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East LoI dated 2008-10-31

Unto Olwyn Laurel, Istvan Wreath, Aryanhwy Pelican, the SCA College of Arms, and all others who do receive this letter, greetings from Brunissende Dragonette de Brocéliande, Blue Tyger Herald.

It is the intent of the Easterners to register the following items.

Unless otherwise noted, the submitter has no desire for authenticity, allows any changes, and allows a holding name.

This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

1: Alexander Makcristyne - New Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 2005, via the East

Vert, a crampon within a bordure argent.

Old Item: Azure, a fess checky Or and gules between three axes Or, to be released.

His name, current device, and badge were registered in March 2005, via the East.

This device is clear of Lothar Hügelman (July 2004 via Æthelmearc): (Fieldless) A crampon argent, with one CD for the field, and another for the bordure.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

2: Aline Kinneir - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 2007, via the East

Sable, on a saltire bretessed between four mullets of four points elongated to base argent, a thistle between four beech leaves palewise proper.

Her name was registered in May 2007, via the East.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

3: Alissenda la Gailharde - New Name & New Device

Argent fretty sable, on a chief azure three crosses bottony argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (Southern French (Occitan)) most important.
Culture (Southern French (Occitan)) most important.

Alissenda is based on Academy of S. Gabriel report 2970 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/2970), which lists the 13th-14th century spellings Allisen, Alissent, and Alixen in Occitan, citing Anne Brenon, Le petit livre aventureux des prénoms occitans au temps du Catharisme, Cateline de la Mor, "Names from Fourteenth Century Foix", and Enric Bagué, Noms Personals de l'Edat Mitjana; and Ellesenda in a Latin document from 974, citing Ramon Ordeig i Mata, Catalunya Carolingia: Volum IV: Els Comtats d'Osona i Manresa.

la Gailharde: Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "French Names from Chastenay, 1448-1457" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/chastenay.html) lists a Guillemette la Gaillarde dated to 1454 in the list of women's full names. Morlet's Dictionnaire étymologique de noms de famille p. 438 s.n. Gaillard gives Gailhard as a Southern French variant of this name; the submitted form is the feminine version of this.

This device is clear of the Barony of Altavia's badge (Feb. 2003 Caid): Argent fretty sable, a chief vert, with one CD for the tincture of the chief, and one for adding the crosses.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

4: Andreiko Eferiev - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Culture (Slavic: late period Cossack or Russian) most important.

Eferi(ev)) most important.

Andreiko: Wickenden 3rd ed. p. 7 s.n. Andrei (dims.) lists Andreiko Morozov c. 1495.

Eferiev: ibid p. 79 s.n. Eferii dates the header to the 13th-14th century as a masculine name meaning 'etherial'. The discussion of patronymics on p. xxii says that names ending in -ii generally drop both vowels and add a soft sign before the -ev patronymic ending, but preserving the first 'i' is possible as a variant spelling. The example used is Vasilii: Vasil'ev or Vasiliev.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

5: Andrew Askebrenner - New Name & New Device

Gules, a fly between two flaunches Or.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No changes.

Andrew is a header in Withycombe, p. 23; dated spellings include Andreu 1273. Andrew also happens to be the submitter's mundane given name, shown on his driver's license witnessed by Istvan.

Askebrenner: R&W p. 15 s.n. Ashburner dates Robert, William le Askebrenner 1278. It's also found with the same date in Middle English Surnames of Occupation 1100-1350 [which is presumably Fransson, Gustav, (Lund: C. W. K. Gleerup, 1935)], p. 174. The worksheet says the submitter wants a surname that deals with fire.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

6: Artemisia Bocca - New Name & New Device

Or, a heart gules pierced by an arrow inverted bendwise sinister, shaft Or fletched vert and head gules, surrounded by three fleurs-de-lys vert.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Meaning (seductive or flirty mouth) most important.

Artemisia is listed in "Feminine Given Names from the Italian Renaissance" by Anebairn MacPharlane of Arrochar (Caidan Heraldic Symposium, AS XXIV), citing the Encyclopedia Britannica's entry on the Early Baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi.

