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East LoI dated 2008-12-22

Unto Olwyn Laurel, Istvan Wreath, Aryanhwy Pelican, the SCA College of Arms, and all others who do receive this letter, greetings from Brunissende Dragonette de Brocéliande, Blue Tyger Herald.

It is the intent of the Easterners to register the following items.

Unless otherwise noted, the submitter has no desire for authenticity, allows any changes, and allows a holding name.

This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

1: Alianora la tesserande - New Name & Resub Device

Purpure, in pale two compass stars and in fess a decrescent and an increscent argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (Anglo-French) most important.
Culture (Anglo-French) most important.

Alianora is a feminine name dated to 1428 in Withycombe s.n. Eleanor. The entry says the name was introduced into England from France via Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122-1204).

la tesserande is a byname meaning 'the (female) weaver'. There's an Ameline la tesserande in Colm Dubh's "An Index to the Given Names Found in the 1292 Census of Paris" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/paris.html).

By current precedent (July 2005 Cover Letter: Counting Differences), this device conflicts with Rafael Diego de Burgos (Dec. 1986 Ansteorra): Purpure, a mullet dismembered argent, with just one CD for adding three charges.

However, the "reasoning" behind this result seems utterly insane to several Eastern commenters (and to Eastern Crown): it's based on a process of changing one device into the other while positing the fewest number of intermediate steps. However, if we consider the devices as they are, with no intermediate steps (zero being by definition the "fewest possible"), then we have a registered device with a primary charge group consisting of one charge, a mullet; and a submitted device with a primary charge group of four charges, consisting of two mullets and two crescents. Per the Rules for Submissions, part X.4.e., "Changing the type of at least half of the charges in a group is one clear difference", and part X.4.f., "Significantly changing the number of charges in any group placed directly on the field or overall is one clear difference. One, two, and three are significantly different from any number". No matter how I and others look at it, that's two clear differences: the type of half the primary charge group has changed to crescents, and the number of charges in the group has changed from one to four. This is the type of reasoning that comes naturally to almost everyone, and in the name of the Eastern College of Heralds, Eastern Crown respectfully asks Wreath to reconsider that precedent.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

2: Alverik Wyntervelt - New Name & New Device

Argent, a chevron checky argent and gules between three lozenges sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound (Alverik Wynterveld) most important.

Alverik - Bahlow (Gentry) p. 12 s.n. Alver(s) dates Alverik Raleves to 1406.

Wyntervelt - Brechenmacher vol. 2 p. 819 s.n Winterfeld cites Adam miles dictus Wyntervelt dated to 1320.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

3: Angharad verch Rees - New Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 2008, via the East

Argent, a fess argent fimbriated and fretty purpure.

Old Item: Quarterly azure and argent all goutty counterchanged, a rose purpure barbed and seeded proper., to be retained as a badge.

Her current device and her badge were registered in April 2003, via the East, under the holding name Angharad of Anglespur.

Her name was registered in March of 2008, via the East.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

4: Anna de Tatecastre - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2008, via the East

Or, on a saltire couped gules a rabbit couchant argent.

Her name was registered in Feb. 2008, via the East.

Her original device submission of Or, on a saltire gules a rabbit couchant bendwise argent was returned on the August 2007 LoD for conflict with Donal macRuiseart (Oct. 1976): Or, on a saltire gules four anchors Or, with just one CD for multiple changes to the tertiary charge(s). This submission makes the saltire couped to clear this conflict.

Correction (2008-Dec-27 10:12:47): This should be a new device: the previous return was at kingdom.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

5: Birna Hakadottir - New Name & New Device

Argent, a bear statant erect, on a chief azure three mullets argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language (Viking) most important.
Culture (Viking) most important.

Birna is a feminine name found on p. 8 of Geirr Bassi.

Haki is a masculine name found on p. 10 of same. According to the instructions on patronymic formation on p. 17, -i changes to -a for the possessive, resulting in Hakadottir.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

6: Catherine of Carillion - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister azure and sable, in fess a decrescent, a mullet of seven points and an increscent argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound (As spelled) most important.

Catherine is dated to 1591 (Townson) s.n. Katharine in Talan Gwynek's "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/reaneyHZ.html).

Carillion is an SCA branch name registered in Feb. 1984, via the East.

This device should be clear of Anna la Claire (Nov. 2006 East): Per bend azure and sable, in bend three decrescents argent, with one CD for arrangement and one for changing the type of two out of three charges.

It's also clear of Sasha Vladimir Obolénskij (Jun. 1991 West): Per bend sinister azure and sable, a mullet of four points bendwise, elongated to dexter chief argent, with one CD for number of primary charges, and another for the number of points on the mullet.

