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East LoI dated 2009-12-13

Unto Olwyn Laurel, Istvan Wreath, Aryanhwy Pelican, the SCA College of Arms, and all others who do receive this letter, greetings from Kolosvari Arpadne Julia, Blue Tyger Herald.

It is the intent of Easterners to register the following items. Unless otherwise noted, the submitter has no desire for authenticity, allows any changes, and allows a holding name. I've used the "language" checkbox to correspond with the "language/culture" box on the name submission form, and the "culture" checkbox for "spelling".

This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

1: Aine Oliphant - New Name & New Device

Gules semy of roses Or, a unicorn's head couped argent, armed Or.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Culture (spelling) most important.

The information about changes allowed and priorities is from the Pennsic worksheet; it was not transferred to the submission form.

Áine is listed as the standard Middle and Early Modern Irish Gaelic form of a name found for 13 women in the annals, dated between 1165 and 1448, in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Aine.shtml). The submission omits the accent, which is allowed for Gaelic names as long as it's done consistently.

Oliphant is a surname dated to 1553 in Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Names of women mentioned in the Perth Guildry Book 1464-1598" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/scots/perth.html). It's also a header in Black, where it's said to be of Norman origin, with dated forms Olifaunt 1317; Olyphand, Olyfant 1326; and Olifant 1459.

The combination of Gaelic and either Anglo-Norman or Scots is a step from period practice, but registerable (Aodagán Duueglas, 09/2005 R-An Tir; Elspeth O'Shea, 02/2000 A-Middle).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

2: Alton of Grimfells - New Name & New Device

Azure estoilly argent, a sun Or eclipsed sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.

Alton is the submitter's legal middle name according to his birth certificate, witnessed by the consulting herald and the names senior herald on duty. It's originally a locative surname: R&W s.n. Alton has, for example, a Thomas Alton 1508, from "one or other of the many places of this name." The use of surnames as given names is discussed in Withycombe, p. xli:

An interesting post-Reformation development was the use of surnames as christian names. One of the earliest examples noted is Lord Guildford Dudley, son of the Duke of Northumberland and husband of Lady Jane Grey, whose mother's maiden name was Guildford. Another early example was Sir Warham St. Leger (1525-97), whose mother was d. and heiress of Hugh Warham, and whose nephew was also named Warham St. Leger. The fashion became fairly general among the landed gentry in Elizabeth's reign, and apparently gave rise to some criticism.
This is followed by a quote from a work by Camden written in 1605 which observes that the practice "seemeth to proceed from hearty good will", preserving the names of godfathers and the like. The July 2009 LoAR has some further discussion of surnames as given names in late-period England, in the registration of Chadwick Mangold (A-Atenveldt):
Other examples of surnames used as given names include Artlington, Ashton, Kelham, Kellam, Kerry, Stocker, Smalege, and Nevell in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, Dictionary of Tudor London Names, and Arcye 1573, Atkinson 1583, Bainbridge 1550, Lambwell 1584, Musgrave 1616, and Richardson 1588 in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "English Given Names from 16th and Early 17th C Marriage Records".
Consensus in kingdom was that Alton fits right in with this pattern.

of Grimfells is based on the March of Grimfells, an SCA group name registered in Nov. 1982 via the Middle.

This device should be clear of Alesia la Sabia de Murcia (10/1994 Atlantia): Azure estencely argent, a sun in splendor between three increscents Or, with CDs for the eclipsing and for removing the increscents. It is well clear of Irja Laulaa (03/1971), registered as Azure, a sun eclipsed, winged Or, under which blazon it gets a CD for adding the estoilles and another for removing the wings. Noir Licorne posted a scan of Irja's device, and it turns out to actually be a winged pellet, as can be seen below, so it's clear by X.2.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=2/2009-12-05/12-41-18_14-02-23_irja.jpg


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

3: Amand le Braceeur - New Name & New Device

Azure, a maple leaf and on a base engrailed Or a natural salamander tergiant fesswise reversed gules.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Meaning (French for 'brewer') most important.

Amand is a masculine name found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Names Found in Commercial Documents from Bordeaux, 1470-1520" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/bordeaux.html), with the example Amand Robert. It's a header in Morlet Dictionnaire, where's it's said to derive from Latin Amandus, and to have been popularized by a 5th c. bishop from Bordeaux and a 7th century Belgian monk in Aquitaine (or something like that). R&W s.n. Amand repeats the information about the bishop and says it was the name of four saints, and dates this spelling as an unmarked patronymic to 1279.

le Braceeur is based on le braceeur, an occupational byname meaning 'brewer' found in Colm Dubh's "Occupational By-Names in the 1292 Tax Role [sic] of Paris" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/parisbynames.html).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

4: Amis Mwyn - New Name & New Device

Or, a saltire azure fretted of a mascle gules.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (Welsh) most important.

Amis is dated to the 13th century under Amice in Talan Gwynek's "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/reaneyintro.html). It's also found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Names found in Quedgeley, Glouchestershire Marriage Registers 1559-1600" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/quedgeley.html) s.n. Amy, dated to 1573.

Mwyn is found in Morgan & Morgan s.n. Mwyndeg, with the example Lewis ap Richard, alias mwyn dated 1614. There's also a Willemum ap Ieuan moyn dated 1595. According to the dictionary, it means 'gentle, mild'.

A combination of English and Welsh is not a deviation from period practice (Aug. 1999 Cover Letter).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

5: Angus Sutherland - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 1994, via Calontir

Per pale gules and sable, a Latin cross between three mullets Or.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

6: Arabella of the Black lion - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.

The name was originally submitted as Arabella of Blacklion. The byname was changed at kingdom to better match the available documentation.

