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East LoI dated 2008-08-31

Unto Olwyn Laurel, Istvan Wreath, Aryanhwy Pelican, the SCA College of Arms, and all others who do receive this letter, greetings from Brunissende Dragonette de Brocéliande, Blue Tyger Herald.

It is the intent of the Easterners to register the following items.

Unless otherwise noted, the submitter has no desire for authenticity, allows any changes, and allows a holding name.

This item was on the 12-2008 LoAR

1: Alesone Gray - New Name & New Device

Gules, three crosses formy surmounted by annulets and on a chief argent three ravens sable.

She cares most about the spelling of her given name as Alesone.

Alesone is dated to 1492 in "A List of Feminine Personal Names Found in Scottish Records" by Talan Gwynek (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/scottishfem.html#scottishfemlate).

Gray is a header on p. 325 of Black; dated examples of this spelling include John Gray 1394, Ibbote Gray 1376, and John Gray of Broxmouth 1357. "Early 16th Century Scottish Lowland Names" by Sharon Krossa (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/lowland16/index.shtml) also cites examples of Gray, with this spelling dated to 1500, 1502, 1517, 1518, 1520, 1549, and 1550.

This name is clear of Alison Gray of Owlwood (July 1994 West) by omission of the third name element.


This item was on the 12-2008 LoAR

2: Anton Lowe von Ulm - New Name & New Device

Argent, a lion's head erased and on a chief indented gules, a fleur-de-lys between two mullets of eight points argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Anton is dated to 1501-1550 in "Late Period German Masculine Given Names" by Talan Gwynek (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/germmasc.html), in the section on names from Plauen, 16th century (Christian names).

Lowe is found in Bahlow (Gentry trans.) p. 296 s.n. Lau: Claus Lowe c. 1400.

Ulm is a city in southwest Germany. According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, Ulm was first mentioned in 854 and was chartered in the 12th century. Ulm played a "leading role" in the wars of the 14th and 15th centuries. The byname von Ulme is found in "German Names from Rottweil, Baden-Wurttemberg, 1441" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/rottweilsur.hmtl). The submitter prefers the normalized spelling von Ulm.

The pattern [given name] + [surname] + [locative byname] is attested in "German Names from Nürnberg, 1497" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/german/nurnberg1497.html).

This device is clear of Lorcán Ó Fearghail's badge (Sep. 2000 Lochac): Argent, a lion's head erased gules, with one CD for adding the chief, and another for adding charges on the chief.


This item was on the 12-2008 LoAR

3: Bertana of Cissanbyrig - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in September of 2004, via Atenveldt

Gules, a heart argent within a bordure denticulada Or.

Her name and device were registered in Sep. 2004, via Atenveldt.


This item was on the 12-2008 LoAR

4: Brunissende Dragonette de Brocéliande and Alys Mackyntoich - Resub Badge

OSCAR finds the name (Brunissende Dragonette de Brocéliande) registered exactly as it appears in September of 2004, via the East
OSCAR finds the name (Alys Mackyntoich) registered exactly as it appears in February of 2005, via the East

(Fieldless) A standing seraph gules, haloed and holding a cup Or.

This badge is to be associated with the Sisterhood of Saint Walburga, whose name was registered to Brunissende and Alys in Nov. 2006.

Brunissende Dragonette de Brocéliande was registered in Sep. 2004, and Alys Mackyntoich was registered in Feb. 2005, both via the East. Brunissende also has a device, a badge, and an alternate name, and Alys has a device and an alternate name.

Their previous badge submission for St. Walburga, (Fieldless) A standing seraph gules, haloed and standing atop an open book, charged on the breast with a cup maintained in both hands Or, was returned by Laurel (Nov. 2006 R-East) because of problems with the depiction of the book. This submission eliminates the book from the design.


This item was on the 12-2008 LoAR

5: Colin Tagan - New Name & New Device

Argent, a sheep rampant sable playing bagpipes, a bordure embattled vert.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound (He cares most about the sound 'tea-gan' of his surname) most important.

Colin: Woulfe p. 176 s.n. Coilín says: "g. id., Colin; a var. of Coileán, q.v. Coilín was also in use among Anglo-Irish families as a 'pet' form of Nicol or Nicholas. Lat. Colinus." [This is from the Google Books snippet view of Woulfe, so kingdom has no idea what "g. id." stands for.] Black also mentions the two possible origins of the name (except he gives the Gaelic as Cailean), and dates Colin to 1261 and 1284-90 and Colinus to 1292.

