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Northshield ILoI dated 2017-08-22

Greetings unto Honourable Lady Merideth NiShionniach, Polaris Herald, the Heralds of Northshield, and our brethren from other kingdoms. Herein please find the Northshield August Internal Letter with Pennsic Submissions. Comments are due by September 20, 2017.

1: Ámundr Rauðr Bjarn -New Name & New Device

Argent, a bear rampant gules and a bordure sable

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound (Amund) most important.

Pennsic Submission

Ámundr is an Old Norse masculine given name found in GB, p 8

Rauðr Bjarn is a constructed descriptive surname.

<Rauðr> - "red", is found on p 26 in GB.

<Bjarn> - "bear" after the table of Animal Names found in "The Bynames of the Viking Age Runic Inscriptions" by Lindorm Eriksson (https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/lindorm/runicbynames/animal.htm#start)

(nom) Eilifr Elgr Eilifr Elk V second part of 11th c N 58 #

(nom) Arnketill Gedda Arnketill Pike V N 230

Pennsic Submission

Name Comments:

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-23 07:47:38
Let us review http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2015/09/15-09lar.html#217, Elric inn rauði úlfr:

Submitted as Elric Rauðúlfr, the name has the intended meaning of "Elric the red wolf". Precedent states:
Lacking solid evidence of a clear pattern of descriptive bynames of the form [color] + [animal] in Old Norse, there is no support for the submitted Hvithestr as a plausible descriptive byname in Old Norse. [Kristin Hvithestr, 12/2003, R-West] [Note by MGC: Hvithestr was meant to mean 'white horse'.]
Therefore, the byname Rauðúlfr ("red wolf") is not registerable as a single byname. However, double bynames in Old Norse are permitted if both can reasonably describe the same person. Therefore, inn rauði úlfr ("the red" and "wolf") is registerable. The submitter allowed a change to this name.
So submitter's "constructed descriptive surname" can expect to be returned, one in quite a long line that get past a kingdom before running into the same precedent--along with parallel cases in Gaelic. His best move is to submit inn rauði bjarn ('the red' and 'bear') or any grammatically correct variation.

Magnus von Lübeck at 2017-08-29 17:05:41
Based on the May 2017 registration of Petra in rauða refr I would suggest inserting the "in" and send everything to Laurel for sorting.

Gunnvor silfraharr (Orle) at 2017-09-08 16:13:53
We allow people to have two descriptive bynames, so long as both could reasonably describe the person, and this follows period examples.

We don't willy-nilly insert particles in Old Norse bynames. Adjectival bynames can be found in both weak and strong forms. Strong adjectives never use <hinn/inn/hin/in>, while weak adjectives may use the particle, but do not require it.

We have several period examples of Old Norse adjectival bynames that exist in both strong and weak versions, so it's not unreasonable to use a documented weak form as justification for an undocumented strong form (for example, <Auð->, <auðgi>, <auðga>; <blakkr>, <blǫkk>, <blakki>; <mikill>, <mikili>, <mikla>; <Rauð->, <Rauða->, <rauðr>, <rauði>; <Spak->, <spakr>, <spaki>, <spaka>). Adjectives should match the gender of the given name.

● masculine strong: <rauðr>
● feminine strong: <rauða>
● masculine weak: <rauði>, <(inn) rauði>
● feminine weak: <rauða>, <(in) rauða>


Therefore, the <Rauðr> portion of this name is Just Fine.

However, <Bjarn> is not correct. We'd need the nominative form, <Bjǫrn>, making the whole name <Ámundr Rauðr Bjǫrn>.

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-09-08 19:02:50
I thank Orle for the corrected grammar. It seems, then, that accepting it we need only correct the headmatter to show two attested bynames, not a single constructed one.

Device Comments:

Beatrice Domenici della Campana at 2017-08-22 21:20:14
I find no conflict.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:33:22
No conflicts found.

Beorhthanc Thuck (Sanguinaris) at 2017-09-18 23:30:54
No conflicts found. Nice clean looking device.


2: Annetje van Leuven -New Name Change

OSCAR NOTE: the old name was registered in March of 1995, via the Middle.

Old Item: Alexandra de Louvain, to be retained as an alternate name.
Submitter desires a feminine name.
No changes.

