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East LoI dated 2010-01-31

Unto Olwyn Laurel, Istvan Wreath, Aryanhwy Pelican, the SCA College of Arms, and all others who do receive this letter, greetings from Kolosvari Arpadne Julia, Blue Tyger Herald.

It is the intent of Easterners to register the following items. Unless otherwise noted, the submitter has no desire for authenticity, allows any changes, and allows a holding name. I've used the "language" checkbox to correspond with the "language/culture" box on the name submission form, and the "culture" checkbox for "spelling".

I apologize in advance for any errors and omissions: due to illness and the length of the letter, I have not had the time or energy to tweak and proofread as thoroughly as I'd like.

This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

1: Alastar O'Rogan - Resub Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 1997, via the East

Per bend azure and vert, a scorpion tergiant Or and in chief a crescent argent.

The previous badge submission of Azure, a scorpion Or and in chief a crescent argent was returned on the July 2006 LoAR (R-East) for conflict with Timothy der Kenntnisreiche (07/2006 An Tir): Azure, a scorpion Or maintaining in chief an open book argent. This submission changes the field to clear this conflict. It is also clear of Josiah Scorpious (10/1979 Atenveldt): Checky sable and vert, a scorpion displayed queue fourché Or, with one CD for the field and another for adding a secondary charge.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

2: Alexandre Bautista de la Mar - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in September of 2008, via the East

Or, a ship and on a chief purpure two crescents pendant Or.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

3: Aleyn Míntengai - Resub Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.

His original name submission of Allyn Min-Teanga was returned on the 05/1994 LoAR (R-East) for spelling and grammar issues.

Aleyn is found in Black s.n. Alan: Aleyn fitz Maucolum 1296.

Míntengai is a constructed descriptive byname intended to mean 'smooth-tongued', based on Nemtengai 'venomous tongue', which is found as a byname of a human character in The Wooing of Emer (CELT archive Gaelic version http://www.ucc.ie/celt/published/G301021.html p.261, or English translation http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/T301021.html p.306), and on minraitech 'smooth-spoken, courteous' found in The Dictionary of the Irish language (http://www.dil.ie/) s.n. mín. Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/naTengad.shtml) includes na Tengad '[of] the tongue' (referring to a linguist) as the Middle Irish Gaelic genitive spelling of the byname a man who died in 1022. The submitter will allow the addition of na to the byname if needed.

A combination of Scots and Gaelic is a step from period practice, but registerable (Galen MacColmáin, 12/2004 A-Calontir).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

4: Amand le Braceeur - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2010, via the East

Azure, on a maple leaf Or a natural salamander tergiant fesswise contourny gules.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

5: Annora Stratton de Buchanan - New Name & New Device

Argent, a triskelion arrondi azure and on a chief sable three ivy leaves argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Meaning most important.

Annora is a header in Talan Gwynek's "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/reaneyAG.html), dated in this spelling to 1187-1215, 13th c, 1273, 1302, and 1316. It's also found in Withycombe s.n. Honor(i)(a), identified as the most common form of the name in the 12th-14th centuries.

Stratton is a header in R&W, with a John Stratton dated to 1366.

de Buchanan is dated to 1373 in Black s.n. Buchanan; it's a district in Stirlingshire. Black's source for this citation was Cartularium comitatus de Levenax ab initio seculi decem tertii usque de annum 1398, published in Ediburgh in 1833, which is available on Google Books (http://books.google.com/books?id=4bhYAAAAMAAJ). The spellings found in it are Mauritio de Buchquhanane (not specifically dated); Waltero de Buchanan and Waltero domino de Buchanan 1373; and Waltero de Buchanane 1394. In addition, Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Index of Scots names found in Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/scots/dost/buchanan.html) lists two instances of of Buchanane, dated 1473-4 and 1474.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

6: Bran mac Brádaigh - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister wavy sable and argent, a raven displayed and a sun counterchanged.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (Irish Gaelic) most important.
Culture (spelling) most important.

Bran is found as the standard Old, Middle, and Early Modern Irish Gaelic nominative spelling of the name of 42 men, dated between 596 and 1435, in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Bran.shtml). It's also found in Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn's "100 Most Popular Men's Names in Early Medieval Ireland" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/irish100.html), with a frequency of 44.

mac Brádaigh is a header in Woulfe (p. 322), with 4 different late period Anglicized forms listed. The patronymic is also mentioned in Academy of St. Gabriel report 2658 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/2658) as part of a feminine clan affiliation byname (Raghnailt inghe_n Mhecc Bradaigh), citing an Annals of the Four Masters entry for the year 1381.

This device is clear of Kathryn of Oldenburg (02/2008 East): Per fess gules and Or, a sun Or and a falcon displayed sable, with one CD for the field and another for the tinctures of the charges.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

7: Bronwen Carus - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 1998, via the East

(Fieldless) Four boar spears, butts conjoined, in saltire argent


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

8: Bruno Caravello - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Venetian) most important.

Bruno is a masculine given name found in Ferrante LaVolpe's "Italian Names from Florance[sic], 1427" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ferrante/catasto/), with a frequency of 9.

Caravello is a surname found in Arval Benicoeur and Talan Gwynek: "Fourteenth Century Venetian Personal Names" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/venice14/). The notes column says about this name: "descriptive, from a word meaning 'brain'. Often used for a foolish or thoughtless person, according to Fucilla, p.179. Apparently a common Venetian surname, judging from McKee."


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

9: Caer Adamant, Shire of - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 1991, via the East

Azure, a pale vert fimbriated Or.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

10: Catherine of Carillion - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2009, via the East

Azure, on a bend between two mullets of seven points argent a decrescent palewise sable.

This badge is clear of Ana Beig de Rosslyn (07/2006 Atlantia): Azure, on a bend between two crosses crosslet argent, three crescents sable, with one CD for the change in type of secondary charges, and another for the type and number of tertiary charges.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

11: Claudio Gonzaga - New Name & New Device

Quarterly Or and vert, an owl counterchanged.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (16th c. Italian) most important.

Claudio is a masculine name found in Juliana de Luna's "Names from Sixteenth Century Venice" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/16thcvenice.html), dated before 1600.

Gonzaga is a village between Mantua and Reggio, according to Arval Benicoeur and Talan Gwynek: "Fourteenth Century Venetian Personal Names" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/venice14/) s.n. Gonzago. It was most famously used as an unmarked locative surname by the ruling dynasty of Mantua (Encyclopedia Britannica under "Gonzaga Dynasty"). The family is mentioned many times in the 16th century book Il Cortegiano (The Book of the Courtier) by Baldassare Castiglione. In the 1606 edition on Google Books (http://books.google.com/books?id=gM8DAAAAcAAJ), the surname is found in the names Giouanni Gonzaga, Leonora Gonzaga, Antonio Gonzaga, Lodouico Gonzaga, and Federico Gonzaga. (The digitizing process apparently failed to number the pages, so a search for 'Gonzaga' is the best way to find these.) As far as kingdom can tell, nobody in the dynasty was called Claudio, so there should be no question of presumption.

This device is clear of Pietari Pentinpoika Uv (06/1991 East): Per bend vert and argent, an eagle owl counterchanged, and of Adelicia Tagliaferro (09/1994 Ansteorra): (Fieldless) An owl Or. In each case, there's one CD for the field, and another for the tincture of half the owl.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

12: Connor McPhaddin - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in September of 1997, via the East

Per chevron argent and azure, two Thor's hammers azure and two spears in saltire Or surmounted by a wolf's head couped argent.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

13: Corcrán mac Diarmata - New Name & New Device

Barry wavy argent and gules, a roundel checky Or and sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (11th-12th c. Irish) most important.

Corcrán is a header in OC&M (p. 60), which lists Corcrán Clérech, who died in 1040.