Eastern Crown has added the word "points" to the blazon.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

7: Deirdre Planchet - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1992, via the East

(Fieldless) A billet gules pierced by a needle fesswise azure.

Her name was registered in May 1992, via the East.

For the sake of completeness, we should mention that her device (Argent, a billet gules pierced by a needle fesswise, on a chief azure three weaver's tablets argent) was forwarded to Laurel on the East's October xLoI.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

8: Edmond O'Roreke - New Name & New Device

Per pale vert and sable, a unicorn and a lion passant respectant within an orle argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.

Edmond is found several times in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Anglicized Irish Names in Indenture Documents, 1570-1578" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/RawData_Indentures.shtml). An indenture dated 10 Feb 1570 mentions Edmond O'Ferrall of Crieduff, one from 26 June 1570 has Edmond Mc Donill Moile of Monynecrosse and Edmond Mc Donyll Moill, another from the same date has Edmond Riough of the O'Moklaghe, and so on.

O Roreke is found in "16th & 17th Century Anglicized Irish Surnames from Woulfe" by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/Woulfe/) as an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadhraic. [The documentation section makes no mention of the apostrophe.]

The quoted indenture documents show that the apostrophe is consistent with period Anglicized Irish orthography, Eastern Crown has left it in place.

This device is clear of Walter Kempe of Falconhold (Feb. 1991 Outlands): Per pale vert and sable, a lion rampant within an orle Or, with one CD for adding the unicorn, and two more for the tinctures of the primaries and the orle.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

9: Ellisif Vémundardóttir - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language (Old Norse) most important.
Culture (Old Norse) most important.

Ellisif is listed as a feminine name on p. 9 of Geirr Bassi.

Vémundr is listed as a masculine name on p. 16 of same. According to the instructions for patronymic formation on p. 17, "many men's names, most commonly those ending in ... -undr, ..., form a genitive in -ar", resulting in Vémundardóttir. (The examples show that the suffix replaces the final 'r' of the name: Sigurðr -> Sigurðardóttir.)


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

10: Emengar la fileresse - New Name & New Device

Vert, a spinning wheel and on a chief Or a dragon passant breathing flames gules.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language (French) most important.
Culture (French) most important.

Her previous name submission of Creiddylad Beumaris was returned in Sep. 2007 in Kingdom, because Creiddylad has been ruled to be a unique literary name and therefore unregisterable. This resubmission is a completely different name.

Emengar - Colm Dubh's "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/paris.html) lists Emengar la sourde ('the deaf woman').

la fileresse: submitted as la fileuse it is meant as an occupational byname meaning 'the (female) spinner', from the French verb filer 'to spin thread' (The Random House Basic Dictionary, French-English English-French). Examples of this formation include Aubertin le crieeur (1292 Census, op. cit.), from crier 'to shout'. Also, R&W s.n. Spinner has John le Spinner 1270. Commenters couldn't find any support for the submitted fileuse. Colm Dubh's "Occupational By-Names in the 1292 Tax Role of Paris" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/parisbynames.html) gives filandriere 'spinner' and fileresse de saie 'silk spinner' (both feminine), along with fileeur de saie for the masculine version of the latter. The submitted la fileuse has therefore been changed to la fileresse (the more similar-sounding of the options) in order to match the available documentation.

This identical device was returned in Kingdom in Sep. 2007 LoD because her name was being returned, and kingdoms cannot create holding names.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

11: Eoghan Bastard mac Lachlainn - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in July of 2006, via the East

Per bend sinister azure and vert, on a bend sinister between a mullet of four points and a tree eradicated argent, a raven close to sinister palewise maintaining a spear bendwise sinister sable.

His name was registered in July 2006, via the East.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

12: Erika Rothals - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in December of 1996, via Atlantia

Per pale checky argent and gules and checky sable and argent, an emmet statant erect contourny sable maintaining a beer mug Or, and an emmet statant erect gules maintaining a beer mug Or.

Her name was registered in Dec. 1996, via Atlantia.

Commenters expressed some concern about the lack of contrast, especially of the black ant, which makes it difficult to figure out what's going on from any distance. Some also doubted whether the insects' posture could be reproduced from the blazon. Eastern Crown does not feel qualified to address these issues, and thus is forwarding this for Wreath's delectation.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

13: Friderich Grimme - New Name & New Device

Argent, a fess wavy vert.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (German) most important.
Culture (German) most important.

Friderich is dated to 1160-90 in "Medieval German Given Names from Silesia" by Talan Gwynek (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/bahlow_v.htm). Also, Brechenmacher vol. 1 p. 506 s.n. Friedrich has Uolrich Friderichs zu Hottingen, 1317.