Annetje Dutch feminine given name found in Family Search:

Annetje Arints, Marriage Date 13 Jan 1572, Amsterdam, Netherlands, Batch #M00705-9 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FN8W-18J)

Leuven - Amsterdam by Nicholas van Ravesteyn, 1649 (use with van as locative surname) See Images #1 & 2 below

van Leuven as found in Family Search:

Janneken Pieters van Leuven, marriage date: 12 May 1591, Delft, Netherlands, no batch #, Delft, archive 0014, inventory number 00117, Trouwboek Gerecht, 1575 december 11 - 1754 december, record number , folio 29 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QL9X-TQXM)

A second reference for <van Leuven> is found in Open Archives - The Genealogical Data of Dutch Archives (https://www.openarch.nl/show.php?archive=elo&identifier=9bcd1677-1302-abce-2e77-877a38a969ea&lang=en &six=1). Geertruyt Jans van Leuven was married in 1596 in a church in Leiden, Netherlands. Image of church records is included below (not in English), Image #3.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1123/2017-08-22/15-37-10_Annetje_Name_Doc_1.jpg
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1123/2017-08-22/15-37-12_Annetje_Name_Doc_2.jpg
#3 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1123/2017-08-22/15-37-13_Church_image.jpg

Name Comments:

Christian Jorgensen af Hilsonger at 2017-08-27 21:08:50
I agree that the documentation for the given name checks out. However the documentation for the byname is not acceptable. The citation in Family Search refers to the open archive site. There is no acceptable batch number, the record was submitted to the Family History Library in 2016 and has not been evaluated. The open archives site shows a page from a supposed church register but there is no chain of custody. You can not examine if the record is actually from the correct church record. Batch files actually let you pull the actual microfilm, you can see the chain of custody, you can inspect the pages before and after the citation. The book is a gathering of verbal history after the fact. It clearly states that this happened in 1580 yet the author was not born until 1613. the problem with verbal history is that names get changed and facts get altered. the book does not contain actual documentation

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-27 21:38:48
None of the content problems would matter if the work was produced at latest in the gray period; we then have a literary instance of a name a contemporary assigned to a human character. Do we know that it dates post-1650?

Magnus von Lübeck at 2017-08-29 19:48:20
Let's tackle this from a different direction. Leuven is a city in the Netherlands. The submitter is changing the locative from de Louvain to van Leuvan. Same city but with a different spelling. The spelling of the city is what commenters need to work on. If you get that, the Dutch van is a simple locative.
We protect the heraldic title based on the city.
http://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=8544
"This French title is locative in origin, from the city known as Leuven in Dutch, within the duchy of Brabant. A pursuivant of this title travelled with Philip the Fair in 1506, according to Domínguez."

Wikipedia s.n. Leuven has "A token of its former importance as a centre of cloth manufacture is shown in that ordinary linen cloth is known in late-14th-century and 15th-century texts as lewyn (other spellings: Leuwyn, Levyne, Lewan(e), Lovanium, Louvain)."
This refers you to the Blaeu Atlas at UCLA, which Pelican has cited on several LoARs. That site is now dead.
There is an alternate site
http://maps.nls.uk/view/104187798
Loeven

I have no doubt that the Dutch spelling Leuven can be found.


3: Arsius de Bordeaux -New Name & New Device

Or, on a saltire sable, a horse's head couped argent, a bordure azure

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound most important.
Language most important.

Pennsic Submission

Arsius is documented as an Occidental name in "FRENCH/OCCITAN NAMES FROM THE XIII CENTURY (A)" by Ramons lo Montalbes (https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ramon/occitan/occitan_a.html)

Arsieu de Montesquiou Arsius de Montesquiou 407

de Bordeaux appears on the cover page of "Toxin bouteselle et sonne tambour, a la Noblesse at gendarmerie Francoyse : contre les Reistres, Allemans et autres nations partis expres de leur payx, avecques intention de ruyner et saccager la France", published in 1587 (http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k795406/f1.item.r=Bordeaux.zoom) See Image #1

This name follows the standard French-Occitan pattern of given name + locative.

Pennsic Submission

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1123/2017-08-22/19-27-38_de_Bordeaux.JPG

Name Comments:

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-23 07:58:31
Minor point: The article adduced for <Arsius> refers to "Occitan names", and that would be the preferable form for the headmatter. "Occidental" as a language term is the original name of Interlingue, a planned international auxiliary language: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occidental_language.

Mira Fastova (Keythong) at 2017-08-23 17:56:31
My fault. The brain saw Occi and the fingers took over. Dumb fingers. :-)

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-23 23:38:46
Sometimes they're smarter than our consciousness. Sometimes! ;->

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2017-08-25 14:37:59
The source for the given name contains a number of names that aren't ethinically Occitan, but the Montesquiou family descended from the dukes of Gascony, so the example of Arsius de Montesquiou is a good choice. The form Arsis persisted as a given name in Catalan as well. He will be the first registered Arsius; congratulations!

The documentation provided for "de Bordeaux" clearly shows it as part of the name "Chrestofle de Bordeaux, Parisien" making it a poor choice for an Occitan boy, but happily it does happen to be just the same in Occitan; 'de' is pretty pan-Romance for 'of', and Bordeaux turns up in Occitan troubadour poetry spelled 'Bordeaux'. There is a cool little lexicon cobbled together from medieval Occitan poetry, and Bordeaux is there: http://lengadoc.chez.com/lexic_medieval.htm

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:34:46
Docs check out.

Device Comments:

Beatrice Domenici della Campana at 2017-08-22 21:22:14
I find no conflict.