Bocca 'mouth' is a header in de Felice's Cognomi. It's found twice in the "Online Tratte of Officeholders" (http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/tratte/doc/name1.html) as a given name, and as Bocci is found among the family names in both the Tratte and the Online Catasto of 1427 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ferrante/catasto/family_names.html).

Came with the request: "PLEASE CHANGE the surname to mean "seductive / flirty mouth"; near as we can tell, it should be of the form Bocca___, based on Boccadifuoco, Boccadoro, Boccafoglia etc. (de Felice s.n. Bocca)."

Commenters expressed some doubt about the plausibility of a byname with the desired meaning, and were unable to suggest anything. This is therefore being forwarded with an appeal for help from the greater expertise of the College of Heralds.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

7: Briana Campbell - New Name & New Device

Or, a thistle slipped and leaved proper, in canton a dragonfly azure bendwise.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound (Briana -> Brianna) most important.

Briana is registerable as an English feminine name, per precedent (March 2003, Brianna ni Shea, R-West).

Campbell: R&W p. 82 s.n. Campbell dates the header spelling to 1282 and 1691.

This device is clear of Kathryn of Castelleone Nuovo (Nov. 1999 Artemisia): Or, a thistle proper within an orle of shamrocks vert, with CDs for the type, tincture, and number of secondary charges.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

8: Bríg na Úain - New Name & New Device

Per bend purpure and vert, a lamb couchant argent and a crossbow bendwise inverted Or.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Meaning (surname = little lamb) most important.

Bríg: Bríg is a header on p. 36 of OCM; the entry mentions two saints named Brígh. The spelling with the 'h' at the end appears after the colon in the header, which means that it's the modern spelling, according to the information in "How To Use This Book" on p. 9. The form before the colon, Bríg, is the "early Irish" spelling.

na Úain is a constructed byname meaning '[of] the lambs'. It's based on Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Topic.shtml), which shows several examples of bynames meaning 'of the domestic animal(s)': na Mart 'of the beeves/cattle', na nGamhnach 'of the milch cows', in Eich Gil 'of the white horse'. In addition, the byname Boircech is glossed 'rich in bulls or stags'. A byname meaning 'of the lambs' is consistent with this pattern. The Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language (http://www.dil.ie/) provides úan 'a lamb' and úainín 'little lamb, lambkin' (dim. of úan). Based on the examples in the Annals Index, the proposed byname uses the genitive form of úan: úain.

As further support, commenters found an anonymous Irish poem, apparently from a manuscript dated 1340, which uses a Uain Dé for 'Lamb of God' (http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G402048/).

The consulting herald further notes that in a perfect world, the submitter would prefer to be 'Brig the lambkin' rather than 'Brig of the lambs'. Examples of bynames using names of animals from the Annals Index include Sinnach/Sionnach 'fox', Daman 'little stag/ox', Cu 'wolf/hound'. If possible, the submitter would prefer to be Bríg Úainín based on these examples.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

9: Cainnech mac Uilliam - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 2007, via the East

Per bend sinister azure and Or, a thistle slipped and leaved argent and a stag rampant proper, armed argent.

His name was registered in May 2007, via the East. His original device submission, Per fess azure and Or, in fess a thistle sustained by a stag rampant proper armed argent, was returned at the same time for lack of identifiability due to poor contrast. This submission changes the thistle to argent and moves the stag entirely onto a metal portion of the field to fix this problem.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

10: Catherine d'Oiseau - New Name & New Device

Per fess Or and azure, a crow sable and a mullet of four greater and four lesser points elongated to base argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Meaning (of the birds) most important.

Catherine: Morlet Noms de famille p. 179 has Catherine, a name made popular by St. Catherine after 307. She was the patron saint of the theology students at the University of Paris. The name is also found in "Names from a 1587 Tax Roll from Provins" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/provins1587.html), which lists a Catherine de Seraucourt. Dauzat (Dictionnaire étymologique des noms et prénoms de France) p. 93 s.n. Catherine mentions a 14th century Ste Catherine de Sienne.

d'Oiseau: Morlet s.n. Doiseau says this probably represents (child of) d'Oiseau, but gives no dates. Dauzat (Dictionnaire étymologique des noms et prénoms de France) p. 205 s.n. Doiseau derives the name from either a merchant "d'oiseaux" or a patronymic based on Oiseau (header on p. 455).


