SCA Laurel Sovereign of Arms
Online System for Commentary and Response

Site News
LoIs
KLoIs
SENA
Prec
AH
Track
Sub Status

Name:

Password:

Create Account

MAIL ME my password.



SEARCH:

[ Site News | LoIs | KLoIs | SENA | Prec | AH | Track | Sub Status ]

East LoI dated 2010-03-20

Unto Olwyn Laurel, Istvan Wreath, Aryanhwy Pelican, the SCA College of Arms, and all others who do receive this letter, greetings from Kolosvari Arpadne Julia, Blue Tyger Herald.

It is the intent of Easterners to register the following items. Unless otherwise noted, the submitter has no desire for authenticity, allows any changes, and allows a holding name. I've used the "language" checkbox to correspond with the "language/culture" box on the name submission form, and the "culture" checkbox for "spelling".

This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

1: Alesone Gray of Cranlegh - New Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 2009, via the East

Quarterly gules and sable, on a bend sinister argent three fleurs-de-lys gules.

Old Item: Gules, three equal-armed Celtic crosses and on a chief argent three ravens sable, to be retained as a badge.

Her name was registered in October 2009, via the East. Her current device, which is to be retained as a badge, was registered (under a holding name) in Dec. 2008, also via the East.

This device is clear of Helene Noel de Montbeliart (Oct. 2005 Calontir): Gules ermined argent, on a bend sinister argent three holly sprigs palewise vert fructed gules, and of Lebanon (important non-SCA armory): Gules, on a bend sinister argent a cedar tree palewise proper, in both cases with one CD for the field and another for the changes to the tertiaries.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

2: Alexander Clarke - New Name & New Device

Azure, a stag's head caboshed and in chief three mullets Or.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (late 15th c. York, England) most important.

Alexander is a masculine name found four times in this spelling in Karen Larsdatter: "An Index to the 1523 Subsidy Roll for York and Ainsty, England" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/york16/given-masc-alpha.htm).

Clarke is listed under Most Widespread Surnames in Julie Kahan: "Surnames in Durham and Northumberland, 1521-1615" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juetta/parish/surnames_top.html). It appears in 18 different parishes, dated between 1541 and 1615.

This device is clear of Richard Stanley Greybeard (Sep. 1993 East): Azure, a stag's head cabossed and on a chief double enarched Or, three mullets of six points azure, with one CD for changing the chief to three mullets, and another for removing the tertiary charges.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

3: Alice de Montbegon - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language most important.

Alice is a feminine name dated to 1273 in Withycombe s.n. Alice.

de Montbegon is a locative surname dated to 1217-18 on p. 255, 1222-23 on p. 262, and 1234-35 on p. 272 of A calender of the Lancashire assize rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, London, Volume 49 (Record Society, 1905; Google Books: http://books.google.com/books?id=xfEMAAAAYAAJ). This source does not appear to have normalized the surnames, as the name also appears as de Montebegon and de Munbegun, and other names occur in an even greater variety of spellings.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

4: Anne Gryffyth - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.

All documentation is from "A Simple Guide to Constructing 16th Century Welsh Names (in English Contexts)" by Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/welsh16.html).

Anne is listed as the 8th most popular woman's name.

Gryffyth is one of the period spellings listed under Gruffudd, the 7th most popular man's name.

The pattern <given name> <father's given name> is listed as the most typical patronymic formation, with one example being Agnes Owen.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

5: Ari haustmyrkr Þorbrandsson - New Name & New Device

Argent, an eagle vert and on a chief azure two wolves statant respectant argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Norse/Viking from Norway) most important.
Meaning (twilight) most important.

All documentation is from Geirr Bassi Haraldsson: The Old Norse Name.

Ari is a masculine name (p. 7, column 1) found 8 times in Landnámabók.

haustmyrkr is a byname (p. 22, column 2) glossed as 'autumn (early) dusk'; it's found once in Landnámabók.

