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An Tir LoI dated 2017-03-31

Greetings unto the Sovereigns and College of Arms from Rhieinwylydd Lions Blood and the An Tir College of Heralds. I beg your indulgence for the length of this letter; we have done our best to present these (many, many!) items as clearly and succinctly as possible. Items processed by the Tir Righ College are indicated as such.

1: Akornebir, Canton of - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 2001, via An Tir.

(Fieldless) A squirrel sejant erect gules maintaining a hunting horn argent banded Or.

This submission is to be associated with Populace


2: An Tir, Kingdom of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in December of 1981, via the West.

Lion's Mane, Order of the

The submitter hypothesizes that 'mane' might be an acceptable heraldic charge. Given the variety of body parts of lions (jambes 1413, tails c. 1460, as well as heads) and the use of hair charges (peruke and tress, both 16th c.), a lion's mane is a plausible charge and hence registerable in an order name. Both words are dated to period in the OED.

Mane is also used in period to describe a person's hair, according to the OED. If that were considered a plausible term to describe one of those hair charges mentioned above, that might be another justification for the order name (with Lion here as a saint's name - as Lion is dated as a Dutch or English 16th c. name in the DMNES or a 14th c. French name).

Finally, given that the submitter already has Lion's Blood (Herald) and the Lion's Heart, as well as the Lion's Sword and the Lion's Rapier, registered to them, submitter believes this construction should be grandfathered to them. Commenters were generally in agreement.


3: An Tir, Kingdom of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in December of 1981, via the West.

Sable Bonnet, Order of the

The OED (s.v. bonnet) dates bonnet, meaning "a head-dress of men and boys; usually soft and distinguished from the hat for want of a brim." The word dates to 1483; this spelling to 1597. Hats like this are clearly registerable as charges, as a period artifact. The Pic Dic s.v. hat dates several hats as charges to period; the modern French word for one such charge is "bonnet albanais," just to further support bonnet as a viable charge.

Sable is a heraldic tincture. It's allowed by precedent in order names.


4: An Tir, Kingdom of - New Order Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in December of 1981, via the West.

Scholar of An Tir, Order of

Checky Or and argent, a corner-cap sable

The submitter would prefer "the scholar" if a scholar could be justified as a charge (or some other justification for an order name). However, Scholar can be justified as a late period English given name: Family Source Historical Records dates Bennett Scholar to 1636 in TRURO, CORNWALL, ENGLAND, batch P00963-1. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JWW2-L3K

Given the pattern of creating given names from family names, Scholar is a plausible given name.

From the submission form: "A corner cap is the early form of the modern mortarboard. The OED dates it to 1573 - we couldn't confirm if the modern form is the period one - we look forward to advice on depictions."

Kingdom also couldn't confirm this was a period style of cap; commenters thought something like a "canterbury cap" (also called "cater cap"), which seems to be medieval - e.g. in this portrait - http://stpaulsanglican.bc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/ThomasCranmer.jpg. However, commentary was not extensive or expert and we would appreciate further commentary.


5: An Tir, Kingdom of - New Order Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in December of 1981, via the West.

Terpsichore's Fox, Order of

Checky Or and argent, a fox rampant contourny sable.

Terpsichore is the name of the muse of dance and chorus. Despite the fact that the OED does not include this citation, Baranbe Barnes 1593 _Parthenophil and Parthenophe: Sonnets, madrigals, elegies, and odes_ includes the line "Terpsichore, break off thy galliard dances!" So the muse was known in England before 1600. The submitter prefers the lingua Anglica Terpsichore's if it can be justified.

Fox is dated to c. 1200 in that spelling in the OED. The Pic Dic indicates that it's a period charge.

For the pattern of this order name, see Juliana de Luna's article "Medieval Secular Order Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/order/new/) which includes, under the pattern saint + other, Saint George's Shield, Saint William's Shield, and Saint George with the Pelican. Kingdom commentary did not address whether a fox could be an appropriate object of veneration associated with Terpsichore or whether saint+charge would be an acceptable order name pattern; further discussion would be helpful here.


6: Ari Hrafnason - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 2016, via An Tir.

Per pale sable and argent, two ravens addorsed reguardant counterchanged and on a chief wavy gules two arrows in saltire argent


7: Aurora Rose Prindel - New Name & New Device

Argent, a raccoon sejant erect affronty gules marked sable maintaining on its chest a demi-clew of yarn issuant from a bowl Or.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.
Spelling (Aurora Rose Prindel) most important.

