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East LoI dated 2009-10-24

Unto Olwyn Laurel, Istvan Wreath, Aryanhwy Pelican, the SCA College of Arms, and all others who do receive this letter, greetings from Kolosvari Arpadne Julia, Blue Tyger Herald.

It is the intent of Easterners to register the following items. Unless otherwise noted, the submitter has no desire for authenticity, allows any changes, and allows a holding name. I've used the "language" checkbox to correspond with the "language/culture" box on the name submission form.

This item was on the 02-2010 LoAR

1: Elena Lytle - New Name & New Device

Vert, on an open book argent a necklace of beads in annulo vert, on a chief argent three wooden drop spindles bendwise sinister proper threaded vert.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language most important.

Elena is found fifteen times, dated between 1187 and 1381, in Talan Gwynek: "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/reaneyAG.html) s.n. Ellen.

Lytle is a surname found in R&W p. 281 s.n. Little, which dates Thomas le Lytle to 1296, along with Eadric Litle 972 and Lefstan Litle c1095.

This device is clear of Lillian Lytle's device (submitted below), with one CD for the change in the tincture of the field and another for the change in type and orientation of the tertiaries on the chief.


This item was on the 02-2010 LoAR

2: Iron Bog, Barony of - New Order Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2010, via the East

Order of the Ducke

(Fieldless) A duck naiant per fess argent and sable

The group's name was registered in March 1984 (via the East) as Iron Bog, Shire of. They became a barony in 2006, and hope to have the O&A updated to reflect this.

This order name falls into the category of orders named for heraldic charges, as described on the August 2005 Cover Letter. All such orders use the eponymous heraldic charge in the badge or other regalia of the order. Meradudd Cethin's "Project Ordensnamen"(http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/) lists orders named for a creature as the fourth most common type. Examples include the Order of the Swan (Cleeves, 500; Germany, 1440).

Ducke is a period spelling of "duck", a swimming bird found throughout Europe (and the rest of the world) in both wild and domesticated species. The OED sv duck dates this spelling to 1523, 1530, and 1564:

1523 Fitzherb, Husb. §146 Take hede how thy hennes, duckes, and gees do ley.

1530 Palsgr. 215/2 Ducke a foule, canne. Duke of the ryver, cannette

1564 J. Rastell Confut. Jewell's Serm. 37b, He is more neerer a ducke than a duke.

The duck has been used as a heraldic charge, though rarely, since the earliest days of heraldry. According to Rodney Dennys, The Heraldic Imagination (Clarkson N. Potter, Inc., New York, 1975) p. 168: "Bouly de Lesdain, in his analysis of the early French seals and enamels, dated between 1127 and 1300, notes forty-eight examples of the Eagle, but only one each of the Cock, Duck, Crow, and Magpie." One example of a somewhat later-period heraldic duck can be seen in the 1507 grant of arms of the Gersei Pethő family in Hungary (http://www.arcanum.hu/mol/lpext.dll/mol_cimer/1/28).

This order name does not conflict with the Order of the White Duck (of the Barony of Loch Salann, Dec. 2003 via Artemisia), per RfS V.2.c.


This item was on the 02-2010 LoAR

3: Lillian Lytle - New Name & New Device

Azure, on an open book argent a necklace of beads in annulo azure, on a chief argent three trees proper.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language most important.

Lillian is found in Withycombe p. 196 s.n. Lil(l)ian; it says the header names "probably originated as pet-forms of Elizabeth", and continues with "Lillian is found as a christian name in England in the 16th C". The entry also mentions the surname Lilion, which occurs "as early as 1273 and looks like a diminutive in -on of Lily." This surname is also found in R&W p. 279 s.n. Liley, with Geoffrey Lilion dated to 1279.

Lytle is a surname found in R&W p. 281 s.n. Little, which dates Thomas le Lytle to 1296, along with Eadric Litle 972 and Lefstan Litle c1095.

This name conflicts with Elizabeth Little (09/2005, An Tir), because Lillian is a diminutive of Elizabeth. Elizabeth has graciously provided a letter of permission to conflict.

This device is clear of Isabelle Christine de Foix: Azure, an open book and on a chief argent three hurts (04/2002, Meridies), with one CD for the type and tincture of the charges on the chief and another for the addition of the tertiary necklace. It is also clear of Elena Lytle's device (submitted above), with one CD for the change in the tincture of the field and another for the change in type and orientation of the tertiaries on the chief.