Iago ab Adam at 2017-08-23 01:09:04
Removing an extraneous comma: Or, on a saltire sable a horse's head couped argent, a bordure azure.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:35:06
No conflicts found. Agree with Iago about the extra comma.


4: Cecily of York -New Badge

OSCAR finds the name on the Northshield LoI of December 27, 2016 as submitted.

(Fieldless) A rabbit courant to sinister gules

Badge Comments:

Beatrice Domenici della Campana at 2017-08-22 21:23:30
I find no conflict.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:35:22
No conflicts found.

Magnus von Lübeck at 2017-08-29 21:23:34
Name registered March 2017.

Mira Fastova (Keythong) at 2017-08-29 21:55:33
Odd that OSCAR didn't pick that up.


5: Geirr Jóhansson -New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound (sounds like mundane name 'Keir') most important.

Geirr Old Norse masculine given name found in GB, p 10

Jóhansson patronymic created using <Jóhann> found in GB, p 12. Standard genitive pattern for patronymic formation.

Name Comments:

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2017-08-25 14:53:19
Geirr is indeed Old Norse, specifically Old West Norse:

Found in Old Danish and Old Swedish as Ger, and in OW.Norse as Geirr (also found as a by-name). From the OW.Norse noun geirr "spear".

Jóhan(n):

Found in Old Swedish as Iohan and in OW.Norse as Jóhann. Christian name; Scandinavian form of Greek Johannes (modern John or Johann).

GB doesn't note what century a name was found in, so the fact that both elements are marked OW. Norse means they work. Iceland was actually Christian by 1000, so that's pretty early. The name looks correctly formed; no conflicts noted.

Christian Jorgensen af Hilsonger at 2017-08-28 00:27:35
I did not find a conflict

Gunnvor silfraharr (Orle) at 2017-09-08 16:16:14
The name is correctly documented and constructed.


6: Hieronymus van Gent -New Name & New Device

Sable, an elk passant Or maintaining on its back a coney sejant argent

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No changes.

Hieronymus is found as a Dutch variation of Jerome in "Dictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources" by Dr. Sara L. Uckelman (http://dmnes.org/cite/Hieronymus/1584/AuFr)

"Hieronymus m. (n/a) Dutch. London, England . 1584. AuFr Galmarts"

van Gent is dated to 1422 and found in "15th Century Dutch Names - Surnames" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/dutch/dutch15surnames.html)

Name Comments:

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2017-08-25 14:55:33
Cool name. Docs check. No conflicts noted.

Christian Jorgensen af Hilsonger at 2017-08-28 00:39:00
The correct citation for the given name is: "The marriage, baptismal and burial registers, 1571-1874, and monumental inscriptions of the Dutch Reformed Church, Austin Friars, London : with a short account of the strangers and their churches" Austin Friars (Church: London, England); Moens, William John Charles Lymington : King & Sons, printers page 26

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:35:52
Docs check out.

Device Comments:

Beatrice Domenici della Campana at 2017-08-22 21:24:34
I find no conflict.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:36:22
No conflict found. I hate to see "maintaining" used when nothing is being held, but I seem to be in a minority.

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-28 13:38:15
Given that elephants maintain their towers on their backs by whatever means, its only a small analogical step to have, say, a bear maintain an owl on its back, even if we can suppose it's actually the owl's claws clutching the fur (Kalika Peredslava, Aug 2015). And then this, with an acrobatic bunny.

Magnus von Lübeck at 2017-09-07 06:39:48
Suggested blazon: Sable, an elk trippant Or maintaining on its back a coney argent.


7: Hieronymus van Gent and Annetje van Leuven -New Badge

OSCAR is unable to find the name (Hieronymus van Gent) , either registered or submitted.
OSCAR is unable to find the name (Annetje van Leuven) , either registered or submitted.

(Fieldless) A Crook of Basel Or

Badge Comments:

Beatrice Domenici della Campana at 2017-08-22 21:26:51
It's worth mentioning the protected arms:

Holy Roman Empire, Arch-Chamberlain of the The following device associated with this name was registered in December of 1994 (via Laurel): Azure, a sceptre Or. Important non-SCA arms

A Crook of Basel is considered a 'staff', as it was originally a stylized Bishop's crozier.

I do not know whether there is a DC between the two.