Þorbrandr is a masculine name (p. 16, column 2) found 10 times in Landnámabók. The instructions on patronymic formation on p. 17 indicate that final -r becomes -s to form the genitive, giving Þorbrands + son: Þorbrandsson.

This device is clear of Friedrich Eric Helmut von Rheinhausen (02/1987 Middle): Argent, an eagle displayed vert, with one CD for adding a chief, and another for adding tertiary charges.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

6: Black Icorndall, Canton of - New Name Change

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in June of 2010, via the East.

Old Item: Gleann nam Feorag Dhuibhe, Canton of, to be released.
Meaning (Valley of the Black Squirrel) most important.

The canton's current name was registered in Nov. 2004, via the East. Groups do not have the option of alternate personas, so the old name is to be released if this submission is registered. The submission is accompanied by a petition, signed by the seneschal, exchequer, and Mistress of Arts and Sciences:

We, the undersigned - comprising three-quarters of the current officers of the Canton of Gleann nam Feorag Dhuibhe - do hereby petition to change the name of this Canton, located in the Barony of Bhakail. For reasons of internal and external ease of use, communication and memorization, we seek to change the name to the period form of Black Ickorndall - the valley of the black squirrel. This represents the same meaning while changing the source culture, resulting in something that can be more easily communicated to the mundane public and be more easily transcribed by members and non-members alike.
To this, we sign our hands to reflect this popular decision, as officers of the Canton.

Submitted as Black Ickorndall, Canton of, the spelling was changed to Icorn- in order to better match the documentation.

Black Icorndall is a constructed English placename.

Black as a placename modifier is found for example in Ekwall s.n. Notley: Black, White Nuteleye 1240. Other examples include Blackalverdon 1242 and Blakecalverdon 1256 (s.n. Callerton), Nigra Heddon 1242 (s.n. Heddon on the Wall), and Blaketorrintun 1219 (s.n. Torrington, Black).

Icorn- is based on Icornsawe 1279, found in Ekwall s.n. Ickornshaw, glossed as 'Squirrel wood', with the first element noted as deriving from Old Norse íkorni 'squirrel'. Smith s.v. ikorni lists Ickenthwaite, Ickering Gill, and Icornhurst as other (modern spellings of) placenames using this element. The second elements of these names are OE scaga 'thicket, small wood' (Ekwall s.n. scaga), ON þveit 'meadow, clearing' (s.n. Thwaite), ON gil 'ravine, narrow valley' (s.n. gil), and OE hurst 'wooded hill' (s.n. Hurst), showing that íkorni was combined with a variety of generic toponyms of both Norse and English origin. Another place named for squirrels is Aconbury, a header in Ekwall glossed as 'Old fort inhabited by squirrels', based on Old English ācweorna, and dated as Akornebir' 1213, Akornebury 1218, Akornebire 1244, and Okernebur' 1241.

-dall is based on Saxendall 1242 found in Ekwall s.n. Saxondale 'valley of the Saxons', with second element OE dæl. Under the header dæl, Ekwall notes that this word for 'valley' "must have been in use all over England, to judge by isolated names such as Dalham, Dalwood, Dawley, Doverdale. Names in Dal- and -dale are most frequent in the old Scandinavian districts and mostly contain ON dalr, ODan, OSw dal 'valley'." Watts s.n. Airedale adds Airedall 1340 as further, somewhat later support for the -dall spelling, along with 16th century examples s.nn. Doverdale, Arkendale, Deepdale, and Swaledale. Ekwall also has Alnerdall s.n. Allerdale, but the date is given as "11 Gospatric's ch", and kingdom must confess ignorance of what that means. Examples of critter + -dale include Ravendale, a header in Ekwall glossed as 'raven valley', and Rosedale, a header glossed as 'horse valley'.

Commenters noted that the meaning of the name is closer to 'black squirrel valley', with "black" modifying "valley" rather than "squirrel", but this is as close as an English placename is likely to get to their desired 'valley of the black squirrel'.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

7: Black Rose, March of the - New Heraldic Title

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1986, via the East

Rose Noir Pursuivant

Meaning most important.