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

11: David Vázquez de Valençia - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No changes.

David is dated to 1468 and 1473 in "A sample of Jewish names in Valencia 1293-1485" by Yehoshua ben Haim haYerushalmi (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/Jewish/names_in_valencia.html).

Vázquez is listed as a patronymic surname found 17 times in Elsbeth Anne Roth's "16th Century Spanish Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/spanish/index.html), with examples dated to 1539, 1562, and 1574.

de Valençia is listed as a locative surname in Juliana de Luna's "Spanish Names from the Late 15th Century" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/isabella/locative.html). The name is also found without the cedilla in Elsbeth's article (op. cit.).

The format of the name (given + patronymic + locative) is based on Elsbeth's article, which gives the examples Juan Martínez de Palategui, Diego López de Olivares, and notes that about 5 percent of the names in her source were of this form.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

12: Deirdre Planchet - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1992, via the East

Argent, a billet gules pierced by a needle fesswise, on a chief azure three weaver's tablets argent.

Her name was registered in May 1992, via the East.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

13: Dionysia Birdclever de Brigge - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 2008, via the East

Azure, a bend sinister Or overall an African grey parrot close argent.

Her name was registered in March 2008, via the East.

Her original device, Azure, a bend sinister Or, overall a popinjay argent tailed gules, was returned at the same time because the identifying parts of the bird (beak and tail) lacked adequate contrast with the field.

This submission features an entirely argent bird in order to fix this problem.

Commenters felt this would be more succinctly blazoned as simply a popinjay, but the type of parrot appears to be important to the submitter, so we have left the blazon as submitted.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

14: D{zu}iugint{eo} Litovka - New Name & New Badge

(Fieldless) A rose in pale Or barbed, seeded and slipped vert, its stem entwined by a snake sable.

Note: the submitted name uses two characters which are not included in the standard Da'ud notation list: z with breve (z̆) and e with ring above (e̊). For the first of these, I'm wondering if the submitter simply misread a z-caron (ž) -- the difference between the diacritics is analogous to the difference between U and V, which can be hard to see in small sizes. I've extended Da'ud notation based on Å for Å and Š for Š (but using 'u' instead of 'v' to denote a breve instead of a caron). In other words, if the html works, the given name should be Dz̆iuginte̊.

Dziuginte is based on an email from Gaile Ivaska, a native Lithuanian speaker, and the article "Lithuanian Names" by William Schmalstieg (http://www.lituanus.org/1982_3/82_3_01.htm). Gaile says it's a feminine name composed of parts meaning 'joy/happiness' and 'defender'. The latter element is found in masculine names as -ginas, derived from the verb ginti 'to defend', according to Schmalstieg's article.

Litovka is dated to 1506 as a byname meaning "[female] Lithuanian" in Wickenden 3rd ed. p. 188 s.n. Litovka. According to Schmalstieg, Lithuanians didn't have bynames until fairly late, so the submitter went with a Russian descriptive as the next best thing.

The Eastern College of Heralds knows nothing whatsoever about Lithuanian names, so this is being forwarded with an appeal for help from the greater expertise of the College of Arms.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

15: Ellen Hughes - New Name & New Device

Azure, on a pale between two domestic cats combattant argent a three-leaved sprig of holly proper.

Submitter desires a feminine name.

She cares most about spelling.

Ellen is found in Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames dated to Ellen 1296 (Ormandy) and 1324 (Tarboc) http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/reaneyAG.html

Hughes: R&W p. 242 s.n. Hugh dates Thomas Hughes to 1327.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

16: Erasmus Urswyc - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister gules and argent, an arrow counterchanged.

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Erasmus is identified as a 3rd century bishop and martyr of Formiae in The Oxford Dictionary of Saints by David Hugh Farmer (Oxford University Press, London, 1987), p. 143. The entry says that his cult spread throughout the Western world, and he was invoked as one of the "Fourteen Holy Helpers" in the 15th century. Withycombe p. 105 s.n. Erasmus says this name came into use in England in the later Middle Ages, and cites Erasmus Paston, died 1540, and Sir Erasmus Dryden, 1553-1632.