Grimme - Bahlow/Gentry p. 171 s.n. Grimm says that in northern Germany, the byname is locative in origin, citing Wulfard von Grimme Stralsund 1284, Jorge von Grymme Liegnitz 1491, and Jorge Grimme Liegnitz 1559. The entry also lists a Henr. (de) Grimme Breslau 1301.

This name should be clear of Friedrich de la Grimace (May 1989 Calontir): commenters felt that Grimme and Grimace look and sound different.

This lovely device is clear of Maddelena Jessamyn de Piemonte (Jun. 1989 Calontir): Or, on a fess wavy vert a cinquefoil Or, with one CD for the field and another for removing the tertiary charge.

It's clear of Cellach Cosnocht macCuain (Jan. 2000 Meridies): Argent, a fess vert between three lanterns sable, with a CD for the type of fess, and another for removing the secondaries.

And it's clear of Bulgaria's flag (Dec. 1994 Laurel): Per fess argent and gules, a fess vert, with a CD for the field and another for the type of fess.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

14: Gaius Iulius Aiax - New Name & New Device

Per pale azure and Or, two squirrels combattant between three acorns counterchanged.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Roman 1st cent.) most important.
Culture (Roman 1st cent.) most important.

He would prefer to keep Iulius, but Ajax can go away if needed.

Documentation consists of the instruction "Please contact Allisoun MacCool for documentation." Eastern Crown has contacted Mistress Alisoun MacCoul of Elphane in Atlantia, who says the submitter does not appear to have been listening: she strongly discouraged him from combining "Magnus" with either Gaius Iulius (Julius Caesar's praenomen and nomen) or with Ajax (because the combination would allude to the greater Ajax of Homer's Illiad). The name elements Gaius, Iulius, and Magnus are found in "Roman Nomenclature" by Barbara F. McManus (http://www.vroma.org/~bmcmanus/roman_names.html), as praenomen, nomen, and cognomen ex virtute (honorific byname), respectively. For Aiax, McManus (op. cit.) says that slaves were often given names from mythology, and further says that a freed slave would take the praenomen and nomen of the man who freed him, plus his slave name as a cognomen. Thus, if a man named Gaius Iulius [Something] freed a slave named Aiax, the freedman's name would become Gaius Iulius Aiax. The Perseus project online (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/persfreq?lookup=Ajax&lang=la) finds 62 instances of Ajax in Latin texts, mostly in Ovid's Metamorphoses or commentary on Vergil's Aeneid by Maurus Servius Honoratus. (Actually, it files all forms of the name under this heading, including all the various Latin declensions such as the genitive Aiacis. The use of 'i' vs 'j' is a matter of transcription -- some editors use 'i' everywhere, others substitute 'j' for the consonantal sound.)

There is a "Letter of Permission to Presume" included which reads: "I, [redacted], known in the SCA as Tiberius Iulius Rufus, give [redacted], known in the SCA as Ajax, permission for my Society name to be used in part of his Society name in order to indicate a relationship. I understand that this permission cannot be withdrawn once this name is registered. [handwritten addendum:] He is my mundane son. [signed] 30 July 08."

Submitted as Gaius Iulius Magnus Aiax, the cognomen Magnus has been dropped from the name in order to avoid issues of presumption against Julius Caesar or the greater Ajax of Homer's Illiad.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

15: Gavin Kilkenny of Kilcarren - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in July of 1980, via the East

(Fieldless) A sun Or eclipsed sable within and conjoined to an annulet gules.

His name and device were registered in July 1980, via the East.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

16: Gianetta Lucia Allegretta - New Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 2003, via the East

Or, a mermaid proper, facing dexter, crined gules, maintaining a threaded needle and a pair of scissors sable, on a chief invected azure a pomegranate Or seeded gules between two escallops inverted ar

Old Item: Argent, a bear rampant vert and on a bordure sable three thistles Or, to be released.

NB: the system is truncating the blazon five characters short of the end. The full blazon should read: Or, a mermaid proper, facing dexter, crined gules, maintaining a threaded needle and a pair of scissors sable, on a chief invected azure a pomegranate Or seeded gules between two escallops inverted argent.

Her name was registered in Jan. 2003, via the East.

Her current device was registered in Aug. 1990, via the East (under a previous name).

This identical device was initially returned on the at Kingdom level for conflict with Cordelia of Diamond Cove (Aug. 1993 West): Argent, a mermaid in her vanity proper, crined sable, on a chief invected azure three lozenges argent. The return said "There is a CD for the field, but the new device is not simple, and thus does not get a CD for the change to only the type of the tertiaries." This is mistaken: maintained charges don't count for complexity. Both this submission and the registered device have "no more than two types of charge directly on the field and ... no overall charges", qualifying for a CD for changing the type of all the tertiaries under RfS X.4.j.ii.