Diarmata is the Middle Irish Gaelic genitive form of Diarmait/Diarmaid, found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan: "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Diarmait.shtml). It was the name of 30 men in the Annals, dated between 615 and 1585. Diarmait is also found in Mari's "Dated Names found in Ó Corráin and Maguire's Irish Names" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/ocm/), with the dates 565 and 665.

The name pattern [given name] + mac + [father's name in genitive case] is found in Sharon L. Krossa, "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names" (3rd edn.; http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

14: Dalla Óláfs kona - New Name & New Device

Per fess wavy azure and sable, a demi-sun issuant from the line of division Or, in base an open book argent, a bordure Or.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language most important.
Meaning (wife of Olaf) most important.

Originally submitted as Dalla Oláfskona, kingdom added a space in the byname to better match the documentation. The submitter allows the grammar of the name to be corrected if needed.

Dalla is a feminine name found in Geirr Bassi, p. 9. It occurs three times in Landnámabók.

Óláfs kona is a constructed byname intended to mean 'wife of Óláfr'. Óláfr is a masculine name found on p. 13 of Geirr Bassi; it occurs 20 times in Landnámabók. kona 'wife' is from Academy of Saint Gabriel report 2512 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/2512), which cites Ragnillde þoralfs kono 1289, Gudrune Eilifs kono 1282, and Bergliot Vþyrms kona ca.1300, from Bjerke, Robert: A Contrastive Study of Old German and Old Norwegian Kinship Terms (Indiana University Publications in Anthropology and Linguistics, Memoir 22 of the International Journal of American Linguistics. Baltimore: Waverly Press, Inc., 1969), pp. 160ff. The genitive of Óláfr was constructed according to the instructions on p. 17 of Geirr Bassi.

This device is clear of Justina Elizabeth Vigilant (6/2004 East): Per fess embattled sable and vert, a demi-sun issuant from the line of division Or and an open book argent, with one CD for changing the field and another for adding the bordure.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

15: Dughdhova yi Shirazi - Resub Name & Resub Device

Purpure, a fish naiant and in chief three hemlock flowers affronty, a bordure argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Meaning (given name starting with D + 'yi Shirazi') most important.

The submitter has had multiple returned names, including two by Laurel: Kaga Ruri (03/2006 Outlands) and Delara-yi Shirâzî (05/2007 Outlands).

Dughdhova is found as dughdhô-vâ in "Zoroastrian names" (http://www.avesta.org/znames.htm), described as an Avestan feminine given name used by the wife of Pourushaspa and mother of Zarathushtra, citing C. Bartholomae: Altiranisches Wörterbuch pg. 1983-88. It apparently means 'milkmaid' or 'one who milks cows'.

yi Shirâzî is found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael and Ursula Georges: "Persian Feminine Names from the Safavid Period" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ursula/persian.html), in which Nihânî-yi Shirâzî is listed as the name of a poetess from the end of the 15th and early 16th centuries.

The submitter is aware that there is a temporal difference of ~2000 years in the name elements, and is willing to accept a more modern Persian version of the given name or another name starting with 'D'. The submitted name omits the hyphen and accents; given that it needs (likely drastic) changes to be registerable, kingdom has made no interim tweaks. We beg the College's assistance in finding a suitable given name.

Laurel returned her previous submission of Argent, in bend sinister, a fan charged with a plate and a wave reversed sable on the 03/2006 LoAR (Kaga Ruri, R-Outlands) because the Japanese "great wave" cannot be adequately described in European heraldic terms. This is a complete redesign.

The submitter included documentation for the depiction of the hemlock flowers from Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conium).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

16: Ealawynn verch Cynddelw - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound (Ealawynn) most important.

Ealawynn is an Old English feminine name dated c. 831 in Searle (p. 195).

Cynddelw is listed as the standard form of a masculine name in Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn's "A Simple Guide to Constructing 13th Century Welsh Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/welsh13.html). The article also gives verch as the Welsh for 'daughter', used in documents of the period to form women's patronymics. Cynddelw is also a header in Morgan & Morgan; the entry apparently gives Chynddwelw Brydydd Mawr as the name of someone who flourished c. 1155-1200, but the summary on the submission form is partially illegible, and kingdom commenters did not have access to the book to help decipher it.

A combination of Old English and Welsh is a step from period practice, but registerable (Aluara verch Morgan ap Rhys, 09/04 A-Caid).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

17: Fiona Siobhan of Kincora - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 1989, via the East

Azure, three owls displayed argent, each charged with a pearled coronet azure.

The submitter became a court baroness on Sep. 1, 2001.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

18: Fortune Sancte Keyne - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (Welsh) most important.

Fortune is a feminine name found in Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn, "A Simple Guide to Constructing 16th Century Welsh Names (in English Contexts)" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/welsh16.html).

Sancte Keyne is a place name dated 1291 in Ekwall, s.n. St Keyne. Unmarked locatives are discussed in the introduction of R&W, but the submitter will allow the addition of a preposition if needed.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

19: Gaius Aeneas Maso - New Name & New Device

Sable, an anchor and on a chief Or a double-headed eagle displayed sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (Early Roman) most important.

Gaius is from the praenomen section and Maso from the cognomen section of "Roman Names" (http://www.novaroma.org/via_romana/names2.html).

Aeneas is a masculine name from Bardas Xiphias, "Common Names of the Aristocracy in the Roman Empire During the 6th and 7th Centuries" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/byzantine/early_byz_names.html), with two occurrences. If Aeneas is not an acceptable nomen, the submitter is willing to use Annaeus, as in Lucius Annaeus Seneca (Seneca the Younger).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

20: Grainne Fhial inghean ui Chearmada - New Name & New Device

Argent semy of quavers vert, a foi throughout azure.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.

Grainne is based on Gráinne, which is the standard Early Modern Irish Gaelic spelling of the name of 22 women, dated between 1317 and 1582, in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Grainne.shtml).

Fhial is the lenited spelling of the descriptive byname Fíal (Middle Irish Gaelic nominative form), 'generous/hospitable'. It was the name of two men in the Annals, dated 970 and 1013 (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Fial.shtml).

Chearmada is the lenited, genitive form of the masculine name Cearmada found in Woulfe s.n. Ó Cearmada (p. 459). The entry gives O Carmody and O Kermody as late-period Anglicized forms of the surname.

The name pattern [given name] + [descriptive byname (usually lenited)] + inghean Ui + [eponymous clan ancestor's name (usually lenited and always in genitive case)] is based on Sharon L. Krossa, "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names" (3rd edn., http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/).

There is a 304 year gap between the earliest date for the given name and the latest date for the descriptive byname; this means there's a step from period practice for the temporal disparity. Kingdom begs the College's assistance in getting rid of those pesky four years, because there's another step from period practice for combining Middle and Early Modern orthography (Ciarán mac Gaoithín, 01/2005 Æthelmearc).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

21: Gunnvaldr hamarskáld - New Name & New Device

Argent, a boot bendwise sinister sable distilling three gouttes de sang, one and two, on a chief sable two axes in saltire surmounted by a sword inverted argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No changes.

Gunnvaldr is a masculine name found on p. 10 of Geirr Bassi. It occurs once in Landnámabók.

hamarskáld is a nickname glossed as 'hammer-skald' on p. 22 of same.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

22: Helga stjarna - New Name & New Device

Azure, in bend three mullets of six points, on a chief Or a rat passant azure.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (Norse) most important.

Originally submitted as Helga Stjarna, the capitalization of the byname was corrected in kingdom, per precedent (Ragnhildr in Sieðkona, 01/2005 R-An Tir).

Helga is a feminine name found on p. 11 of Geirr Bassi. It occurs 36 times in Landnámabók.

stjarna is a byname meaning 'star' found on p. 28 of Geirr Bassi. It occurs once in Landnámabók.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

23: Isylte Aron - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.

Isylte is a feminine name dated to 1612 in Withycombe s.n. Isolda.

Aron is a header in Bardsley; the entry includes Adam Aron 1420.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

24: John Averey - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound (John + Avery) most important.

