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Æthelmearc ILoI dated 2017-05-29

Greetings unto Sofie Silver Buccle and the College of Heralds of the Kingdom of Æthelmearc. This is Æ193a, internal letter of intent. It is the intent of the Garnet office to submit the following elements to the Laurel Sovereign of Arms for registration.

1: Æthelmearc, Kingdom of -New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 1998, via Æthelmearc.

Argent, two headsman's axes palewise addorsed head to tail sable.

This submission is to be associated with Thrown Weapons rank of Thrower

Herald of Record: Dagonell (dpsalley@heronter.org)

The November 2012 LoAR Cover Letter includes a discussion on allowable oddball orientations.

A3D2c mentions combattant as "an arrangement that includes posture/orientation". What other sorts of arrangements are possible?

Period armory draws charges to take up the most space possible. With two charges, typically we find both charges placed side by side in fess, with their long axes vertical. There are therefore three posture/orientation cases possible, all of which we see in period armory: both charges facing the same direction, charges addorsed, or charges respectant/combatant. There is also the far less common case of two horizontal charges placed in pale: both charges facing the same direction, or charges facing in opposite directions. Examples:

BSB Cod.icon.291, f. 36r: Bendy azure and argent, a sword fesswise between two lions counterpassant passant. It is unclear if this is a single primary group of three charges, or a primary sword between secondary lions, or primary lions surrounding a secondary sword. In any case, the upper lion is passant to sinister and the lower lion is passant to dexter.

BSB Cod.icon.307, p. 287: Or, in pale a hunting horn and a hunting horn reversed sable. Two horns facing in opposite directions.

The Visitation of Cheshire in 1580 gives the arms of Glegg of Gayton as Sable, two lions counterpassant in pale argent collared gules. We would likely blazon this as in pale two lions counter-passant passant, to clarify that the upper lion is passant to sinister and the lower lion passant to dexter.

The client wishes this to be a test case as to whether or not charges can be blazoned addorsed head to tail in a similar manner to how they can be blazoned default and reversed (the hunting horn example above.)


2: Æthelmearc, Kingdom of -New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 1998, via Æthelmearc.

Argent, two headsman's axes palewise addorsed head to tail within a bordure azure.

This submission is to be associated with Thrown Weapons rank of Caster

Herald of Record: Dagonell (dpsalley@heronter.org)

The November 2012 LoAR Cover Letter includes a discussion on allowable oddball orientations.

A3D2c mentions combattant as "an arrangement that includes posture/orientation". What other sorts of arrangements are possible?

Period armory draws charges to take up the most space possible. With two charges, typically we find both charges placed side by side in fess, with their long axes vertical. There are therefore three posture/orientation cases possible, all of which we see in period armory: both charges facing the same direction, charges addorsed, or charges respectant/combatant. There is also the far less common case of two horizontal charges placed in pale: both charges facing the same direction, or charges facing in opposite directions. Examples:

BSB Cod.icon.291, f. 36r: Bendy azure and argent, a sword fesswise between two lions counterpassant passant. It is unclear if this is a single primary group of three charges, or a primary sword between secondary lions, or primary lions surrounding a secondary sword. In any case, the upper lion is passant to sinister and the lower lion is passant to dexter.

BSB Cod.icon.307, p. 287: Or, in pale a hunting horn and a hunting horn reversed sable. Two horns facing in opposite directions.

The Visitation of Cheshire in 1580 gives the arms of Glegg of Gayton as Sable, two lions counterpassant in pale argent collared gules. We would likely blazon this as in pale two lions counter-passant passant, to clarify that the upper lion is passant to sinister and the lower lion passant to dexter.

The client wishes this to be a test case as to whether or not charges can be blazoned addorsed head to tail in a similar manner to how they can be blazoned default and reversed (the hunting horn example above.)


3: Æthelmearc, Kingdom of -New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 1998, via Æthelmearc.

Argent, two headsman's axes palewise addorsed head to tail within a bordure gules.

This submission is to be associated with Thrown Weapons rank of Huntsman

Herald of Record: Dagonell (dpsalley@heronter.org)

The November 2012 LoAR Cover Letter includes a discussion on allowable oddball orientations.

A3D2c mentions combattant as "an arrangement that includes posture/orientation". What other sorts of arrangements are possible?

Period armory draws charges to take up the most space possible. With two charges, typically we find both charges placed side by side in fess, with their long axes vertical. There are therefore three posture/orientation cases possible, all of which we see in period armory: both charges facing the same direction, charges addorsed, or charges respectant/combatant. There is also the far less common case of two horizontal charges placed in pale: both charges facing the same direction, or charges facing in opposite directions. Examples:

BSB Cod.icon.291, f. 36r: Bendy azure and argent, a sword fesswise between two lions counterpassant passant. It is unclear if this is a single primary group of three charges, or a primary sword between secondary lions, or primary lions surrounding a secondary sword. In any case, the upper lion is passant to sinister and the lower lion is passant to dexter.

