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East LoI dated 2010-08-31

Unto Olwyn Laurel, Istvan Wreath, Juliana Pelican, the SCA College of Arms, and all others who do receive this letter, greetings from Ása in Svarta, Blue Tyger Herald and Lillia de Vaux, Eastern Crown Herald.



It is the intent of Easterners to register the following items. Unless otherwise noted, the submitter has no desire for authenticity, allows any changes, and allows a holding name. I've used the "language" checkbox to correspond with the "language/culture" box on the name submission form, and the "culture" checkbox for "spelling".

This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

1: Aibhilín inghean Uí Phaidín - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 2009, via the East

Per chevron purpure and argent, three Lacy knots in chevron argent and an iris purpure slipped and leaved vert

Commenters thought that this was clear of Rhiannon of Faeroe (02/1998, Atenveldt), Per chevron purpure and argent, three triquetras counterchanged, with CDs for the changes in number and type of primary charges.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

2: Alessandra da Montereggioni - New Name

Alessandra is found in Rhian Lyth of Blackmoor Vale, "Italian Renaissance Women's Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/italian.html), which contains names from the 14th and 15th centuries.

Montereggioni is a town in Italy (modern: Monteriggioni) mentioned in Dante's Divine Comedy, Inferno xxxi 41-44: "come in su la cercia londa Monteriggioni di terri si corona". The edition being quoted was not identified, but Eastern Crown's copy (transl. T.G. Bergin, NY: Appleton-Century-Crofts, Inc., 1955) translates this passage as, "...as above its garland of high walls / Montereggione lifts its towered crown..." The town name appears as "montereggion" in a 14th-century edition of Inferno (AMS Historica, Biblioteca Digitale dell'Università di Bologna, Canto XXXI, c.72v., vv.28-57; http://amshistorica.cib.unibo.it/diglib.php?inv=170).

The locative preposition da is found in Talan Gwynek, "15th Century Italian Men's Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/italian15m.html).

Whether the terminal -i should appear in the locative was not determined in commentary.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

3: Ása in svarta - New Badge

OSCAR thinks the name is registered as Ãsa in svarta in July of 2006, via the East.

(Fieldless) A cross of four lozenges conjoined per saltire Or and azure

Her name and device, Quarterly Or and azure, a spoon and a hammer in saltire counterchanged, were registered 07/2006 via the East. (The registered name was verified by Eastern Crown in the O&A; we can't figure out why OSCAR isn't matching it.)

The badge is clear of Malcolm Drum (04/1996, Middle), Argent, four lozenges conjoined in saltire azure. There is a CD for fieldlessness, one for changing the tincture of half of the charge group, and another for changing the arrangement from in saltire to in cross.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

4: Asther de Perpinya - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in July of 2010, via the East

Or, a burning brazier suspended by two chains gules, in base two bars wavy azure

Her name is currently on the East's 2010-04-30 xLoI (http://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=13399). A prior device submission was returned in kingdom (02/2010 Eastern LoD).


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

5: Beatrice de Warynton - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 2010, via the East

Argent, a peacock proper and on a chief embattled azure three crescents argent

This peacock is in the default position [04/2007 Cover Letter: "From Wreath: Concerning Peacocks"], and has been blazoned as such. There is some variation in the proper coloration for peacocks [Pettronella of Caer Galen, 09/2004, Outlands-A]. As such, there is no CD between a peacock proper and one that is all azure or all vert. This submission was conflict checked as a peacock azure and a peacock proper.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

6: Cezilia Raposa - New Name

Cezilia is a feminine given name found twice, once as Cezilia and once as Çezilia, in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Portuguese Names from Lisbon, 1565" (http://ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/portuguese/lisbon1565.html).

Raposa, 'fox', is a descriptive surname that appears once in the same article.

The introduction of the article states that the most common naming pattern was <given name + surname>, and gives a feminine example, <Isabel Guomez>.

The name was thought to be clear of Cicilia Rosa (08/2000, Ansteorra).