John is a masculine name found 494 times in Julian Goodwyn's "English Names Found in Brass Enscriptions" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/brasses/). It's also dated to 1279 in R&W s.n. Aylett.

Averey is a surname dated to 1279 in R&W s.n. Averay.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

25: Joscelin le esqurel - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister purpure and sable, a squirrel within an orle of acorns Or.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Meaning (the squirrel) most important.

Submitted as Joscelin l'Esqurel, the spelling of the byname was changed to expand the scribal abbreviation and to match the documentation.

Joscelin is a masculine name found in R&W s.n. Jocelyn, which lists Joscelinus de Stalham 1149-66, Willelmus filius Jocealini, Jocelini 1208-1212, and Ralph Joscelin 1208. It's also found in Withycombe s.n. Jocelyn, dated to 1199 as a given name.

le esqurel is a byname dated to 1274 in R&W s.n. Squirrel. The originally submitted l'Esqurel was from Morlet Dictionnaire s.n. Esquirol, -irou (p. 386), which states that it is used to describe someone who is fast. It can also refer to the place names Esquirol and Esquirols.

This device is in conflict with Kallista Morgunova's in-progress device submission on Æthelmearc's Nov. 2009 LoI: Purpure, a squirrel maintaining an acorn within an orle of nine acorns Or, with just one CD for the field. The conflicting device is not yet registered, however, so kingdom is forwarding this submission for consideration.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

26: Joscelin le esqurel - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2010, via the East

(Fieldless) On an acorn sable a squirrel Or.

His name and device are submitted above.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

27: Katarzyna Gwozdz - New Name & New Device

Gules, on a bend sinister between two crosses fourchy, between the tines of each fork a roundel, argent three glazier's nails palewise sable.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Meaning (Katarina) most important.

The submitter will accept changes to the given name only.

Katarzyna is found in Walraven von Nijmegan and Arval Benicoeur, "Polish Given Names in Nazwiska Polaków" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/walraven/polish/). This name is found under the Roman or Greek feminine names.

Gwozdz is a family name meaning 'forest/woods' or 'nail', according to an article by Peter Gwozdz (http://www.gwozdz.org/name.html); this article is an overview of the family name that includes detailed citations from Kazimierz Rymut, Nazwiska Polaków and Witold Taszycki, Słownik Staropolskich Nazw Osobowych (SSNO; 'Dictionary of Old Polish Names'), in which it appears on p. 129 (s.n. Gwozd) and p. 188 of vol. II (s.n. Goźdź), respectively. The name appears in various spellings, for example, Contra Gozdzonem Andree 1386, Pro Andrea dicto Gwoscz 1390, Andreas dictus Gosdz de Odolino 1393, Andreas Goszdz de Oczicze 1400, Stanislaum Gvoszcz 1437, Stanislaus Goszdz 1440, Iohanne Gwoszdz de Lappczicza...Johannes Goszdz 1451, and Nobilis Petrus alias Gwoszdz de Lapczicza 1460. Vol. VII (Supplement) of SSNO , s.n. Gozd, (p. 74) has an entry reading Pro parte...Hinek generi Gwozdonis de Chronow...advocat(i) de Woynicz 1569 (1349). Aleksandra Cieślikowa, Staropolskie Odapelatywne Nazwy Osobowe: Proces Onimozacji (Warsaw: Polska Akademia Nauk - Instytut Języka Polskiego, 1990, p. 43), s.nn. Gozd and Goźdź, has Gozd 1397, Gwozd 1275, gozd 1412, Goźdź 1386, Gwoźdź 1390, and Goźdź 1451. Nobody in kingdom had access to vol. II of SSNO in order to verify the information in Peter Gwozdz's article, but commenters felt the citations are sufficiently detailed to give this source the benefit of the doubt. Also, Herby Rodów Polskich (Paszkiewicz et al., Orbis Books, London, 1990) p. 72 has "Gozdzki, Gocki, Goscki, Gojscki, Godzki i Goyski województwo sandomierskie 1550 i 1778 r." (Nobody in kingdom can read Polish, so translations could not be provided.) Gwozdz is also the submitter's legal surname, as verified on her driver's license by Eastern Crown; however, considering the variation in the period spellings, the submitted spelling appears to plausible for the 13th to 15th centuries without falling back on the legal name allowance.

The crosses in the device were originally blazoned as crosses Osmorog. According to the 09/2009 LoAR (Micolay Haiduk, A-Ansteorra), this is not an actual type of cross; rather, Osmorog was the name of the family that purportedly bore it. The device has been reblazoned to match the blazon from Micolay's acceptance. The device is clear of Connor Cruimseach MacIlvey (04/1992, Caid), Gules, two scarpes between two Celtic crosses argent, with one CD for the addition of tertiary charges and another for the change in number of primary charges.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

28: Kendrich Kennethson - New Name & New Device

Per pale Or and gules, three roundels in pale between two flaunches, all counterchanged.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Meaning (Kendrich, son of Kenneth) most important.

Kendrich is a masculine name found in Withycombe s.n. Kenrick (p. 188), which states that the name is based on the Old English Cynric, and was "fairly common in the Middle Ages", including as a surname, and lists the spelling Ken(d)rick 1602. Withycombe also notes that the given name survived into the 17th century. The submitted spelling is based on R&W, s.n. Kerrick (p. 263), which includes a John Kendrich 1279.

Kennethson is a surname meaning 'son of Kenneth'. The use of -son in patronymics is discussed in R&W, pp. xix-xxi, e.g., Thomas Prestson 1332. Black, s.n. Kennethson (p. 393), includes Alexander Kennethson 1430.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

29: Kilian MacAd - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister argent and sable, a bend sinister bevilled gules between a mask of comedy and a mask of tragedy counterchanged.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound (Killian, like Lillian Mach Aid) most important.

Submitted as Kilian MacAdhe, the spelling of the surname was changed to match the available documentation.

Kilian is found in Talan Gwynek: "Late Period German Masculine Names" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/talan/germmasc/), in the list of names from 16th C Plauen. It's also found in OCM s.n. Cilléne as the Anglicized form of the Gaelic saint's name, but this has been ruled unregisterable lacking evidence of period use (Kilian the Black, 09/2006, A-Meridies).

MacAd is a surname dated to 1596 in Black s.n. Macad. (This was the only support provided for the originally submitted spelling.) The submitter prefers the MacAdhe spelling, but will accept MacAd if necessary.

The combination of German and Scots is a step from period practice, but registerable (Siegfried McClure, 04/02).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

30: Leopold Draco - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2009, via the East

Azure, two tridents in saltire, overall a fleur-de-lys, a bordure Or.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

31: Lucy of Brakendelve - New Name & New Device

Gules, on a dragonfly Or a mullet voided and interlaced within and conjoined to an annulet sable.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Meaning (Lucy from the Canton of Brakendelve) most important.

Lucy is a feminine given name found in Withycombe s.n. Lucia, which lists a Lucy Godstow 1450. The name also appears under Lucia in Talan Gwynek: "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/reaneyHZ.html), with this spelling dated to 1277 and 1450.

of Brakendelve is a locative byname based on the branch name Brakendelve, Canton of, registered 11/1996 via the Middle.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

32: Lysken die Waeyer - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.

Lysken is a feminine given name dated to 1518 in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "15th Century Dutch Names" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/dutch/dutch15.html).

die Waeyer (ibid.) is a descriptive byname meaning 'the one who is lively or unpredictable', dated 1432-3.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

33: Madelaine de Mortaigne - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.