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2017-08-25 15:12:57
There definitely is a visual difference; the scepter of the Arch-Chamberlain is a giant fly-swatter.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margraviate_of_Brandenburg#/media/File:Wappen_Mark_Brandenburg.png

The other issue is whether the charge itself, which was the emblem of the Prince-Bishopric of Basel and continues to be used by the canton, is appropriate for personal arms; I don't think we have an example in period of the charge in personal arms. On the other hand, we let people register bishop's croziers and fasces, which are much more widely understood as emblems of authority. I would expect this to be more likely confused with a chess piece; in fact, it's worth a look against:

Herrel of Smael Nest The following badge associated with this name was registered in May of 1985 (via Caid): Per pale azure and vert, a chess rook Or. for House Smael Nest

1 for field v. fieldless, but a period chess rook does not look like a castle; it has a swoopy top. http://mistholme.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/chess_rook.jpg

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-25 18:10:40
The illo linked for the scepter is labeled "Custom Creation according to blazon of the coats of arms", which worried me--artists' misinterpretations of blazons are not unknown, right?--but fortunately other versions found on the Net confirm that it has a significant handle, e.g. at http://www.ngw.nl/heraldrywiki/index.php?title=Brandenburg for the successor entity and http://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-coat-of-arms-flags-coat-of-arms-of-the-state-of-brandenburg-white-2 7952671.html.

As for the swoopy tops of rooks, yes, but invariably bifurcated. See e.g. http://www.heraldica.org/topics/national/italy/touring1.htm (page-search for rook and do read the caption), http://www7b.biglobe.ne.jp/~bprince/hr/parker/jpglossc.htm#Chess%20rook, https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/A_Complete_Guide_to_Heraldry/Chapter_19, fig. 524, and the chess rook links from http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/heraldry/siebmacher/chesspiece.html. Unlike the two-headed chess knights that became single-headed, I don't believe rooks evolved into single-swoop pieces.

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-23 08:14:31
Our only registration of "a crook of Basel" (note capitalization) is to Alda Mauricia, Sep 1995, Purpure, a crook of Basel argent. This means the charge meets the description of http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html#A2A, "Items which have not been registered in over a decade, have only been registered a few times, or have recent registrations only via the [Existing Registration] Clause may need to be documented." Its entry at http://mistholme.com/dictionary/crook-basel/ may suffice; but if so, that should be cited in the headmatter.

Since that entry also does not see "Crook" as a proper noun, propose blazon:

(Fieldless) A crook of Basel Or

Magnus von Lübeck at 2017-09-07 06:33:21
To take care of this entire issue:
Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry s.n. Crook of Basel
http://mistholme.com/?s=basel
"The term "crook of Basel" refers to a specific stylization of a charge found in the arms of Basel. In its original form, it was drawn as a bishop's crozier [Zurich ix], but by 1413 it had assumed its present, highly stylized form [Conz.Const. ccv], to the point where it may be considered a separate charge."

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:37:02
Don't see any definite conflicts unless Beatrice's find is indeed a conflict.


8: Hieronymus van Gent and Annetje van Leuven -New Badge

OSCAR is unable to find the name (Hieronymus van Gent) , either registered or submitted.
OSCAR is unable to find the name (Annetje van Leuven) , either registered or submitted.

(Fieldless) A furison Or estencelly gules

Badge Comments:

Beatrice Domenici della Campana at 2017-08-22 21:24:48
I find no conflict.

Iago ab Adam at 2017-08-23 01:18:14
I'm just on the edge of whether I can make out the tincture of the sparks from a reasonable viewing distance. OSCAR seems to be having the same issue, as only one of the clusters has more than a few pixels of red in it.

This would be helped by making the dots a little bigger, and by using a thinner outline on them.

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-23 08:15:19
Concur.

Coblaith Muimnech at 2017-08-23 22:15:37
I agree.

Gunnvor silfraharr (Orle) at 2017-09-08 16:18:19
Concur. If the sparks were more butch and there were fewer of them this would be much more identifiable.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:37:21
Agree with Iago's comments about the sparks. No conflicts found.


9: Hieronymus van Gent and Annetje van Leuven -New Badge

OSCAR is unable to find the name (Hieronymus van Gent) , either registered or submitted.
OSCAR is unable to find the name (Annetje van Leuven) , either registered or submitted.

(Fieldless) A griffin sejant argent grasping a furison Or

Badge Comments:

Beatrice Domenici della Campana at 2017-08-22 21:28:14
I find no conflict.

I am slightly concnered that the maintained charge is not truly palewise, nor truly bendwise, and since we now give difference for maintained charges, I believe it should be in a blazonable orientation.

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2017-08-25 15:24:46
I am more concerned that they have colored in the open portion of the furison, which is voided by default. That part shouldn't be yellow. I thought she was holding a book.

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-25 18:52:12
Concur.

Magnus von Lübeck at 2017-09-07 06:06:38
And I thought it was a crown before reading the blazon. The furison would be much easier to identify if it were horizontal and colored correctly.

Gunnvor silfraharr (Orle) at 2017-09-08 16:33:59
Period furisons come solid and with cutouts. Old Norse examples can have elaborate sculptural elements.

As drawn, I'm not certain I would have figured out that this was a furison. The combination of being grasped and sideways makes it challenging to identify.

I messed with the original drawing a bit to put the furison in its normal orientation, which I find more identifiable, just so we could see what that looks like.

1: Image 1

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-09-08 18:34:37
With coloring, I hope this will be acceptable to submitter.