Arabella is a primarly Scottish feminine name found in Withycombe s.n. Arabel(l)a, dated to 1255, and to 1575-1615 in the person of one Arabella Stuart. In OSCAR commentary on another Arabella (June 2009 Meridies LoI), Nicholas de Estleche dictus le Tardif (Edelweiss) cited Arabella Cokayn bap. 19 Nov. 1631, Souldrop, Bedfordshire and Arabella Fysher bap. 24 Oct. 1575, Toddington, Bedfordshire, from IGI Parish Record extracts.

of the Black lion is a constructed inn sign-based surname based on Gretchen Beck: "Inn, Shop, or House names found in imprints from the EEBO database, 1473-1600" (http://www.contrib.andrew.cmu.edu/~grm/sign-of-the.html). Under the category of 'Color + Beast', examples include signe (or sygne) of the Red lion and signe (or sygne) of the Black beare. R&W briefly discusses sign names on p. xvi under 'Local Surnames', mentioning atte Lamb and atte Raven as examples; a dated example is found s.n. Bell: John atte Belle 1332.

Correction (2010-Jan-14 13:01:52): The submitter cares most about the sound 'Black lion'.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

7: Aureliana Curva - New Name & New Device

Gules, a triangle inverted between three spiders argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Client requests authenticity for Roman.
Language (Roman) most important.

Aureliana is a feminine name found twice in Berret Chavez: "Common Names of the Aristocracy in the Roman Empire During the 6th and 7th Centuries" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/byzantine/early_byz_names.html). According to the introduction, the source material for this article (The Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire, vol. 3) covers the years 527 to 641.

Curva is the feminine form of Curvus, a cognomen dated to 322 in Meradudd Cethin: "Names and Naming Practices of Regal and Republican Rome" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/roman/).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

8: Barbeta Kyrkeland - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2008, via the East

Vert, a hedgehog statant and on a chief Or three oak leaves bendwise sinister vert.

This device is clear of Xena Baxter Wynthorpe (03/1984 Caid): Vert, a hedgehog statant Or, with one CD for adding the chief, and another for the tertiary leaves on the chief.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

9: Beatrice Spigliati - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound ('Betty Spaghetti') most important.
Meaning ('Betty Spaghetti') most important.

Beatrice is a feminine given name found twice (out of 2664 women) in Juliana de Luna's "A Listing of all Women's Given Names from the Condado Section of the Florence Catasto of 1427" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/condado/womensalpha.html).

Spigliati is a family name found twice in Ferrante LaVolpe's "Family Names Appearing in the Catasto of 1427" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ferrante/catasto/family_names.html).

Correction (2010-Jan-14 13:01:22): The submission form has Spighiati crossed out with Spigliati written below. This was a correction made by the submitter or her herald, not by kingdom. (The worksheet has the 'l' rather than the 'h'.)


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

10: Brighid of the Black lion - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound (Blacklion) most important.

The name was originally submitted as Brighid of Blacklion. The byname was changed at kingdom to better match the available documentation.

Brighid is found in OC&M s.n. Brigit; the entry mentions that there were 15 saints of this name, including Saint Brigit of Kildare. According to precedent (Brygyt d'Arcy of Glen Meara, 06/2003 R-Trimaris), the submitted spelling is the Early Modern Gaelic (c. 1200 to c. 1700) form of the name, and is registerable as a saint's name. Commenters noted that this name (or something very like it) was used in English: Talan Gwynek's "Late Sixteenth Century English Given Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/eng16/eng16alpha.html) has two instances of Bridget.

of the Black lion is a constructed inn sign-based surname based on Gretchen Beck: "Inn, Shop, or House names found in imprints from the EEBO database, 1473-1600" (http://www.contrib.andrew.cmu.edu/~grm/sign-of-the.html). Under the category of 'Color + Beast', examples include signe (or sygne) of the Red lion and signe (or sygne) of the Black beare. R&W briefly discusses sign names on p. xvi under 'Local Surnames', mentioning atte Lamb and atte Raven as examples; a dated example is found s.n. Bell: John atte Belle 1332.

A combination of English and Gaelic is a step from period practice, but registerable (Ian MacHenrik, 10/99).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

11: Connor Roe - New Name & New Device

Paly sable and argent, a chief gules.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Client requests authenticity for 16c England.
Sound most important.

[The Pennsic worksheet says he cares most about 15th century English language/culture, but the authenticity request on the form is for the 16th century.]

Connor is an English form of the Irish masculine name Conchobar, according to OCM s.n. Conchobar and Withycombe s.n. Con(n)or. In the registration of Connor MacConmara (A-Ansteorra) on the Jan. 2008 LoAR, the name Connor Roe MacGuyre is cited from the travel writings of Fynes Morrison, published in 1617; the name is mentioned in connection with an event occurring in 1600. The registration of Connor MacGrath (A-Middle) on the Jan. 2009 LoAR adds a Connor O'Moyle O'Fahie of Lickmolashe, clerk from the Patent Rolls of James I (1603-1604).

Roe is a header in R&W, with William le Roe dated to 1170. It also occurs as an Anglicized form of some Irish byname in the writings of Fynes Morrison, published in 1617 (see above). (The Irish byname was probably Ruadh: see Woulfe s.nn. Mac Muiris Ruaidh and Mac Ruaidh.)


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

12: Elizabeth la Brouillarde and Alastair Corran - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name (Elizabeth la Brouillarde) registered exactly as it appears in August of 2002, via the East
OSCAR finds the name (Alastair Corran) registered exactly as it appears in June of 2004, via the East

Sable, a rose slipped and leaved and in chief a death's head argent.