This item was on the 02-2010 LoAR

4: Lucrezia Spinelli - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 2010, via the East

Per chevron vert and gules, two sheaves of artists brushes and a framed door Or.


This item was on the 02-2010 LoAR

5: Marietta da Firenze - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 2004, via the East

Per pale vert and Or, a badger rampant sable marked argent.

This badge is clear of Sengeli von Zauberberg: Or, a brown woodchuck rampant proper (03/2009 Middle), with one CD for the tincture of the field and another for the tincture of the beast: brown is different from sable per the March 2002 Cover Letter.


This item was on the 02-2010 LoAR

6: Matilda of Fossoway - New Name & New Device

Per chevron Or and sable, two cats statant respectant and an acorn counterchanged.

No changes.

Matilda is a feminine name dated in this header spelling between 1189 and 1215 in Withycombe p. 212-13.

of Fossoway is a locative byname from the united parish of Fossoway and Tulliebole, in Perthshire and Kinross-shire, Scotland. The parish church (Established Church of Scotland) has birth and marriage records dating from 1609-1687 (http://dgnscrn.demon.co.uk/genuki/KRS/Fossoway/index.html and http://www.btinternet.com/~fossoway/). Kingdom is unconvinced by this documentation, but is hoping that the greater resources of the College will turn up something better. (The closest we could find is Fosse Way, an "ancient road from Lincoln to near Axminster" in Ekwall p. 185.)


This item was on the 02-2010 LoAR

7: Orm the Scop - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (10c. Anglo-Danish) most important.

Orm is found in Nordiskt Runnamnslexicon by Lena Peterson (http://www.sofi.se/images/runor/pdf/lexikon.pdf) under Ormr; the translation by Gunnvöra Silfrahárr (http://www.vikinganswerlady.com/FTP_Files/NordisktRunnamnslexicon.zip) indicates that orm is identified as Old Danish and Old Swedish, and it's found as a byname. The name is discussed in Academy of S. Gabriel report 3146 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/3146), which recommends Ormr as a well-attested 10th c. Icelandic and Norwegian masculine name (citing Lind s.n. Ormr) which is pronounced very similarly to Orm. Ormr is also the form found as a masculine name in Geirr Bassi (p. 13 column 2), with 27 occurrences in the Landnámabók. The spelling Orm is found in Words, Names, and History: Selected Writings of Cecily Clark (edited by Peter Jackson; D.S. Brewer, Cambridge, 1995). It's on p. 313, in a list of single-element names found as marginalia on the leaves of a tenth-century gospel-book (British Library additional MS 40,000). The article says the name-lists date from the 12th century, and show "unmistakably English" features. If necessary, the submitter will accept the spelling with the final -r, but he would prefer it without.

A scop is an Old English poet or minstrel, found in the OED in this spelling in Beowulf:

Beowulf 496 Scop hwilum sang hador on Heorote. c888 K. ÆLFRED Boeth. xli. §1 Omerus se goda sceop. c1205 LAY. 22705 Scopes er sungen of Arure an kingen.
Commenters noted that the Scop could be viewed as a Lingua Anglica form of the Norse prepended byname Skáld-, glossed as 'skald, poet' in Geirr Bassi p. 27 column 1.


This item was on the 02-2010 LoAR

8: Rose Mary Anderson - New Name & New Device

Argent, in fess a sprig of rosemary vert and a raven volant sable, a chief indented purpure.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language (family's lowland heritage and the name Anderson) most important.

Originally submitted as Rós Máiri inghean Andreu, the name was changed at kingdom to make it registerable (double given names are not registerable in Gaelic) and to comply with the submitter's desire for a Lowland name using the surname Anderson.

Rose is a header in Talan Gwynek: "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/reaneyHZ.html), dated in this spelling to 1202, 1277, 1279, 1309, 1316, 1325, 1332, 1379, and 1525.

Mary is also a header in Talan's article, dated in this spelling to 1272-1307, c.1440, 1480, 1597, and 1598. Double given names were rare in late period England, but are registerable (Rebekah Anna Leah Wynterbourne, 06/2004 R-Atenveldt).