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

7: Christopher Stanley - New Name & New Device

Azure, three cranes argent each maintaining a rapier Or and on a chief embattled argent three thistles proper

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (English) most important.
Culture (16th Century English) most important.

Christopher is found 116 times between 1541 and 1620 in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "English Given Names from 16th and Early 17th C Marriage Records" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/parishes/parishes.html and http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/parishes/christopher.html). Bardsley, s.n. Christopher, also notes a <Christopher Fell> (1545) and a <Christopher Scales> (1546).

Stanley is dated 1588-9 in Julie Kahan, "Surnames in Durham and Northumberland, 1521-1615" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juetta/parish/surnames.html). Bardsley, s.n. Stanley, lists <Edward Stanley> (1578-9).

Commenter thought that the name was clear of Christopher Starling (11/2004, West).

There was some debate as to whether the device should be returned for having a complexity count of nine. As consensus was not reached, this was sent on to the CoA for further discussion.

Correction (2010-Oct-29 09:10:33): The submitter has withdrawn this device and will resubmit something else.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

8: Declán Gobha - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 2009, via the East

Per bend rayonny gules and argent, an anvil argent and a sword bendwise sable


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

9: Eleanor the librarie-keeper - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Meaning (Spelling most important) most important.

Eleanor is found 12 times between 1574 and 1620 in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "English Given Names from 16th and Early 17th C Marriage Records" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/parishes/eleanor.html).

the librarie-keeper is an occupational byname intended to mean 'the librarian'. There were no citations for 'librarian' pre-1670, but the OED notes under meaning #2, the keeper or custodian of a library, that, "this word has surplanted the older library-keeper". A mention of "Andreas Bavard, custos librarie, anno dom. 1468" is found in Ottobuoni MS. 1565, f. 8vo in the Vatican Library [as cited in 'History of Greyfriars: Guardians or wardens', The Grey Friars of London (1915), pp. 53-62. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51597&strquery=librarie]. Custos librarie can be translated as 'library keeper' from Latin (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/morph?l=custos&la=la). However, the year this manuscript was actually written could not be verified.

Thomas Elyot's The Image of Governance, published in 1541, makes mention of "keepers of the lybrarye" [Jennifer Summit, Memory's library: medieval books in early modern England, University of Chicago Press, 2008, p.98; http://books.google.com/books?id=8vZzRmijcJ4C]. The occupation is the subject of John Drurie's (or Drury's) The Reformed Librarie-Keeper: or, Two copies of letters concerning the place and office of a librarie-keeper, published in 1650 (http://books.google.com/books?id=GE7j7-UO_iUC). In addition, another book, this one from 1603, mentioned "Amongst others Iohn Clipstone priest, sometime Custos of the Librarie of the Guildhall, 1457. An other of Edmond Alison priest, one of the Custos of the Library, 1510. &c. Sir Iohn Langley Goldsmith, Mayor, 1576. lyeth buried in the vault, vnder the tombe of Iohn welles before named." ['Cheape warde', A Survey of London, by John Stow: Reprinted from the text of 1603 (1908), pp. 258-276. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=60044&strquery=librarie].

The spelling librarie appears c. 1449 according to the OED: "Pecock kepr. 1. vi.30. In caas a greet clerk wolde go into a librarie and ouer studie there a long proces of feith writun in the Bible."

The OED entry for keeper, definition #1, is "one who has charge, care, or oversight of any person or thing; a guardian, warden, custodian". Definitions #1 and 3 also note that keeper is often used as a second element, e.g., alehouse-keeper, hound-keeper, and chapel-keeper. For specific dated examples, house-keeper is found in 1536, housekeeper in 1605 (both under Housekeeper), and inne-keeper in 1596 (under Innkeeper). As such, the term itself seems to be reasonable for the 16th and early 17th centuries.