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-25 18:51:44
To set Donna Beatrice's mind (and mine) at ease, observe the following registered armory with maintained items halfway between the blazonable angles, all from 2016 LoIs, well after the decree of August 2015:
https://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=66121 for Hannah Story Teller
https://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=65572 for Ignat [corrected] Ladogin
https://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=64840 for Jean-Robert Le Marchand de Sel
https://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=66485 for Iurii Viktorov Belogorskii
https://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=64101 for Ljúfvina haustmyrkr Hrafnsdóttir
https://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=63829 for Rayner Blackwood
https://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=63225 for Sigurðr skrifari
https://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=65358 for Yzabeau Brossier

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:38:02
If the griffin is a normal two-winged one, we should be able to see at least a bit of its dexter wing. No conflicts found. Have to agree with Beatrice about the furison.

Kryss Kostarev at 2017-09-20 07:49:08
For the sake of visualizing, I left the furison in the original orientation but voided it and added the dexter wing.

1: Image 1

Kryss Kostarev at 2017-09-08 11:00:53
This is awfully close to Albrecht Dürer's Griffin woodcut. Just an observation.

1: Image 1

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-09-08 18:34:01
I believe it is out of copyright. See also https://quoteinvestigator.com/2013/03/06/artists-steal/.


10: Hieronymus van Gent and Annetje van Leuven -New Badge

OSCAR is unable to find the name (Hieronymus van Gent) , either registered or submitted.
OSCAR is unable to find the name (Annetje van Leuven) , either registered or submitted.

Gules, in saltire two ragged staves argent between four furisons flats to center Or

Badge Comments:

Beatrice Domenici della Campana at 2017-08-22 21:29:17
I find no conflict.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:38:17
No conflicts found.


11: Honora de Cunningham -Resub Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 2015, via Northshield.

(Fieldless) On a weeping willow tree eradicated argent an increscent azure

Pennsic Submission

Submission History: Previous badge submission, 'Azure, a willow tree eradicated argent', was returned from the May 2016 Northshield kingdom letter due to multiple conflicts. (https://oscar.sca.org/kingdom/kingsingleitem.php?kingdom=19&id=64586)

Badge Comments:

Beatrice Domenici della Campana at 2017-08-22 21:29:55
I find no conflict.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:38:36
No conflicts found.


12: Hrothgar Ulfr Gunnarsson -New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister argent and gules, a raven migrant to dexter chief sable and a wolf courant argent

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Norse) most important.

Pennsic Submission

This name combines an Old English given name with Norse bynames. SENA Appendix C permits this combination.

Hrothgar is a header form in PASE (http://pase.ac.uk/jsp/index.jsp); the spelling <Hrodgar> is dated to the 11th c.

Ulfr Although GB shows Ulfr as a masculine given name, it could also be a descriptive byname meaning 'wolf' since "A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic (1910)" by by Geir T. Zoëga [See Image #1 below] (http://www.ling.upenn.edu/~kurisuto/germanic/oi_zoega_about.html) shows ulfr as a common noun with that meaning on p 458. This would be parallel to a number of animal bynames shown by GB:

bestinger or "captive bear" p 20

bjarki or "bear cub", p 20

brusi or "buck", p 20

dyr or "deer", p 21

galti or "boar"

isungr or "polar bear", p 23

melrakki or "polar fox", p 25

Gunnarsson is a Norse patronymic constructed from <Gunnarr> from GB, p 10. Patronymic construction converts the final 'r' to an 's' before the addition of -son.

English unmarked transliteration is preferred by the submitter.

Pennsic Submission

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1123/2017-08-22/15-47-19_Hrothgar_Name_Doc_2_1.jpg

Name Comments:

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2017-08-25 15:41:59
I believe we enforce the convention that animal bynames in Norse appear lower-case. There is a Hrothgar Gunnarsson already registered, so the úlfr element is critical, Hrothgar úlfr Gunnarsson (with or without accent). Hroðgar úlfr Gunnarsson is also good, as that is likely what all the Hrodgar examples in the detail data at PASE represent.

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-25 19:00:40
The convention has been discarded. No mention of exceptions by type is made at http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2012/04/12-04cl.html, "From Pelican: Norse Capitalization".

So <Hrothgar Úlfr Gunnarsson> and <Hroðgar Úlfr Gunnarsson> (with or without accent in both cases) are also good.

Gunnvor silfraharr (Orle) at 2017-09-08 16:36:12
If he wanted a fully Old Norse name, the cognate is <Hróðgeirr>.

Device Comments:

Beatrice Domenici della Campana at 2017-08-22 21:34:32
Birds and quadrupeds do not have comparable postures, so we should not have issues under Unity.

I believe this is clear of: Hawk Gunnulf The following device associated with this name was registered in April of 1998 (via Meridies): Per bend sinister gules and argent, a hawk striking to sinister and a wolf passant counterchanged.