Madelaine is found in a Middle French book published in 1581, in a reference to the feast day of Mary Magdalen on p. 285: "le jour de la Madelaine" (Henri Lancelot-Voisin de La Popelinière, Jean Le Frère, and Paul-Émile Piguerre [presumed authors]: L'histoire de France, enrichie des plus notables occurrances survenues ez provinces de l'Europe et pays voisins, soit en paix, soit en guerre, tant pour le fait séculier qu'eclésiastic, depuis l'an 1550 jusques à ces temps, published by H. d'Abraham, La Rochelle, 1581; http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k1159043). In addition, Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Names Found in Ambleny Registers 1578-1616" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/Ambleny/FemGivenNames.shtml) lists eight instances of the feminine name Madeleine, and Cateline de la Mor's "Sixteenth Century Norman Names" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/cateline/norman16.html) lists Madallaine and Madeleine.

de Mortaigne is found in a book published in 1609 by Sébastian Roulliard, in a list of besieged cities on p. 280: "Les sièges de Mortaigne, de Belesine, & la Tour grise..." (Parthénie, ou Histoire de la très-auguste... église de Chartres, dédiée par les vieux druides en l'honneur de la Vierge qui enfanteroit, avec ce qui s'est passé de plus mémorable au faict de la seigneurie... de la dicte église, ville et païs chartrain, par Me Sébastian Roulliard, published by Robin Thierry and Pierre Chevalier, Paris, 1609; http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k5674684c). It's also found in Morlet Dictionnaire s.n. Mortagne; the entry says the place was named for the Mauritani people of Gaul, and gives early dated forms Moretoin c. 1025 and Mauritonio c. 1055. Also, R&W s.n. Morten lists Gilbert de Moretaign' dated 1187.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

34: Magdalena Lantfarerin - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Meaning (surname roughly 'migrant') most important.

Submitted as Magdalena die Lantfarerinn, the article and the extra 'n' at the end of the surname were dropped to match the documentation.

Magdalena is a feminine name which occurs eight times in Aryanhwy merch Catmael: "German Names from 1495" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/german1495.html).

Lantfarerin is based on Landfahrer 'pilgrim, vagrant', dated in the spelling Lantfarer to 1397 in Bahlow/Gentry s.n. Land. The feminized form is based on Aryanhwy's "German Names from Nürnberg, 1497" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/surnamesnurndesc.html), which includes examples of descriptive bynames feminized with -in, such as Bischoff/Bischoffin 'bishop' and Bayer/Bayerin 'Bavarian'. This article also says that surnames at this time were largely inherited, and the only descriptives found with der are 'the younger' and 'the elder', so commenters did not feel that die was appropriate.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

35: Magnus Morte - New Name

No major changes.
Sound (byname that sounds like 'Morte') most important.

Magnus is a header in R&W, with Magnus de Weitecroft found temp. Henry II [reigned 1154-89].

Morte is found in R&W s.n. Mort, with John Morte dated to 1322.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

36: Magnus Morte - New Household Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2010, via the East

Knot and Snake House

Per pale azure and argent, a snake in a cavendish knot erect argent.

No major changes.

Knot is dated c. 1449 in the OED, and knots were used in period badges. Snake is dated to 1412-20 (ibid.) Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "English Sign Names" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/inn/) includes examples of the pattern X House or X Tavern. The submitter would prefer Knotty or Knotted Snake, but will settle for Knot and Snake, which is what was documented.(Knotty is dated to 1602 in the OED.) According to Mari's article, the form "A + B House" is rare, but does occur, with one example noted: Bear and Harrow (possibly standardized spelling, temp. James I).

As the uncharged part of the field is a plain tincture, this is not considered to be marshalled arms (Murdoch Bayne, 08/2002 Æthelmearc). The submitter is aware that this may conflict with Frewin Finnbegason (12/1984 Caid): Per saltire gules and sable, a Norse serpent nowed argent, with one CD for the field, and any second CD having to come from the shape of the snake, as there's no difference for the forced move. Commenters thought that the badge is clear of Dustin the Harmless (08/1995 Caid): Per pale azure and argent, a snake erect counterchanged, with one CD for changing the tincture of half of the snake and another for the difference between a snake erect and one nowed.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

37: Magnús œðíkollr - New Name & New Device

Gules, an open book Or bound sable en soleil Or, on a chief argent a bear passant sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Norse) most important.
Meaning (Byname meaning 'the mad' (as a divine gift)) most important.

Submitted as Magnús Œðíkollr, the capitalization of the descriptive byname was corrected per precedent (Ragnhildr in Sieðkona, 01/2005 An Tir).

Magnús is a masculine name found on p. 13 of Geirr Bassi.

œðíkollr is a nickname glossed as 'mad-head, wild man' on p. 30 of same. It occurs once in Landnámabók. According to the worksheet, the submitter wants the byname to mean something similar to 'divine madness'.

Correction (2010-Feb-21 10:02:18): Oops, we forgot a checkbox: the submitter will not accept major changes.

Correction (2010-Feb-21 11:02:16): Oops, we forgot a checkbox: the submitter will not accept major changes.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

38: Magnus of the East - New Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 2004, via the East

Gules, a chevron argent between two bees Or and a drinking horn argent.

Old Item: Gules, on a chevron argent two axes in chevron heads to center sable and in base a tankard Or, to be released.

This device should be clear of Alleyn of Kent (04/1996, West), Gules, a chevron argent between two reremice and a mallet Or, with a CD for changing the type of the secondary charges and another for changing the tincture of "half" the secondary charges since they are arranged two and one. It is also clear of Cuhelyn Cam vap Morcant (07/1999, Meridies), Gules, a chevron between three crosses crosslet argent, by the same count.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

39: Martoni Szarvas Kato - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Martoni is based on Kázmér Miklós, Régi magyar családnevek szótára (Magyar Nyelvtudományi Társaság, Budapest, 1993), s.n. Mártoni, which lists Marthoni (1559) and Martony (1568).

Szarvas is a header form (ibid.), with period spellings Sarvas (1554) and Szarwas (1574 and 1581, etc.). Period Hungarian spelling alternated more-or-less freely between /t/ and /th/, between /i/, /j/, and /y/, and between /u/, /v/, and /w/. In late period, spelling also alternated between /sz/, /s/, and /z/. Thus, Martoni and Szarvas are plausible late-period spellings of these bynames.

The diminutive Kato (for Katalin) is found in several places in Kázmér (s.nn. András, Fejérdi, Nagypál, and Kató): andras kato (1583), feyerdi Kato (1568), Nagÿ Pal Kato (1658), and Kato (matronymic; 1574, 1580, and 1589).

While most names in period Hungary were recorded with only one byname, examples of two bynames can be found from the 15th century on. Usually, one of these bynames is a locative. Szabó T. Attila, Erdélyi Magyar Szótörténeti Tár, vol. VIII: M-Meg (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1996) has several examples under malomfalvi ('from Malomfalva'): Malamffaly Soffalj Janos (1590), Malomfalui Galfi Mihalnak (1593), Malomfalui Olah Gyeörgyne (1600). Soffalj means 'from Sófalva', Galfi is 'son of Gál', and Olah is 'Rumanian'. From the same volume (s.nn. magyar 'Hungarian', madár 'bird'): Ethedy magiar Janos (1592) and the Latinized Thomas Madar de Szent Simon (1622). The Latinized name pattern also occurs in earlier documents. Kredics László - Solymosi László, A veszprémi püspökség 1524. évi urbáriuma (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1993), a census-like document from 1524, has Barnabas Molnar de Chopak (p. 28). Molnar is 'miller'. Engal Pál, Kamarahaszna-összeírások 1427-böl (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1989), a tax roll from 1427, has half a dozen examples, including Petri filii Sebastiani de Belse (p. 25), and Petri Baglas de Hegalya (p. 36). Baglas is literally 'with owl', a metaphorical epithet.