Urswyc is a surname dated to 1479 (in Essex) in Julian Goodwyn's "Brass Enscription Index" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/brasses/). It's also found in R&W p. 463 s.n. Urswick, dated in the spelling Urswyk to 1449


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

17: Erna máni - New Name Change From Holding Name

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in February of 2009, via the East.

Old Item: Arielle of Eisental, to be released.
Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (Old Norse) most important.
Culture (Old Norse) most important.

Her previous name submission of Arielle Makcristyne was pended on the March 2005 LoAR for research on Jewish/Scottish contact in period. The combination of non-Biblical Jewish names with Scots or Scottish Gaelic was declared unregisterable with the return of her name on the Sep. 2005 LoAR. Her device was registered under the holding name Arielle of Eisental in March 2005, via the East.

Erna is listed as a feminine name on p. 9 of Geirr Bassi. It's not italicized and unmarked, meaning it's from the Family Sagas (Islendingasogur).

Máni: ibid p. 25 gives máni as a byname meaning 'moon'; it occurs twice in Landnamabok.

Per precedent, descriptive bynames (nicknames) in Norse should be written in lowercase letters, so the submitted Máni has been changed to máni.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

18: Fridha av Bergen - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in September of 2004, via Atlantia

(Fieldless) On a hexagon argent two axes in saltire azure.

Her name was registered in Sept. 2004, via Atlantia.

She has a device, Per bend vert and azure, two cats salient within a bordure indented argent, registered in Sep. 2007 via the East.

Even if the hexagon is taken as a medium of heraldic display (and Eastern Crown knows of no period examples of such), this is clear of Agravaine Rhiwallon (March 1999, East): (Fieldless) Two axes in saltire sable, with one CD for the field(lessness) and another for the tincture of the axes.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

19: Friedrich Parcifal - New Name Change & New Badge

OSCAR NOTE: 'Old Item' should contain the former primary name. The form that is there is not a registered name.

Vert, two axes addorsed argent.

Old Item: Eadric Wiglafes sunu, to be retained as an alternate name.
Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (German) most important.
Culture (German) most important.

His current name was registered in Oct. 2006, via the East.

He also has a device, Vert, two axes addorsed and on a chief argent three crosses potent vert, registered in Oct. 2007, via the East.

Friedrich is a header on p. 133 of Bahlow (Gentry); the entry says the frequency of the name is due to its use by ruling dynasties, and mentions Friedrich I Barbarossa and Friedrich II, of the Hohenstaufens.

Parcifal: ibid p. 363 s.n. Parseval dates a Conrad Parcifal to 1296.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

20: Gaius Patronius - New Name & New Device

Or, between two natural seahorses addorsed a trident sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (Roman) most important.
Culture (Roman) most important.

Gaius is given as a praenomen in The Private Life of the Romans, chapter 2: Roman Names, by Harold Whetstone Johnston (Scott, Foresman and Co., 1903, 1932; online at http://www.forumromanum.org/life/johnston_2.html).

Patronius: Gaius Patronius Arbiter was an Imperial Roman author. His nomen was more commonly written as Petronius, which is how the Encyclopedia Britannica has it, along with an "original name" of Titus Petronius Niger. [The free online entry doesn't elaborate: the only other info it gives is "Roman author", "died AD 66", and "reputed author of the Satyricon, a literary portrait of Roman society of the 1st century AD" -- and even that it obscures every three seconds with the *% $ #@^ login screen.] The submission form says he's a poet who wrote the Apocolocyntosis of Claudius, but all the online searches attribute that work to Seneca. There's a printout included of an alibris search result, which gives "Arbiter Patronius, Patronius, Martin S Smith, PhD (Photographer)" as the author(s) for a work titled Cena Trimalchionis (which is a section or chapter of the Satyricon, according to Wikipedia).

Commenters felt that the alibris entry probably has a typo -- the Roman satirist's nomen is normally spelled Petronius -- but this doesn't preclude the plausibility of the submitted Patronius (possibly with a different meaning). Eastern Crown doesn't know nearly enough about Roman names to make this determination, so we are forwarding the name unchanged.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

21: Gunter der Ohse - New Name & New Device

Argent, two maces in saltire sable between four gouts d'huile in cross, a chief indented vert.

No major changes.
Language (Germanic) most important.
Culture (Germanic) most important.