The pattern [<given name> + the <occupation>] is not considered likely to have been used in the 16th century, when the term "library keeper" (in some form) came into use, although it was still found in the 14th century according to the introduction for R&W ("Heredity of Surnames" and "Surnames of Occupation and Office"). Examples of this pattern (sometimes in hereditary bynames) were <Thomas le hosteler>, 1331, and <Roger le Mounk>, 1318. Commenters generally thought that this temporal discrepency between the 16th to early 17th century name elements and a name pattern that had disappeared by the start of the 15th century would be worth, at most, a step from period practice. Whether the submitted form is an acceptable lingua anglica form of "custos librarie", considering the strong gray period citations, is for Pelican to decide.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

10: Emeline Patterson - Resub Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2005, via the East

(Fieldless) Three toads conjoined in pall at the feet vert

Her name and device, Purpure, a crane and on a chief embattled argent three mullets of eight points vert, were registered in 02/2005 via the East. This is a resubmission of (Fieldless) Three toads tergiant conjoined in pall at the feet vert, which was returned on the 09/2007 LoAR because the toads were not conjoined.

The badge is clear of Ragnarr the Frog (05/1998, East), (Fieldless) A frog tergiant vert, with one CD for fieldlessness and one for the change in number of the frogs. It is clear of Meadhbh ní Ruadháin (08/1994, East), Argent, three frogs in pall, legs extended, heads to center, within a bordure engrailed vert, with a CD for fieldless and another for the addition of the bordure. It is also clear of Ailís inghean uí Ruairc (01/2006, Atlantia), Argent, three frogs vert, with a CD for fieldlessness and one for the orientation of the frogs.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

11: Eva Bengrek - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 2008, via the East

Gules, a mascle and a bordure argent


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

12: Eva Woderose - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 2007, via the East

(Fieldless) A rose slipped and leaved per pale argent and purpure

Her name was registered 11/2007 and a device, Gules, on a bend sinister between two wolves couchant argent, three roses proper, in 12/2007, both via the East. A badge was withdrawn by the submitter during kingdom commentary.

The badge is technically clear of Beatrice Domenici della Campana (03/2000, An Tir), (Fieldless) A rose per pale argent and azure, with a CD for fieldlessness and another for changing half of the tincture of the charge. It is also clear of Tanczos Ilona (09/2005, East), (Fieldless) A six-petalled periwinkle per bend purpure and argent, with one CD for fieldlessness, one for changing the type of division from per bend to per pale, and another for reversing the tinctures.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

13: Giovanni da Montereggioni - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Giovanni is a common Tuscan name found in Arval Benicoeur and Talan Gwynek, "Fourteenth Century Venetian Personal Names" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/venice14/).

Montereggioni is a town in Italy (modern: Monteriggioni) mentioned in Dante's Divine Comedy, Inferno xxxi 41-44: "come in su la cercia londa Monteriggioni di terri si corona". The edition being quoted was not identified, but Eastern Crown's copy (transl. T.G. Bergin, NY: Appleton-Century-Crofts, Inc., 1955) translates this passage as, "...as above its garland of high walls / Montereggione lifts its towered crown..." The town appears as "montereggion" in a 14th-century edition of Inferno (AMS Historica, Biblioteca Digitale dell'Università di Bologna, Canto XXXI, c.72v., vv.28-57; http://amshistorica.cib.unibo.it/diglib.php?inv=170).

The locative preposition da is found in Talan Gwynek, "15th Century Italian Men's Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/italian15m.html).

Whether the terminal -i should appear in the locative was not determined, so I am forwarding this unchanged for further discussion by the experts.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

14: Gustav zem Sterne - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Meaning (Spelling of Gustav, meaning of byname ('star')) most important.

