglase is found in Black, s.n. Douglas, in the spellings <Dulglass> (1433) and <Douglase> (1429). R&W, s.n. Douglas, also includes <Duglas> (1175-99).

The combination of English and Scots is registerable without a step from period practice [Michael Duncan of Hadley, 04/2004, Caid].


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

7: Caitlin Sorcha O'Doghartie - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 1993, via the East

Per pale azure and argent, a sheep passant counterchanged

Her name was registered 06/1993 via the East. Note that this is clear of the badge of Chlurain, Clan (01/1981, Atenveldt), Per fess gules and Or, a sheep passant argent, its sinister foreleg in a tub sable, with a CD for the changes to the field, and another for the change of half of the tincture of the primary charge. It is also clear of Þorbjorn Ragnvaldsson (East Kingdom August xLoI), Gules, a goat courant argent, for the same reasons.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

8: Cassandra of the Marshes - New Name & New Device

Azure, in pale four natural dolphins bendwise sinister argent

The name was submitted as Cassandra the Missing, but was changed in kingdom to the submitter's second choice (see below).

Cassandra is a header in Withycombe, dated 1207-73. It is also found in Talan Gwynek, "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/reaneyAG.html), dated 1182-1303. The given name is also found in Bardsley, s.n. Cass, dated 1509.

the Missing is intended as a descriptive byname. The term is found in the OED with the definition of "not present; not found; absent": Heywood Play of Love (Brandl) 24 Whiche one ones founde I fynde of all the rest Not one myssyng, dated a. 1530. It is seen in the spelling <mysynge> c. 1566. In Shakespeare's Tempest, it is found in the submitted spelling, dated 1607. Under the definition "Absence, privation, lack", it is found as <missing> a. 1300, <myssynge> 1393, <myssyng> c. 1440, <missing> 1611. If the byname is found to be appropriate, the submitted spelling should be acceptable on the basis of the gray period instances. It was not known if this byname is registerable, as no precedent was found for it; however, abstract, adjectival terms as descriptives are generally not allowed. As an example, the byname <the Lost> had been SCA-compatible, and as such, is no longer registerable as of 2009. As an alternative, the surname <Missing> without the article was considered, but could not be found earlier than 1725-9.

As no support could be found for the byname <the Missing>, the byname was changed to her second choice, of the Marshes. This is a locative based on the branch name Marshes, March of the (01/1973).

The device was thought to be clear of Roberto Giano (05/2000, Ansteorra), Azure, two dolphins haurient addorsed argent, with one CD for the change in number of dolphins, and another for the arrangement (in pale vs. in fess). It was also thought to be clear of Caid, Kingdom of (12/1985), Azure, a dolphin embowed uriant to sinister argent. There is a CD for the change in number of dolphins, and it was thought that there is one for posture (head up vs. head down). There is no CD for the facing [Brenguier Viennois, 04/2005, Middle], or for the change from a heraldic dolphin to a natural one [Helga Iden dohtir, 04/2002, Caid].


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

9: Ceara inghean Chuarta - New Name & New Device

Vert, on a bend between two equal-armed Celtic crosses argent three harps palewise vert

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for Irish Gaelic.

The name was submitted as Ceara inghean Cuarta, but was changed in kingdom (see below).

Ceara is found in OC&M, s.n. Cera, as the name of three saints and as the legendary name of a wife of Nemed. In commentary for another ongoing submission (Ceara MacElea, 07/2010 xLoI, Outlands), Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada noted that she had found no evidence of the use of the given name by humans in period. However, the name should be allowed via the saint's name allowance on the basis of the information in OC&M.

inghean 'daughter' and the formation of the name is documented using Sharon Krossa, "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/).

Cuarta is based on Woulfe, s.n. Mac Cuarta. No dates were provided for any forms of this name, but modern forms of this name are M'Cowrty, M'Cowart, M'Cuyrt, MacCourt, MacCort, and MacCourtney. It's noted that it's "not improbably a corruption of Mac Mhuircheartaigh". Elmet noted that M'Cowrty, M'Cowart, and M'Cuyrt are 16th-17th century Anglicized Irish forms, which suggests that some form of <mac Cuarta> existed in period. <cuarta> appears in the CELT archive, but only as a common word ('circuit'), not as a name.

The name needs to be lenited and the patronym needs to be in the genitive case; however, none of the commenters could determine what the genitive form would be. As such, the name has been changed to Ceara inghean Chuarta to at least partially correct the name. We ask the College's assistance to correctly form the patronym.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

10: Connell of Dumfries - New Name & New Device

Azure, on a bend between two lutes argent three arrows gules

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (Scots) most important.
Culture (Scots) most important.

Connell is dated 1599 in Mari's "Names Found in Anglicized Irish Documents" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/). It is also found as a surname in Scots, in a non-normalized entry dated 02 July 1577 in Extracts from the Records of the Burgh of Glasgow vol. 1: 1573-1642 (1914), pp. 56-65 http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=47671&strquery=connell):

2 July 1577.

Connell.