Submitted as Sable Rose, the title was changed to Rose Noir to better match the documentation, per the submitters' preference.

The title is based on the group's arms (Argent, a Maltese cross between four roses, each environed of a laurel wreath sable) and the pattern of heraldic titles based on heraldic charges found in Juliana de Luna: "Heraldic Titles from the Middle Ages and Renaissance" (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/HeraldicTitles/). Examples listed include Blanche Rose, Noir Lyon, Noir Taureau, Noyre Fawcone, Eagle Vert, and Leon d'Or, and the detailed list notes that Blanche Rose also occurs as Rose Blanche. Also on the detailed list is Rose Rouge, a just-post-period title dated to 1602.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

8: Catherine de Sant Martí - New Name Change & New Badge

OSCAR NOTE: 'Old Item' should contain the former primary name. The form that is there is not a registered name.

(Fieldless) In pale a crescent pendant Or conjoined to a fess embattled couped argent.

Old Item: Katryne Blak, to be retained as an alternate name.
Submitter desires a feminine name.
No changes.
Language (Catalan) most important.

Her current name was registered in May 2005, via the East. It is to be retained as an alternate name.

Catherine appears in "The Sala Family Archives: A Hand List of Medieval and Early Modern Catalonian Charters" by Joseph J. Gwara, Jr. (http://www8.georgetown.edu/departments/medieval/labyrinth/professional/pubs/sala/). Item 190 of the Hand List is a receipt dated 1483 which mentions "his wife Catherine of Vic" in the summary. The excerpt doesn't include the woman's name, but comparison of other names in the summaries and excerpts does not show much name normalization: oblique Latin cases are changed to the nominative, and capitalization and i/j and u/v appear to be changed to their modern values, but names in the summaries otherwise appear to be reproduced as originally written.

de Sant Martí is a locative byname found in Arval Benicoeur: "Catalan Names from 12th and 13th Century Charters" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/catalan/catalan.html). The name appears once in the raw data section, in a charter labeled "Vic, Arxiu Capitular, calaix 6, no. 383": Guillem de Sant Martí. The charters are dated between 1101 and 1269, but the online archive containing them has been moved or deleted, so a more specific date could not be found.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

9: Eleazar ha Levi - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in September of 1986, via the East

Per bend sinister argent and gules, a fleam gules and a bee Or.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

10: Fergus Derg - New Name & New Device

Or, a bear passant and in chief a bow and arrow fesswise in pale sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Client requests authenticity for mid-1300s Scotland or Ireland.
Meaning (red (color) mead (drink)) most important.

Submitted as Fergus Redmead, the byname was changed to partially comply with the request for authenticity, with the submitter's agreement (as conveyed by his herald).

Fergus is listed as the fourth most popular name, with a count of 140, in Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn's "100 Most Popular Men's Names in Early Medieval Ireland" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/irish100.html). It's also found as the standard Old and Middle Irish Gaelic nominative spelling of the name of 33 men in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Fearghus.shtml); it's found in entries dated between 503 and 926, and between 1402 and 1599.

Derg is the standard Old and Middle Irish Gaelic nominative spelling of a descriptive byname meaning 'wine-red', found as the byname of five men in annal entries for 555, 600, 604, 721, 727, 794, 862, and 1039 in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Derg.shtml).

Neither name element is found in the submitter's requested time period of the mid-1300s (Fergus, in particular, skips right over the 11th to 14th centuries), but they are both appropriate for 6th to 10th century Ireland. The originally submitted Redmead was based on Reaney's Origins p. 184, which gives Meader and Medemaker as drink-related surnames, and on Whitebread, the name of a baker found on p. 183. It was intended as an occupational term for someone who makes mead of a reddish color, or as a toponymic for someone living near a meadow of red-flowering plants.