This badge is clear of Madeleine Rose de Cardeville (02/2007 Calontir): Sable, a rose argent barbed and seeded proper and a tierce argent ermined gules, with CDs for the type and tincture of the secondary charge. It is technically clear of Christiana O'Ruarke (01/2002 Ansteorra): Sable, in pale a swan naiant and a rose argent, with a CD for changing the number of primary charges and another for adding a secondary charge. It's clear of Æduuard of Haxeholm (11/1993 Calontir): Sable, masoned argent, a rose and a chief embattled argent, with one CD for the field and another for the type of secondary charge.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

13: Erika Rothals - Resub Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in December of 1996, via Atlantia

Per bend checky gules and argent and checky argent and sable, in bend sinister a tankard Or between an ant sable and an ant gules, heads to center.

Her previous submission of Per pale checky argent and gules and checky sable and argent, an emmet statant erect contourny sable maintaining a beer mug Or, and an emmet statant erect gules maintaining a beer mug Or was returned in April 2009 (R-East) for unrecognizability. The device has been redesigned and resubmitted as a badge (because of the increased clarity of the design on a square field).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

14: Esclarmonde al-Andalusiyya - New Name

No major changes.
Meaning (Esclaremonde from Andalus) most important.

The paperwork received from Herald's Point used a branch name form, and had two different spellings of the given name: Esclarmonde as the "Society Name", and Esclaremonde as the "Name being submitted (if different from above)". The worksheet also used the spelling with the extra 'e', so it was the filing name used in kingdom. (The desired meaning is also from the worksheet.) The name has been corrected to the spelling without the extra 'e', to match the available documentation.

Esclarmonde is a feminine name from Cateline de la Mor: "Names from Fourteenth Century Foix" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/cateline/foix.html). The source for this article translated the names from Latin to modern French, so the spellings may not be original. Esclarmonde is also the love interest of Huon de Bordeaux, the subject of an Old French chanson de geste (and its sequels) from the 13th century, found in Huon de Bordeaux: Chanson de geste du XIIIe siècle, publiée d'après le manuscrit de Paris BNF fr. 22555, P by William W. Kibler, François Suard; Paris, 2003 (snippet view: http://books.google.com/books?id=VjhlAAAAMAAJ).

al-Andalusiyya is from "Arabic Names from al-Andalus" by Juliana de Luna (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/alandalus/). It's listed as an example of a geographical nisba, meaning 'the woman from al-Andalus', in the discussion of name types and formats. It's also what you get if you apply the rules for feminizing names found in Da'ud ibn Auda's "Period Arabic Names and Naming Practices" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/arabic-naming2.htm) to al-Andalusī, found in Juliana's above-cited article as a masculine nickname meaning 'from Andalus'.

A combination of French and Arabic is a step from period practice, but registerable (al-'Aliyya Lyonnais, 07/2006).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

15: Eva Brangwyne - New Name & New Device

Azure, a leviathan within a bordure nebuly argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound (phonetic) most important.

Eva is a feminine name found in "A Simple Guide to Constructing 13th Century Welsh Names" by Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/welsh13.html). It's also a header in Withycombe, dated to 1199-1219, 1273, 1303, and 1346.

Brangwyne is dated to 1283 as an unmarked matronymic (Adam Brangwyne) in R&W s.n. Brangwin.

This depiction of a leviathan is based on a period image of a whale with legs suckling its young, found online (http://www.strangescience.net/enlar/en_whayng.gif); it's by Conrad or Konrad Gesner, and it's in his Fischbuch published in 1598 (http://www.humi.mita.keio.ac.jp/treasures/nature/Gesner-web/fish/html/normal/l206.html). It's also found in some edition(s) of his Icones animalium quadrupedum viviparorum et oviparorum, but the 1553 edition available online (http://num-scd-ulp.u-strasbg.fr:8080/214/) doesn't have this particular image (closest it gets: http://imgbase-scd-ulp.u-strasbg.fr/displayimage.php?album=287&pos=414).

There's a possible conflict with the Barony of Aquaterra's badge for the Order of the Silver Dolphin (08/2002 An Tir): Azure, a dolphin and a bordure nebuly argent. If a heraldic dolphin is ruled substantially different from a leviathan (which is basically a variant form of a heraldic whale as described in the August 2005 Cover Letter), then they're clear by X.2; if there's only a CD, then it's a conflict.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

16: Feradach mac Ciain - New Name & New Device

Per bend embattled gules and Or, a demi-sun and a lynx passant counterchanged.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound most important.

Originally submitted as Federach mac Cian, the name was changed at kingdom to match the available documentation.

Feradach is found with a count of 29 in "100 Most Popular Men's Names in Early Medieval Ireland" by Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/tangwystyl/irish100/). It's also found as the standard Old and Middle Irish Gaelic nominative form of the name of 24 men in "Index of Names in Irish Annals" by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Feradach.shtml), dated between 582 and 1542. The originally submitted Federach was documented as the (modern) name of a legendary prince, the father of St. Fillan (http://www.macnabclanuk.org/history2.html); commenters couldn't find this spelling referring to anyone else in period, and concluded that it's probably an error that has propagated in the hagiography of St. Fillan.

Ciain is our best guess at the genitive form of Cian, a header in OCM; the entry includes one Cian mac Mael Muad, son-in-law of Brian Boru, "who was slain at the battle of Clontarf in 1014." Cian is also found as the standard Old, Middle, and Early Modern Irish Gaelic nominative spelling of the name of 12 men in the Annals (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Cian.shtml), dated between 867 and 1577. Mari makes no guess as to a genitive form, but based on other names in -an in Tangwystyl's cited article (Trian - Triain, Éogan - Éogain, Bran - Brain, Fintan - Fintain), commenters thought Ciain is as likely as anything.

This device is clear of Nigellus le Haie (05/1983 Middle): Per bend embattled gules and azure, issuant from sinister chief a demi-sun Or, with one CD for the tincture of half the field, and another for the number of primary charges.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

17: Fionnghuala inghean Mhic Ceallaigh - New Name & New Device

Argent, a rose purpure seeded and barbed proper, on a chief engrailed purpure two swans naiant respectant argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (12th-14th c. Irish) most important.