The submitter includes an email from Cordelia giving permission to conflict. Without an actual signature, the permission isn't valid, but luckily the point is moot.

Counting the maintained charges, the complexity count (tinctures plus charge types) of this device comes out to 12, which rather exceeds the rule-of-thumb guideline of 8. However, commenters felt that the overall impression isn't overly complex (there are examples of Tudor heraldry far more complicated than this), and without the maintained charges, the count is only 9, so Eastern Crown is forwarding it for Wreath to decide.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

17: Helgu-ulfr Sigarsson - New Name & New Device

Gules, on a pale between two wolves combattant argent in chief a mullet of eight points voided and interlaced sable.

Helgu- is a prepended byname glossed as 'Helga-' in Geirr Bassi, p. 22.

Ulfr is a masculine name, found as Úlfr on p. 15 of same.

Sigarr is a masculine name found on p. 14. According to the instructions on p. 17, names in -rr form genitives in -rs, giving Sigarsson for the patronymic.

The patronymic has been corrected from Siggarsson to Sigarsson. [The double 'g' appears to be an error: the only place where it appears is on the "Society Name" line on the name submission form. The worksheet and all the docs have one 'g', as do all the device-related forms.]

This name is clear of Úlfr Sigmundarson (Feb. 2003 Caid) if only by addition of the prepended byname, so the question of whether "Sigmund" and "Sigar" are different enough is luckily moot.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

18: Isabella Lupo - New Name & New Device

Argent, a tree eradicated proper between two flaunches vert each charged with three plates.

No changes.

The degree of changes allowed isn't 100% clear: the submission form has an X in the "no major changes" box, and the "no minor changes" box has an X with a lot of ink around it (either filling in the box, or scribbling it out, hard to tell). The worksheet is somewhat clearer: the "please change my name only if necessary" section has the text crossed out, and there's an X in the box for "make NO changes".

Isabella is found in Arval Benicoeur's "Feminine Given Names from the Online Catasto of Florence in 1427" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/catasto/).

Lupo is from "1800 Surnames Recorded in 1447" by N.F. Faraglia (http://www.abruzzoheritage.com/magazine/2002_06/d.htm).

This device should be well clear of Bergdís Thorgrímsdóttir (July 2001 An Tir): Argent, a tree proper, on a chief embattled azure three plates, with CDs for the type, number, and tincture of the peripheral charge(s).


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

19: Ísgerðr ísungr - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No holding name.
Sound most important.
Meaning most important.

Ísgerðr is listed on p. 12 of Geirr Bassi as a feminine name. [The documentation section has the accent on the 'I', but the Society Name line does not.]

ísungr is found on p. 23 as a nickname meaning 'polar bear'. According to the information on bynames on p. 18, "A noun may be used as a nickname for either a man or a woman."

Norse names may be registered with or without accent marks, as long as they're used or dropped consistently. The submitted name (Isgerðr ísungr) has an accent on the byname, and sound is marked as most important, so Eastern Crown has added the accent mark to the given name.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

20: Jacquelinne Sauvageon - New Device

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Azure, a urinal basketed Or and flasked argent triply-banded at the neck gules.

Her name was registered in Feb. 2002, via Meridies.

Documentation for a urinal in a basket as a period heraldic crest is included: Heraldry For the Local Historian and Genealogist by Stephen Friar (Grange Books) on p. 194 gives "the unique urinal crest of Dr Louys Caerlyon (1483)" as an example illustrating the wide range of charges used in heraldry. The picture shows a flask in a basket, very similar to the submitted emblazon.

Commenters felt that blazoning this a "urinal" (besides causing much sputtering) would be unlikely to result in anything like the submitted emblazon, unless the charge is included in the new PicDic or something. However, the terminology seems important to the submitter, Eastern Crown is leaving any reblazon decisions to Wreath.

This device should be clear of Morwydd Fyngwen (Feb. 1986 East): Azure, a basket Or, in chief three snowflakes argent, with one CD for the vase and another for removing the snowflakes.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

21: Jame Aguillier - New Name & New Device

Or, an English panther passant bendwise sable incensed gules between two fleurs-de-lys gules.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (French 13th Cent.) most important.
Culture (French 13th Cent.) most important.

Jame - "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" by Colm Dubh (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/paris.html) lists Jame le munier.

Aguillier - "Occupational By-Names in the 1292 Tax Role of Paris" by Colm Dubh (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/parisbynames.html) cites four examples of aguillier 'needle-maker'.

NB: the above is Eastern Crown's decision. Howver, http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/paris.html shows "l'aguillier" (Thoumas l'aguillier) with use of the "l'" article and no capital for the occupational byname. So it is my (Blue Tyger) opinion that the correct form would be Jame l'aguillier.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

22: Jeanne Robin - New Name & New Device

Per chevron Or and gules, three castles counterchanged windowed and gated sable.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.