Gustav is an undocumented variant spelling of the Swedish masculine given name Gøstaf, a header form in SMP, vol. 9, pp. 525-72 (also found at http://www.sofi.se/servlet/GetDoc?meta_id=1801). The name was found in the 13th to early 16th centuries in various spellings. Examples include <Gostauus> (1225, 1511), <Gostavus> (1511), <Gustaue-> (1361), <Gustauer-> (1367), and <Gustavi> (1341), and <Gustaf> (1401, 1515). Due to the variation in spelling, it is thought that the submitted spelling is not unreasonable, although it's based on Latinized and/or genitive forms (e.g., Gustavi).

zem Sterne is a byname meaning 'at the sign of the star' found in Bahlow/Gentry, s.n. Stern; Walther zem Sterne (from Basel) is dated 1255. Socin gives the same example (Waltherus zem Sterne). A 'hus zem Sterne' (also in Basel), dated 1311, is found in Basler Zeitschrift für Geschichte und Altertumskunde (Historische und Antiquarische Gesellschaft zu Basel, Stiftung Pro Augusta Raurica; http://books.google.com/books?id=Qt8WAQAAIAAJ, p. 406)

The specific combination of Swiss German (an Alemannic dialect) and Swedish has not been ruled upon, but since Alamannic is in the High German group of languages, it should be a step from period practice [Beorn Boghener, 11/03]. The submitter would prefer a wholly German name, if evidence of Gustav in period Germany could be found. The submitter will accept the attested spelling Gustaf if necessary for registration.

Noir Licorne provided some examples of Gustav in German contexts in the gray period. It is found on p. 247 of Prodromus oder Vortrab künfftiger und bald folgenden, published 1641 (http://books.google.com/books?id=S4VBAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA273), and on pp. 264 and 319 of Historie Teutscher Händel vom Jahr 1617-1643, published 1643. She notes that some of these references are to Gustav Adolph, king of Sweden, and Gustav Horn, a Swedish/Finnish soldier and politician, so they may not reflect usage in Germany at the time.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

15: Katerine atte Wyshe de la Rye - New Name Change & Resub Device Change

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in November of 2010, via the East.

Azure, a fess argent doubly cotised Or

Old Item: Katryne Blak, to be retained as an alternate name.
Old Item: Azure, a crescent pendant Or and a bordure denticulada argent, to be retained as a badge.
Submitter desires a feminine name.
No changes.

The submitter's currently registered name, Katryne Blak, was registered 05/2005 via the East. She has a name change to Catherine de Sant Martí on the East's 2010-03-20 External Letter of Intent (http://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=12950). She would like to retain both names as alternates. As OSCAR matches the submitted item with the currently registered primary name, the older name (Katryne) has been entered as the Old Item rather than the name in progress (Catherine).

The submitter desires a late 14th century English name, but the box for an authenticity request was not checked.

Katerine is a feminine given name dated 1437 in Talan Gwynek, "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/reaneyintro.html).

atte Wyshe de la Rye is a locative byname found in R&W, s.n. Wish. William atte Wyshe de la Rye is dated 1305.

Correction (2010-Sep-28 21:09:25): Catherine de Sant Martí was registered on the June 2006 LOAR, and is now the primary name being changed.

This is a resubmission of a withdrawn badge on the East's 2010-03-20 xLoI [(Fieldless) In pale a crescent pendant Or conjoined to a fess embattled couped argent]. Her current device was registered 11/2009 via the East. She also has a second badge, Argent, a fox passant gules within a bordure per saltire sable and gules (11/2006, East).

The current device submission is based on image "No. 84 - De la Mere", Or, a fesse doubly cotised (or, between two bars gemelles) azure in Boutell's Handbook to English Heraldry, p. 54 (http://www.gutenberg.org/files/23186/23186-h/23186-h.htm).


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

16: Lucien de Wyntere - New Name & New Device

Azure, a cross of Jerusalem within a bordure argent

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (Unspecified) most important.
Culture (Unspecified) most important.

Lucien is found in Colm Dubh, "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/paris.html), which lists a <Lucien le péletier>.

de Wyntere is a byname found in Loveday Toddekyn, "Flemish Bynames from Bruges" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/docs/bruges/).

The submitter argues that Bruges was a French possession in period (and included a modern map showing Europe c. 1380), and a center of commerce, so the combination of French and Flemish should be registerable. This combination does not yet appear to have been ruled upon to date.