Jonet Scott, spous to Samsoun Wilsoun, is decernit and ordanit be hir confessioun to delyver to Isabell Connell vj s. of fie witht ane lynnyng coller and ane hardin aperoun promeist in fie, price iij s., incontinent witht [blank] of expenssis.

Dumfries is a locative byname found in Mills and in Black, s.n. Dumfries, where gives <de Dumfries> (1291, 1299), <de Dumfres> (1394), and <de Dumfreys> (1460). The submitted spelling is also found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Index of Scots names found in Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/scots/dost/dumfries.html), dated 1629.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

11: Cristoff Gockerhan von Loch - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in July of 2009, via the East

Gyronny azure and argent, a cockatrice displayed gules combed and wattled Or

His name was registered 07/2009, via the East. This device is a redesign following a kingdom return, so is new to Laurel.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

12: Decimus Iulius Crassianus Macedonicus - New Name & New Device

Per fess gyronny of sixteen Or and gules, and sable, a demi-roundel issuant from the line of division sable and a scorpion Or

No major changes.

The name was submitted as Decius Iulius Crassianus Macedonicus and was changed in kingdom (see below).

Decimus is a praenomen, Iulius a nomen, and Macedonicus an agnomen found in Meradudd Cethin, "Names and Naming Practices of Regal and Republican Rome" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/roman/names.html and http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/roman/names2.html), as is the naming pattern [praenomen + nomen + cognomen + agnomen] (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/roman/index.html).

Crassianus is found in Plutarch's Lives as the name of a centurion, <Caius Crassianus> (http://books.google.com/books?id=H5lcpDJ_u44C&pg=PA97). The name is also mentioned in Frederic Taber Cooper, Word formation in the Roman sermo plebeivs: an historical study of the development of vocabulary in vulgar and late Latin, with special reference to the Romance languages (published 1895; http://books.google.com/books?id=xG9fAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA146), in a discussion of the development and use of the -ianus suffix.

The original name element <Decius> was documented from "novaroma.org". Metron Ariston noted in post-Pennsic follow up that anything referring to the historical <Decius Iunius Brutus> appeared to have been based on a false reading, and virtually every modern source now gives his praenomen as <Decimus>. Thus, sources like Nova Roma that use <Decius> seem to be drawing on the outdated information. As a result of this information, the name was changed to Decimus Iulius Crassianus Macedonicus. The submission form noted that <Decimus> might need to be used, so the submitter is aware of this possibility.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

13: East, Kingdom of the - New Other

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 1973,

(Fieldless) A tyger passant azure

The kingdom's name was registered 01/1973. The badge (Fieldless) A tyger passant azure (registered 08/1973, East) is to be officially designated as the populace badge for the kingdom.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

14: Edel Feurer Drache - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound (close to 'edelfeura') most important.

Edel is a header form in Brechenmacher, and is said to be derived from Adal(bert). An example is <Frid Dictus Edel>, 1296.

Feurer is from Bahlow/Gentry, s.n. Feuer, with <Perthold der feurer> dated 1350.

Drache (ibid., s.n. Draa(c)k) is a surname found in the submitted spelling in Frankfurt in 1357.

Double bynames are found in German [Konrad Faust Tyndell, 06/2010], so are registerable.

The submitter will accept intermediate changes.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

15: Edmund of Limerick - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Edmund is in R&W, s.n. Edmond, dated in this spelling to 1275. In Bardsley, s.n. Edmund, it is found as a surname (i.e., unmarked patronym) dated to 1379.

of Limerick is a locative byname based on the Irish county and town of Limerick, which is found in Roome, A Dictionary of Irish Place-Names. It is found in this spelling in 'Elizabeth I: volume 142: March 1589', Calendar of State Papers, Ireland, 1588-1592 (1885), pp. 128-141. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=49058&strquery=limerick). The personal names in that source do not appear to have been normalized, but it's not clear if the place names were.

The locative is spelled <Lymerick> in 'Close Rolls, Edward III: August 1332', Calendar of Close Rolls, Edward III: volume 2: 1330-1333 (1898), pp. 482-489 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=98734&strquery=lymerick), and in 'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1589', Middlesex county records: Volume 1: 1550-1603 (1886), pp. 182-189 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65958&strquery=Lymerick.

The spelling <Limerich> appears in annals of Roger de Hoveden, which describe a visit by Henry II of England to Ireland, and describe him as "rex Corcensis, & rex de Limerich..." (Charles O'Kelly. Macariae excidium, or, The destruction of Cyprus: being a secret history of the war of the revolution in Ireland; http://books.google.com/books?id=ewIGAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA263).

It is found as <Lymerycke> and <Limeryck> in the maps of South Leinster (plate 42) and Connaught (plate 40), respectively, in Pieter van den Keere's Atlas of the British Isles, c. 1605 (Harry Margary, Lympne Castle, Kent, 1972). The submitted spelling was thought to be a reasonable variant.