Gunter: "Some Early Middle High German Bynames" by Talan Gwynek (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/Early_German_Bynames.html) under Münech 'monk' has a Gunter der Munech von Basele 1262.

der Ohse: this is based on various animal-derived bynames in Talan's article (op. cit.), including Esel 'donkey' and Hunt 'dog'. Ochse as the German for Ox is from the Collins Gem German Dictionary, p. 183 (no copies provided).

Brechenmacher s.n. Ochs dates Sifrit Ohse 1330, and Bahlow (Gentry) s.n. Ochs has the inn-name-based Johann zum Ochsen 1408, along with the compounds Hundertosse 1400 and Martin Ochsenschuh 1365. Bahlow indicates that 'Ochs' is southern, while 'Osse' is northern, so Eastern Crown is not certain that these cites quite support the submitted Ochse. Then there's the matter of the particle. In modern German, 'des' is possessive, giving the submitted name the meaning 'the ox's Gunter' or 'Gunter who is owned by the ox'. Commenters found no evidence for such constructions in German names. The closest documented particle in sound and spelling would be der 'the', but all the examples we found of 'X the Y' names in German use a description such as an occupation or nationality, applied literally rather than figuratively: der Munech 'the monk' from Talan's cited article, der Hüne 1324 'the Hungarian' or 'the giant' from Bahlow s.n. Hühn(e). The submitter does not allow major changes such as dropping an element. Changing des to the documented zum (with an accompanying change to Ochsen) would change the meaning, from someone who is ox-like or works with oxen to someone who happens to live near a particular building, and would in addition be a stretch of the "minor change" concept -- the only things the two words have in common is the number of letters and the language.

All that said, Eastern Crown is fairly certain that some combination along the lines of 'Gunther the Ox' is registerable: a quick look for "X the Y" names was far from comprehensive, so any conclusions reached must be tentative. The submitted Gunter des Ochse has therefore been changed to Gunter der Ohse to somewhat better match the available documentation.

Correction (2008-Oct-31 14:10:58): Let's improve the French spelling here

Argent, two maces in saltire sable between four gouttes d'huile in cross, a chief indented vert.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

22: Hugh Tauerner - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 2007, via the East

Per fess indented sable and vert.

His name was registered in May 2007, via the East.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

23: Hugh Tauerner - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 2007, via the East

(Fieldless) A wheel per fess sable and vert.

His name was registered in May 2007, via the East.

This (lovely) badge is clear of Rachael of Bhakail (Sep. 2006 East): Or, a wheel vert, with a CD for the field and another for half the tincture of the charge.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

24: Idon of Sheffeld - New Name & New Device

Per chevron inverted azure and gules, three maple leaves two and one argent and two scimitars crossed in saltire proper.

Submitter has no desire as to gender.
Language (English 13th-14th cent.) most important.
Culture (English 13th-14th cent.) most important.

Idon is found in "Yorkshire Feminine Names from 1379" by Talan Gwynek (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/yorkshire.html).

Sheffeld is found in "Surnames in 15th Century York" by Karen Larsdatter (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/york15/surnames-alphabetical.htm).


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

25: Johann Boese - New Name & New Device

Per pale sable and argent, a mullet of four points elongated to base in base a housecat couchant a chief counterchanged.

He cares most about his first name being Johann.

Johann: Bahlow (Gentry) p. 251 s.n. Johannes lists patronymics Johann, Lüttjohann, Stammerjohann, undated.

Boese is a header glossed as 'bad, evil, wicked' in "Some Early Middle High German Bynames" by Talan Gwynek (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/Early_German_Bynames.html). It dates the Latin translation malus to 1136


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

26: Khalida bint 'Abdal-Aziz - New Name & New Device

Gules, on a maple leaf Or a domestic cat's head contourny sable and in base a standing balance Or.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (Arabic) most important.
Culture (Arabic) most important.

Khalida is identified as a feminine ism on p. 51 of "Period Arabic Names and Naming Practices" by Da'ud ibn Auda (KWHS Proceedings, AS 38).

bint is used to form feminine patronymics (ibid., p. 45).

'Abdal-Aziz is identified as a masculine ism (ibid., p. 49).


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

27: Kochou Zaygo - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister sable and vert, a bend argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (early Hungarian) most important.
Culture (early Hungarian) most important.

