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Caid LoI dated 2017-04-30

Unto Emma Laurel, Brunissende Wreath, Alys Pelican, Cormac Beare, and the College of Arms entire does Ariana Trident, on behalf of Estrith Dolphin and the Caid College of Heralds, send greetings and salutations.

With much appreciation for all your hard work we request your consideration of the following submission from our March 14th meeting.

This item was on the 07-2017 LoAR

1: Caid, Kingdom of - Resub Appeal of Laurel Return of Blazon Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 1975, via the West.

(Fieldess) A Cross of Caid argent

This submission is to be associated with Populace Badge; Augmentation of Arms

The College of Heralds of Caid congratulate Cormac Beare on his recent appointment as Wreath and would like to welcome him in the traditional manner by requesting a reconsideration on the blazon for our populace badge and Augmentation of Arms, currently blazoned as:"(Fieldless) Four crescents conjoined in saltire horns outward argent", to the preferred: "(Fieldless) A Cross of Caid argent". Laurel Sovereign of Arms has repeatedly declined to blazon the heraldic motif, hereunto only colloquially known as the "Cross of Caid", in blazons since the first request in July of 1996, again in May 2007, again in November 2012, and lastly upheld in November 2014, where it again was declined in the traditional fashion. The primary reason for return, per the May 2007 Cover Letter specifically addressing this topic, was the lack of documentation that named crosses were used in Period blazons.

But wait, there's more!

"Cross of Caid" is documented as a plausible constructed charge name following the late period practice of naming heraldic crosses using the pattern "Croix de X" where X is a regional location/city. As specified in the May 2007 LoAR cover letter, and cited in the November 2012 and 2014 returns, Laurel requested documentation that named crosses were used in period blazons to support this request, and specifically asked for more than one instance of a named cross appearing in a period blazon. We have gone father to provide examples of named crosses specifically for places, which we believe better supports our request to blazon the heraldic charge after a territory/Kingdom. Examples of this pattern were found in several regions, primarily in France, in sources dating between 1587 and 1648 with the attested pattern appearing in blazons, as index entries for heraldic charges, or in prose using the patterned term as means to heraldically identify individuals/groups.

Croix de Ierusalem/Hierusalem (modernly Jerusalem) was found dated to1586 on page 21 of the publication "Les Droict Avtoritez et Perorgatives que Pretendent av Royavme de Hierusalem, les Princes & Signeurs Spirituels & Temporels…" (see Figures 1 and 2). While this example is not a blazon, it does specifically refer to the pattern as a heraldic charge stating that "L'On voit en plusieurs lieux du Marquisat de Motserrat les cinq Croix des Hierusalem aux armoiries desdicts Marquis." Roughly translated this means that "We see around the Marquisat (territorial lordship or possessions of a Marquis) of Motserrat five crosses of Jerusalem on the arms of the Marquis.". The Croix de Ierusalem is also found dated to1639 on page 371 of "Histoire de la Ville et Compte de Valentiennes" (see Figures 3 and 4). This source has records of the blazons for the Provosts for the town on a given year and shows the attested pattern of named crosses in a period blazon. The example of "Ierusalem" is attributed to the Provost Nicolas du Puich from 1541 who bears "D'azur a un poing arme d'argent, tenant une espee d'arget croisee et pommeau d'or; au chef d'or, a l'aigle naissant de sable et la Croix de Ierusalem de gueule, au canton dextre du chief." This translates to "Azure, a hand holding a sword silver handled Or and on a chief Or an eagle sable and in canton chief a Cross of Jerusalem gules". The "Croix de Hierusalem" is again documented to 1642 in "Considerations Historiques sur La Genealogie de la Maision de Lorraine" (see Figures 23 and 24). This passages states "Croix de Hierusalem entrees dans les Armes de la Maison le Lorraine apres le marriage de René d'Anjou." This translates to "The Cross of Jerusalem enters the arms of the House of Lorraine after the marriage of René d'Anjou" and clearly shows the first usage of the Cross of Jerusalem as heraldic charge within a bloodline.

Croix de Lorraine was found in 1599 in "Histoire des Derniers Touvbles de France" on page 8 (see Figures 5 and 6). This source provides the attested pattern in a heraldic context as the author describes the coronet worn by an individual to display the Cross of Lorraine and the motto (in Spanish): "Morir o mas contento". The "Croix de Lorraine" again appears in 1630 in "Les Oevvres de Mre Francois de Malherbe, Gentil-homme ordinaire de la chambre du Roy" (see Figures 7 and 8), though in this instance it looks like the author is using the Cross of Lorraine as an example of a reference to the Knights Templar unit in Palestine, but as this was recognized as a Heraldic symbol of the order it supports the idea of named crosses used as heraldic identification of the members of the named area. The "Croix de Lorraine" also appears in "Indices Armorials OV Sommaire Explication des mots vsitez au Volason des Armoiries " on page 44 as part of a blazon (see Figures 11 and 14). The author in this example notes on page 140 that it is called thusly because it was borne by a prince of the house of Lorraine (see Figure 22).