Documentation of French-Flemish contact is evidenced by the Armorial des Rois de l'Épinette de Lille (1283-1486), which is available in an edition by Michel Popoff (ISBN 2-86377-033-0), and the Armorial de la Flandre Wallonne dit de La Marche de Lille (compiled 1543-4), which is described at http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/periodrolls.html. Both of these armorials are from French-speaking Flanders, so a shared name pool between Flanders and northern France is to be expected. Indeed, some of the same names appear both on the Flemish name article cited above and "Personal names found in the Armorial du dénombrement de la Comté de Clermont en Beauvaisis 1373-1376" by Chrestienne la pescheresse (KWHS Proceedings, Caid, 2007).

One possible conflict was raised: the device of Curwinus Trevirensis, (04/2003, Atlantia), Azure, a Norse sun cross within a bordure argent. There does not appear to be a ruling on whether there is substantial difference between a cross of Jerusalem and a Norse sun cross. If they are not substantially different, then this would be a conflict.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

17: Mariota of Kildare - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 2008, via the East

Or, a duck purpure, in chief three gouttes de larme inverted and a base wavy azure

Her name was registered in 06/2008 via the East.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

18: Mariota of Kildare - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 2008, via the East

(Fieldless) A duck purpure

The badge is clear of Gerberga of Ardennes (02/2002, Meridies), Per bend purpure and argent, a crutch and a duck naiant counterchanged, with a CD for fieldlessness and another for change in number of primary charges. It is clear of Alana of Carillon (11/1989, East), Or, mulletty of six points azure, an owl purpure, and of Damian Popyngeye (04/1996, Atlantia), Plumetty argent and vert, a popinjay purpure, both with a CD for fieldlessness and another for the change in type of bird.

Noir Licorne raised the question of whether this badge conflicts with the badges for the Order of the Pelican, (Tinctureless) A pelican in its piety, and (Tinctureless) A pelican vulning itself. There is one CD for the fieldless bribe, but the second must come from the type of bird. As this has not been ruled upon previously, and both are distinct period charges in period postures, this is being forwarded for Wreath to decide.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

19: Morgaine de Beaumont - New Name

Morgaine is the submitter's legal name. A copy of her driver's license was provided.

de Beaumont is a locative byname found in R&W, s.n. Beaumond: <de Belmont> and <de Bellomonte> (Domesday Book), <de Beumund> (1275), <de Beaumond> (1332), etc. The submitted spelling of the town name is found in Watts, s.n Beaumont, dated 1291.

The name is clear of Adrienne Morgaine de Beaumont (05/1989, Caid) for the removal of the first given name.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

20: Oddkatla Jónsdóttir - New Name & New Device

Purpure, on a mole rampant Or, the letters DK sable

All name elements and the formation of patronymic bynames were documented using Geir Bassi. Oddkatla is found on p. 13, the masculine given name Jón is found on p. 12, and the formation of patronymic bynames is found on p. 17.

The consulting herald notes that the name should be clear of Katrina Jonsdottir (08/1986, West).

The name was submitted as Oddkatla Jónsdottir. As Norse names must be accented consistently, the byname was changed to Oddkatla Jónsdóttir.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

21: Pátraic Ó Donngaile - New Name & New Device

Sable, in pale two keys in saltire and an anchor fouled of its chain Or

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Meaning (Unspecified) most important.

Pátraic is a header form in OC&M, which states that it is an Irish form of Patrick. Pátraic in Middle Irish Gaelic can be supported indirectly, with Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" including both Mael Pátraic and Gilla Pátraic (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/MaelPatraic.shtml and http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/GiollaPhadraig.shtml). It is found in Early Modern Irish Gaelic in the same article (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Padraig.shtml).

O Donnghal is a patronymic from Tangwystyl's article (ibid.) under "Glossary of Elements in bynames", found under the modern form Donnghal(ach). This states "O Donely 1; 2 possible origins, Woulfe p. 505".

Elmet noted that the byname in the actual manuscript was <O Donely>, which is Anglicized Irish. The Gaelic form <Donngall> is found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Donngal.shtml), years 731-1108. The genitive form in both Old and Middle Irish Gaelic is <Donngaile>.