Szarvas is another metaphorical epithet (meaning 'stag, hind'). Martoni is in form a possible locative, but is glossed by Kázmér as a marked patronymic, as there is no place called Márton or Mártoni in Hungary. However, examples of placenames formed from given names abound: Alberti (Pest, Somogy counties), Barabás (Bereg, Zala counties), Bereck (Háromszék) and Berecki (Zemplén c.), Dömötöri (Vas c.), Elek (Arad c.), Györgyi (Abaúj c.), Ivány (Heves, Sopron counties), and Iványi (Baranya, Bereg, Gömör counties), etc. (Kázmér, s.nn. Alberti, Barabási, Berecki, Dömötöri, Eleki, Györgyi, Iványi). Thus, since either Márton or Mártoni is a plausible (if fictional) Hungarian placename, the submitted name follows the form of the multi-byname examples above.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

40: Matthew Cameron de Buchanan - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister sable and azure, two scarpes between a wolf's head erased contourny and a thistle argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Meaning most important.

Matthew is a masculine name found in Julian Goodwyn's "English Names Found in Brass Inscriptions" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/brasses/), with six occurrences pre-1600, the earliest from 1400.

Cameron is a header form in Black, which lists a John Cameron 1434.

de Buchanan is dated to 1373 in Black s.n. Buchanan; it's a district in Stirlingshire. Black's source for this citation was Cartularium comitatus de Levenax ab initio seculi decem tertii usque de annum 1398, published in Ediburgh in 1833, which is available on Google Books (http://books.google.com/books?id=4bhYAAAAMAAJ). The spellings found in it are Mauritio de Buchquhanane (not specifically dated); Waltero de Buchanan and Waltero domino de Buchanan 1373; and Waltero de Buchanane 1394. In addition, Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Index of Scots names found in Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/scots/dost/buchanan.html) lists two instances of of Buchanane, dated 1473-4 and 1474.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

41: Matthias Grünewald - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister sable and purpure, a comet bendwise sinister and a unicorn statant contourny argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Austrian Landsknecht region) most important.

Both Matthias and Grünewald are found in Bahlow's Unsere Vornamen im Wandel der Jahrhunderte s.n. Matthias (p. 73), which lists a M. Grünewald, Meister des Isenheimer Altars 1515. In addition, Aryanhwy merch Catmael: "German Names from 1495" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/german1495.html) lists the spellings Mathis, Mathias and Matthis for the given name.

Green Anchor made the case that the painter Matthias Grünewald (c. 1480-1528) is important enough to protect, as he has his own entry in the Encyclopedia Britannica (s.n. Mathias Grunewald), and because Paul Hindemith wrote an opera and a symphony about him, both titled Mathias der Maler ('Mathias the Painter'). Whether he is prominent enough to be protected is up to Pelican to decide.

Correction (2010-Feb-22 09:02:47): On closer scrutiny, I think the "I care most about" text reads "Austrian Landsknecht Period" (not "region").


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

42: Meadhbh bean mhic Brádaigh - New Name & New Device

Argent, a sun and on a chief wavy sable two triquetrae argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (Irish Gaelic) most important.

Meadhbh is the standard Early Modern Irish Gaelic spelling of the name of six women, dated between 1444 and 1582, in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Meadhbh.shtml). It's also found in OCM s.n. Medb, identified as "one of the twenty most popular names in later medieval Ireland".

mhic Brádaigh is the genitive, lenited form of Mac Brádaigh, a header on p. 322 of Woulfe. The entry lists four different late-period Anglicized forms of the surname. The submitted spelling is mentioned in Academy of St. Gabriel report 2658 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/2658) as "a form of an Irish clan affiliation"; the report gives the example Raghnailt inghe_n Mhecc Bradaigh, citing an Annals of the Four Masters entry for the year 1381.

The construction bean 'wife' + the husband's byname is documented from various Annals entries on the January 2009 LoAR (Malie bean mhic Aoidh, A-Middle). The spelling bean mhic is implied to be the standard Early Modern form in the registration of Afraig bean mhic Fhearghuis (01/2003 East).

The device is clear of Ruslan Novgorodcev (01/1992, East), Argent, a sun in his splendor and on a chief sable three mullets argent. There is one CD for the difference in the line of the chief, and another for the difference in type and number of the tertiary charges.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

43: Meadhbh bean mhic Brádaigh and Bran mac Brádaigh - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name (Meadhbh bean mhic Brádaigh) on the East LoI of January 31, 2010 as submitted.
OSCAR finds the name (Bran mac Brádaigh) registered exactly as it appears in April of 2010, via the East

Argent, a sun between two scarpes gemel sable.

This badge is clear of Sol Tizona (07/2004, Northshield), Argent, a sun between a chief enarched and a base sable. There are two CDs for changing the type and number of secondary charges. It is clear of Alison MacLeod, registered for Muiriath Úathach (12/2000, Atlantia), Argent, a sun in his splendor within an orle of mullets sable, with CDs for changing the type and number of secondary charges (Muiriath's orle was made up of eight mullets). There is no CD between a sun and a sun in splendor.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

44: Mechthild Welandsdochter - New Name & New Device

Argent, two maces in saltire and on a chief gules three snails argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Meaning (Old English - 'Battle-might/strength' & 'smith's daughter') most important.

Mechthild is a feminine name dated to 1330 and 1361 in Talan Gwynek:, "Medieval German Given Names from Silesia" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/bahlow_v.htm). It's also found under Ma[e]chthilt in Aryanhwy merch Catmael: "German Names from Rottweil, Baden-Württemberg, 1441" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/rottweil1441.html), and in Bahlow/Gentry s.n. Mechtold, which says it's a saint's name, mentioning the mystic Mechthild of Magdeburg, c. 1230.

Welandsdochter is based on Bahlow/Gentry s.n. Wieland, which dates the spelling Weland as a surname to 1374, along with a Master Wiland 1333; and on Talan's Silesia article (op. cit.), which dates the masculine name Wiland to 1333 and 1341, and the variant spelling Wyland to c. 1320. The suffix -dochtor 'daughter' is found once in Hamburg in Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Women's Surnames in 15th- and 16th-Century Germany" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/womenssurnames.html).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

45: Moire MacGraha - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound (Maura + Mac-Graha) most important.

Moire is found in entry 6541 (p. 252) of "The Seventeenth Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records in Ireland: Appendix III: Fiants of the Reign of Queen Elizabeth" (Dublin: Alex. Thom. & Co., 1885; http://books.google.com/books?id=NSwNAAAAYAAJ). This entry includes Moire nyn Dermott in a list of people pardoned on 30 May 1601.

MacGraha is based on Woulfe, s.n. Mag Ratha, p. 425, which lists M'Graha as a temp. Eliz. I - James I Anglicized spelling.

Kingdom feels this name does not (quite) conflict with the names Moire nic Greagair (08/1999 East), Moira MacGregor (10/1999 Outlands), and Maura McCrery (11/1995 Atlantia).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

46: Mor ingen Conchobair - New Name & New Device

Per chevron sable and azure, a chevron argent ermined azure between two pawprints and a wolf statant argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (10th century Irish) most important.

Mór is given as the standard Middle and Early Modern Irish Gaelic spelling of the name of 41 women, dated between 916 and 1599, in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Mor.shtml). The submission omits the accent, which is allowed for Gaelic names as long as it's done consistently.

Conchobair is the standard Old and Middle Irish Gaelic genitive spelling of the name of 40 men in the Annals, dated between 706 and 1603 (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Conchobar.shtml).

The pattern [given name] ingen [father's name in genitive case] is based on Sharon Krossa, "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/), substituting the pre-1200 spelling ingen for the later-period inghean. [Blue Tyger believes the father's name should be lenited to Chonchobair, but feels constrained to stick with the spelling on the Letter of Decisions.]

There is one step from period practice for the use of pawprints. The complexity count for the device is seven, under the rule-of-thumb limit of eight.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

47: Muirenn ingen Bróen meic Ríáin - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for 5th to 10th century Irish.
Language (Irish) most important.

Muirenn is listed as the standard Old and Middle Irish Gaelic spelling of the name of six women, dated between 643 and 979, in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan: "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Muirenn.shtml).

Bróen is found as the name of one man in the Annals, dated 850 (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Broen.shtml). The name should be in the genitive case, but the article does not provide that information. Any assistance correcting the form of the name is appreciated.