Anderson is dated to 1529 and 1594 in Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Index of Scots names in DOST" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/scots/dost/anderson.html). It's also found under Aberdeen Surnames, with 122 total instances, in "Early 16th Century Scottish Lowland Names" by Sharon Krossa (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/lowland16/index.shtml), dated in this spelling to 1518, 1522, 1525, and 1540. A combination of Scots and English is not a deviation from period practice (Michael Duncan of Hadley, 04/04 A-Caid).

(Note: the rosemary is actually vert on the submission form; the grayish tincture here is an artifact of scanning.)


This item was on the 02-2010 LoAR

9: Sorcha nic Aedha - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in July of 1999, via the East

Per fess azure and sable, a fess wavy argent and in chief a sun Or.

This device is clear of Morwynna Cryw: Per fess azure and counter-ermine, a fess wavy argent between a sun in splendour Or and a decrescent moon argent (12/1989 East), with one CD for the tincture of half the field and another for removing the decrescent.


This item was on the 02-2010 LoAR

10: Stephanus de Londres - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2007, via the East

Per fess azure and gules, three estoiles in fess argent and a dragon Or.

This device is clear of both Sean de Londres: Per fess azure and gules, in pale a Paschal lamb argent and a dragon segreant Or (02/1985 East) and Suzanne Neuber de Londres: Per fess azure and gules, two chalices argent and a dragon segreant Or (01/1993 East), with CDs for the number and type of primary charges.


This item was on the 02-2010 LoAR

11: Þorbj{o,}rn Ragnvaldsson - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.

Þorbj{o,}rn is a masculine name found in Geirr Bassi p. 16 column 2, with 55 occurrences in the Landnámabók. The submitter would prefer the spelling Torbjorn, but kingdom did not turn up any support for that; it's implied to be a later-period spelling in Academy of S. Gabriel report 1520 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/1520), but without any further details.

Ragnvaldr is a header labeled as a masculine name on p. 162 (or p. 158 by the PDF's numbering) of Nordiskt runnamnslexikon by Lena Peterson (http://www.sofi.se/images/runor/pdf/lexikon.pdf). In Gunnvöra Silfrahárr's translation (http://www.vikinganswerlady.com/FTP_Files/NordisktRunnamnslexicon.zip), it's on p. 77, and the first part of the entry reads "O.Dan. Rawald (?), Regnwald, O.Swed. Ragnvald, OW.Norse Rögnvaldr." (That last actually appears as R{o,}gnvaldr in the original.) R{o,}gnvaldr is listed as a masculine name (with one occurrence in Landnámabók) on p. 14, column 1 of Geirr Bassi. One could construct the -a- spelling based on this source: it has Ragnarr, Ragnfrødr, Ragnfriðr, Ragnheiðr and Ragnhildr on p. 14 (the first two masculine, the rest feminine) using Ragn-, and Aðalvaldr, Afvaldr, Ávaldr, Gjafvaldr, Gunnvaldr, Ráðvaldr, R{o,}gnvaldr, Þorvaldr, {O,}gvaldr, and {O,}lvaldr as masculine names in -valdr. The patronymic Ragnvaldsson is constructed according to the instructions on p. 17 of Geirr Bassi: final -r becomes -s for the possessive, and -son is added at the end.


This item was on the 02-2010 LoAR

12: Ysmay de Lynn - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Client requests authenticity for "14 Century England".

Ysmay is a feminine name dated to 1273 in Withycombe s.n. Ismay, p. 165. It's described as a rather rare 13c. name with uncertain etymology, perhaps related to Ismenia.

de Lynn is found in Bardsley s.n. Lynn (p. 503), which dates Cecilia de Lynn temp. Henry III - Edward I; this translates to sometime between 1216 and 1307.

Correction (2009-Oct-26 14:10:18): Oops, forgot one checkbox: sound (unspecified) is marked as most important.


Bibliography

Bardsley, Charles Wareing. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames. Oxford University Press, London, 1901.

Ekwall, Eilert. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names. Fourth edition. Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1991.

Geirr Bassi Haraldsson. The Old Norse Name. Private Press, Maryland, 1977.

Reaney, P.H. and R. M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. Third edition, Oxford University Press, 1995.

Withycombe, E.G. The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names. Third edition. Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1979.


OSCAR counts 7 New Names, 1 New Order Name, 7 New Devices and 2 New Badges. These 17 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $51 for them. There are a total of 17 items submitted on this letter.

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