The formation of a clan affiliation byname is described in Sharon Krossa, "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/#clanaffiliationbyname).

The name was submitted as Pátraic O Donnghal. The submitter has no preference between the modern or manuscript form of the byname as long as the result relates to Co. Donegal. Thus, the name was changed to match the available documentation.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

22: Pierre de Tours - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 2006, via the East

Azure, a cross of five mascles and on a chief argent three gunstones

His name was registered 08/2006 via the East. His original submission, Azure, a cross of five mascles, a chief argent, was returned on the same letter for conflict with Talan of Skye, Purpure, a Bowen cross and a chief argent.

This resubmission conflicts with that of Clara Marschall (12/2008, Ansteorra), Azure, a Bowen cross and on a chief argent three chevronnels throughout braced gules. There is only a single CD for the changes to the tertiary charges.

A letter of permission to conflict has been obtained by Elmet; as soon as it is received by Eastern Crown and verified to be valid, it will be forwarded to Ragged Staff for inclusion in the packet.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

23: Robert the Frank - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound (Unspecified) most important.

Robert is a masculine given name found in R&W, s.n. Robert. This spelling is found in the Domesday Book (1066) and in 1292. It is noted that this popular name was introduced by the Normans during the reign of Edward the Confessor.

the Frank is a lingua anglica rendering of the descriptive byname variously rendered as le Franc (1221), le Fraunc (tempus Henry III?), le Fraunk (1296), and le Fronk (1296) in R&W, s.n. Frank. The surname Frank (without the article 'le') is dated 1270. The entry states that Fronco is the Old German for 'a Frank' and that it was not uncommon in the 11th to 14th centuries. The entry also notes that the surname could be from the Middle English/Old French franc 'free' (not a serf or slave), and dated this meaning to c. 1325 in the MED. Withycombe states that the name was common from the time of the Norman conquest until the mid-14th century, and that the submitted spelling was found with "some frequency" in the records from this time. <James le Fraunk'> and <Bertholomew le Frank'> both appear in entry no. 36, dated 1248, in 'Final Concords for Lincs: 30-33 Henry III (Case 130, File 33)', Final Concords of the County of Lincoln: 1244-1272 (1920), pp. 33-51. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=53621&strquery=frank. The bynames do not appear to have been normalized.

As a term ('the Frank') pertaining to someone of Germanic descent, the OED states that the idea that the term was derived from the word for 'free' was "already current in the 10th century; but the real relation between the words seems to be the reverse of this". However, this shows that the term was appropriate both as a descriptive term referring to nationality and as a generic adjective in period.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

24: Roseia Peseie - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound (Rosey Posey) most important.

Roseia is found in Talan Gwynek, "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/reaneyintro.html), under the header Rose, and is dated in this spelling to 1346.

Peseie is found in R&W, s.n. Pizey: <de Peseie> is dated to 1284 and 1300. The submitter would prefer a variant beginning with "Po-", but none were found.

The name was submitted as Roseia de Peseie, but the submitted requested that the preposition be dropped if possible. Dropping of the preposition is discussed in the introduction of R&W: "Loss of the Preposition", which states that it was regularly dropped pre-15th century. The name was changed to accomodate the submitter's request.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

25: Rychyld de Lochabre - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 2008, via the East

Azure, an armored angel maintaining a sword in sinister hand and in chief three doves volant, on a demi-sun issuant from base Or a cross flory azure

The submitter's name was registered 11/2008 via the East.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

26: Spurius Genucius Rutilus - New Name & New Device

Gules, a donkey sejant Or and in chief three gladii proper

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Unspecified) most important.
Culture (Unspecified) most important.

Spurius is a praenomen and Genucius a nomen (dated 451 to 270 BCE) found in Meradudd Cethin, "Names and Naming Practices of Regal and Republican Rome" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/roman/names.html.

Rutilus is not found in this article (although a similar name, <Rutilius> is), but it is found in the name <C. Sempronius Rutilus> in Titus Livius (59 BCE to 17 CE), Ab Urbe Condita, Book XXXVII, entry 57 (http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/livy/liv.36.shtml#57).