Kochou is a header on p. 465 of Fehértói Katalin: Árpád-kori személynévtár (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 2004), dated in this spelling (in a Latin context) to 1211. Kázmér Miklós: Régi Magyar családnevek szótára (Magyar Nyelvtudományi Társaság, Budapest, 1993) p. 606 s.n. Kocsó identifies it as a masculine "old secular" name.

Zaygo is a byname meaning 'noisy, noisemaker', dated in this spelling to 1450 and 1488 in Kázmér p. 1156 s.n. Zajgó.

This lovely device is clear of Leif Moonshadow Dalesonn and Shawna Kerr of Devonshire (Jan. 1983 East): Per bend sinister sable and vert, a bend sinister argent between a decrescent and a seahorse erect Or, and of Roland Silvervale (Aug. 1991 Middle): Per bend sinister sable and vert, a bend sinister and in dexter chief a decrescent argent. In each case, there's a CD for the orientation of the bend, and another for removing the secondary charge(s).


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

28: Lachlann Graheme - New Name Change & New Device

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in February of 2009, via the East.

Per pale argent and vert, on a tower per pale azure and argent an ivy vine bendwise sinster per pale argent and vert.

Old Item: Lachlann mac Lachlainn, to be retained as an alternate name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.

His current name and his badge (Fieldless) Two spears in saltire, overall a wolf's head erased argent were registered in June 2001, via the East.

Lachlann is dated to 1436 in Black p. 410 s.n. Lachlan.

Graheme is dated to 1547 in Black p. 323 s.n. Graham.

This name is clear of Lachlann Dougal Graeme (Jul. 1988 An Tir) by removal of the middle name.

This device may conflict with Gregor von Münchhausen (Mar. 1998 Outlands): (Fieldless) On a tower per pale azure and argent, a dexter gauntlet clenched counterchanged. There is one CD for the field. The second CD must come from the tertiary charges: a gauntlet, half white and half blue, versus an ivy vine, half white and half green. A tower is probably not "simple enough in outline to be voided", so the submitted device likely doesn't qualify for RfS X.4.j.ii (which would grant a CD for changing just the type of the tertiary charge), so the question boils down to whether changing half the tincture of a tertiary charge counts as a "significant change".

Eastern Crown doesnot feel qualified to make such a decision, and is thus forwarding this for Wreath's delectation.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

29: Lev Nikolaev - New Name & New Device

Argent, a lion's head erased contourny gules and a chief embattled sable.

Meaning (Lev son of Nikolai) most important.

All documentation from Wickenden 3rd ed.

Lev is a header on p. 185, identified as a Russianization of Leo, or 'lion'. The header form is dated to 1498: Lev Nedoelov.

Nikolaev is a patronymic dated to 1634-42 on p. 237 s.n. Nikolai. Variants of the name are dated earlier than that (such as Mikolaev 1578-9), and Nikolai itself is dated as early as 1291.

This device is clear of Duncan Maclaren (Jun. 2001 Atlantia): Or, a lion's head erased and a chief embattled sable, with one CD for the field, and one for the orientation of the head. It's also clear of Lorcá Ó Fearghail (Sep. 2000 Lochac): Argent, a lion's head erased gules, with one CD for the orientation of the head, and another for the peripheral charge.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

30: Magdalena d'Arzenta - New Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 2006, via the East

Gules, three spiders within an orle argent.

Old Item: Gules, three spiders inverted, a bordure argent., to be released.

Her name was registered in Aug. 2006, via the East.

Her current device was registered in the March 2008 LoAR: Gules, three spiders inverted, a bordure argent. The SCA does not use single diminutives of ordinaries: if there's just one, it's an orle, not a tressure. The blazon has been corrected accordingly.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

31: Máire inghean uí Mheardha - New Name

No major changes.
Language (Irish/Gaelic) most important.
Culture (Irish/Gaelic) most important.

Máire is listed as the standard Early Modern Irish Gaelic (c. 1200-c. 1700) spelling of the name of 15 women, dated between 1396 and 1601, in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/).

inghean uí Mheardha: Woulfe p. 615 s.n. ÓMeardha lists the italicized (grey-area) Anglicizations O'Merga and O'Mergay.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

32: Marianne de la Tour - New Name & New Device

Purpure masoned, a centaur passant argent and on a chief embattled argent a natural dolphin purpure.