Ríáin is the standard Middle Irish Gaelic genitive form of the name of three men in the Annals, dated between 895 and 1016 (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Rian.shtml).

The two-generational patronymic name pattern of [given name] + ingen 'daughter' + [father's name in genitive case and lenited] + meic '(of) son' + [grandfather's name in genitive case and lenited] is based on Sharon Krossa: "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/). The spellings of ingen and meic are appropriate prior to 1200. According to "The Spelling of Lenited Consonants in Gaelic" by Sharon L. Krossa (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotlang/lenition.shtml), names and words beginning with "B", "m", and "R" did not change in spelling when lenited before c. 1200.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

48: Nergis bint Mustafa - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for late 16th century Ottoman Turkish.
Sound (ner-geese) most important.

All documentation is from Ursula Georges: "Sixteenth Century Turkish Names" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ursula/ottoman/).

Nergis is listed as a feminine Muslim name; the list of complete names includes Nergis bint Abdullah.

Mustafa is listed as a masculine Muslim name, and the list of complete names includes Fatima bint Mustafa.

Kingdom believes the submitted name looks authentic for 1520s Istambul court records (modulo whatever normalization the source may have introduced in its transcriptions).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

49: Nkante n gheren - New Name & New Device

Argent, in annulo eight gouttes bases to center between in chief a pair of bull's horns sable, a base barry of eight sable and argent.

Sound (nkanta or nkant-ay) most important.

Submitted as Nkante of the Hidden River, the byname was changed (with the submitter's input) based on available documentation.

Nkante appears as a name in the oral epic Sunjata (Bambo Suso et al., Penguin Classics, 1999, http://books.google.com/books?id=c0JD0sfi7fsC, lines 1940-3, p. 91), which is based on early 13th century events in the life of Sunjata (or Sundiata) Keita, the founder of the West African Mali empire:

It was that day that Sunjata told Bala Fasigi Kyuate,
'Every smith in Manding
Will bear the name Nkante.
I want you to sing the praises of the smiths so that I can hear.'
Multiple written versions of the Sunjata epic now exist in various African languages; however, since the tale is based on an oral tradition, there's no way to know if this is how the name was found in period.

n gheren (intended as 'of rivers') is based on gher n gheren 'river of rivers', a name given to the Niger river by the Tuareg Berbers around Timbuktu, according to Marq De Villiers and Sheila Hirtle, Timbuktu: The Sahara's Fabled City of Gold (Random House, Inc., 2007, p. 34, 45; http://books.google.com/books?id=8A6ujuTIdr4C). Some ancestors of Sunjata were listed with locative bynames in the translations of Epic of Sunjata, such as Faran Tunkara of Kuntunya and Tenen Mansa Konkon of Kirina (Sunjata: A West African Epic of the Mande Peoples, translated by David C. Conrad from narration by Djanka Tassey Condé, Hackett Publishing, 2004, p. 8; http://books.google.com/books?id=SlFSW3GKKZcC).

The polyglot Mali empire was known in period by both the Arabs and Europeans, as shown by the writings of Ibn Battuta, who visited in 1352 ("Travels in Asia and Africa 1325-1354", translated and edited by H.A.R. Gibb, London: Broadway House, 1929; http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/source/1354-ibnbattuta.html) and the 1375 Catalan Atlas attributed to Abraham Cresques (Bibliotèque nationale de France; see relevant detail at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mansa_Musa.jpg). The atlas includes the trading city of Timbuktu ('Tenbuch') and text that supposedly translates to, "This Negro lord is called Musa Mali, Lord of the Negroes of Guinea. So abundant is the gold which is found in his country that he is the richest and most noble king in all the land". Most local documents from this area seem to have been written in Arabic, so we have very little information on period West African naming practices outside of Arabic contexts. Academy of Saint Gabriel Report no. 3178 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/3178) provides examples of names in Arabic contexts, and supports the combination of Arabic with Manding:

We found a number of inscriptions from archaeological sites in Mali which record medieval African names in Arabic contexts. Some of these names show the influence of Manding languages. For instance, we found the Manding word <Waa> or <Wa> in combination with a given name in several inscriptions (one example is <Waa Makkii bni Yuusuf>). We also found one man, <`Uma[r] Kumba>, using the Manding byname <Kumba> (literally, 'Big Head').

Commenters could not find documentation to support the byname of the Hidden River, even invoking the lingua anglica rule. The Niger River, however, was well known in period. Ibn Battuta stated that he had traveled by boat on the Niger, which he had called the Nile River (early scholars thought it was the same river), to the capital of Mali and the city of Timbuktu. Another name for the river in the oral traditions, or at least for part of the river, is Djoliba or Jaliba (Andrew Massing, "The Mane, the Decline of Mali, and Mandinka Expansion towards the South Windward Coast", Cahiers d'études africaines 1985; 25(97):21-55; http://www.persee.fr/web/revues/home/prescript/article/cea_0008-0055_1985_num_25_97_2184). Djoliba is also the name of the city where Sunjata was born. The Niger is called Fl. Girin in the 1265 Tabula Peutingeriana (see the bottom right corner of http://www.euratlas.net/cartogra/peutinger/6_epirum/epirus_2_4.html); this possibly lends credence to the theory that 'Niger' is derived from the Tuareg phrase rather than the Latin for 'black'. It is found as Fl. Niger in Theatrum orbis terrarium by Abraham Ortelius (1570, Library of Congress; http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.gmd/g3200m.gct00003).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

50: Óláfr Haraldsson - New Name & New Badge

Sable, a saltire bretessed between four mullets of four points, a bordure argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for Viking-age Scandinavia.
Language (Viking-age Scandinavia) most important.
Meaning (Harald's son) most important.

Submitted as Oláfr Haraldsson, the name has been changed to Óláfr Haraldsson to maintain consistency in the use of accents.

Óláfr is a masculine name found on p. 13 of Geirr Bassi. It occurs twenty times in Landnámabók.

Haraldsson is based on the masculine name Haraldr found on p. 11 of Geirr Bassi. It occurs eight times in Landnámabók. The patronymic is constructed according to the instructions on p. 17: -r becomes -s for the genitive case, and -son is added at the end.

The badge is clear of Aline Kinneir, registered in 02/2009 (East), Sable, on a saltire bretessed between four mullets of four points elongated to base argent, a thistle proper between four beech leaves palewise vert. There is one CD for removing the tertiary charges, and one for adding the bordure.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

51: Quinton MacGillivray - New Name & New Device

Or, a one-eyed rabbit sejant erect guardant contourny sable, orbed gules, maintaining a sword, in base two rabbit's pawprints in chevron inverted, a bordure sable

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Culture (Spelling of byname) most important.

Quinton is a male given name that appears once, dated 1559, in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "English Given Names from 16th and Early 17th C Marriage Records" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/parishes/parishes.html).

MacGillivray is a header form in Black (p. 502), which includes M'Gillewra (1549), McIlvery (1541), and MacGillivray (1622).

The combination of English and Scots is not a step from period practice [Michael Duncan of Hadley, 04/2004].

This device is clear of Ellyn Dawndelyon d'Azay (02/1990, West), Or, a coney rampant to sinister sable, with one CD for the addition of the bordure and another for the addition of the secondary charges.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

52: Rainillt Leia de Bello Marisco - New Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 2003, via the East

Per chevron sable semy-de-lys argent and sable, a chevron Or and in base a swan naiant argent.

Old Item: Vert, two coneys combattant argent, to be retained as a badge.

Precedent is mixed on the subject of strewn charges on only part of a plain field.