The submitter will allow the spelling <Edmond> only if necessary for registration, but will accept changes to the byname as needed.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

16: Edward Talbot - New Name & New Device

Azure, a wolf rampant between two axes palewise heads facing, all within a bordure argent

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Edward is found as a presumably unmarked patronym in Bardsley, s.n. Edward, dated 1EdwIII (1327) and 1379.

Talbot is found in R&W, s.n. Talbot, dated 1332.

Both name elements are also found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Index of Names in the 1541 Subsidy Roll of London", making this a wonderful English name that is appropriate for much of our period.

There was an Edward Talbot, 8th Earl of Shrewsbury, in our period, but commenters did not think that he was worthy of protection.

Commenters were split as to whether the design was a primary charge between two secondaries, or three co-primary charges. If the latter, there is a conflict with the device of Christian Blood (01/2005, Middle), Azure, a double-bitted axe and a bordure argent. There is a CD for changing the number of primary charges, but none for changing the type of only half of the charge group. If the axes are considered to be secondary charges, no conflicts were found.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

17: Elisabeth Borden of Kent - New Acceptance of Armory Transfer

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 2009, via the East

Azure, two batons in saltire between four crosses crosslet argent

Acceptance of armory transfer from Francesco Gaetano Greco d'Edessa. The armory is intended as a badge. Her name was registered 01/2009 via the East.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

18: Elizabet rábiti - New Name & New Device

Per chevron throughout vert and argent, two ivy leaves inverted Or and a raven displayed sable

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (Scandinavian/Norse) most important.
Culture (Scandinavian/Norse) most important.

Elizabeth is found in SMP, vol. 5, s.n. Elizabeth, dated 1321 and 1356.

rábiti 'racehorse, Arabian horse' is found in Geirr Bassi, p. 26.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

19: Emundi {o,}lfúss - New Name & New Device

Azure, a cracked tankard bendwise sinister reversed argent distilling a goutte d'eau

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound ('eh-mun-dee' - beginning name sound) most important.
Meaning (byname meaning 'desirous of beer') most important.

Emundi is a masculine given name found in Geirr Bassi, p. 9.

{o,}lfúss 'desirous of beer' is a masculine byname found on p. 30 (ibid.).


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

20: Engel der Arzt - New Name & New Device

Quarterly azure and purpure, a cross between four open books argent

Sound (first name sound - unspecified) most important.

Engel is a given name found in Talan Gwynek, "Medieval German Given Names from Silesia" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/bahlow_v.htm), dated 1330. He prefers the spelling Engle, if possible.

Arzt 'healer or doctor' is the header form in Bahlow/Gentry. An example is <der Arczt>, 1382-99. He prefers the header spelling to the attested form.

Commenters could not find the submitter's desired spellings. However, an English-Old High German dictionary gave the words arzat, arzatari, arzenari (pronunciation guides removed) for the meaning of 'medical doctor' (http://www.koeblergerhard.de/germanistischewoerterbuecher/althochdeutscheswoerterbuch/neuenglisch-ah d.pdf, p. 126). As such, kingdom gave the submitter the benefit of the doubt for the arz- spelling of the occupational byname rather than changing it to the attested form <Arczt>.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

21: Francesco Gaetano Greco d'Edessa - New Armory Transfer

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 2004, via the East

Azure, two batons in saltire between four crosses crosslet argent

Armory transfer to Elisabeth Borden of Kent. His name was registered 06/2004 via the East. This badge was registered 07/2006, also via the East.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

22: Generys William - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language (Welsh - time period unimportant) most important.
Culture (Welsh - time period unimportant) most important.

Generys is found in Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn, "A Simple Guide to Constructing 13th Century Welsh Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/welsh13.html).

William is a masculine given name from Tangwystyl's article "A Simple Guide to Constructing 16th Century Welsh Names (in English Contexts)" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/welsh16.html).

According to the latter article, unmarked patronyms were used by men, but that women were less likely to omit the patronymic particle. However, as it appears that it was done at least occasionally, the submitted name was considered to be plausible.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

23: Gunnv{o,}r hausakljúfr - New Name & New Device

Gules, three cats courant in annulo contourny argent

No major changes.

Gunnv{o,}r is a feminine given name that appears twice in the Landnamabok, as described on p. 10 of Geirr Bassi.

hausakljúfr 'skull-cleaver' is a nickname that appears once in the Landnamabok. It is found on p. 22 (ibid.).


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

24: Gynter Eiriksson - New Name & New Device

Paly of five argent and azure, a sword sable between two Maltese crosses, one per pale azure and argent and the other argent and azure

No major changes.
Meaning (Eirikr + byname construction) most important.

Gynter appears in SMP, vol. 9 (primary listing, pp. 489-90), dated c. 1367.

Eiriksson is a patronymic byname formed from the masculine given name Eirikr per Geirr Bassi, p. 17.