One DC for the change of tincture of the bird, and I believe another for the posture of the bird, from migrant to dexter chief to striking to sinister, but someone may need to look at the art to be sure.

I believe this is also clear of: Lucius Marius Lupus The following device associated with this name was registered in January of 2009 (via Northshield): Per chevron argent and gules, a raven displayed sable and a wolf passant argent.

With one DC for the field, and another for the orientation of the bird from palewise to bendwise (but since this is in the same Kingdom, perhaps the submitter should be given a heads up about this very similar design?)

I find no conflict.

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-25 13:46:09
Here's Hawk's hawk. Note that we have a routine DC for field as well as for all tinctures of charge group (which we should have noticed from the blazon alone), as well as for posture of half the group.

1: Image 1

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-25 13:49:54
I don't feel the device at https://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=8188 as similar to this.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:38:54
No conflicts found.

Magnus von Lübeck at 2017-09-06 21:29:43
No conflict found.


13: Kolfinna in quarra -New Name & New Device

Please consider the following possible conflicts identified by OSCAR (many will not be conflicts): Kolfinna in kyrra(8/2003)

Argent, an oak tree eradicated vert, on a chief azure two acorns Or

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Pennsic Submission

Kolfinna: GB p. 12 listed as female name with 6 instances

in quarra: 'qairrei' found in Wright's Gothic Grammar, page b0339, entry 17 (http://web.ff.cuni.cz/cgi-bin/uaa_slovnik/gmc_search_v3?cmd=formquery2&query=gentle&startrow=1) translated to 'gentle' (see Image #1) Feminized construction to <in quarra> per GB pg 19

STRUCTURE: Construction is given+nickname as described GB p 5-6

Submitter desired meaning: "Kolfinna the gentle"

Pennsic Submission

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1123/2017-08-22/19-52-06_Kolfinna_Name_Doc_1.jpg

Name Comments:

Beatrice Domenici della Campana at 2017-08-22 21:36:25
I'm not great with names conflict, but I think OSCAR has identified a sound conflict here.

Kolfinna in kyrra, registered 2003 via Caid, I believe is in sound conflict with this submission. There is not a substantial change in any syllable to my ear.

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-23 09:03:21
http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html#PN3C2, "Substantial Change to One Syllable", requires only that both the vowel and one consonant group be different between names--not totally different as required under PN.3.C.3. If the <qu-> of the submission is pronounced /kw/ where the <k-> of the proposed conflict is pronounced /k/, that is a difference. There is presumably also a difference between <-a-> and <y->, and the two would not conflict.

However, having no recollection of initial consonants changing between masculine and feminine forms in Old Norse, I am extremely doubtful that the U of <in quarra> is correctly inserted--and for that matter, the first I correctly dropped--vs. the masculine "qairrus".* Someone with access to Geirr Bassi had better confirm or falsify this.

If the feminine is correctly <in qairra>, and if as I suspect Wright's <q-> is a mere orthographic variant of Cleasby/Vigfusson's <k->,** the names do therefore conflict as to sound. And if they're different, I very much want to know how!
---------------------
* This should be the word cited in the headmatter, as shown by Image #1 from Wright. "Qairrei" is 'meekness', a noun.
** Cf. http://web.ff.cuni.cz/cgi-bin/uaa_slovnik/gmc_search_v3?cmd=formquery2&query=kyrr-l%E1tr&startrow=1.

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2017-08-25 16:35:21
A Norse speaker wouldn't know what to do with a Q, and neither would a Goth. I suspect the purpose in citing GB is for the construction 'in' + 'word that ends in a' for a feminine byname. The letter 𐌵 in Gothic is what is represented by the Q in Wright's book. The notes say, "/kʷ/ is similarly written with a single character in the native alphabet and is transliterated q (with no following u)." Ironically, from what I can glean from the various orthographical discussions, qairrei wouldn't be far from kyrri, ai in Gothic ranging from short I to ay as in day, and ei in Gothic representing the vowel in need and beat.

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2017-08-25 16:03:16
Kolfinna is a fine Norse name.

I am confused as to why the submitter believes "Gothic" is a good combination with Old Norse. I quote the Wikipedia article (which is very detailed and quite well documented) on "Gothic language" where it says, "Only a few documents in Gothic survive, not enough for completely reconstructing the language. Most Gothic corpora are translations or glosses of other languages (namely, Greek), so foreign linguistic elements most certainly influenced the texts." If we had sufficient grammatical examples to be able to construct a plausible byname, it would not look like Norse. It would certainly be coeval with very early Old Norse, but with no evidence that the cultures interacted, it wouldn't make a good name combination.

There is a perfectly good Norse byname meaning 'gentle', and that is inn kyrri (masculine)/ in kyrra (feminine). As OSCAR, Beatrice, and Michael have pointed out, Kolfinna in kyrra is already registered, so the corrected form of this name that we would normally recommend has an identical conflict. The easiest solution is to add a patronymic element, but that requires choosing her father's name, which is best done by her.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:39:55
What I see in Wright is the word "quaírrus" with a note saying that the Old Icelandic cognate is "kwirr". Agree with Beatrice and OSCAR about the possible name conflict.