Current precedent disallows strewn charges on only part of a plain field, even when the field has a "natural" division such as an ordinary (see July 1998 LoAR, Miriel MacGregor), barring evidence that such fields were used in period armory. [Bohémond le Sinistre, 01/2001, Outlands]

If the field was a fur rather than a semy, such a design was ruled acceptable:

[Per chevron pean and sable, on a chevron Or ...] It was the consensus of the College that a divided field in which the two parts are tinctures that share the same background is allowable if there is an ordinary to aid in the separation of the two parts, though the practice is not documented. [Thorgrimr inn kyrri, 02/2001, Atlantia]

To confuse matters, we have the acceptance without comment (other than an artist's note) of Tvoislava Michelovna (11/2009, Atenveldt), Per bend sinister argent and argent goutty de larmes, on a bend sinister azure three roses argent, in chief a threaded needle bendwise sinister inverted sable. This appeared to overturn the first 2001 precedent, but this was not explicitly stated. As such, kingdom thinks that this device is now registerable, but appeals to Wreath to please clarify the matter for other submissions.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

53: Rose le Marinier - New Name & New Device

Azure, a lymphad, sail set and oars shipped, and on a base wavy argent a rose gules.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound (given name must sound like "Rose") most important.
Language (French, if possible) most important.

Rose is a feminine given name found in Withycombe, s.n. Rose, p. 258. This spelling was dated 1316. It is also the submitter's legal middle name, as attested by Eastern Crown.

le Marinier is a byname found in R&W (s.n. Mariner, p. 290), with Hugo le marinier found in 1228. R&W includes other occupational bynames that fit this pattern: s.n. Cropper ('cropper or reaper'), Alice le Crappere (1315); s.n. Parker ('park keeper'), Claricia le Parkeres (1327), and s.n. Retter ('net-maker'), Alice le Retour (1279).

The submitter is willing to accept spelling changes as long as the sound of the first name is "rose". She will also accept feminization of the byname if needed. The name should be clear of Rose de Le Mans (05/1992, West) and Rose Marian of Edgewater (02/1986, East).

The device is clear of Gwenhwyvar Ywein (07/1997, Atlantia), Azure, a lymphad and on a chief argent three loaves of brown bread proper, and An Loch, Shire of (04/2006, Ansteorra), Azure, a lymphad and on a chief wavy argent a laurel wreath vert, with one CD for changing the chief to a base, and another for the changes to the tertiary charges.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

54: Rudolphus Nitriensis - New Name & New Device

Azure, on the breast of a swan argent a rose proper

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound (Rudolf) most important.
Meaning (of Nyitra) most important.

Rudolphus is dated to 1276 (in a 1641 copy) as the name of a cleric in Fehértói Katalin, Árpád-kori személynévtár (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 2004), s.n. Rodolphus. Other spellings (Radolfus, Rodolphus, etc.) are dated between 1203 and 1300.

Nitriensis is a Latin adjective meaning "of/from Nyitra", dated to 1347 in Kázmér Miklós, Régi Magyar Családnevek Szótára (Magyar Nyelvtudományi Társaság, Budapest, 1993), found in the section on the derivation/motivation of the surname Nyitrai. Examples of locative adjectives are found in Fehértói (op. cit.) under Radolphus, e.g., Radulfo Borsiensi, 1214/1269.

Correction (2010-Feb-20 10:02:55): See the letter of permission to conflict with the armory of Rorik Fredericsson in the comments.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

55: Sarra the Lymner - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2003, via the East

(Fieldless) A hedgehog proper.

The default posture for a hedgehog is statant, and the default color is brown with a white face and belly (see the Glossary of Terms under 'urchin').


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

56: Séadna Reed of Ravengate - New Name Change

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in April of 2010, via the East.

Old Item: Siobhan Reed, to be released.
Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound (Shay-na) most important.

Séadna is found s.n. Setna (p. 165) in OCM, which states that there are 13 saints of this name, including St. Setna of Armagh. Commenters noted that the name is masculine, not feminine as the submitter desires, but the sound is approximately correct.

Reed is grandfathered to the submitter.

Ravengate is a constructed locative based on Ekwall s.n. Ravendale, which has Ravenedal DB, Ravendala c1115, Estravendal 1254, and Westravendale 1219 'raven valley'; and on gata, which is identified as a Scandinavian word meaning 'road'. Under the header Galgate, there is Galwaithegate c1190, Galewethegate c1210 ('the Galway road'); under Holgate there's Holegate 1200, Holgate 1218 ('hollow road'), and s.n. Harrogate the header is dated 1512 along with Harlogate 1522 (from Harlow, the name of a nearby hill, and -gate, "in the north country sense 'right of pasturage for cattle, pasturage'").

The combination of Gaelic and English is a step from period practice, but registerable (Damaris Baróid, 01/2005, Atenveldt).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

57: Siobhán in Scéith Girr - New Name & New Device

Gules, a phoenix argent rising from flames Or and on a chief argent three salamanders gules enflamed proper.

Sound most important.
Meaning (Siobhan of the Short Shield) most important.

The submitter stated that any changes to the byname were acceptable, but will not allow changes to the given name.

Siobhán is found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Siban.shtml). The submitted spelling is the Early Modern Irish form; 22 women had this name in the Annals, years 1310-1600.

in Scéith Girr (ibid., http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/inSceithGirr.shtml) is a masculine byname meaning '[of] the short shield' in Middle Irish. One man in the Annals had this name, 1055-1134. This name is one step from period practice for the lingual mix of Middle and Early Modern Irish.

Kingdom commenters were not sure if the byname needs to be lenited, based on "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names (3rd Ed.)" by Sharon Krossa (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/#descriptivebyname).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

58: Thallos Alexios - New Name & New Device

Argent, a tree issuant from base vert and on a chief wavy azure a demi-sun issuant from the line of division Or.

Sound most important.

Thallos, Greek Θαλλος (Theta alpha lambda lamda omicron sigma), is the name of a writer c. 55 CE. It was documented from Robert Van Voorst, Jesus Outside the New Testament: An Introduction to the Ancient Evidence (http://books.google.com/books?id=lwzliMSRGGkC&pg=PA20&dq=Thallos+historian#v=onepage&q=Thallos%20his torian&f=false).

Alexios, Greek Αλεξιος (Alpha lambda epsilon xi iota omicron sigma), is the masculine name of a Greek comic poet, and a common descriptive. Unfortunately, photocopies of the sources were not provided at Heralds Point. One of the consulting heralds was contacted as requested on the form to provide more information:

It is on evidence that may or may not refer to Jesus that appears outside the Bible, but the evidence for the author is solid. The author is Robert Van Voorst and the title is Jesus Outside the New Testament: An Introduction to the Ancient Evidence...On pages 20 and following the author gives a fairly scholarly discussion on the Thallos who is mentioned citing a number of classical sources for his existence. While one may not buy into his arguments of the author as a support for the historicity of the eclipse at the time of Jesus' death, his detailed summary of the evidence for the author is certainly enough to document the name...There are several Byzantine emperors named Alexios Comnenos, but we used the earlier sources to match the time frame of Thallos.

Under the anglicized form Alexis the Greek comic poet who lived from c. 375 to c. 275 appears in the second edition of the Oxford Classical Dictionary where his work and its fame is noted by Aulus Gellius as having been known by and copied by Roman playwrights like Turpilius and Plautus. I can send you copies of that if you need, but my understanding was that the submitter really wanted it simply as a descriptive meaning "defender" and that was derived by the time I got there from Withycombe (s.n. Alexis) which derives it from Greek Alexios "'helper', 'defender', the name of a 5th-C Roman saint. It has always been used more in the Eastern than the Western Church, and is particularly common in Russia."