Commenters noted the name of Gunnar Eriksson (04/1993, Middle). It was felt, however, that it was sufficiently different from the submitted name.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

25: Hachille the Harlequin - New Armory Transfer

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in September of 1995, via the East

Argent, a pale lozengy argent and azure between a mask of comedy and a mask of tragedy azure

His name and device were registered 09/1995 via the East. Armory transfer to Lorcan Dracontius. Hachille passed away in 2001. As Hachille did not have a heraldic will, the paperwork was filled out in his name by Lorcan as heir.

In the case of a posthumous armory transfer, precedent states that we need documentation to show that (a) the person transferring the armory is deceased, and (b) the person accepting the transfer has the legal right to do so (i.e., either is the legal heir or has been granted permission by the heir). A copy of the obituary was obtained. However, Hachille passed away intestate, and Lorcan's status as widower is not legally recognized in Pennsylvania, meaning that he is not automatically considered to be Hachille's heir under state law. The Administrative Handbook, Section IV.G.4, states that, "residual property heirs of the owner under the laws of the state of the owner's death have the right to give permission to conflict, release the items, or transfer the items as these heirs deem appropriate." Lorcan has provided proof that he had concurrent estate under common law with respect to their home (joint tenancy with right of survivorship). Brigantia Principal Herald and the East Kingdom College of Heralds respectfully request that this documentation be accepted in fulfillment of this requirement.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

26: Honda Saburou Tadamitsu - New Name & New Device

Azure, seven plates, one, two, one, two, and one, and an orle argent

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for 1573-1600 Japanese (Momoyama).

All elements were documented using Solveig's NCMJ.

Honda is a surname meaning 'many' is found on p. 221, dated 1529.

Saburou, a masculine yobina glossed as 'third son' is found on p. 212, dated 1572.

Tadamitsu is a constructed nanori meaning 'faithful shining'. Construction of nanori is found described on p. 43, construction of nanori. It is dated 1183 on pp. 181 and 300, and 1147 on p. 357.

The submitter was contacted because the authenticity request and the disallowance of changes are mutually exclusive. The submitter agreed to allow minor changes if necessary.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

27: Jamys O Donill - New Name & New Device

Per chevron vert and Or, a fox sejant proper betweeen three Celtic crosses counterchanged

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound (unspecified) most important.

Jamys is found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Index of Scots names found in Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/scots/dost/), dated 1492.

O Donill is found in Woulfe, s.n. O'Domnaill, in which it is described as a Tudor/Stuart form. It is also found in Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada, "Names Found in Anglicized Irish Documents" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/Masculine.shtml, s.nn. Con, Connor, and Dermot, dated 1600, 1599, and 1598, respectively.

The combination of Anglicized Irish and English is a step from period practice [Gareth McGilchrist, 11/2004]. A ruling for Anglicized Irish and Scots was not found, but as both are functionally similar to English [Ryan de Caergybi, 05/2003], the combination should be, at most, a step from period practice [Connor MacGregor of the Bog, 03/2010].

Commenters were unsure if this was a conflict with Seamus Ó Domhnaill (09/2006, Caid). It was clear on the basis of appearance, but possibly not on the basis of sound.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

28: Karaz bint Tariq al-Qahuahiyya - New Name

Sound (unspecified) most important.

The name was submitted as Karaz bint Tariq al Qahuahiyya and was changed by kingdom (see below).

Karaz is the Arabic word for 'cherry, cherry tree'. It follows a pattern of Arabic slave girl names, which often included flowers, trees, and other plant life. Examples from Juliana de Luna, "Arabic Women's Names from al-Andalus" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/alandalus/) include al-Arāka 'type of tree', al-Yāsamīn 'jasmine', Athl 'type of tree', Bahār 'sweet smelling plant', Banafsaj 'violet', Narjis 'narcissus', and Ward 'rose'.

bint Tariq 'daughter of Tariq' is derived from Tariq, a masculine given name found in Juliana's article (ibid.).

al-Qahuahiyya is an occupational byname intended to mean 'maker/seller of coffee'. The Arabic word for coffee, Qahwa was found in Ralph Maddox, Coffee and Coffeehouses, and it was thought that Qahua was a reasonable variant. The pattern follows examples of occupational bynames found in the Cairo Geniza (KHWSS Proceedings, 2005?) that were formed directly from the product name: al-'Ambarī 'seller of ambergris', al-Asalī 'seller of honey', al-{H.}innāwī 'seller of henna', al-Amshā{t.}ī 'maker of combs', and al-Jalājilī 'seller of bells'.

If necessary, the submitter will allow the occupational byname to be dropped.

The name was changed to Karaz bint Tariq al-Qahuahiyya (adding a hyphen to the occupational byname) in order to match the documentation.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

29: Kusunoki Kinshige - New Name & New Badge

Per fess wavy argent and barry wavy azure and argent, two arrows in saltire azure

No major changes.

His current primary name was registered 02/2008 via the East, as was a device, Azure mullety of eight points, a chevron cotised between three foxes rampant each maintaining an arrow argent.

All elements are found in Solveig's NCMJ.

Kusunoki 'camphor tree' is a historical surname (p. 321) from the Nanboku period, dated 1392.