There was some worry in kingdom commentary about slot machine heraldry, but the issue is fuzzy enough that we're sending it up.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

11: Finnghuala Rowan - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 2008, via the East

Per bend sinister gules and sable, a dog passant argent marked sable between in bend two hearts argent.

Her previous device (Per bend sinister gules and sable, a dog passant argent spotted sable between in bend two hearts ermine) was returned on the July 2009 LoAR (R-East) for unrecognizability, because of the confusion between the ermine spots on the hearts and the non-ermine spots on the dog. This resubmission removes the ermine spots to eliminate this problem.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

12: Gianotta dalla Fiora - New Alternate Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 2004, via the East

Adeliza da Salerno

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (11th century Norman) most important.
Culture (spelling) most important.

The desired language/culture appear at the end of the primary Society Name, in parentheses, rather than on the relevant line underneath the checkboxes.

Submitted as Adelisa di Salerno, the name was changed to better match the available documentation.

Adelaisa, Adeleisa, and Adeliza are listed in Academy of Saint Gabriel report 3009 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/3009) as 11th and early 12th century feminine names from in and around Normandy, citing Delisle, Leopold, ed.: Rouleaux des Morts du IXe au XVe Siecle. These particular names were apparently recorded in Latin, though the report notes that the spoken language in the area was a dialect of Old French.

da Salerno is an Italian locative surname based on Salerno, the location of one of the first medical schools in Europe. The city appears in this spelling in Maridonna Benvenuti: "Mercator's Place Names of Italy in 1554" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/maridonna/mercator/south.html), in the Southern Italy region, in Campania. Of course, the place existed considerably earlier than 1554: there is an anonymous 12th or 13th century poem (in Latin) about the medical school, the first line of which reads "Anglorum regi scripsit tota schola Salerni" (http://www.accademiajr.it/bibvirt/regimen.html). Unfortunately, the poem only uses this genitive form of the placename, but a Latin name with a genitive in -i would have a nominative in -us, and names that end in -us in the Latin nominative generally end in -o in Italian, so Salerno is probably already the appropriate vernacular name of the city for the 12th or 13th century.

The use of da in Italian locative surnames can be documented for example from Talan Gwynek: "15th Century Italian Men's Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/italian15m.html): Bortolomio da Roma, Zohane da Parma, etc. The preposition was changed from di because kingdom commenters could only find locatives with di in very late-period Italian, which raised questions of temporal incompatibility. Of course, the most likely preposition for early period would be Latin de, but that would technically change the language of the surname, and the submitter does not allow major changes.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

13: Goerijs Goriszoon - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2008, via the East

Per bend Or and sable, a sword bendwise and a hurdy-gurdy bendwise, crank to base, counterchanged.

This submission is accompanied by documentation for the hurdy-gurdy as a period artifact. A German website on the history of the hurdy-gurdy (http://www.gotschy.com/deutsch/history.html) shows (among others) a 12th century sculpture from the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, with two men playing a large, violin-shaped hurdy-gurdy called an organistrum, and a painting by Hieronymus Bosch depicting a vaguely paddle-shaped hurdy-gurdy c. 1500. Both of these images are also found at a website titled "Traditional Music in the Time of Vermeer: the Hurdy-Gurdy" (http://www.essentialvermeer.com/folk_music/hurdygurdy.html), along with (again among many others) a miniature from the Sforza Book of Hours (c. 1490) showing an angel playing a lute-shaped hurdy-gurdy much like the one depicted on the submitted device.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

14: Isabel Chamberlaine - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Culture (spelling of Chamberlaine) most important.

Isabel is a header dated to 1141-49, c. 1160, 1268, 1276, 1304, 1327, 1354, 1379, 1440, 1473, 1485, and 1535 in Talan Gwynek: "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/reaneyHZ.html).

Chamberlaine is a surname dated to 1602 (p. xxxiv) in Hitching & Hitching: References to English Surnames in 1601 and 1602 (limited preview on Google Books: http://books.google.com/books?id=oCS7gpDhGdUC).