Spelling is marked as most important; the specifics line says "French/English."

Jeanne is found as a feminine given name in Dauzat p. 343 s.n. Jean.

Robin is dated as a surname to 1248 in R&W p. 380 s.n. Robin.

This device should be clear of Cheryl of Castlewhyte (Sep. 1973): Per chevron sable and gules, three castles argent, and of David of Castlewhyte (Sep. 1973): Per chevron gules and sable, three castles argent, in each case with one CD for (at least) half the field tincture, and another for the tincture of the primary charges.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

23: Jón mj{o,}ksiglandi - New Name & New Device

Per pale gules and azure, two towers the dexter argent, the sinister Or, in chief a roundel per pale Or and argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Meaning (Jon the far-traveller) most important.

Jón is a masculine name found on p. 12 of Geirr Bassi. It's a name of Christian origin borne by 9 individuals in Landnamabok.

mj{o,}ksiglandi is found on p. 26 of same as a byname meaning 'much-sailing, far-travelling'; it was borne by three men in Landnamabok.

This device is clear of Brian FitzWilliam of Glastonbury (Jan. 2002 West): Per pale azure and argent, two towers counterchanged, and of Rúadhán Bárd (June 1998 AEthelmearc): Azure, in fess two chess rooks argent; in each case, there's one CD for changes to the field, one for the tincture of half the primary charges, and a third for the roundel.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

24: Jordan Lovatt - Resub Name & Resub Device

Per pale sable and argent, two unicorns combattant counterchanged, in chief a decrescent Or.

No changes.

This is an old "lost sheep": the identical name and a device blazoned the same as this appeared on the 2000-04-ILoR as "accepted" (read "forwarded"), but there's no sign of either the name or the device on the corresponding LoARs. The external LoIs are not online (they're the very last two that aren't), so we can't verify exactly what happened, but it appears that the submission fell between the cracks on the kingdom side of things.

Jordan - Bardsley p. 434-435 s.n. Jordan dates Jordan atte Mull to 1300.

Lovatt - R&W p. 285 s.n. Lovat dates William Lovatt to 1537.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

25: Leopold Draco - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (German - French) most important.
Culture (German - French) most important.

Leopold is a a masculine name dated to the 12th century in Bahlow's Unsere Vornamen im Wandel der Jahrhunderte p. 65 s.n. Leopold.

Draco is a French unmarked locative byname found in Morlet Noms de famille p. 347 s.n. Dragon.

A combination of German and French is a step from period practice, but registerable (Amalia Künne, 12/01 A-Atlantia).


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

26: Lothar qui et Segimundus - New Name & New Device

Per pale argent and sable, on a bend three nails palewise counterchanged.

Client requests authenticity for 9th century Frankish.
Language (9th century Frankish) most important.
Culture (9th century Frankish) most important.

There's a note in the margin on the submission form which is luckily repeated in a more central location on the worksheet: "will accept any changes EXCEPT Lothario".

Lothar is a header on p. 66 of Bahlow's Unsere Vornamen...; examples include Charlemagne's successor Lothar I, Lothar II (for whom Lotharingia is named), and Lothar v. Supplinburg, a prince of Saxony in the 12th century.

qui et is a form of "aka" found in 9th century Frankish names recorded in Latin, according to Academy of St. Gabriel report 2397 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/2397). Several examples of the form Grimo qui et Adalgisus 'Grimo, who [is] also Adalgisus' are given, citing Stark, Franz, Die Kosenamen der Germanen (Wiesbaden: Dr. Martin Sändig oHG., 1967 [1868]), pp. 150-1.

Segimundus is found in Bahlow's Unsere Vornamen... p. 92 s.n. Siegmund as the name of a prince of the Cheruseri [?? handwriting decipherment going on -- the photocopies missed the Siegmund page] mentioned by Tacitus in his Annals.

Some commenters were worried that with two given names and no obvious byname, this name doesn't meet the requirements of the Rules for Submissions. However, Hildegardis quae et Berthegundis was registered in Dec. 2007 (via Æthelmearc) with a "nice name" comment, using the same St. Gabriel report as documentation. Also, there is precedent (Madeleine Moinet dit Boismenu, 7/96 A-Atenveldt) explicitly allowing dictus-type bynames in Latin, German, and French, and this sort of "otherwise known as" appelation is a variant of this type of byname: the second given name functions as a second piece of identifying information which answers the question of "which Lothar?"