BSB Cod.icon.307, p. 287: Or, in pale a hunting horn and a hunting horn reversed sable. Two horns facing in opposite directions.

The Visitation of Cheshire in 1580 gives the arms of Glegg of Gayton as Sable, two lions counterpassant in pale argent collared gules. We would likely blazon this as in pale two lions counter-passant passant, to clarify that the upper lion is passant to sinister and the lower lion passant to dexter.

The client wishes this to be a test case as to whether or not charges can be blazoned addorsed head to tail in a similar manner to how they can be blazoned default and reversed (the hunting horn example above.)


4: Æthelmearc, Kingdom of -New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 1998, via Æthelmearc.

Argent, two headsman's axes palewise addorsed head to tail within a bordure sable.

This submission is to be associated with Thrown Weapons rank of Verfur

Herald of Record: Dagonell (dpsalley@heronter.org)

The November 2012 LoAR Cover Letter includes a discussion on allowable oddball orientations.

A3D2c mentions combattant as "an arrangement that includes posture/orientation". What other sorts of arrangements are possible?

Period armory draws charges to take up the most space possible. With two charges, typically we find both charges placed side by side in fess, with their long axes vertical. There are therefore three posture/orientation cases possible, all of which we see in period armory: both charges facing the same direction, charges addorsed, or charges respectant/combatant. There is also the far less common case of two horizontal charges placed in pale: both charges facing the same direction, or charges facing in opposite directions. Examples:

BSB Cod.icon.291, f. 36r: Bendy azure and argent, a sword fesswise between two lions counterpassant passant. It is unclear if this is a single primary group of three charges, or a primary sword between secondary lions, or primary lions surrounding a secondary sword. In any case, the upper lion is passant to sinister and the lower lion is passant to dexter.

BSB Cod.icon.307, p. 287: Or, in pale a hunting horn and a hunting horn reversed sable. Two horns facing in opposite directions.

The Visitation of Cheshire in 1580 gives the arms of Glegg of Gayton as Sable, two lions counterpassant in pale argent collared gules. We would likely blazon this as in pale two lions counter-passant passant, to clarify that the upper lion is passant to sinister and the lower lion passant to dexter.

The client wishes this to be a test case as to whether or not charges can be blazoned addorsed head to tail in a similar manner to how they can be blazoned default and reversed (the hunting horn example above.)


5: Æthelmearc, Kingdom of -New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 1998, via Æthelmearc.

Or, two headsman's axes palewise addorsed head to tail sable.

This submission is to be associated with Thrown Weapons rank of Marksman

Herald of Record: Dagonell (dpsalley@heronter.org)

The November 2012 LoAR Cover Letter includes a discussion on allowable oddball orientations.

A3D2c mentions combattant as "an arrangement that includes posture/orientation". What other sorts of arrangements are possible?

Period armory draws charges to take up the most space possible. With two charges, typically we find both charges placed side by side in fess, with their long axes vertical. There are therefore three posture/orientation cases possible, all of which we see in period armory: both charges facing the same direction, charges addorsed, or charges respectant/combatant. There is also the far less common case of two horizontal charges placed in pale: both charges facing the same direction, or charges facing in opposite directions. Examples:

BSB Cod.icon.291, f. 36r: Bendy azure and argent, a sword fesswise between two lions counterpassant passant. It is unclear if this is a single primary group of three charges, or a primary sword between secondary lions, or primary lions surrounding a secondary sword. In any case, the upper lion is passant to sinister and the lower lion is passant to dexter.

BSB Cod.icon.307, p. 287: Or, in pale a hunting horn and a hunting horn reversed sable. Two horns facing in opposite directions.

The Visitation of Cheshire in 1580 gives the arms of Glegg of Gayton as Sable, two lions counterpassant in pale argent collared gules. We would likely blazon this as in pale two lions counter-passant passant, to clarify that the upper lion is passant to sinister and the lower lion passant to dexter.

The client wishes this to be a test case as to whether or not charges can be blazoned addorsed head to tail in a similar manner to how they can be blazoned default and reversed (the hunting horn example above.)


If somebody is gracious enough to give me a second chance, I won't need a third. --Pete Rose

Madoc Garnet

Saiman Cornelian


OSCAR counts 5 Badges. There are a total of 5 items submitted on this letter.

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