The device was redrawn by kingdom (with the submitter's permission) because the original depiction of the gladii blurred the line between co-primary and secondary charges.


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

27: Þorbjorn Ragnvaldsson - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2010, via the East

Gules, a goat courant argent

His name was registered 02/2010 via the East (full version Þorbj{o,}rn Ragnvaldsson). Note that the submission form listed the name as Þorbjørn Ragnvaldsson. It was corrected to the full form of the registered spelling.

Elmet cited a possible conflict with the badge of Chlurain, Clan (01/1981, Atenveldt), Per fess gules and Or, a sheep passant argent, its sinister foreleg in a tub sable (see below). There is a CD for the change to the field, but none for the change from passant to courant. The second CD must come from either the difference in type of charge, or the removal of the tub, if it is deemed large enough to count for difference. Sheep and goats are combined in the same category in the O&A, but there doesn't seem to be a precedent stating whether they conflict.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=363/2010-09-01/01-40-38_Clan Chlurian badge 1974.JPG


This item was on the 11-2010 LoAR

28: Wilham de Broc - New Name & New Device

Quarterly per fess wavy azure and argent, in bend sinister two cats rampant to sinister azure

No major changes.

Wilham is a masculine given name found in Julian Goodwyn, "English Names found in Brass Enscriptions" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/brasses/men.html, dated 1361. An earlier instance of the given name was found dated 1269, albeit in a French record: "Esi lui deit doner la meite dun fee de chevaler ke Wilham de Montsorel tient en Bensington e le fee de Pebbewrthe e le servise Wilhame de Mackele, e les servises sire Wilham de Huntecumbe e labbe de Eynesham en le Welde..." ('Close Rolls, October 1269', Calendar of Close Rolls, Henry III: volume 14: 1268-1272 (1938), pp. 140-147. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=95764&strquery=wilham).

de Broc is found in R&W, s.n. Brook, which includes <Rand de Broc> (1157).

The name is clear of William Ranulf le Broc (06/1988, Atlantia), for addition of an element.

The device is clear of Lewana de Panton (04/2006, Middle), Quarterly azure and argent, in bend sinister two domestic cats rampant sinister, with CDs for the changes of field division, tincture, and facing of the cats.

Correction (2010-Sep-18 10:09:54): Lewana de Panton's device is Quarterly azure and argent, in bend sinister two domestic cats rampant sinister sable. Eastern Crown apologizes for her cut-and-paste error.

Correction (2010-Sep-18 10:09:46): Lewana de Panton's device is Quarterly azure and argent, in bend sinister two domestic cats rampant sable. Eastern Crown apologizes for her OTHER cut-and-paste error.

Correction (2010-Sep-18 10:09:10): Lewana de Panton's device is Quarterly azure and argent, in bend sinister two domestic cats rampant sinister sable. Eastern Crown apologizes for her cut-and-paste error.


[Bahlow/Gentry] Bahlow, Hans. Deutsches Nameslexikon. (Translation by Edda Gentry).

[Bardsley] Bardsley, Charles. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames.

[Geir Bassi] Geirr Bassi Haraldsson. The Old Norse Name.

[OC&M] Ó Corrain, Donnchadh & Maguire, Fidelma. Irish Names.

[OED] The Oxford English Dictionary. Compact edition.

[R&W] Reaney, P.H. and R. M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. 3rd edn.

[SMP] Sveriges medeltida personnamn.

[Socin] Socin, Adolf. Mittelhochdeutsches Namenbuch.

[Watts] Watts, Victor, ed. Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names, Based on the Collections of the English Place-Name Society.


OSCAR counts 14 New Names, 1 New Name Change, 14 New Devices and 3 New Badges. These 32 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $96 for them. OSCAR counts 1 Resub Device, 1 Resub Device Change and 1 Resub Badge. These 3 items are not chargeable. There are a total of 35 items submitted on this letter.

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