The PicDic identifies this type of nail as a Passion nail. There is no difference granted between the various sorts of nails, and the submitter did not feel it necessary to specify the type, so Eastern Crown has not changed the blazon.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

27: Luned Gwyn - New Name & New Device

Azure, a leaf within an orle of roundels argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.
Meaning most important.

Luned is found on p. 63 of Gruffudd with the Welsh note "Ffurf o 'Eluned'".

The July 2004 acceptance of Julian ferch Luned (via Drachenwald) says that Luned is a feminine name known only from Arthurian legend, and as such is registerable, though not authentic as a Welsh name. The English part of Gruffudd's entry on the name reads: "Form of 'Eluned'. Owain a Luned, tale of Middle Ages." For the byname, both of Tangwystyl's "Simple Guides" for Welsh names (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/welsh13.html and http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/welsh16.html) give Wen as the form of Gwyn appropriate for use with a feminine name. However, the 16th century guide notes that women were sometimes recorded with masculine surnames, possibly as a result of English-speaking clerks following normal English practice. The submitter checked the "spelling most important" box (among others), so Eastern Crown has made no changes.

Gwyn is found on p. 345 of Bardsley as a nickname meaning 'the white'.

This device is clear of Rebecca Marchand d'Alsace (Feb. 1992 Caid): Vert, a seeblatt argent, with one CD for the field, and another for adding the roundels. It's well clear of Justin of Seven Oaks (Mar. 1985 East): Azure, an oak leaf palewise Or within an orle of acorns argent, with CDs for the tincture and the type of the leaf, and a third for changing the acorns to roundels.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

28: Mairghréicc Ruadh inghen Ui Faolaín - New Name & New Device

Azure, on a bend sinister argent between a fleur-de-lys and a cross crosslet fitchy Or, four hearts palewise gules.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language most important.

Spelling ("Irish") most important.

All documentation from Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/).

Mairghréicc is found in the Raw Data section under Máirghréad, in an entry for 1433. There are 26 women with the name Mairghread found in the annals, with dates ranging from 1361 to 1662.

Ruadh is the standard Early Modern (c. 1200 - c. 1700) spelling of a descriptive byname meaning 'red', found in the Annals for 78 men, with dates between 1039 and the end of period.

inghen Ui is found in the Raw Data under Máirghréad in an entry for the year 1451.

Faolaín is the standard Early Modern genitive spelling of Fáelán / Faolán, found in the Annals as the name of 19 men, with dates mostly 12th century and earlier, plus 1203 and 1423.

This name is clear of Máirghréad inghean Fhaoláin (Nov. 2002 An Tir) by addition of the descriptive byname.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

29: Mairghréicc Ruadh inghen Ui Faolaín - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name on the East LoI of December 22, 2008 as submitted.

Gules, on a bend sinister argent between two hearts Or, a fleur-de-lys palewise azure.

This badge is clear of Caitlin O'Hart (Oct. 1997 Middle): Gules, on a bend sinister between two hearts argent, a lute proper, with one CD for the tincture of the secondary charges, and another for the type and tincture of the tertiary charge.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

30: Marion de Lari - New Name & New Device

Azure, a peacock in his pride argent eyed azure and on a point pointed argent a rose azure.

No major changes.
Sound (Marion of Lori) most important.

Marion is a header in R&W p. 298: Marion Lambert 1379.

Lari is a town found in the Central Italy section of "Mercator's Place Names of Italy in 1554" by Maridonna Benvenuti (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/maridonna/mercator/). Also, R&W s.n. Lawry has Simon filius Lari 1197.

This device is clear of Etienne Perdreau (Mar. 1996 West): Azure, a peacock in his pride, in chief a pair of rapiers crossed at the tips argent, with at least a CD for the change from rapiers to a point pointed, and another for adding the rose.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

31: Michael of Carillion - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 2004, via the East

(Fieldless) On a double-headed eagle sable in pale a crescent pendant and a mullet of nine points argent.

His (holding) name and device were registered in Oct. 2004, via the East.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

32: Miriel de Pukehole - New Name

No major changes.
Sound most important.

The documentation section says "Client really likes Miriel. Byname can be changed to make registerable."

Miriel is found in Bardsley p. 581 s.n. Pamphilion: Miriel Pampilion 1273.

de Pukehole is found in "'Misplaced' Names in Reaney & Wilson" by Jeanne Marie Lacroix (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/misplacednamesbyname.htm), dated to 1296 under the header Puckle (p. 364), and glossed as 'dweller by the elf-hollow'.

Commenters worried about the possibilities for mispronouncing this spelling of the surname (in somewhat objectionable fashion), but Eastern Crown is uncertain whether this is grounds for any changes, and so is leaving the decision to Pelican.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

33: Mordred Blaksoule - New Name & New Device

Or, a sword sustained by a hand issuant from a wing sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (OE - ME) most important.
Culture (OE - ME) most important.
Meaning (last name means black soul) most important.