Fionnghuala is a feminine name identified in OCM s.n. Finnguala (p. 103) as "an extremely popular name in Ireland in the later middle ages". It is also found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" as the standard Early Modern Irish Gaelic nominative spelling of the name of 26 women, dated between 1247 and 1531 (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Fionnghuala.shtml).

inghean Mhic Ceallaigh is based on the masculine name Ceallach, found in the Annals as the name of 14 men, dated between 658 and 1376 (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Cellach.shtml); Ceallaigh is listed as the standard Early Modern genitive spelling. Sharon Krossa's "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names", 3rd edition (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/) says in the discussion of Ní and Nic that inghean mhic occurs in simple patronymic bynames when the father's name starts with Mac. We're not sure it's the correct construction here, but we're also not sure whether changing it to inghean uí counts as a major change, so we're forwarding it unchanged for the experts to sort out.

Kingdom believes this name should be clear of Phiala O'Ceallaigh (05/1994 East).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

18: Francesco Gaetano Greco d'Edessa - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 2004, via the East

(Fieldless) A patriarchal cross flory per pale argent and Or.

If registered, this will be his fourth badge and fifth piece of armory, which is below the current limit of 6.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

19: Franz von Heilbronn - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 2003, via the East

Sable, a lynx Or and a bear argent combatant, in chief an annulet Or.

His original device submission of Sable, a bear argent and a lynx combatant between three annulets engrailed on the outer edge and invected on the inner edge Or was returned in March 2007 (R-East) for a lack of identifiability due to the non-period style of the annulets. This submission replaces those annulets with one plain-line annulet, and switches the placement of the bear and lynx.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

20: Friedrich Parcifal von Österreich - New Name Change

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in April of 2010, via the East.

Old Item: Friedrich Parcifal, to be retained as an alternate name.
Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound (Osterreich) most important.

Submitted as Friedrich Parcifal von Osterreich, kingdom added the umlaut to match the cited documentation. The Pennsic worksheet indicates that the submitter will only accept spelling changes to the locative.

His current name, Friedrich Parcifal, was registered in Feb. 2009 via the East. These elements are thus grandfathered to him.

von Österreich is based on the heraldic title Österreich Herald, dated to 1440 in Juliana de Luna's "Heraldic Titles from the Middle Ages and Renaissance: Dictionary of Period Forms" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/jes/HeraldicTitles/dictionary.shtml). Brechenmacher s.n. Öst(e)rreicher has der Österrich 1338 and der Öusterrich 1350, and a map of Vienna published in 1578 spells it Oestereich (http://www.columbia.edu/itc/mealac/pritchett/00generallinks/munster/germany/xvienna1578.jpg).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

21: Galefridus Peregrinus - New Alternate Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 2006, via the East

Taguchi Moronaga

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for Japanese Hei'an period.
Language (Japanese Hei'an period) most important.

The Pennsic worksheet indicates that if the authenticity request cannot be met, he would prefer this submission to be returned.

Moronaga is a Hei'an period given name (nanori) meaning 'teacher/expert' found in NCMJ (revised edition, p. 111, under Thematic Dictionary - Spatial Relationships, Long/oldest/senior), dated 1183.

Taguchi (ibid., p. 100; found under Mouth/entrance/exit) is a Hei'an period family name meaning 'rice paddy', dated 1183.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

22: Gilleain of the Black lion - New Name & New Device

Argent, on a bend purpure between four lions couchant sable three plates.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound (Blacklion) most important.

Submitted as Gilleain of Blacklion, the byname was changed at kingdom to better match the available documentation.

Gilleain is mentioned in Black s.n. MacLean (p. 536) as a spelling of Gaelic Gille Eoin found in "the Gaelic genealogical MS of 1467."

of the Black lion is a constructed inn sign-based surname based on Gretchen Beck: "Inn, Shop, or House names found in imprints from the EEBO database, 1473-1600" (http://www.contrib.andrew.cmu.edu/~grm/sign-of-the.html). Under the category of 'Color + Beast', examples include signe (or sygne) of the Red lion and signe (or sygne) of the Black beare. R&W briefly discusses sign names on p. xvi under 'Local Surnames', mentioning atte Lamb and atte Raven as examples; a dated example is found s.n. Bell: John atte Belle 1332.

A combination of English and Gaelic is a step from period practice, but registerable (Ian MacHenrik, 10/99).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

23: James the Archer - New Name & New Device

Per fess gules and azure, on a fess engrailed argent an arrow sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (English) most important.

James is a masculine name found as header in Withycombe, dated c. 1240. It's also a header in R&W, dated 1255 as a given name. It's also found in Karen Larsdatter: "An Index to the 1296 Lay Subsidy Rolls for Rutland, England" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/Rutland/index.htm), with a frequency of 4.

the Archer is a Lingua Anglica translation of le Archer, dated 1199 in R&W s.n. Archer. It's also found in Bardsley s.n. Archer, dated to temp. Henry III and Edward I, and to 1275 and 1375. The submitter will accept le instead of the if necessary, but dropping the preposition is not an option, as it leaves us with his mundane name.

This device is clear of the flags of Luxemburg and the Netherlands (12/1994 via Laurel): Per fess gules and azure, a fess argent, with one CD for the engrailing and another for the addition of the tertiary arrow.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

24: Joan of Coggeshall - New Name & New Device

Per pale gules and sable, three wagon wheels and a chief Or

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Culture (spelling) most important.