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

15: Ivan valfrekr - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No changes.

Ivan is a masculine name dated to 1181-82 in Wickenden (both 2nd and 3rd eds.) s.n. Ioann.

valfrekr is an Old Norse descriptive byname meaning 'val-fresh, greedy for battle-casualties' found on p. 29 (col. 1) of Geirr Bassi.

A combination of Russian and Old Norse has been ruled a step from period practice, but registerable (Gorm Bolin, A-Middle 10/2002).

Commenters raised the possibility of conflict with Ivarr Valfrekr (Apr. 1998 Middle). It's probably different enough in sound, but we're not sure about appearance.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

16: Iwain de Vassy - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister embattled sable and lozengy azure and argent, a mullet of four points elongated to base argent and an anvil Or.

Culture (spelling: either Vassy or Vescy) most important.

Iwain (also written Ivain or Yvain), the Knight with the Lion, is a major character from Arthurian legend; he is the title character of a 12th c. romance by Chretien de Troyes. The submitted spelling is found in Flutre, Louis-Fernand: Table des Noms Propres avec Toutes Leurs Variantes Figurant dans les Romans du Moyen Age Écrits en Français ou en Provençal et Actuellement Publiés ou Analysés (Poitiers: Centre d'Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale, 1962) p. 110 s.n. Ivain. Current precedent allows the registration of names of significant characters from period Arthurian literature, as there is a pattern of such names being used in England and France in period (Bedivere de Bryon, 06/1999 A-Atlantia). Iwain is also a masculine name found in 12th-13th c. Dutch sources, according to Academy of St. Gabriel report 2906 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/2906), citing Tavernier-Vereecken: Gentse Naamkunde van ca. 1000 tot 1253: een bijdrage tot de kennis van het oudste middelnederlands.

Vassy is a town in Calvados, France which was the location of an infamous massacre of Protestants by the Duc de Guise in 1562. Contemporary published accounts of the event spell the placename as Vassi, Vassy, and Vaissy, according to Graphic history: the Wars, massacres and troubles of Tortorel and Perrissin by Philip Benedict, p. 263 (Librairie Droz, Geneva, 2007; Google Books: http://books.google.com/books?id=ZO75rkTPt5QC). The place certainly existed before the 16th century, but we've been unable to find it spelled as Vassy any earlier in the usual French sources: Dauzat & Rostaing s.n. Vaissac has Vadeium 1107, Vaceium 1187, and Vaixi 1486, and Morlet s.n. Vassy derives the surname from the gallo-roman placename Vacciacum, but without dates.

If his first choice of de Vassy doesn't work for some reason, the submitter provided documentation for his second choice of de Vescy, which is a locative surname found in "An Index to the 1332 Lay Subsidy Rolls for Lincolnshire, England" by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/LincLSR/BynU.html).


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

17: Jibril ibn `Ammar al-Fayyad - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 2009, via the East

Argent, a decrescent sable between two curved swords in scabbards fesswise addorsed and a chalice gules.

His name was registered (via the East) and his previous device was returned on the Oct. 2009 LoAR because it was withdrawn by the submitter.

This submission is accompanied by documentation for the use of cups, crescents, swords, and addorsed charges in Mamluk heraldry, from Da'ud ibn Auda: "Islamic Heraldry, An Introduction" (http://www.appletonstudios.com/MamlukHeraldry2001.pdf), along with a picture from a website titled Eternal Egypt (http://www.eternalegypt.org/) of a "Textile Fragment with Blazon of Sword Bearer" showing two swords in tasseled scabbards, very like the ones in the submitted emblazon. The textile fragment is identified as 14th century Bahri Mamluk. (The image is attached, as the URL for the specific webpage comes out several lines long. The site does have a search function, and "blazon of sword bearer" works for finding the desired object.)

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=2/2010-03-19/11-04-24_JibrilSwords.jpg


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

18: Judith Daft - New Household Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2003, via the East

Valgautr House

No major changes.
Sound ("val" "gautr" or "odin") most important.