Mordred is a header in Searle, dated c. 1000.

Blaksoule is dated to 1332 in Studies on Middle English Nicknames - I. Compounds by Jan Jönsjö, p. 58 s.n. Blacksoule. It's identified as a compound of OE blæc 'black' and sawol 'soul', meaning 'black soul, evil man'.

Commenters felt this combination of name and byname may be overly evocative of the Arthurian character. Eastern Crown does not feel qualified to make such a judgement, so she is forwarding this for Pelican's decision.

Per the August 2005 Cover Letter ("From Wreath: Wings that Hold"), this wing is correctly blazoned. The closest not-quite-conflict brought up in commentary was a device in Fox-Davies which is not currently protected: the Duke of Calabria's Or, a wing terminating in a hand sable sustaining a sword argent, which by Eastern Crown's count gets a CD for orientation and another for the tincture of the sword.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

34: Olivier de Capendu - New Name & New Device

Or, on a chevron gules three crosses fleury Or and a chief embattled gules.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (French 14th century) most important.
Culture (French 14th century) most important.

Olivier is found in Colm Dubh's "Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/paris.html).

Capendu is found on p. 146 of Dauzat & Rostaing.Capendu is the header in D&R; In Morlet, p168, header "Capendu", the dated spellings are Capendud 1063 and Campendud 1071. Eastern Crown doesn't know enough about the evolution of French spelling to tell whether the final 'd' would've been dropped by the 14th century or not, so she has made no changes.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

35: Patricio de Cordoba - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 1997, via the East

Quarterly sable and Or, six broken keys in pale, wards to base, sable.

His name and device were registered in April 1997, via the East.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

36: Patricio de Cordoba - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 1997, via the East

Sable, on a bend sinister bretessed Or three broken keys wards to base sable.

His name and device were registered in April 1997, via the East.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

37: Pedro Gonzalo de Castilla - New Name & New Device

Or, a wolf passant gules, on a chief embattled azure a dove volant maintaining an olive branch argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (Spanish) most important.
Culture (Spanish) most important.

Pedro is dated between 1030 and 1299 in "A Glossary of the Personal Names in Diez Melcon's Apellidos Castellano-Leoneses" by Talan Gwynek (KWHS Proceedings, 1993), p. 135. Gonzalo is an unmarked patronymic dated between 955 and 1297, ibid. p. 129.

de Castilla 'from Castilla' is from the Locative Surnames section of Juliana de Luna's "Spanish Names from the Late 15th Century" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/isabella/locative.html).

NB: On the form the Society Name line definitely has an 'e' at the end of the locative, while the documentation definitely has an 'a'. The submitted Castille has been corrected to Castilla to match the documentation.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

38: Pedro Gonzalo de Castilla - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2009, via the East

Or, a wolf passant gules, a chief embattled azure.

His name and device are submitted above.

Correction (2008-Dec-23 05:12:55): This is a badge submission, not device.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

39: Sarra de la Mer - New Name & New Device

Or semy of hearts sable, a chevron azure and in base a raven close to sinister sable.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound (English) most important.

Sarra is dated to 1189-1215 in Withycombe s.n. Sara(h).

de la Mer is based on R&W p. 130 s.n. Delamar, which dates William de la Mere to 1260.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

40: Sigfrid Herrmann - New Name & New Device

Per pale sable and gules, a sword bendwise and a bordure embattled argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for German persona (late).
Sound most important.

Sigfrid is dated to 1310 in Talan Gwynek's "Medieval German Given Names from Silesia" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/bahlow_v.htm).

Herrmann is a secondary header under Hermann in Bahlow (Gentry). The entry mentions Hermann Billung, Duke of the Saxons around 950, and Landgrave Hermann of Thuringia, patron of poets around 1200.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

41: Simon Caspar Joder von Steffisburg - Resub Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 2003, via the East

Or, a Swiss dagger and overall an eye sable.

His name and device were registered in Jan. 2003, via the East.

His previous badge submission, Or, a kindjal and overall a human eye sable, was returned on the March 2008 LoAR (R-East) for lack of evidence that kindjal daggers are period. This submission features a Swiss dagger in place of the kindjal. Documentation for this type of dagger is included: The Swiss at War 1300-1500 by Douglas Miller and Gerry Embleton (Men-at-Arms 94; series editor Martin Windrow) p. 23 includes a photograph of a Swiss dagger found in Lake Morat, from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

42: Simon Helpe - New Name & New Device

Paly Or and gules, a bend counterchanged and a chief sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Meaning (Simon the helpful) most important.

Simon is a header dated to 1197 in Withycombe.