Joan is a header in Withycombe; the entry says "By the 16th C it was the third commonest English female name". It's also a header in Talan Gwynek's "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/reaneyHZ.html), dated in this spelling 29 times between 1219 and 1549.

of Coggeshall is a locative surname based on Ekwall s.n. Coggeshall, which dates Coggeshal to 1168 and 1191, and on Bardsley s.n. Cogswell, which has Roger de Cogeshall 1273 and Ralph de Coggeshal temp. Henry III-Edward I. If the surname must be changed, the submitter will accept the 1273 spelling.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

25: Kara Irini bint Todori - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Culture ('Irini' spelling) most important.

All name elements are found in Ursula Georges: "Sixteenth-Century Turkish Names" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ursula/ottoman/).

Kara is listed as a byname meaning 'dark, unlucky, gloomy'; the text states that descriptive bynames are often prepended, and the example given for this byname is Kara Mustafa.

Irini is listed as a feminine Christian name.

bint 'daughter of' is found in many complete names, including Christian ones such as Irini bint Yorgi (Christian 1528) (from the list of complete names).

Todori is listed as a masculine Christian name.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

26: Katerina de la Bere - New Name & New Device

Per pale indented argent and vert, a bear rampant and a bell counterchanged.

No changes.

Katerina is found in R&W s.n. Catlin (p. 87), dated to 1275 as a given name. It's also found in Talan Gwynek: "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/reaneyHZ.html) under Katharine, dated ten times between 1208 and 1497. (One of the ten is the above-mentioned instance s.n. Catlin.)

de la Bere is a surname dated to 1263 in R&W s.n. Bear (p. 34).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

27: Lü An-Hua - New Name & New Device

Gules, in pale two delfs voided Or.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Client requests authenticity.
Sound most important.

An is dated between 1081 and c. 1140 in Yin Mei Li: "Feminine Chinese Names" (KWHSS Proceedings, 2003, Calontir, p. 22), in the section on historical feminine names. An example is the literary name of the poetess Li Ch'ing-chao: I An (Wade-Giles romanization) or Yi An (pinyin romanization).

Hua 'flower bud/flower heart' is dated to the 10th century (ibid., p. 12). An example is Hua Jui Fu-jen, also called Lady Fei, a concubine of Ming Ch'ang.

is identified in Academy of Saint Gabriel Report 2346 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/2346/) as a family name (hsing) used in Honan, Kiangsi, and other provinces between 1100 and 1500. The source cited for this name is one or more of Dictionary of Ming Biography 1368-1644; A Chinese Biographical Dictionary, and In Search of Your Asian Roots, Genealogical Research on Chinese Surnames.

This name should be clear of Lung Hua (04/2004 Calontir).

This device is clear of various registrations of the form Gules, an [x] within a delf voided Or: if the delf is a co-primary charge, then there are CDs for changing the type of half of the charges and for the arrangement, and if the delf is secondary, the device is clear by X.2.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

28: Máirghréad Ghearr - New Name & New Device

Per bend gules and vert, a bend between a thistle and a dragon argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Meaning (Margaret the not so tall (short)) most important.

Máirghréad is listed as the standard Early Modern Irish Gaelic nominative spelling of the name of 26 women in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Mairghread.shtml), dated between 1361 and 1662.

Ghearr is based on the masculine descriptive byname Gearr, listed as the standard Early Modern Irish Gaelic nominative spelling of the byname of four men in the Annals (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Gearr.shtml), dated between 1228 and 1473. It's defined as 'short/low-sized'. (The opposite byname, Mór 'big/great', is found for both men and women in the Annals.) Ghearr is the lenited form appropriate for use with a feminine name which doesn't end in -c, -ch, or -g, according to "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names", 3rd edition, by Sharon Krossa (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/#descriptivebyname).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

29: Maurin Lessault - New Household Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 1990, via Caid

Stonebridge Gambol House

Azure, a dance between two winged feet argent.

No major changes.
Culture (spelling: 'Gambol' preferred over 'Gamble') most important.

Stonebridge is a header in R&W (p. 429), with Walter de Stanbrugg dated to 1296. For the spelling Stone-, Ekwall s.n. Stone (p. 446) has Stone dated to E1, 1324, 1316, and 1327. For -bridge, "English Names found in Brass Enscriptions" by Julian Goodwyn (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/brasses/lastnameAH.html) has Bridgeman in 1503 and Bradbridge in 1592.

Gambol is based on Bardsley s.nn. Gamble and Gambling (pp. 806-7), which has Johannes Gamolson 1379 (showing the -ol ending) and Margaret Gamblin 1625-6 (showing the inserted 'b', in a diminutive of the preceding name). R&W s.n. Gambell adds Gamel as a given name in 1066 and 1158 and as a surname in 1202 and 1260, and Gambel as a surname in 1297.

The construction is intended as [placename] + [family name], forming a compound placename meaning 'Stonebridge of the Gambol family'. This sort of construction is found in Ekwall s.n. Bridge Sollers (p. 64): Bruges Solers 1291, where Sollers is a Norman family name, and s.n. Bridgerule: Bruge Ruardi 1242, which belonged to a Ruald Adobat in 1086.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

30: Melina Delabarge - New Name & New Device

Or, a chevron and a bordure embattled sable.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound (Melina de La Berge) most important.

Submitted as Melina DeLabarge, the capitalization of the surname was changed at kingdom to match the available documentation.

Melina occurs once in Juliana de Luna: "A Listing of all Women's Given Names from the Condado Section of the Florence Catasto of 1427" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/condado/womensalpha.html).

Delabarge is a surname found once in Aryanhwy merch Catmael: "Names from Artois, 1601" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/french/french1601.html). Kingdom commenters couldn't find any support for the submitter's preferred de La Berge (capitalization changes OK); any assistance from the College would be appreciated.

A combination of Italian and French is a step from period practice, but registerable (Tessa Cheval, 11/2000).