Tagan is based on the gray-area Anglicized surname O Tagan, found in Woulfe s.n. Ó Tadhgáin. Later Englishings of this name include Teigan and Teegan, so even the vowels may be pretty close to what the submitter wants. Dropping the 'O' from Gaelic surnames appears to have become more common post-period, but there are a few examples in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "16th & 17th Century Anglicized Irish Surnames from Woulfe" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/Woulfe/): Derriroe for Ó Dairbhre, Harrity for Ó hAireachtaigh, Mulclahy for Ó Maolchluiche, Mullaghny and Meloughna for Ó Maolfhachtna, Moreen for Ó Móirín, Rolley for Ó Roghallaigh, and Roolane for Ó Rothláin. Given these examples and O Tagan, kingdom believes that Tagan is plausible as a late-period Anglicized Irish surname.

Submitted as Colin Teaghan, this surname appears in Woulfe s.n. Ó Téacháin as a post-period Anglicized form. The two gray-area Englishings O Taughan, O Tauhan indicate that the name likely wasn't pronounced 'tea-gan'. Because 'Teaghan' is post-period, kingdom has changed the name to Colin Tagan in order to make the name registerable (and to hopefully get closer to the submitter's desired sound).


This item was on the 12-2008 LoAR

6: Cristiana ingen Mec-Bead - New Name & New Device

Gules, a bend bevilled between a sun and three musical notes Or.

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Note: the "Society Name" line on the name submission form clearly has Cristiana (no 'h'), while the documentation summary and the device form both have Christiana.

Talan Gwynek's "A List of Feminine Personal Names Found in Scottish Records" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/scottishfem.html) s.n. Christian dates Cristiana to 1284 and 1360. According to Sharon Krossa's "Scottish Gaelic Given Names" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/gaelicgiven/women/christian.shtml), there is evidence that "late 13th-16th century Scottish Gaels were using a name that was recorded in Latin documents as Cristina", but there is no evidence for what the medieval Scottish Gaelic form of that name was. We are thus left with the Scots name from Talan's article; combining it with a Gaelic patronymic is considered a step from period practice, but registerable.

Mec-Bead is from "A Simple Guide to Constructing 12th Century Scottish Gaelic Names" by Sharon Krossa (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/simplescotgaelicnames12.htm), where it is given as the genitive of the masculine names Mac-Bead or Mac-Bethad. According to Sharon Krossa's "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/), a patronymic beginning with 'M' needs to be lenited after ingen, but her "The Spelling of Lenited Consonants in Gaelic"(http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotlang/lenition.shtml) says that in pre-1200 orthography, the lenition of 'm' is not shown in writing. Therefore, ingen Mec-Bead should be correct.

Submitted as Cristiana inghen Mec-Bead, the patronymic particle has been corrected to ingen, because the source for Mec-Bead is noted as using the earlier orthography.


This item was on the 12-2008 LoAR

7: Elizabeth Miller of Edgewater - New Name & New Device

Per chevron sable and gules, three millrinds argent, a fillet ermine.

Elizabeth is the most common female name in Talan Gwynek's "Late Sixteenth Century English Given Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/eng16/eng16ffreq.html).

Miller is a header on p. 532 of Bardsley, dated in this spelling to 1573.

Edgewater can be constructed as a possible English placename, based on such places as Edgebrook (a header in R&W, dated in the spelling Eggebrok 1327), Edgecliff (de Eggeclive 1280), Edgecombe (de Egghacombe 1275, Egecom 1494), Edgefield (de Egefeld' 1198, de Eggesfeld 1208, de Eggefeld 1374-75; also Mills: Edisfelda 1086), Edgworth (Mills: Eggewrthe 1212), and Edge (Ekwall: Eghe DB, Egge 1260, 1268, 1276: OE ecg 'edge, hillside, hill'); and Blackwater (Ekwall: Blackwater 1576, 1577), Wastwater (Wassewater 1294, Waswater 1322, Wastwater 1338; probably reduced form of 'the lake in Wasdale'). For the spelling of the first element, Julian Goodwyn's "Monumental Brass Enscriptions" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/brasses/lastnameAH.html has Edgcomb 1545 and Edgerley 1500, and "16th Century Gloucestershire Names" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/late16.html) has Hornedge once in Quedgeley.