Sound most important.

Marianne: Dauzat's Dictionnaire des noms et prénoms p. 416 s.n. Marien has Marian, undated. The submitted name is feminized by adding -ne (like Jehan -> Jehanne, ibid p. 343).

de la Tour: Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "French Names from Paris, 1421, 1423, & 1438" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/paris1423surnames.html) has de la Tour dated to 1421, so the submitted de Latour has been changed to de la Tour per the submitter's wishes.

This name is clear of Marie de la Tour Abandonée (Jul. 1983 Middle) by dropping of the last element (and possibly for difference of given name as well). It's similarly well clear of Marie Latourette Beaudoin (Dec. 2002 Middle).


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

33: Michaela Amour - New Name & New Device

Vert, two snakes entwined around a rose slipped and leaved argent.

No major changes.
Language (13th century Occitan) most important.
Culture (13th century Occitan) most important.

Michaela: Academy of S. Gabriel report 2581 gives Michaela as a 13th century Occitan feminine name from Marseille, citing any or all of: Colm Dubh's "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris"; Simon Seror: Les Noms des Juifs de France au Moyen Age, and Monique Bourin & Pascal Chareille, eds.: Genèse médiévale de l'anthroponymie moderne.

Amour is a header (undated) on p. 8 of Dauzat's [?] Dictionnaire des noms de famille et prénoms de France.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

34: Molly Schofield - New Name & New Device

Gules, two crossbows palewise and on a chief argent, two mullets of four points elongated to base gules.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language (English) most important.
Culture (English) most important.

Molly is a diminutive of Mary, which according to Withycombe s.n. Mary has been used from approximately the 13th century. R&W p. 312 s.n. Mollison dates Thomas Mollysone to 1589.

Schofield is a header in R&W, p. 395, with dated cite John de Scholefeld 1343. Hitching & Hitching 1601 p. lix has Scholfeeld and Scholefielde.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

35: Petra Zennia Velikaiaskii - New Name & New Device

Azure, a trident between two natural seahorses respectant and a base argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (Russian) most important.
Culture (Russian) most important.

All documentation from Wickenden 3rd edition.

Petra is identified as a masculine given name, diminutive of Petr, on p. 266. On p. 265 s.n. Petr (dims), there's a Petra Pakich 1552.

Zennia Velikaia is a header on p. 439 (in the Place Names section), identified as being founded in the 12th century. According to the information on p. xxix, locative bynames are created by adding an adjectival suffix, usually -skii/-skoi/-skyi.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

36: Robert du Bourg - New Name & New Device

Gules, a chevron and on a chief argent three fleurs-de-lys gules.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (French) most important.
Culture (French) most important.

Robert: Colm Dubh's "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/paris.html) lists a Robert le berchier.

du Bourg is found in Morlet [noms de famille, presumably] p. 130 s.n. Bourg [apparently undated].

This device is clear of Dugan Makgowin of Aydel (Mar. 2007 East): Gules, a chevron and in chief a boar passant contourny argent, with one CD for boar vs. chief, and another for the tertiaries.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

37: Robert Tristan - New Name & New Device

Vert, a frog argent estencely vert.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound (Robert Tristan) most important.

Robert is a header on p. 380 of R&W, dated in this spelling as a given name to 1066, and as a patronymic to 1292. In addition, Withycombe p. 255 s.n. Robert dates Robert(us) to 1071-5 and 1086 DB. Robert can also be documented in France, for example using Colm Dubh's "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/paris.html).

Tristan is mentioned in Withycombe p. 283 s.n. Tristram as "a surname in France as early as the end of the 12th C." R&W p. 455 s.n. Tristram dates the header spelling as a given name to 1204 and 1296, and as a patronymic to 1207 and 1296.Tristan is a header in Dauzat, p. 578, identified as an ancient baptismal name, frequent in Paris at the end of the 13th century. Various Academy of St. Gabriel reports indicate that in English, the name invariably became Tristram. (There's a whole list of reports discussing forms of Tristan in report 2738: http://www.s-gabriel.org/2738.)

So Robert Tristan, submitted as English name, is also a fine French name.