Submitted as House Valgautr, the order of elements was changed with the submitter's permission to better match the available documentation.

Valgautr is a masculine name found on p. 15 (col. 2) of Geirr Bassi; it's marked as coming from Heimskringla.

House is meant as a lingua anglica translation of Old Norse bœr or staðr, which are found in the names of farms and other settlements, often combined with personal names, in Talan Gwynek's "Place-Names in Landnámabók (Incomplete)" (http://my.stratos.net/~bmscott/Landnamabok_Place-Names.html). Examples include Sumarliðabœr 'Sumarliði's farmhouse' (discussed under Brekkur) and Auðsstaðir 'Auð's stead(s)'. All of the examples with personal names appear to use the "house" element second, which, combined with the lack of evidence for an English pattern of "House X" without a preposition, prompted kingdom to move the designator after the name.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

19: Kathryn Fontayne - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2008, via the East

Per pale azure and purpure, a rose within an orle of oak leaves conjoined argent.

This device is clear of Jonas Aquilian (11/1990 Caid): Per pale azure and sable, a rose within a bordure embattled argent, with one CD for the change in tincture of half the field, and another for the change in type of peripheral charge.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

20: Konrad von Altorff - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 2006, via the East

Per fess Or and bendy sinister gules and argent, a bull's head caboshed and in chief two eagles sable.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

21: Leofflæda of Endeweard - New Name

No major changes.

Submitted as Leofflaeda of Endeweard, the spelling of the given name was changed to Leofflæda in order to match the documentation.

Leofflæda is found under Leofflæd in Marieke van de Dal: "Anglo-Saxon Women's Names from Royal Charters" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/marieke/anglosaxonfem/), dated 1043x1046; the source is listed as Sawyer number S-1469, and the language is noted as (Old) English (as opposed to Latin).

Endeweard, Shire of is a branch name registered in Jan. 1987, via the East.

Commenters believe the name differs sufficiently in both appearance and sound from Leofcwen of Endeweard (11/2008 East).


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

22: Lisabetta Medaglia - New Name & New Device

Argent, a griffin sejant purpure maintaining a bow proper, all within a bordure azure semy of plates.

Culture (spelling: Medaglia or Meralla as byname) most important.

Lisabetta appears three times in "Feminine Given Names from the Online Catasto of Florence of 1427" by Arval Benicoeur (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/catasto/#alpha). It's also listed in "Italian Renaissance Women's Names" by Rhian Lyth of Blackmoor Vale (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/italian.html).

Medaglia was the surname of an architect (Antonio Medaglia) who was active in 16c Italy; he is mentioned as one of the teachers of the Venetian sculptor Alessandro Vittoria in "Veronese's Portrait of the Sculptor Vittoria" by Margaretta Salinger (The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, New Series, Vol. 5, No. 1; JSTOR: http://www.jstor.org/pss/3257397). Girolamo Caracausi's Dizionario Onomastico Della Sicilia (Palermo, Centro di Studi Filologici e Linguistici Siciliani, 1993) p. 998 s.n. Medaglia calls it a "variante ipercorretta" (hypocoristic variant, i.e. pet form?) of Meraglia, and cross-references to Miraglia. Under Meraglia (p. 1008), it says: "corrisponde topograficamente a Miraglia; cfr. Andreas Meralla Citarda 103 (a. 1326)", which is something like "corresponds topographically to Miraglia; compare Andreas Meralla ... dated 1326." The entry under Miraglia (as quoted in a letter from Maridonna; the packet of photocopies doesn't include the relevant page) doesn't give any dates, but derives the name from Sicilian ammaraglio 'admiral of the sea', or possibly miragla 'money, coin'. For what it's worth, Florio's 1611 Italian-English dictionary (http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/florio/) p. 305 has an entry for Medáglia: "any ancient medaile, coine, stampe or image. Also a jewell, an ouch, a brouch, any embossed or grauen worke of metals. Also vsed for a womans quaint." If Medaglia isn't registerable, the submitter will accept Meralla, which is dated to 1326 in Caracausi s.n. Meraglia (see above).