Helpe is a header dated to 1327 in R&W.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

43: Sorcha de Barry - New Name & New Device

Barry of six argent and gules, a bend sinister cotised sable.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language (Irish 12-14 hundreds) most important.
Culture (Irish 12-14 hundreds) most important.

Sorcha is given as the standard Early Modern Irish spelling of the name of four women dated between 1480 and 1639 in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals".

de Barry: Woulfe p. 26 s.n. de Barra dates William de Barry to 1207.

A combination of Gaelic and English is a step from period practice, though registerable (Ian MacHenrik, 10/99 A-An Tir). However, Academy of St. Gabriel report 3000 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/3000) gives Sorcha as a possible English spelling of the Gaelic name, based on the sounds it contains, citing various entries in Woulfe. Therefore, there may not actually be a step from period practice for the language combination.


This item was on the 04-2009 LoAR

44: Vassilis apo Monemvassia - New Name & New Device

Or, four helmets in cross bases to center and four swords in saltire points to center sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (Greek NOT Latin) most important.
Culture (Greek NOT Latin) most important.

Vassilis is the submitter's legal given name (driver's license witnessed by Ailis Linne and Elisabeth de Rossignol).

apo is "from" in Greek [no source cited]. The worksheet (though not the submission form) says it may be dropped if needed for registration.

Monemvassia is the name of well-known medieval fortress and adjacent town, according to Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monemvassia). The entry says it was known by the Franks as Malvasia, and derives the Greek name from mone and emvassia, meaning 'single entrance'. The (subscription-only part of the) Encyclopedia Britannica online s.v. Monemvassia basically confirms the Wikipedia entry, mentioning a medieval fortress and a 14th century Byzantine church. Also, there's a c. 1680 map by Frederick de Wit titled Malvasia (http://historic-cities.huji.ac.il/greece/monemvasia/maps/de_wit_1680_monemvasia.html), showing a hilly island topped with buildings.

Commenters don't know enough about Greek names to help any more than that, so we appeal to the CoA for assistance.

There was some doubt expressed about the recognizability of this device: the helmets were likened to shears, and commenters felt it necessary to conflict-check it against various forms of cross.

Eastern Crown doesn't feel qualified to judge and so is forwarding it for Wreath's decision.


Here ends, in this cold Feast day of Saint Zeno, this East Kingdom letter of intent.

Yours in service,

Brunissende

Blue Tyger Herald

blue.tyger@eastkingdom.org

Bibliography

Bahlow, Hans; translated by Edda Gentry. Dictionary of German Names, 2nd ed. Max Kade Institute, Madison, Wisconsin, 2002.

Bahlow, Hans, Unsere Vornamen im Wandel der Jahrhunderte. C. A. Starke Verlag, Limburg a. d. Lahn, 1965.

Bardsley, Charles Wareing. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames. Oxford University Press, London, 1901.

Black, George F. The Surnames of Scotland. New York Public Library, 1989.

Dauzat, Albert and Marie-Thérèse Morlet. Dictionnaire étymologique des noms de famille et prénoms de France. Librairie Larousse, Paris, 1989.

Dauzat, Albert et Charles Rostaing. Dictionnaire Étymologique des Noms de Lieux de la France. Paris, 1963.

Geirr Bassi Haraldsson. The Old Norse Name. Private Press, Maryland, 1977.

Gruffudd, Heini. Enwau Cymraeg I Blant. Welsh Names for Children. Y Lolfa Cyf. Wales, 1980.

Jönsjö, Jan. Middle English Nicknames: I. Compounds. Lund Studies in English 55, Sweden, 1979.

Morlet, Marie-Thérèse. Dictionnaire Etymologique des Noms de Famille. Librairie Académique Perrin, 1997.

Ó Corraín, Donnchadh and Fidelma Maguire. Irish Names. Lilliput Press, Dublin, 1990.

Paul Wickenden of Thanet. A Dictionary of Period Russian Names. 3rd edition. SCA, Inc., 2000.

Reaney, P.H. and R. M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. Third edition, Oxford University Press, 1995.

Solveig Throndardottir. Name Construction in Mediaeval Japan. Carlsbad, NM: The Outlaw Press, 1994; Columbia MO: Potboiler Press, 1999.

Withycombe, E.G. The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names. Third edition. Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1979.

Woulfe, Patrick. Sloinnte Gaedheal is Gall. Irish Names and Surnames. M.H. Gill & Son, Dublin, 1923.


OSCAR counts 29 New Names, 28 New Devices, 2 New Device Changes and 6 New Badges. These 65 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $195 for them. OSCAR counts 1 Resub Name, 3 Resub Devices and 1 Resub Badge. These 5 items are not chargeable. There are a total of 70 items submitted on this letter.

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