Croix de Savoye (modernly Savoy) was found in 1599 in "Histoire des Derniers Touvbles de France" on page 135 (see Figures 5 and 9). This source provides the attested pattern in a heraldic context as the author describes the banners flown by the Officers of the King as both the Cross of Savoy with the Fleurs de lys of France.

Croix de Bourgogne (modernly Burgundy) was documented to 1635 in "Indices Armorials OV Sommaire Explication des mots vsitez au Volason des Armoiries" on pages 147 and 369 (see Figures 11, 12, and 13). The former citation is a discussion on the cross and how it is a variant of the Cross of St Andrew, and the latter citation lists the Cross of Burgundy in a table of known heraldic charges (alongside the likewise named Cross of St. Andrew). The "Croix de Bourgogne" is also found dated to1639 on page 373 of "Histoire de la Ville et Compte de Valentiennes" (see Figures 3 and 10). This source has records of the blazons for the Provosts for the town on a given year and shows the attested pattern of named crosses in a period blazon. The example of "Bourgogne" is attributed to the Provost Hughes de Bassecourt from 1601 who bears "Escartele d'azur a la bende d'argent, charge de trois Croix de Bourgogne de gueule, et de gueule a trois maillets d'or."

Croix de Florence was found in 1648 on page 135 of "Svitte de L'Inventaire de L'Histoire de France" (see Figures 15 and 16) where the passage discussed two Knights of the Duke and Duchess bearing the Cross of Florence as a means of heraldic identification ("[…]et de deux Chevaliers portans la Croix de Florence.").

As previously stated in the letter of appeal submitted in 2007, the College of Heralds in Caid still argue that the cross of Caid is not an obscure charge and though Laurel does not disagree (per the May 2007 cover letter), the commonality of the charge was determined to not be grounds for supporting a blazon change. We feel that this should be taken into consideration especially when discussing the period practice of naming crosses. The pattern shown within this documentation supports that naming a cross for the territory that bears it was a common period practice, as the cross was arguably named only by its association to that territory. The Caidan charge is, at the time of this writing, 38 years old (having been registered and in use since AS14) and has long been recognized outside of the kingdom to be colloquially known as the "Cross of Caid"/"Caidan Cross". Following the period model, this should be sufficient to bolster the request's plausibility.

While Laurel did not choose to weigh in on the orientation of the Caidan charge during the May 2007 Cover Letter, or in other returns, we do recognize that crosses by default are "upright" (meaning they extend from the chief/base, and sides perpendicularly) and would not document the motif used by Caid. However, there are saltires that were used in period that were known as "crosses" which would support naming the motif as a "Cross", despite the contributing charges being arranged in saltire. The "Cross of Burgundy" is dated above to 1635 and 1639, and can also be documented on a coin minted in 1621 found in a publication from 1647 (see Figures 17 and 18). The Cross of St. Andrew was likewise by default saltirewise and can be documented to 1572 (see Figures 19 and 20) where the author describes it as "This Saltier is made by the manner of a Crosse, called S. Andrewe his Crosse, and commonly of us Englishe men, is thereunto compared." The Cross of St. Julian is likewise oriented saltirewise, and can be documented to 1634 (though assumed to 1514) on the arms of the Worshipful Company of Innholders, whose patron saint was St. Julian the Hospitalier (MISTHOLME, "Saltire").

We likewise recognize that most crosses are by design a continuous and single charge, which would not support documenting the motif used by Caid alone, however there are a few "crosses" that are constructed using multiple charges (usually conjoined in cross, or repeated into a cross-like shape) that are already documented to period usage. The Ermine Cross has been documented to 1460 in the arms of Hurston or Hurleston (MISTHOLME, "Cross: Ermine Spot"). The "Cross of Jerusalem" (herein dated to1587, 1599) likewise contains elements that are not continuous but defining features of the charge as a whole (the crosses couped surrounding the cross crosslet). The Croix Lozenge'e (Lozengy) can also be dated to at least 1635 in "Indice Armorial OV Sommaire"(see Figures 11 and 21). This cross can either have a field treatment of lozengy, or be comprised of lozenges arranged in cross. A "cross of annulets braced", or a "cross of chain" can be documented to 1395 in the canting arms of Chene (MISTHOLME, "Cross: Annulets braced"). All of these examples show a pattern that four crescents conjoined is plausible to have existed in period by following the pattern of arranging multiple charges in a cross to form the overall charge.