Kinshige is a historical masculine nanori (p. 338) from the Kamakura period, dated 1332.

Commenters noted that Kin is glossed as 'noble/public official/officer/duke', and shige as 'blossoming'. The character for the former is associated with higher court nobility. The name is listed as a nanori in NCMJ, however, and not a title. If the character is read as kimi instead of kin, then it also becomes an honorific for persons of exceptionally high social status. As the given name was not listed as a title in the source, the submitter was given the benefit of the doubt.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

30: Leon the Navigator - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister azure and vert, in bend an astrolabe and a caravel argent

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Meaning most important.

Leon is found in Withycombe, s.n. Leo, as a masculine given name dated to 1213-5 and 1306.

the Navigator is intended as an occupational byname. Navigator appears in the OED as <nauigator> 1590 and 1625. The u/v switch is unremarkable in English, so the submitted spelling should be registerable. The term was found dated 1601 (in a likely normalized source): "We had need to cherish this Subject, I think him to be the best and most necessary Member of the Common-Wealth, I mean the Navigator." ('Journal of the House of Commons: December 1601', The Journals of all the Parliaments during the reign of Queen Elizabeth (1682), pp. 660-689. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=43741&strquery=navigator). The Eynsham Cartulary includes a <Robertus Nauigator> in an entry from 1241 (p. 220, entry 351, http://books.google.com/books?id=ifNAAAAAYAAJ). The introduction of R&W includes examples of occupational bynames both with and without the definite article 'the', and states that sometimes the nicknames or occupational names included 'le' or 'la', and given a 12th century example: <Richard (le) turnur>.

The submitter has requested that he be contacted first if changes need to be made.

Moline and Green Anchor both noted that the astrolabe should be solidly tinctured so that the field does not show through (i.e., it appears as though the backplate is missing). Whether this error on the part of the colorist at Pennsic is cause for return is for Wreath to decide. Green Anchor also requested reblazoning of the caravel as a generic ship.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

31: Lorcan Dracontius - New Acceptance of Armory Transfer

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in December of 1993, via the East

Argent, a pale lozengy argent and azure between a mask of comedy and a mask of tragedy azure

His name was registered 12/1993 via the East. Acceptance of armory transfer from Hachille the Harlequin. Hachille passed away in 2001 and Lorcan completed the paperwork as his heir. If this transfer is accepted, this will be Lorcan's third piece of registered armory. It is intended to be a badge.

In the case of a posthumous armory transfer, precedent states that we need documentation to show that (a) the person transferring the armory is deceased, and (b) the person accepting the transfer has the legal right to do so (i.e., either is the legal heir or has been granted permission by the heir). A copy of the obituary was provided. However, Hachille passed away intestate, and Lorcan's status as widower is not legally recognized in Pennsylvania, meaning that he is not automatically considered to be Hachille's heir under state law. The Administrative Handbook, Section IV.G.4, states that, "residual property heirs of the owner under the laws of the state of the owner's death have the right to give permission to conflict, release the items, or transfer the items as these heirs deem appropriate." Lorcan has provided proof that he had concurrent estate under common law with respect to their home (joint tenancy with right of survivorship). Brigantia Principal Herald and the East Kingdom College of Heralds respectfully request that this documentation be accepted in fulfillment of this requirement.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

32: Lorita de Siena - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 2004, via the East

Fieldless) A rose per chevron inverted purpure and Or

Her name was registered in 05/2004 via the East, along with her device, Per chevron inverted purpure and Or, a chevron inverted sable between two roses counterchanged.

Correction (2010-Nov-01 22:11:13): The images were re-added to this item.

Correction (2010-Nov-01 22:11:50): Blazon correction: (Fieldless) A rose per chevron inverted purpure and Or


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

33: Lucie Lovegood of Ramisgate - New Name

No major changes.

Lucie is found in Withycombe, s.n. Lucia, Lucy. The spelling dated to the 14th century is described as "legendary". Other spellings (ibid.) are <Lucia> (1196-1428), <Luce> (1273-1604), and <Lucy> (1450). The submitted spelling is also found in Julian Goodwyn, "English Names in Brass Enscriptions" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/brasses/women.html), dated 1349, making the given name temporally compatible with the byname.

Lovegood is a header in R&W, which has the spellings <Livegod> (1204), <Louegod> (1327), and <Levegood> (1398). R&W notes that "the variation in the first vowel points to a fist element Leof-, hence from OE Leofgod..." As in early 14th century English orthography, u and v are the same and interchangeable. Thus, the submitted spelling seems to be a reasonable extrapolation.

The submitter prefers the v/oo spelling to ensure proper pronunciation.

of Ramisgate is a locative byname based on the town in Thanet formed before 1225. It is found in Ekwall, s.n. Ramsgate. Assitance finding dated instances of the locative would be appreciated.

The submitter will not allow the spelling Lucy. The submitter will allow intermediate changes.