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

23: Malcolm Bowman - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 1998, via the East

(Fieldless) A hedgehog rampant to sinister argent.

This badge is clear of Gwyl ferch Teleri Celli Caregi (08/1987 Atlantia): Vert, a hedgehog rampant to sinister within a bordure argent, with one CD for the field(lessness), and another for removing the bordure.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

24: Marguerite inghean Lachlainn - New Name & New Badge

(Fieldless) A mushroom quarterly vert and azure.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.

Submitted as Marguerite Ingen Lachlainn, the spelling and capitalization of the particle was corrected to temporally match the patronymic.

Marguerite is a feminine name which occurs four times in Aryanhwy merch Catmael: "French Names from Paris, 1421, 1423, & 1438" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/french/paris1423.html). It's also found in Colm Dubh: "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/paris.html).

inghean Lachlainn is based on the masculine name Lochlainn, which is listed as the standard Middle and Early Modern Irish Gaelic spelling (both nominative and genitive) of the name of 11 men, dated between 983 and 1486, in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Lochlainn.shtml). The spelling with 'a' rather than 'o' is found in the raw data under Magnus (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Magnus.shtml): Maghnus mac Diarmada Uí Lachlainn died in 1201 (Annal C, entry M1201.5). Annal C is noted as one of the ones that tends to use later spellings, so Ingen was changed to the later spelling inghean to better match the patronymic.

A combination of French and Gaelic is a step from period practice, but registerable (Maura MacPharlain, Feb. 2000 R-Atlantia).

This badge is clear of Deirdre Marianne Steele of Cowdray (03/1987 West): Argent, a mushroom capped per pale purpure and Or and stemmed per pale Or and purpure, with one CD for fieldlessness, and another for the tincture of the charge.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

25: Muin maqq Mínaín - New Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 1997, via Atlantia

Per saltire Or semy of flames vert, and vert, an annulet counterchanged vert and Or.

Old Item: Vert, on a plate, a flame issuant to chief from a bowl vert and a bordure rayonny Or, to be released.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

26: Owain ap Dafydd o Llyn Cwellyn - New Name & New Device

Or semy of beech leaves bendwise vert, an elephant statant affronty purpure.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Client requests authenticity for 10th-11th c Welsh.
Meaning (son of Dafydd o Llyn Cwellyn) most important.

Submitted as Owyn, the given name was changed in an attempt to meet the request for authenticity.

The submitter includes a letter from his father:

I, [...], known in the SCA as Dafydd o Llyn Cwellyn, do attest that [...], known in the SCA as Owen ap Dafydd o Llyn Cwellyn, is my legal son. I give him permission for my Society name to be used in part of his Society name in order to indicate a relationship. I understand that this letter cannot be withdrawn once [...]'s name is registered.
1-4-2010 [signed]

Owain is a masculine name dated c.1100-1171 on p. 77 of Heini Gruffudd's Welsh Names for Children, which is a source to be used with caution: the dates are presumably accurate, but the spellings may not be. It is, however, the closest we could find to the submitter's desired time period. This spelling is also found as a surname in R&W s.n. Owen, dated to 1242. The originally submitted Owyn is found twice in Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Index of Names in the 1541 Subsidy Roll of London" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/english/enggivlondon1541.html), in the list of given names of English men.

The structure ap [father's name] is based on Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn's "Simple Guide to Constructing 13th Century Welsh Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/welsh13.html); the article says "a common convention is to use ap before consonants and ab before vowels". His father's name, Dafydd o Llyn Cwellyn, was registered in Aug. 1982, via the East, and is grandfathered to the submitter.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

27: Robert the Doubtfull - New Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 1991, via the East

Gules, on a pale engrailed Or between two tankards argent a sickle sable.

Old Item: Gules, on a pale engrailed Or between two tankards argent two arrows in fess vert, to be released.