Parker under Chief (http://www.heraldsnet.org/saitou/parker/Jpglossc.htm#Chief) writes: "It is contended by some writers that the chief has a diminutive, and to a figure as shewn in the margin is given the name of fillet. [...] It is said that the fillet does not occur at all in English arms, but perhaps the following example may be cited: Argent, two bars and a canton gules; over all a fillet sable - BOIS or DEBOYS, 1315, Ingham Church, Norfolk." The figure in the margin shows a bar across the field at about the same height as the bottom line of a chief (that is, about a quarter of the way down). Guillim's A Display of Heraldrie (1610; http://www.btinternet.com/~paul.j.grant/guillim/s2/gu_s2c4.htm) also describes a "fillet" under the heading Chief, and shows an example which he blazons Or, a Chiefe, Azure, a Fillet in the nether part thereof, Argent, which is basically Or, a chief azure fimbriated argent: a narrow white bar about a quarter of the way down, with blue above and yellow below. The PicDic s.v. Chief contends that a fillet cannot be used without a chief, and further says that because the SCA doesn't allow fimbriated chiefs, the only allowable use of the charge is "counterchanged". The accompanying picture shows a closely-spaced group of three horizontal lines about a quarter of the way down. This is not borne out in the existing registrations of fillets -- only two out of the seven are counterchanged horizontally. However, the most recent registration of a fillet (not a fillet cross) in the SCA is old enough to rent a car (Nov. 1983), with no indication in precedents of why there's nothing after that. It may be related to the ban on single diminutives of ordinaries (which existed no later than 1988, probably earlier [Taliesynne Nychymrh yr Anghygannedd, June 1988 R-Trimaris]), but kingdom can find no specific application of the principle to fillets or chiefs.

What this all boils down to is "we don't know." Wreath, enjoy!


This item was on the 12-2008 LoAR

8: Gavin MacKinnon - New Name & New Device

Per pall vert, sable, and sable, a pall and in chief an eagle argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.

Gavin is dated as a Scottish name to 1477 and 1577 in "Concerning the Names Gavin, Gawaine, Gavan, and Gabhainn" by Arval Benicoeur (http://www.medievalscotland.org/problem/names/gavin.shtml), citing Black and/or the manuscript Aberdeen Council Register. Also, "Early 16th Century Scottish Lowland Names" by Sharon Krossa (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/lowland16/meninstances.shtml) dates Gavine to 1509.

MacKinnon is a header in Black, p. 531; dated spellings include Makkynnon 1536 and Mackiynnan 1545, so the submitted spelling seems not too far afield.

This name may conflict with Kevin MacKinnon (Jan. 1985 Atenveldt). They're different by one syllable, which is something of a borderline case for name conflict, so kingdom is forwarding this for Pelican's decision.

This device is clear of Myles of Falkon Hold (Aug. 1983 Atenveldt): Per chevron inverted gules and sable, a pall and in chief an eagle displayed Or, with one CD for the field tinctures and two more for the tinctures of the primary and secondary charges.


This item was on the 12-2008 LoAR

9: Joseph Harcourt - New Name & New Device

Per pale gules and sable, two smith's hammers in saltire Or within a bordure embattled argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound most important.

Joseph is dated between 1581 and 1595 in "Late 16th Century English Given Names" by Talan Gwynek (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/eng16/eng16mfreq.html). Also, "An Index to the 1523 Subsidy Roll for York and Ainsty, England" by Karen Larsdatter (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/york16/index.htm) lists one occurrence of Joseph.

Harcourt is dated to 1460 in Julian Goodwyn's "Brass Enscription Index" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/brasses/lastnameAH.html).


This item was on the 12-2008 LoAR

10: Katherine O'Brien - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2003, via the East

Argent, a triquetra between in pall three groups of three gouttes one and two azure.

Her name was registered in Apr. 2003, via the East.

Clear of Egil Ironwood (Feb. 1986 Ansteorra): Argent, a triquetra sable, with one CD for the tincture of the triquetra, and another for adding the gouttes.


This item was on the 12-2008 LoAR

11: Katrin Cooper - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Commenters did not find the specific spelling Katrin in period English sources, but they got close: Kathrin and Katryne appear in both "16th Century Gloucestershire Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/late16.html) and "English Given Names from 16th and Early 17th C Marriage Records" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/parishes/parishes.html), both by Aryanhwy merch Catmael; Kathryn is found in her "Index of Names in the 1541 Subsidy Roll of London" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/english/enggivlondon1541.html); and katrine is dated to 1506 and kathrine to 1522 in "Names from the Guild of the Holy Cross, Our Lady, and St. John the Baptist, Stratford-On-Avon (females, entered 1406-1430, 1490-1534)" by Douglas Galbi (http://www.galbithink.org/names/guild.txt). These variations between 't' and 'th', 'i' and 'y', and the presence or absence of a final 'e' should be enough to justify Katrin as a plausibly period English form of Catherine.

Cooper is a header in Bardsley, p. 201, dated in this spelling to 1607. This spelling is also found in "Names from 15th Century York" by Karen Larsdatter (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/york15/index.html).


This item was on the 12-2008 LoAR

12: Meryke Wynterbourne - New Name & New Device

Azure, a bend ermine between an escarbuncle and a wolf rampant argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Meryke is a given name found in Morgan & Morgan p. 167 s.n. Meurig: Meryke Grefyth 1556.

Wynterbourne is found on p. 39 (which is marked p. lxx in the 1601 section) of Hitching & Hitching, via Google Books (http://books.google.com/books?id=yY_0VYXJuroC).

A combination of English and Welsh is not considered a deviation from period practice (08/99 CL).