Commenters believe this device should be clear of Heinrich Alois von Speyer's badge (08/1988 Middle): Or, a chevron throughout sable and in base a campfire sable, enflamed gules, with one CD for the type and another for half the tincture of the secondary/peripheral charge. A scan of Heinrich's badge is provided, below.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=2/2009-12-08/17-05-00_16-30-01_melina.jpg


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

31: Molly Schofield - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2009, via the East

Per bend sinister gules and argent, a sun counterchanged.

Her previous device submission (Gules, in fess two crossbows and on a chief argent, two mullets of four points elongated to base gules) appeared under Returns-East on the Feb. 2009 LoAR because it was withdrawn by the submitter.

This device is clear of Dagmar von Zeitz (08/2002 Meridies): Per bend Or and gules, a sun counterchanged; Gareth Ivinghoe (02/1991 West): Per saltire gules and Or, a sun counterchanged; and Malcolm Fraser the Impatient (11/2002 AEthelmearc): Per pale azure and Or, a sun counterchanged. In each case, there is one CD for changes to the field, and another for changes to the tincture of the sun.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

32: Nicholas de Marays - New Name & New Device

Gules, on a bend between two phoenixes argent, three mullets of seven points gules.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No changes.

Nicholas is a header in Withycombe (pp. 227-8), with this spelling dated to 1273. It's also found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan: "An Index to the 1332 Lay Subsidy Rolls for Lincolnshire, England" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/LincLSR/) as one of the most popular masculine names.

de Marays is a byname found in a Latin record dated 1333-4 in Cartularium prioratus de Gyseburne (Publications of the Surtees Society, vol. 86, 1889; item 211A under "Cartae de Gyseburne", p. 86; http://books.google.com/books?id=6hpal1cnegkC). This same source also has the byname de la Marays in an entry dated 1251-2 (item 188, p. 78). Mari's cited article has the surname Marays, without the preposition.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

33: Perronnelle de Croy - New Name & New Device

Argent, on a pale azure between two lions combattant gules three fleurs de lys argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (French) most important.

Perronnelle is a feminine name found in Colm Dubh: "Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/paris.html), which lists a Perronnelle la Loque. A similar spelling, Perrenelle, is found in Chrestiene la pescheresse: "Some Names from Picardy in the 14th C. from Armorial du dénombrement de la Comté de Clermont en Beauvaisis 1373-1376" (KWHSS Proceedings, Caid, 2007).

de Croy is a surname dated to 1340 in the name Bertremardus De Croy in Morlet Picardie (p. 45).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

34: Petra Zenniaskii - New Name Change From Holding Name

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in April of 2010, via the East.

Old Item: Petra of Silver Rhylle, to be released.
No major changes.

His originally submitted name of Petra Zennia Velikaiaskii was returned in Feb. 2009 (R-East) because the locative byname was incorrectly constructed. The return read in part:

Unfortunately, no documentation was provided to show that in Russian, locative bynames based on compound place names used the full place name. On the contrary, we have evidence that this was not done. Carp notes that of "all the locative examples [of Novgorod] in Wickenden, none use the Velikii that was frequently appended when referring to the city itself." This suggests that the appropriate Russian locative byname based on Zennia Velikaia would be formed from Zennia alone. For a man, this would give the byname Zenniaskii.
The submitter will not allow changes to the given name, but is accepting Pelican's advice on the byname.

Petra is a diminutive of the masculine name Petr; it's dated to 1552 in Wickenden (3rd ed.) s.n. Petr, p. 265, in the name Petra Pakich.

Zennia Velikaia is a header in Wickenden's section on place names (p. 439); the entry indicates the city was founded in the 12th century. According to the information on p. xxix, locative bynames are most often created by adding an adjectival suffix, usually -skii/-skoi/-skyi.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

35: Phelippe du Peiregore - New Name & New Device

Argent, a bend sinister sable between three gouttes in bend sinister and a cross formy gules.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound (Philippe) most important.

Submitted as Philippe du Périgord, the spelling of the byname was changed at kingdom to match available documentation, and the spelling of the given name was changed to avoid problems with temporal disparity.

Phelippe is a masculine name found in Colm Dubh: "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/paris.html), in the name Phelippe l'escremisséeur. The article also has a Phelipe de Pontaise [un] mari. The originally submitted Philippe is dated to 1403 in Chrestienne la pescheresse: "Personal names found in the Armorial des rois de l'épinette de Lille 1283-1486: a sampling of male names from the North of France between the 13th and 15th century" (KWHSS Proceedings, Caid, 2007).

Peiregore is a 12th century form of the region name Périgord found in Ernest Nègre: Toponymie générale de la France (Librairie Droz, 1990; http://books.google.com/books?id=rsNpi7IVulEC), p. 155 s.n. Le Périgord. The originally submitted spelling is found as a header in Dauzat & Rostaing. The preposition du is a contraction of de plus the article le, as shown in "French Names from Two 13th Century Chronicles: Places Names used in Locative Surnames" by Arval Benicoeur (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/crusades/crusadesLieux.html).


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

36: Rufus Bowie - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 2008, via the East

Per pale embattled sable and argent, a sackbut palewise, bell to base, and a recorder counterchanged.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

37: Sephare Dryden - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.

The submitter asks that she be contacted for approval for any changes needed.

Sephare is a feminine name derived from an unrecorded Old English *S{ae-}faru. It's dated in this spelling as a given name to 1188 in R&W s.n. Seavers, p. 398. Other spellings include Radulfus filius Sefare 1221 and Seuar' Boykin 1277, showing that the name continued in use at least into the 13th century.