Correction (2010-Nov-01 22:11:16): The variant spellings for the locative in Ekwall were <Ramisgate>, <Remisgate>, and <Remmesgate>, which states that they were taken from The Register of St. Augustines' Abbey, Canturbury. They were undated in the entry.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

34: Mina di Pasquale - New Name

No major changes.
Sound (unspecified) most important.

Mina is found in Arval Benicoeur, "Feminine Given Names from the Online Catasto of Florence of 1427" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/arval/catasto/), and in Juliana de Luna, "Names in 15th Century Florence and Her Dominions: Condado" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/juliana/condado).

di Pasquale is a patronymic byname found in Juliana's article (ibid.), which also supports use of the patronymic particle di.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

35: Muirenn na Tengad - New Name & New Device

Vert, a tree blasted and in base an open book, a bordure argent

No major changes.
Culture (mid-period Irish) most important.

The name was submitted as Muirenn na Thengad and changed in kingdom (see below).

Muirenn is a header form in OC&M, which states that is a popular Irish early period name dated to approximately 831.

na Thengad 'of the tongue' is a the expected feminine form of a masculine descriptive byname, na Tengad, found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Alpha.shtml). The byname is the Middle Irish Gaelic genitive form, found in year 1022. The spelling in the raw data is <na Tengadh>, and it is glossed as 'the linguist' or '[of] the tongue'.

As descriptive bynames do not need to be lenited if the given name ends with -n and the descriptive starts with T (Sharon Krossa, "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names", http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/), the byname was changed to the documented form, na Tengad.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

36: Onóra inghean Uí Ruairc - New Name & New Device

Per chevron Or and gules, two oak trees eradicated azure and a unicorn argent

No major changes.
Language (Gaelic) most important.

The name was submitted as Onòra inghean Uí Ruairc and changed in kingdom to correct the direction of the accent on the given name.

Onóra is a header form in Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Onora.shtml), found in years 1383-1600.

Ruairc is found in the Annals Index (ibid.), s.n. Uallgarg/Ualgarg (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Uallgarg.shtml). The byname <Uí Ruairc> is found at least 10 times in the article.

The formation of female clan affiliation byname using inghean uí is found in Sharon Krossa, "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names" (3rd edn., http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/#clanaffiliationbyname).

Commenters believed the name to be clear of Elinora inghean ui Ruairc (08/2001, Ansteorra).


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

37: Owen of Falkonmore - New Name & New Device

Argent, two frogs sejant respectant vert

No changes.

Owen is a header form in Withycombe, and is dated to 1200, 1273, and 1492.

of Falkonmore is the registered byname of his father, Baldric of Falkonmore (09/1996, Atlantia). Documentation of the legal relationship has been obtained, so the submitter is eligible for the grandfather clause.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

38: Per Arca - New Name

Sound ('arka') most important.

Per is a masculine name in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Portuguese Masculine Names from Lisbon, 1565" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/portuguese/masc1565.html). It is a diminutive of the given name Pero.

Arca is found in João du Cros, Livro Armerio-Mor, p. 108. This source is a 16th century armorial, so the name was in use at that time.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

39: Rónán Gruamdha - New Name & New Device

Argent, on a pale indented between two eagles gules three pheons Or

No major changes.
Sound (Ronan) most important.

The name was submitted as Ronán Gruamdha and was changed by kingdom to consistently accent the given name and match the documentation.

Rónán is a header found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Ronan.shtml), years 590-1117. The submitted spelling is the standardized Old Irish Gaelic and Middle Irish Gaelic nominative form. It is also a saint's name according to OC&M, s.n. Rónán.

Gruamdha '[the] grim/surly/morose/gloomy' is a descriptive byname also found in the Annals Index (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Gruamdha.shtml), 1440. It is the standard Early Modern Irish Gaelic nominative form.

The formation of names with descriptive bynames is described in Sharon Krossa, "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names" (3rd edn., http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/#descriptivebyname).


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

40: Sarra Daykin - New Name & New Device

Gules, on a sun between six roses slipped and leaved in annulo Or, a lion contourny gules

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No changes.

Sarra is found in the submitted spelling in R&W, s.nn. Deave, Brook, and Botler dated 1317, 1327, and 1332, respectively.

Daykin is a header form in R&W. It is found in the submitted spelling as a given name in 1290. The variant <Deykin> was found as a surname, dated 1344 (ibid.). Bardsley, s.n. Daykin has the spelling <Daykyn> dated 1379. As such, the submitted spelling was considered to be reasonable due to the i/y switch in English.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

41: Serafima Medvednikova - New Name & New Device

Per saltire azure and sable, a bear rampant between in fess two mullets of four points elongated to base argent

No major changes.
Language (Unspecified) most important.
Culture (Unspecified) most important.

Serafima is a header form found in Wickenden, "Dictionary of Period Russian Names"; it is the name of a second century martyr.

Medvednikova 'bearhunter' is found in Wickenden, "Occupational Bynames in Medieval Russia" (http://www.goldschp.net/archive/jobnames.html".