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

28: Sandrine de Berry - New Name & New Device

Sable semy-de-lys Or, a swan naiant to sinister argent and on a chief Or three fleurs-de-lys sable.

Sandrine is a feminine name found twice in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan: "Names Found in Ambleny Registers 1578-1616" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/Ambleny/FemGivenNames.shtml), dated 1584 and 1615.

de Berry is dated to 1421 in the surnames section of Aryanhwy merch Catmael: "French Names from Paris, 1421, 1423, & 1438" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/french/paris1423.html).


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

29: Sera bat Josce - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (Jewish woman living in Angevin England) most important.

Sera is listed as a variant of the feminine name Sarah in Eleazar ha-Levi: "Jewish Naming Convention in Angevin England" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/jewish.html).

Josce is listed as a variant of the masculine name Joseph in same.

The cited article indicates that fil was used as the patronymic particle for both men and women. The submitter prefers bat but will accept fil (or fille) if necessary. bat is identified as the Sephardic pronunciation of Hebrew 'daughter (of)' in Julie Stampnitzky's "Glossary for Titles and Bynames" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juetta/titles.html).


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

30: Siobhan inghean Chormaic - New Name & New Device

Per chevron argent and azure, a chevron counterchanged between three pheons gules and a triquetra argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language most important.

Submitted as Siobhan inghean Cormaic, the patronymic was changed to show lenition, per the documentation.

Siobhan is based on Siobhán, the standard Early Modern Irish Gaelic spelling of the name of 22 women between 1310 and 1600 in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Siban.shtml).

Chormaic is based on Cormaic, the standard Early Modern Irish Gaelic genitive spelling of the name of 28 men in the Annals, between 762 and 1589 (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Cormacc.shtml).

inghean + father's name in genitive case and lenited is from "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names (3rd Edition)" by Sharon Krossa (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/).


This item was on the 06-2010 LoAR

31: Vienna de la Mer - New Name Change

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in June of 2010, via the East.

Old Item: Viennet de la Mer, to be retained as an alternate name.

Her current name was registered in Jan. 2004, via the East. It is to be retained as an alternate name.

Vienna is a feminine name found as a variant of Viena in Juliana de Luna: "Names from Sixteenth Century Venice" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/16thcvenice.html).

de la Mer is dated to 1423 in the surname section of Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "French Names From Paris, 1421, 1423 & 1438" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/french/paris1423.html). It is also grandfathered to the submitter.

A combination of French and Italian is a step from period practice, but registerable (Marion Leoncina da Susa, 01/2005 Meridies).


Bibliography:

Dauzat, Albert & Charles Rostaing. Dictionnaire Étymologique des Noms de Lieux de la France. Paris, 1963.

Ekwall, Eilert. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names. Fourth edition. Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1991.

Geirr Bassi Haraldsson. The Old Norse Name. Private Press, Maryland, 1977.

Morlet, Marie-Therese. Dictionnaire Étymologique des Noms de Famille. Librairie Académique Perrin, 1997.

Paul Wickenden of Thanet. A Dictionary of Period Russian Names. 3rd edition. SCA, Inc., 2000.

Reaney, P.H. and R. M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. Third edition, Oxford University Press, 1995.

Smith, A.H. English Place-Name Elements (Volumes I & II). Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1956.

Watts, Victor. The Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names. Cambridge University Press, 2004.

Withycombe, E.G. The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names. Third edition. Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1979.


OSCAR counts 15 New Names, 3 New Name Changes, 1 New Alternate Name, 1 New Household Name, 1 New Heraldic Title, 11 New Devices, 3 New Device Changes and 4 New Badges. These 39 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $117 for them. OSCAR counts 2 Resub Devices. These 2 items are not chargeable. There are a total of 41 items submitted on this letter.

[ Site News | LoIs | KLoIs | SENA | Prec | AH | Track | Sub Status ]


Site Copyright © 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2011, Lewis Tanzos