This item was on the 12-2008 LoAR

13: Noomi bat Avraham - New Device

OSCAR finds the name on the East LoI of October 31, 2007 as submitted.

Per pale Or and azure, a tree blasted and couped counterchanged.

Her name was registered in 02/08 via the East. (A heads-up to the filing clerk: her Request for Reconsideration appears on the July internal letter, in which she asks that the spelling "Naomi" be restored.)

One commenter noted that the trunk on this tree is unusually short, but kingdom believes it's within the range of possible variation.


This item was on the 12-2008 LoAR

14: Noomi bat Avraham - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name on the East LoI of October 31, 2007 as submitted.

(Fieldless) A tree blasted and couped per pale Or and azure.

Her name was registered in 02/08 via the East. (A heads-up to the filing clerk: her Request for Reconsideration appears on the July internal letter, in which she asks that the spelling "Naomi" be restored.)

One commenter noted that the trunk on this tree is unusually short, but kingdom believes it's within the range of possible variation.


This item was on the 12-2008 LoAR

15: Sorcha inghean Uí Néill - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Client requests authenticity.
Sound most important.

The documentation section says the "critical part is Sorcha, the rest can be played with."

Sorcha is found as the name of three women in the Annals Index, dated to 1480, 1500, and 1530.

inghean Uí Néill is from the "Historical Name Generator: Sixteenth Century Irish and Scottish Gaelic Names" by Sharon Krossa (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/hng16gaelic/). It's labeled 'Name with Clan Affiliation for an Irish Gaelic Woman'.


This item was on the 12-2008 LoAR

16: Tanczos Istvan - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 2002, via the East

(Fieldless) A saltire couped crosslet gules.

His name and device were registered in May 2002, via the East.

Correction (2008-Aug-31 14:08:06): This is in fact a resubmission.

His previous badge submission, (Fieldless) A staple sable, was returned for conflict on the Feb. 2004 LoR. This is a complete redesign.

Correction (2008-Aug-31 14:08:13): Correction to correction: this was a Kingdom return and is therefore new to Laurel.

Hopefully there shouldn't be any more corrections here today.


This item was on the 12-2008 LoAR

17: Tobijasz Bogdanowicz - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Client requests authenticity for 14th century Polish language/culture.

He is fine with any and all changes, as long as some form of Tobias is retained as his given name.

Tobijasz is found in Walraven van Nijmegen's "Polish Given Names in Nazwiska Polaków" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/walraven/polish/), in the Masculine Names - Old Testament section. The article gives no dates beyond "in period", and the spellings may be modern; however, Tobijasz is also found in Józef Bubak: Księga naszych imion (Wrocław, Warszawa, Kraków; Zakład Narodowy Im. Ossolińskich Wydawnictwo, 1993) s.n. Tobiasz, dated to 1263.

Bogdanowicz is associated with the date 1430 under Mogiła on p. 230 of Herby Rodów Polskich (Polish Coats of Arms) by Mieczysława Paszkiewicza and Jerzego Kulczyckiego (Orbis Books, London, 1990). The spelling may be modern. Bubak (op. cit.) dates Bogdan to 1136 s.n. Bogdan, but it's concerned with given names, not surnames, so it doesn't help date the spelling of the patronymic ending.


Here ends this East Kingdom letter of intent.

Yours in service,

Brunissende

Blue Tyger Herald

Bibliography

Bahlow, Hans; translated by Edda Gentry. Dictionary of German Names, 2nd ed. Max Kade Institute, Madison, Wisconsin, 2002.

Bardsley, Charles Wareing. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames. Oxford University Press, London, 1901.

Black, George F. The Surnames of Scotland. New York Public Library, 1989.

Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme and Akagawa Yoshio. A Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry as used in the Society for Creative Anachronism. 2nd ed., 1992.

Ekwall, Eilert. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names. Fourth edition. Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1991.

Hitching, F. K., and S. Hitching, References to English Surnames in 1601 and 1602. Walton-on-Thames, 1910-11; Baltimore: republished for the Clearfield Company, Inc. by Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1998.

Mari Elspeth nic Bryan: "Index of Names in Irish Annals". http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/

Mills, A.D. A Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1991.

Morgan, T.J. and Prys Morgan. Welsh Surnames. University of Wales Press, Cardiff, 1985.

Reaney, P.H. and R. M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. Third edition, Oxford University Press, 1995.

Withycombe, E.G. The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names. Third edition. Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1979.

Woulfe, Patrick. Sloinnte Gaedheal is Gall. Irish Names and Surnames. M.H. Gill & Son, Dublin, 1923.


OSCAR counts 11 New Names, 10 New Devices and 3 New Badges. These 24 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $72 for them. OSCAR counts 1 Resub Badge. This item is not chargeable. There are a total of 25 items submitted on this letter.

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