Dryden is a header in R&W, p. 143; the entry includes Philip de Dryden 1290. R&W's introduction (p. xvii, Loss of the Preposition) says there are 28 examples of locative bynames without prepositions in the Curia Regis Rolls, 1201-21, and lists the examples Alan Cheles 1219 and Richard Sulee 1221. This makes Dryden without the preposition unusual but certainly not impossible as a 13th century byname.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

38: Sigurðr berserkr - New Name & New Device

Or, a pale between two bears combattant sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (9-10th c. Norwegian/Icelandic) most important.
Meaning (Sigurðr) most important.

The submitter wants no changes to the given name, but will allow all changes needed to make the byname registerable.

Sigurðr is a masculine name found on p. 14 of Geirr Bassi; it's found 17 times in the Lándnámabók.

berserkr is a byname glossed as 'berserk' on p. 20 of Geirr Bassi; it's found once in Lándnámabók.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

39: Síle Bowie - New Device

OSCAR finds the name on the East LoI of September 06, 2007 as submitted.

Per bend embattled sable and argent, a thimble and a viol counterchanged.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

40: Simona bat Leone - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Meaning ('Simona daughter of Leon', with the 'bat' particle if possible) most important.

Simona is a feminine name found in "Italian Renaissance Women's Names" by Rhian Lyth of Blackmoor Vale (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/italian.html). It's also listed with a frequency of 22 in "A Listing of all Women's Given Names from the Condado Section of the Florence Catasto of 1427" by Juliana de Luna (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/condado/womensalpha.html). The similar Simone is found as both a feminine and masculine name in "A Sample of Jewish Names in Milan 1540-1570" by Yehoshua ben Haim haYerushalmi (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/yehoshua/milan_names.html). One feminine example is Ricca de Suavis son of Simone (f).

Leone is a masculine name found in "Names of Jews in Rome in the 1550's" by Yehoshua ben Haim haYerushalmi (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/yehoshua/rome_names.html); it occurs four times as a given name, and twice in the patronymic di Leone. This article also offers support for the mix of languages in the patronymic phrase: it has three examples of Hebrew ben in an otherwise Italian name (e.g. Benedetto ben Joab Passapaire), along with eight examples using Arabic ibn (e.g. Jehudah Cohen di David Cohen ibn Nardush). The article doesn't have any examples of the feminine equivalents (bat, bint), but many of the women are listed with just one name, and the ones with further names very often include English translations like "the daughter of". Kingdom commenters feel the masculine examples should be enough to give the benefit of the doubt to the feminine construction.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

41: Siobhan inghen Chon Mhara - New Name & New Device

Quarterly vert and Or, a sheep passant sable between four crosses parted and fretted counterchanged.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Culture (spelling: Siobhan) most important.

Submitted as Siobhan inghen Con Mara, the patronymic has been lenited as required in a feminine name.

Siobhan is based on Siobhán, the standard Early Modern Irish Gaelic spelling of the name of 22 women in "Index of Names in Irish Annals" by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Siban.shtml), dated between 1310 and 1600.

inghen Chon Mhara is a patronymic based on the masculine name Cú Mhara, found as the standard Early Modern spelling of the name of 12 men in the Annals between 1030 and 1486 (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/CuMara.shtml). Precedent addressed this exact byname in July 2003 (Sorcha inghen Chon Mhara, A-Atenveldt): "When the masculine name Cú Mara is used in a woman's byname, it needs to be put into the genitive case and lenited. Therefore, inghen Chon Mhara and, more typically, inghean Chon Mhara are forms of this byname appropriate for Early Modern Irish Gaelic." The precedent quotes an earlier one from Jan. 2002 (Temair Brecc inghen Choluim, A-West) describing inghen as a conservative spelling of inghean, found in the Annals of Connacht.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

42: Tadgán mac Lagmainn - New Name & New Device

Azure, in fess on a turtle between two swords argent, a valknut sable, and a chief Or.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Gaelic with byname of Norse origin) most important.

Tadgán is a header in OCM (p. 168), identified as a diminutive of Tadc. The entry for the latter gives examples of Tadc from the tenth and eleventh centuries. Tadgán is also found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Tadgan.shtml), where it's identified as the standard Middle Irish Gaelic nominative spelling of the name of two men in the Annals, dated between 972 and 996.

mac Lagmainn is based on a patronymic found in the Annals of Ulster, U1167.1: Muircertach, mac Lagmaind h-Ui Duibh Dirma (http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G100001A/text715.html). It also occurs in a slightly different spelling in U1014.2: Amlaim m. Laghmaind. The -nn ending is based on advice from Rowel, who said -nn and -nd vary freely in Middle Irish Gaelic. Mac Laghmainn is found as a second header in Woulfe s.n. Mac Ladhmainn (p. 386); the entry says the patronymic derives from a Norse personal name meaning 'lawman'.

The use of a valknut is a step from period practice.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

43: Titus Claudius Silvanus - New Name & New Device

Argent, two lightning bolts in saltire gules, overall a wolf's head couped sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Roman) most important.

Titus is listed as a common praenomen in Meradudd Cethin: "Names and Naming Practices of Regal and Republican Rome" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/roman/). Examples of its use are the 1st c. BC Roman consuls Titus Statilius Taurus II and Titus Quinctius Crispinus, listed on a website called UNRV History (United Nations of Roma Victrix, http://www.unrv.com/government/consul-1-bc.php).

Claudius is a nomen dated between 495 and 38 BC in Meradudd's cited article. The UNRV site has the examples Marcus Claudius Marcellus Aeserninus and C. Claudius Pulcher (among others) in the list of 1st c. BC consuls.