The submitter will allow intermediate changes.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

42: Sigurðr inn danski - New Name & New Device

Or, a wood chisel, blade to chief, sable

Client requests authenticity for 12th C Icelandic language and/or culture.
Language (12th C Icelandic language and/or culture) most important.
Culture (12th C Icelandic language and/or culture) most important.

The name was submitted as Sigurdr inn danski, but was changed in kingdom to match the available documentation.

Sigurðr is a masculine name found in Geirr Bassi, p. 14. It appears 17 times in the Landnamabok.

inn danski 'Dane, from Denmark' is found on p. 20 (ibid.). It is found twice in the Landnamabok.

Commenters raised the possibility of a visual conflict with the device of Angus Kerr (06/2001, East), Or, a spear sable.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

43: Sigurðr inn danski - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 2011, via the East

(Fieldless) A nail Or


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

44: Simon Digorie - New Name & New Device

Per chevron vert and gules, a chevron sable fimbriated between three lozenges Or

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Client requests authenticity for late 16th century Lowland Scots or Northern English (if Lowland Scots isn't possible).
Sound ('Diggory') most important.

Simon is a header in Withycombe, which states that it has "been used as a Christian name by the Frasers of Lovat from the 12th C to the present day." Examples of the submitted spelling were dated 1197-1284. The name was considered to be an excellent late-period Scottish Lowlands name, found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Index of Scots names found in Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/scots/dost/simon.html) in years 1362-1506 in the submitted spelling, and 1495 and 1550 in the spelling <Symon>.

Digorie is found in R&W, s.n. Diggory, which lists <Degory Water>, 1461, and <Digorie Baker>, 1600. It is also used as an unmarked patronymic byname. Commenters could not confirm if the byname was authentic for the desired time or place.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

45: Simona bat Leone - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2010, via the East

Per pale azure and argent vetu, a mullet of six points between three bees, all counterchanged

Her name was registered 04/2010, via the East.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

46: Takezaki Kotau - New Name & New Device

Argent, three gouttes in annulo tails to heads within an annulet sable

No major changes.

Both elements are documented from Solveig's NCMJ.

Takezaki 'bamboo slope' is found under the heading Historical Surnames (p. 327), and is attested to the Kamakura Period, 1332.

Kotau 'reply' is found under the heading Historical Masculine Nanori (p. 339), attested to the same period and year.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

47: Thomas Gernon - New Name & New Device

Vert, on a chevron throughout between three ram's heads erased argent three casks palewise proper

No major changes.
Language (French, 15th century) most important.
Culture (French, 15th century) most important.

Thomas is from Morlet Vol. II, dated between 923 and 1096. It also appears in French transcriptions of Froissart's Chronicles (completed 1373-1400). An example is "messire Thomas Trivet" (Antwerp MS 15.5, fol. 46v; http://www.hrionline.ac.uk/onlinefroissart/browsey.jsp?AbsDiv=ms.f.transc.Ant-2&AbsPb=Ant-2_46v&term s=thomas).

Gernon 'mustache' is found in R&W, s.n. Garnon, dated 1086, 1310, 1327, and 1524. R&W also states that it is the OFr "gernon". It is also found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Index of Names in the 1381 Suffolk Poll Tax" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/english/suffolk1381.pdf).

If the name is considered a combination of English and French, it is registerable without a step from period practice [Engelbert the Pious, 12/2003].


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

48: Thora Dragonet - New Name & New Device

Per saltire azure and gules, a battle-axe reversed argent

The name was submitted as Thora of Dragonet, but was changed by kingdom (see below).

Thora is found in Talan Gwynek, "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/reaneyHZ.html), dated to 1210.

of Dragonet is intended to be a byname derived from the branch Le Fief des Dragonets, Shire of (11/2006, East).

As the entire group name (excluding the designator) must be used in locative bynames, the full name would have been Thora of Le Fief des Dragonets. Rather than change the name that drastically, the name was changed to Thora Dragonet. Dragonet is a troubadour, eldest son of Dragonet de Mondragon, who was active 1176-1227, as found in Proper Names in the Lyrics of the Troubadours by Frank M. Chambers (Univ. of North Carolina Press 1971; http://books.google.com/books?id=efglAQAAIAAJ, p. 110 in snippet view). As such, it could be function as an unmarked patronym.

The combination of English and French is registerable without a step from period practice [Engelbert the Pious, 12/2003].

The form notes that the given name must not be changed, but the rest of the name can be.

The device is clear of the important non-SCA arms of Canton of Saint Galen (protected 07/2009), Vert, a fasces argent. There is a CD for changes to the field, and a second CD for the difference between a fasces and the axe [Christian Blood, 01/2005].


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

49: Tristan de Worrell - New Name & New Device

Or, two boars combattant sable, in base a wooden barrel proper

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.

Tristan is found in Morlet Dictionnaire, s.n. Tristan, dated 1150. Withycombe, s.n. Tristram, dates <Tristram> to 1189 in England.

de Worrell is found in R&W, s.n. Worral. An example is <Alan de Worrell>, 1388.