This device (which commenters named Sparky the Frog) is clear of Eliko de Lindasund (Jan. 2008 Atlantia): Azure, a frog argent, with one CD for the field, and another for the strewn charges.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

38: Tiberius Iulius Rufus - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 2007, via the East

Gules, a gauntleted fist argent within and conjoined to an annulet Or.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

39: Tiberius Iulius Rufus - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 2007, via the East

Fieldless, a gauntleted fist argent within and conjoined to an annulet Or.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

40: Viola Epifani - New Name & New Device

Argent, three pomegranates slipped and leaved purpure and a chief doubly enarched vert.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound (Epiphany) most important.

Viola: de Felice Nomi s.n. Viola p. 353 mentions a Saint Viola from Verona and Shakespeare's character from 12th Night. It says the name is found throughout Italy.

Epifani is a variant spelling found in de Felice Cognomi s.n. Ephifani p. 118. The entry says the name is found throughout southern Italy and is derived from Greek; the consulting herald couldn't decipher any more than that.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

41: William Atherbridge - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 2006, via the East

Gyronny Or and azure, a ram rampant gules armed argent.

His name was registered in Aug. 2006, via the East.

His device (Argent, in saltire a rose purpure, slipped and leaved vert, and a sword inverted purpure, a base wavy barry wavy vert and argent.) was registered in Aug. 2007, via the Middle.


This item was on the 02-2009 LoAR

42: William Martinet - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Client requests authenticity for 11th c. Norman invasion of England..

William: R&W s.n. Williams has Rauf le fuiz William 1299, among others.

Martinet is a header in Bardsley p. 517; the entry mentions a marriage involving one André Martinet in 1644. Morlet's Dictionnaire étymologique des noms de famille s.n. Martin gives Martinet as a mostly Northern variant. Martinet is also French for "swift" (the bird).

This name is clear of William Martin Blacksmith (Apr. 1991 Atlantia) by deletion of the third element.


Here ends, in this beautiful Feast day of Saint Notburga, this East Kingdom letter of intent.

Yours in service,

Brunissende

Blue Tyger Herald

Bibliography

Bahlow, Hans; translated by Edda Gentry. Dictionary of German Names, 2nd ed. Max Kade Institute, Madison, Wisconsin, 2002.

Bardsley, Charles Wareing. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames. Oxford University Press, London, 1901.

Black, George F. The Surnames of Scotland. New York Public Library, 1989.

Dauzat, Albert and Marie-Thérèse Morlet. Dictionnaire étymologique des noms de famille et prénoms de France. Librairie Larousse, Paris, 1989.

De Felice, Emidio. Dizionario dei cognomi Italiani. Mondadori, Milan, 1992.

De Felice, Emidio. Dizionario dei nomi Italiani. Mondadori, Milan, 1986.

Geirr Bassi Haraldsson. The Old Norse Name. Private Press, Maryland, 1977.

Hitching, F. K., and S. Hitching, References to English Surnames in 1601 and 1602. Walton-on-Thames, 1910-11; Baltimore: republished for the Clearfield Company, Inc. by Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1998.

Morlet, Marie-Thérèse. Dictionnaire Etymologique des Noms de Famille. Librairie Académique Perrin, 1997.

Ó Corraín, Donnchadh and Fidelma Maguire. Irish Names. Lilliput Press, Dublin, 1990.

Paul Wickenden of Thanet. A Dictionary of Period Russian Names. 3rd edition. SCA, Inc., 2000.

Reaney, P.H. and R. M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. Third edition, Oxford University Press, 1995.

Solveig Throndardottir. Name Construction in Mediaeval Japan. Carlsbad, NM: The Outlaw Press, 1994; Columbia MO: Potboiler Press, 1999.

Withycombe, E.G. The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names. Third edition. Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1979.

Woulfe, Patrick. Sloinnte Gaedheal is Gall. Irish Names and Surnames. M.H. Gill & Son, Dublin, 1923.


OSCAR counts 27 New Names, 2 New Name Changes, 26 New Devices, 2 New Device Changes and 7 New Badges. These 64 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $192 for them. OSCAR counts 1 New Holding Name Change. OSCAR counts 2 Resub Devices. These 3 items are not chargeable. There are a total of 67 items submitted on this letter.

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