Silvanus is a cognomen found in Lindley Richard Dean: "A study of the cognomina of soldiers in the Roman legions" (http://books.google.com/books?id=MF0KAAAAIAAJ). One example is L. Pomponius Silvanus, a soldier in the XIth legion during the first century, found on p. 52. The cognomen also occurs on the above-cited UNRV list in the name of the Consul Minor for the year 2 BC: Marcus Plautius Silvanus.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

44: Tommaso Valeriano - New Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 2003, via the East

Purpure, a dog rampant and in sinister chief an anchor Or

Old Item: Per bend sable and purpure, a sword between six mullets two two and two argent, to be retained as a badge.

His current device was registered in Nov. 2003 via the East.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

45: Tristan of the Black lion - New Name

Sound (Blacklion) most important.

Submitted as Tristan of Blacklion, the byname was changed at kingdom to better match the available documentation.

Tristan is the submitter's mundane given name, witnessed on his passport by the consulting herald.

of the Black lion is a constructed inn sign-based surname based on Gretchen Beck: "Inn, Shop, or House names found in imprints from the EEBO database, 1473-1600" (http://www.contrib.andrew.cmu.edu/~grm/sign-of-the.html). Under the category of 'Color + Beast', examples include signe (or sygne) of the Red lion and signe (or sygne) of the Black beare. R&W briefly discusses sign names on p. xvi under 'Local Surnames', mentioning atte Lamb and atte Raven as examples; a dated example is found s.n. Bell: John atte Belle 1332.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

46: Ulrich Parcifal - New Name & New Device

Vert, two axes addorsed and on a chief argent three crosses potent vert, overall a label couped gules.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.

Ulrich is a masculine name found as a header dated in this spelling between c. 1250 and 1369 in Talan Gwynek: "Medieval German Given Names from Silesia" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/bahlow_v.htm). It's also a header found in this spelling 95 times in Aryanhwy merch Catmael: "German Names from Nürnberg, 1497" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/german/nurnberg1497.html).

Parcifal is a masculine name found in Bahlow/Gentry s.n. Parseval; this spelling is dated to 1436 and 1551 as a given name, and to 1296 as a surname. A letter is included from Friedrich Parcifal (registered 02/2009 via the East), attesting that Ulrich is his son and therefore eligible to use the grandfather clause for the surname [which hardly seems necessary, but there it is].

There is a letter of permission to conflict included from Friedrich Parcifal, whose device Vert, two axes addorsed and on a chief argent three crosses potent vert was registered in Oct. 2007, via the East.

Correction (2010-Jan-19 16:01:10): It turns out that this device was accompanied by several pages of documentation for low-contrast labels; this documentation was the victim of technical difficulties before the kingdom commentary level. It's rather long to include in a correction, so I'll put scans up in a comment once I get the scans done.


This item was on the 04-2010 LoAR

47: William Blackthorn - New Name & New Device

Azure, a saltire cotised and in chief two scimitars in saltire argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Submitted as William of Blackthorn, the preposition has been dropped at the submitter's request.

William is one of the most common English men's names, introduced by the Normans in the 11th century, according to Withycombe s.n. William. It occurs 230 times in Julian Goodwyn's "English Names found in Brass Enscriptions" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/brasses/), dated as early as 1323, and it's the third most frequent masculine name in Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "16th Century Gloucestershire Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/late16.html), with 74 instances of the spelling William out of a total of 154 occurrences of the name.

Blackthorn is an unmarked locative surname based on John de Blakethorn 1276, John Blakethorn 1379, and William Blakthorn 1442 from R&W s.n. Blackthorn (p. 47), and on Blackthorne 1316 in Watts s.n. Blackthorn.


Bibliography

Bahlow, Hans; translated by Edda Gentry. Dictionary of German Names, 2nd ed. Max Kade Institute, Madison, Wisconsin, 2002.

Bardsley, Charles Wareing. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames. Oxford University Press, London, 1901.

Black, George F. The Surnames of Scotland. New York Public Library, 1989.

Brechenmacher, Josef Karlmann. Etymologisches Wörterbuch der Deutschen Familiennamen. C.A. Starke-Verlag, Limburg, 1957-60.

Dauzat, Albert et Charles Rostaing. Dictionnaire Étymologique des Noms de Lieux de la France. Paris, 1963.

Ekwall, Eilert. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names. Fourth edition. Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1991.

Geirr Bassi Haraldsson. The Old Norse Name. Private Press, Maryland, 1977.

Morgan, T.J. and Prys Morgan. Welsh Surnames. University of Wales Press, Cardiff, 1985.

Morlet, Marie-Therese. Dictionnaire Étymologique des Noms de Famille. Librairie Académique Perrin, 1997.

Morlet, Marie-Therese. Etude d'anthroponymie picarde, les noms de personne en Haute Picardie aux XIIIe, XIVe, XVe siecles. Amiens, Musee de Picardie, 1967.

Ó Corraín, Donnchadh and Fidelma Maguire. Irish Names. Lilliput Press, Dublin, 1990.

Paul Wickenden of Thanet. A Dictionary of Period Russian Names. 3rd edition. SCA, Inc., 2000.

Reaney, P.H. and R. M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. Third edition, Oxford University Press, 1995.

Solveig Throndardottir. Name Construction in Mediaeval Japan. The Outlaw Press, Carslbad, NM 1994; Potboiler Press, Columbia, MO 1999.

Watts, Victor. The Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names. Cambridge University Press, 2004.

Withycombe, E.G. The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names. Third edition. Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1979.

Woulfe, Patrick. Sloinnte Gaedheal is Gall. Irish Names and Surnames. M.H. Gill & Son, Dublin, 1923.


OSCAR counts 33 New Names, 1 New Name Change, 1 New Alternate Name, 1 New Household Name, 29 New Devices, 1 New Device Change and 3 New Badges. These 69 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $207 for them. OSCAR counts 1 New Holding Name Change. OSCAR counts 2 Resub Devices and 1 Resub Badge. These 4 items are not chargeable. There are a total of 73 items submitted on this letter.

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