The Anglicized form Alexis is also found in the Encyclopedia Britannica (1911 edition). The Lexicon of Greek Personal Names (LGPN; http://www.lgpn.ox.ac.uk/names/practices.html) supports the use of patronymics in ancient Greek naming, stating that, "The patronymic generally took the form of the father's name in the genitive case: AlexandroV Filippou 'Alexander son of Philip'; but in areas of the Aeolic dialect (the island of Lesbos and the facing coast of Asia Minor, and Thessaly and Boiotia on the mainland) the patronymic also took the form of an adjective derived from the father's name, AlexandroV FilippeioV. This usage occurs in the poems of Homer: AiaV TelamwnioV 'Ajax the son of Telamon'. (A second form found in Homer, in which the father's name is given a termination with patronymic force '-ides' (Ektwr PriamidhV 'Hector son of Priam') survived in the historical period but as an independent name-form deprived of patronymic force.)." From some of the examples on that site, commenters thought that the byname might be correctly formed: Alexandros Filippou, Alesandros Filippeios, Aias Telemonios, and Ektor Priamides. In addition, the LGPN (http://www.lgpn.ox.ac.uk/publications/index.html) includes Alexios (LGPN I, III.A, IV) and Thallos (LGPN I, II, III.A, III.B, IV).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

59: Tommaltach MacFhiachach - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 1990, via the East

Sable, in bend two lions statant, each crowned with a pearled coronet Or.

The submitter became a court baron on 09/01/2001.

The device is clear of Cynan Gould (03/1999 East): Quarterly azure and argent, in bend two lions rampant Or, with one CD for changing the field and another for the change in posture of the lions. It is also clear of Kane Greymane (04/1988 West): Sable, in pale two lions couchant Or, crined argent, with one CD for the posture change and another for the change in arrangement.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

60: Tressach an Bhogha - New Name & New Device

Or, on a chevron inverted cotissed gules a rose argent, barbed and seeded proper.

Sound (Tracey, Tressach) most important.

Tressach is a masculine given name found as a header in OC&M (p. 173). It also appears as the name of three men in the Irish Annals, years 884-969. The submitted spelling is the standard nominative form in both Old Irish Gaelic and Middle Irish Gaelic, according to Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Tressach.shtml).

an Bhogha, 'of the bow', is based on the 11/2003 LoAR [Seamus an Bhogha Bhearnaigh Mac an t'Saoi]:

The byname in Boghanna Bernaig was submitted as a constructed byname meaning '[of] the Broken Bow'. This phrase combines elements in Middle Irish Gaelic (c. 900 to c. 1200) forms (in and Bernaig) with an element in an Early Modern Irish Gaelic (c. 1200 to c. 1700) or Modern (c. 1700 to present) form (Boghanna)...

Additionally, the submitted Boghanna means 'bows'. All of the period descriptive bynames found so far refering to a weapon (axe, spear, etc.) use a singular word for a weapon rather than a plural. The Early Modern Irish Gaelic word for 'bow' is Bogha. Effric Neyn Ken3ocht Mcherrald explains:

Since Early Gaelic <in> (Strachan, _Old-Irish Paradigms_) and modern Scottish Gaelic <an> (Dwelly) in genitive masculine singular lenite, EMIr <an> should also lenite what follows.

Therefore, a byname meaning '[of] the bow' in Early Modern Irish would be an Bhogha, with '[of] the broken bow' being an Bhogha Bhearnaigh...

Bynames based on weapons also appear in Mari's Index: in Gai Bernaig ([of] the Broken Spear), in Gai Móir ([of] the Large Spear), and na Tuaighe ([of] the Axe/Battle-Axe/Hatchet).

The submitter would appreciate assistance making the name linguistically compatible, but wants the given name to be as close to 'Tracey' as she can get.

The combination of the Old or Middle Irish Gaelic Tressach with the Early Modern Irish Gaelic byname is one step from period practice [Ciarán mac Gaoithín, 01/2005, Æthelmearc].


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

61: Vivienne farmaðr - New Name & New Device

Purpure, an ermine statant proper, a chief rayonny ermine.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Client requests authenticity for 800-1000 CE.
Meaning (Last name: seafarer) most important.

Vivienne is based on the male given name Vivien, found in Colm Dubh, "An Index to the Given Names in the Paris Census of 1292" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/paris.html). The submitted name is the expected feminine form of Vivien, which appears on the list, following the pattern of Alain/Alainne, Ascelin/Ascelinne, Galien/Galienne, Germain/Germainne, Julien/Julienne, etc. (ibid.)

farmaðr 'sea-farer' is a nickname from Geirr Bassi, p. 21; it occurs once in Landnámabók.

The combination of French and Old Norse is a step from period practice, but registerable (Juste ormstunga, 07/2006 A-Atlantia).

The device is clear of Felycia Flauter (05/1992, Middle), Purpure, an otter passant within a bordure argent, with one CD for the change of type of the secondary charge, and one for changing the tincture of the secondary charge from argent to ermine.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

62: Zillah al-Ṣaghīra al-Ḥurra - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound (Zih-lah) most important.

Zillah is a biblical feminine name (the wife of Lamech mentioned briefly in Genesis 4:19 and 4:23), and according to the consulting herald might be justified as Jewish or late period (Puritan) English. al-Ṣaghīra is a descriptive byname meaning 'the small'; the masculine form al-Ṣagīr is found in Juliana de Luna, "Arabic Names from al-Andalus" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/alandalus/). al-Ḥurra is a descriptive feminine byname meaning 'free' (ibid.).

Juliana's article also mentions that biblical names were used as isms (given names), so this supports the name Zillah with the otherwise Arabic name. Current precedent is that names from the Bible are generally registerable for languages/cultures where Biblical names are found in the naming pool, even if evidence of the use of a particular name is not documented [Jerusha Kilgour 04/2007, A-Meridies]. The use of more than one nickname is also supported: "A person may have more than one name of this type; in everyday life they are generally called by only one at a time, though more than one nickname may be found in formal written settings." (ibid.) Feminization of given names (isms) by adding -a or -ah is discussed in Da'ud ibn Auda, "Period Arabic Names and Naming Practices" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/arabic-naming2.htm, and his examples of feminine cognomens include two ending in -ah. As such, the feminization of al-Ṣaghīr seems plausible.

Correction (2010-Feb-07 18:02:09): As noted in the comments, the correct LoAR for the Jerusha Kilgour precedent is 07/2004.


Bibliography:

Bahlow, Hans; translated by Edda Gentry. Dictionary of German Names, 2nd ed. Max Kade Institute, Madison, Wisconsin, 2002.

Bahlow, Hans; Unsere Vornamen im Wandel der Jahrhunderte. Limburg a. d. Lahn: C. A. Starke Verlag, 1965.

Bardsley, Charles Wareing. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames. Oxford University Press, London, 1901.

Black, George F. The Surnames of Scotland. New York Public Library, 1989.

[eDIL] The Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, http://www.dil.ie/

Ekwall, Eilert. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names. Fourth edition. Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1991.

[Geirr Bassi] Geirr Bassi Haraldsson. The Old Norse Name. Private Press, Maryland, 1977.

Morgan, T.J. and Prys Morgan. Welsh Surnames. University of Wales Press, Cardiff, 1985.

[Morlet Dictionnaire] Morlet, Marie-Thérèse. Dictionnaire Étymologique de Noms de Famille.

[OC&M] Ó Corraín, Donnchadh and Fidelma Maguire. Irish Names. Lilliput Press, Dublin, 1990.

[OED] Oxford English Dictionary.

[R&W] Reaney, P.H. and R. M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. Third edition, Oxford University Press, 1995.

Searle, W.G. Onomasticon Anglo-Saxonicum. Cambridge University Press, 1897.

Watts, Victor. The Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names. Cambridge University Press, 2004.

Withycombe, E.G. The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names. Third edition. Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1979.

Woulfe, Patrick. Sloinnte Gaedheal is Gall. Irish Names and Surnames. M.H. Gill & Son, Dublin, 1923.


OSCAR counts 43 New Names, 1 New Name Change, 1 New Household Name, 32 New Devices, 2 New Device Changes and 10 New Badges. These 89 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $267 for them. OSCAR counts 2 Resub Names, 1 Resub Device and 1 Resub Badge. These 4 items are not chargeable. There are a total of 93 items submitted on this letter.

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