Gunnvor silfraharr (Orle) at 2017-09-08 16:41:21
You can't insert a Gothic adjective into an Old Norse adjectival phrase.

The byname in Old Norse is <in kyrra>. It might be possible to combine Old Norse and Gothic, but as per SENA PN.1.B.1., "Single Time and Place: A registerable name phrase must follow the rules of grammar and structure for a single time and place. It may not mix languages unless that mixing of languages within a name phrase is attested as a period practice." This would preclude use of the Old Norse particle <in>. She'd have to figure out how Gothic bynames are correctly constructed.

If she really wants to be <Kolfinna in kyrra>, then she should add a patronymic or another byname, perhaps a locative, to clear the conflict.

Device Comments:

Beatrice Domenici della Campana at 2017-08-22 21:37:35
I find no conflict.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:39:07
No conflicts found.


14: Lachlann del Glen -New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 1992, via the Middle.

(Fieldless) A sun per pale gules and argent

Badge Comments:

Beatrice Domenici della Campana at 2017-08-22 21:40:44
I find no conflict.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:40:28
Using the face makes this a "sun in his splendor". No conflicts found.

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-28 13:46:34
Whoops! Right. So:

(Fieldless) A sun in his splendor per pale gules and argent


15: Lazaro de Aragon -New Name & New Device

Argent, in bend two lion's heads couped purpure

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound (wants it to sound like 'la-SAR-oh' rather than 'LA-sar-oh') most important.

Lazaro is a masculine given dated to 1289-1300, found in "Medieval Spanish Names from the Monastery of Sahagun The Names, Third Group" by Antonio Miguel Santos de Borja, (https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/miguel/sahagun/sahagunNames3.html)

de Aragon is a late 15th c locative surname found in "Spanish Names from the Late 15th Century" by Juliana de Luna, (https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/isabella/locative.html)

Name Comments:

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:40:54
Docs check out, but have no idea what the period pronunciation would be.

Device Comments:

Beatrice Domenici della Campana at 2017-08-22 21:42:57
I do not see these heads as couped--couped would have a straight line cut-off. Neither are these erased--there are no prominent jags of skin/flesh (I don't see any neck showing, only what appears to be mane). I'm not sure if this is blazonable.

I find no conflict.

Iago ab Adam at 2017-08-23 01:33:57
Concur.

Relevant (and quite recent) precedent: This device is returned for redraw. Please instruct the submitter on the proper way to draw erasing: either three or four prominent, pointed jags on the erasing, as described on the Cover Letter to the November 2001 LoAR:

Therefore, for purposes of recreating period armorial style for erasing, the erasing should (1) have between three and eight jags; (2) have jags that are approximately one-sixth to one-third the total height of the charge being erased; and (3) have jags that are not straight but rather are wavy or curved.

As drawn, the "jags" appear to be details of the mane.
[Octamasades Skuthikos. Dec 2016 via An Tir]

(link to that submission, for reference: http://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=68718)

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-23 09:10:39
The line doesn't have to be straight, but it does have to be smooth. "From Wreath: Couped and Erased" in http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2001/11/01-11cl.html, declares that in period:

The most significant difference between couped and erased is that couped was almost universally treated as a smooth line, while erased was marked by the presence of significant and prominent jags. Virtually all heads found in period heraldic artwork are distinctly either couped or erased, without intermediate artistic forms.
If a smooth convex line--the same cover-letter item notes "Another convex form [of couped] resembled a shallow T-shirt neck line"--were drawn along the sinister edge of the heads and a bit of purpure were filled in to meet it, or if the manes' tresses were adjusted so they formed such a line, we would have the blazon as submitted without losing much if any beauty from this emblazon.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:41:21
No conflicts found, but strongly agree with the other commenters about the problem of the heads.

Kryss Kostarev at 2017-09-20 10:59:20
Here is a set of heads couped.

1: Image 1


16: Michahel Auerr -New Name & New Device

Please consider the following possible conflicts identified by OSCAR (many will not be conflicts): Michael Eryri(7/2016)

Per chevron argent and gules, three phoenixes counterchanged

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound (Sound of given name: Michahel) most important.

Pennsic Submission

Michahel is found in "Medieval German Given Names from Silesia" by Talan Gwynek, s.n. Michahel dated to 1315. (https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/talan/bahlow/bahlowMasc.html)

Auerr is found in Family Search: Katharina Auerr, christened 1 April 1599, Baden, Germany, Batch C93413-3 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NC4T-XZG)

The name pattern given+byname is used in German by SENA, Appendix A.

Pennsic Submission

Name Comments:

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-23 09:14:26
Minor correction: The reference is actually s.n. Michael.