Therefore, it is feasible given the documentation provided that "four crescents conjoined in saltire horns outward" could be blazoned as the "Cross of Caid" by period practices in both naming patterns and charge constructions; and, as we believe this addresses the reason for the traditional return, we ask that Wreath reconsider our previous request to blazon the charge as such.

Caid is a kingdom of the SCA, registered in February 1975.

All figures referenced within the text that do not appear attached will be in the comments, in numerical order.

SOURCES

BOSSEWELL, John; De Capo Press, London, 1572; "Workes of Armorie"

De CYPRE, Estienne de Lusignan; Paris, 1586; "Les Droict Avtoritez et Perorgatives que Pretendent av Royavme de Hierusalem, les Princes & Signeurs Spirituels & Temporels…", accessed at: https://books.google.com/books?id=ZblOAAAAcAAJ&pg=RA1-PA31-IA1&dq=%22croix+de%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahU KEwiT7ZfvloDTAhUS5WMKHcJrCCA4ChDoAQhYMAg#v=onepage&q=%22croix%20de%22&f=false

GELIOT, Lovvan. Paris 1635; "Indices Armorials OV: Sommaire Explication des mots vsitez au Volason des Armoiries par Lovvan Geliot, Advocate au parlement de Dijon", accessed at: https://books.google.com/books?id=EexDAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA284&dq=Croix+de+France&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjpw 7uR_fzRAhXDKWMKHZJPBSsQ6AEIVjAI#v=onepage&q=Croix&f=false

le FEBVRE, Louis Chantereau; Paris, 1642; "Considerations Historiques sur La Genealogie de la Maision de Lorraine"; accessed at: https://books.google.com/books?id=-AIgdER4b14C&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=o nepage&q&f=false

de MALHERBE, François; Paris 1630; "Les Oevvres de Mre Francois de Malherbe, Gentil-homme ordinaire de la chambre du Roy", accessed at: https://books.google.com/books?id=sjI5Sjay92YC&pg=PA486&dq=%22croix+de+Lorraine%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0a hUKEwjX57b8hIrTAhWKwFQKHacKDLY4ChDoAQgqMAI#v=onepage&q=%22croix%20de%20Lorraine%22&f=false

MATTHIEU, Petrus; France, 1599; "Histoire des Derniers Trovbles de France", accessed at: https://books.google.com/books?id=X8RTAAAAcAAJ&pg=RA2-PA99-IA1&dq=%22croix+de%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahU KEwjmnvnNmYDTAhVHVWMKHZsZDWo4RhDoAQhJMAY#v=onepage&q=%22croix%20de%22&f=false

d'OUTREMAN, Henri; France 1639; "Histoire de la Ville et Compte de Valentiennes", accessed at: https://books.google.com/books?id=pRlUAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA373&dq=Croix+de+Burgundy&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi lzOzwiIDTAhUFLmMKHY_7BlMQ6AEIGjAA#v=onepage&q=Croix%20de%20Burgundy&f=false

SECOND, Tome. Paris 1648; "Svitte de L'Inventaire de L'Histoire de France"; accessed at: https://books.google.com/books?id=fVg_AAAAcAAJ&pg=PA18&dq=Croix+de+France&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjy_M GGlf3RAhUCr1QKHbq_D1g4MhDoAQgZMAA#v=onepage&q&f=false

VERDUSSEN, Ierosme; 1647; "Ordonnance du roy sur le reglement de ses monnoyes", accessed at: https://books.google.com/books?id=Vy4VAAAAQAAJ&pg=PP69&dq=Croix+de+Bourgogne&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi uqKjGkYDTAhVMyGMKHfFkAyMQ6AEIMTAD#v=onepage&q=Croix%20de%20Bourgogne&f=false

MISTHOLME. Website; Accessed at:

http://mistholme.com/dictionary/saltire/

http://mistholme.com/dictionary/cross-ermine-spots/

http://mistholme.com/dictionary/cross-annulets-braced/

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=766/2017-04-30/18-38-38_Source_9_1586.png
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=766/2017-04-30/18-38-39_Source_9_Passage.png
#3 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=766/2017-04-30/18-38-39_Source_5_1639.png
#4 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=766/2017-04-30/18-38-40_Source_5_Passage_2.png
#5 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=766/2017-04-30/18-38-40_Source_10_1599.png


In Service to Kingdom, Crown, and the Cross of Caid-

Ariana verch Gwenllian

Trident Herald


OSCAR counts 1 Resub Blazon Change. This item is not chargeable.There is only one item submitted on this letter.

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