The combination of French and English is registerable without a step from period practice [Engelbert the Pious, 12/2003].


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

50: Ulrich Reinhart - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound (Ull-rick Rine-hart) most important.
Language (Unspecified) most important.
Culture (Unspecified) most important.

Ulrich is a given name found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "German Names from Rottweil, Baden-Württemberg, 1441" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/rottweil1441.html).

Reinhart is a surname in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "German Names from 1495" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/surnames1495.html), in which it is found five times.

The submitter has requested that he be contacted prior to making any major changes.


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

51: Violante da Rocha - New Name & New Device

Argent, on a saltire between four escallops azure an escallop Or

The name was submitted as Violante Nascente da Rocha, but was changed by kingdom (see below).

Violante is found in Juliana de Luna, "Portuguese Names 1350-1450" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/portuguese), in which it appears once.

da Rocha is the submitter's legal surname, although whether proof was provided during the consultation at Pennsic was not noted on the form. However, this element is also found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Portuguese Names from Lisbon, 1565" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/portuguese/lisbon1565.html), so the submitter need not rely on the legal name allowance.

Nascente 'headwater' (Portuguese) was intended to be a locative byname. A source was not provided for this. The submitter allows this element to be dropped if necessary. Commenters could not document use of this element in period, and no documentation was included. As a result, Nascente was removed from the name. If this element can be documented, it was found that unmarked toponymics and locatives were rare in Portuguese (see Aryanhwy's article cited above). An example is Bulhão (perhaps 'a spring'), which was found both marked (with de and do) and unmarked. If the unmarked toponym became an inherited surname, the combination of <given name + surname from toponym + locative> was thought to be a plausible construction.

Commenters were unsure if the name conflicts with that of Violante de Rojas (08/2009, East).


This item was on the 01-2011 LoAR

52: William Bircholt of Dartmouth - New Name & New Device

Quarterly gules and Or, a boar rampant sable

No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for 14th C English.

William is found in R&W, s.n. William, with <Henry fitz William> dated to 1300. It is found later in period as well, for example, in Karen Larsdatter, "Masculine Given Names Found in the 1523 Subsidy Roll for York and Ainsty, England" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/york16/given-masc-freq.htm), and in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "English Given Names from 16th and Early 17th C Marriage Records: William" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/parishes/william.html).

Bircholt 'birch grove' is a header in Ekwall, with <Birichalt> noted as being from II DM (Domesday Monachorum, c. 1087), and <Bircheholt> dated 1219. A reference to <Bircholt barony and franchise> is found in item 3687 of 'Henry VIII: December 1523, 21-31', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 3: 1519-1523 (1867), pp. 1514-1532 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=91138&strquery=Bircholt).

Dartmouth is the modern spelling of the city in England, found in Ekwall, s.n. Dart. The name of the city is glossed as 'the mouth of the Dart'. Period forms given in Ekwall were <Dærentamuða> and <Dertamuða> (1049), and <Dertemuðe> (1205). The submitted spelling appears in the map of Devon (plate 6) in Pieter van den Keere's Atlas of the British Isles, c. 1605 (Harry Margary, Lympne Castle, Kent, 1972; plate 6).


[Bahlow/Gentry] Bahlow, Hans. Deutsches Nameslexikon.

[Bardsley] Bardsley, Charles. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames.

[Black] Black, George F. The Surnames of Scotland.

[Brechenmacher] Brechenmacher, Josef Karlmann. Etymologisches Wörterbuch der Deutschen Familiennamen.

[Ekwall] Ekwall, Eilert. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place-names.

[Geirr Bassi] Geirr Bassi Haraldsson. The Old Norse Name.

[Morlet] Morlet, Marie-Therese. Les Noms de Personne sur le Territoire de l'Ancienne Gaule du VI au XII Si. Vol. II.

[Morlet Dictionnaire] Morlet, Maire-Therese. Dictionnaire �tymologique de Noms de Famille.

[OC&M] Ó Corrain, Donnchadh & Maguire, Fidelma. Irish Names.

[Wickenden] Paul Wickenden of Thanet, A Dictionary of Period Russian Names.

[R&W] Reaney, P.H. and R. M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames.

[Room] Room, Adrian. A Dictionary of Irish Place-Names.

[NCMJ] Solveig Throndardottir. Name Construction in Mediaeval Japan. Revised edition.

[SMP] Sveriges medeltida personnamn (SMP).

[Withycombe] Withycombe, E.G. Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names.

[Woulfe] Woulfe, Patrick. Sloinnte Gaedheal is Gall: Irish Names and Surnames.

1911 Britannica Encyclopedia.

[DOST] The Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue.

[OED] The Oxford English Dictionary.


OSCAR counts 42 New Names, 34 New Devices and 3 New Badges. These 79 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $237 for them. OSCAR counts 2 Acceptances of Armory Transfers, 2 Armory Transfers and 1 Other. These 5 items may or may not require payment. There are a total of 84 items submitted on this letter.

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