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2017-08-25 20:57:51
Bahlow, s.n. Auer has Joh. us der ouwe in 1294 and L. Ouwer in 1269. The O forms seem to be older than the A forms, in case it is important to him.

Docs check, no conflicts noted.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:42:03
Is the client's preference for a pronunciation with three syllables? I've no good idea how the given name is supposed to be pronounced.

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-28 13:50:48
I'm figuring /ˈmixahel/ (/x/ as in "Bach" /bax/), with choice of stressed syllable based on cognates and the rest on the spelling.

Device Comments:

Beatrice Domenici della Campana at 2017-08-22 21:44:14
I find no conflict.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:42:32
No conflicts found.


17: Sorcha Bhuidhe -New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 2007, via Northshield.

Gules, two elephants rampant respectant argent

Pennsic Submission

Badge Comments:

Beatrice Domenici della Campana at 2017-08-22 21:44:59
I find no conflict.

Iago ab Adam at 2017-08-23 01:42:02
'Rampant respectant' can be simplified.

Gules, two elephants combatant argent.

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:43:09
No conflicts found. Agree with Iago's reblazon.

Kryss Kostarev at 2017-09-20 14:17:25
I am bothered by the lack of a second tusk in both elephants. I also see a coloring mistake in the dexter elephant that eliminates the elephant's foreleg.

Mira Fastova (Keythong) at 2017-09-20 14:37:57
Thank you for pointing that out. We can fix it before forwarding it to Laurel.

Kryss Kostarev at 2017-09-20 23:32:56
If it will help, here is a corrected color copy. I also put the extra tusks in.

1: Image 1

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-09-20 23:39:40
THERE ya go!


18: Thorir inn Sterki -New Name & New Device

Please consider the following possible conflicts identified by OSCAR (many will not be conflicts): Tyrannius Darius(8/2016)

Bendy Or and sable, a Thor's hammer argent within a bordure vert.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (wants given name Thorir) most important.
Meaning (wants byname with the meaning strong) most important.

Pennsic Submission

Thorir GB shows <þórir> as a common Old Norse masculine given name on p 16

inn sterki is found in GB, p 28, as an adjectival byname meaning 'strong, powerful'

Pattern follows given name + adjectival byname with simplified spelling and no markings.

Pennsic Submission

Name Comments:

Adelaide de Beaumont at 2017-08-25 21:14:12
þórir: The first element Þór- is identical to the Old Icelandic Þórr, the god of thunder. The derivation of the second element -véR or its side-form -vir is not certain. The name-element may derive from Germanic *-wíhaz, related to the Gothic adjective weihs, "holy," making the sense of the word "priest." Alternatively, -véR may be a formed from the Gothic verb weihan "to fight" and related to the OW.Norse noun víg, "fight, struggle," which would make the interpretation "warrior."

inn sterki is a common byname, but should not be capitalized. It's a popular combination; we already have registered Arnþorr inn sterki, Þorbjorn inn sterki, and Þorgarðr inn Sterki. If Þorgarðr inn Sterki was considered sufficiently different from Þorbjorn inn Sterki, this should be clear.

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-26 02:38:53
http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2012/04/12-04cl.html, "From Pelican: Norse Capitalization" allows <Sterki> to be capitalized if the submitter wishes. See the discussion there for why.

And yes, <Thorir> is clear of both <Þorgarðr> and <Þorbjorn> under http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html#PN3C2 because their second syllables are nothing alike.

Gunnvor silfraharr (Orle) at 2017-09-08 16:44:18
The name is okay, dropping the thorn and accents throughout.

Device Comments:

Beatrice Domenici della Campana at 2017-08-22 21:45:48
I find no conflict.

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-08-23 09:20:48
It might be a service to submitter to let him know that a narrower bordure would be equally acceptable to the College.

Mira Fastova (Keythong) at 2017-08-24 10:47:39
I had that same thought

Gawain of Miskbridge (Green Anchor) at 2017-08-28 10:44:08
No conflicts found. Interesting: we usually have problems with bordures that aren't wide enough.

Gunnvor silfraharr (Orle) at 2017-09-08 16:52:39
I don't know where this particular "Thor's hammer" representation originated, but I swear to gawd I think it's an adult novelty every time I see it.

Here's a sketch with a more typical period shape for the Thor's hammer and a somewhat narrower bordure, for comparison.

1: Image 1 2: Image 2

Michael Gerard Curtememoire at 2017-09-08 19:13:23
What does Orle think of the representation at https://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=7947?

Gunnvor silfraharr (Orle) at 2017-09-08 20:26:56
That one's better. It still doesn't look like period examples, but at least the hammer head is easily "read" as such.


Thus ends the August Internal Letter for Northshield.

In service to Northshield & the College of Arms

Mistress Mira Fastova

Keythong Herald


OSCAR counts 9 Names, 1 Name Change, 8 Devices and 8 Badges. There are a total of 26 items submitted on this letter.

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