Aurora: Withycombe (3rd ed.) pg 37 sn Aurora says "The Latin name for the goddess of the dawn. Since the Renaissance occasionally used in England, Germany, and France (Aurore)." The name has also been registered as a grey period English given name. Quoting the Oct 2011 LoAR:

Edelweiss was able to find a 1640 date for Aurora as a feminine English name; this grey period citation is sufficient to allow the use of the name in English context. [Aurora Swanhild, Oct. 2011, A-Aethelmearc]

This documentation was used most recently in the registration of <Aurora Rose Glasford> on the Dec 2014 LoAR. See http://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=17188 for discussion on Aurora Swanhild; as ffride pointed out in kingdom, the grey period documentation is from ancestry.com and does not have an image; however, the details given seem remarkably specific to me and unlikely to be a user-entered record (quoting Edelweiss):

St. Olave, Hart Street, London

1640 Decem.r 14 Marie daughter of Richard and Vera

Aurora Pepper Baptized

St. Botolph, Aldersgate, London

1653 October 3 Borne Lucy da: of Vere

Aurora Pepper, baptised the

same day St. Botolph, Aldersgate, London

Deaths & Buryalls 1665

January 13 Vera Aurora Pepper

Juliana de Luna also commented on the name Aurora in past submissions, and it may be thus registerable as a literary name:

William Alexander used <Aurora> in the early part of the grey period as a name for his (presumably human) mistress, to whom his poems are addressed. You can see, for example, this in Google Books, Specimens of the British Poets: With Biographical and Critical Notices. Brittanica dates the Aurora sonnets to 1604.

Quoting the April 2013 LoAR, sn Aurora Katherine d'Hiver:

There is a pattern in sixteenth century England of coining new given names derived from classical mythology, including the names of minor goddesses like Aurora. Eastern Crown found several equivalent names in the IGI Parish Records extracts, including Phoebe, Dione, Clymene, Selene, Maia, and Thalia.

Rose: found in R&W sn Rose date to 1604 or 1609 as "Rose"

Finally, Johannes Prindel, married 1635, Germany. batch M92519-4 https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4T5-LXT

Feb 2015 LOAR allows borrowing German into English


8: Ayla Roth - New Name & New Device

Argent, on a phoenix beneath in chief a flame gules, a thimble Or

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No holding name.
No changes.

Ayla Meyloch, female, married 1600, Babenhausen, Hessen, Germany. Batch no. M92095-1

(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NZTC-JQP)

Nicolauss Roth, christened 1636, Babenhausen, Hessen, Germany. Batch no. C92095-1

(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NCXG-WQF)

Submitter's original drawing had a smaller thimble which most commenters found unidentifiable. Submitter prepared this redraw; original below for comparison.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=708/2017-04-01/15-54-43_ayla_device.jpg


9: Bernard of York - New Name & New Device

Per pale azure and sable, a bear sejant erect, in chief three chalices argent

Submitter desires a masculine name.

<Bernard> is a masculine name from Hampshire dated to 1488 in English names found in Brass Enscriptions by Julian Goodwyn at http://heraldry.sca.org/names/brasses/men.html.

<de York> is found as a byname in Names from 15th century York by Karen Larsdatter at http://heraldry.sca.org/names/york15/. <of York> is a reasonable lingua Anglica form.


10: Cornelia au Cheval Noir - New Name & New Device

Per fess wavy argent and azure, a demi-horse rampant issuant from the line of division sable and a lyre Or.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Meaning (black horse as byname) most important.

<Cornelia> is the submitter's modern name as per her WA driver's license as attested by Black Lion, Lions Blood and Lions Heart. It is also found in grey period Belgium:

Cornelia Corneil, female, christened 1649, Namur, Namur, Belgium. Batch no. C73939-1

(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FVS1-K9K). Given the location of Namur in the (modern) Walloon region of Belgium, I would assume the language for this record is French, and thus it should be compatible with a French locative byname. (If not French, then Dutch, and within 300 years of the byname and still fine.)

<au Cheval Noir> is a constructed locative byname based on the pattern (charge+tincture) as found in Inn Signs and House Names in 15th Century Paris by Julia Smith at http://medievalscotland.org/jes/ParisInnHouseNames/. Examples of this pattern in the article include

enseigne la Barbe d'or (sign of the gold beard)

l'enseigne de la Croix d'or (sign of the gold cross)

l'enseigne du Lion d'or (sign of the gold lion)

l'enseigne du Mortier d'or (sign of the gold mortar)

le Pennier vert (the green basket)

l'ostel du Pennier vert (hostel of the green basket)

la maison du Chappeau rouge (the house of the red hat)

This was submitted simply as <Cornelia Cheval-Noir>. SENA App A states:

French: Locatives may be derived from place names, in the form de X (or d'X, if X starts with a vowel); from generic toponyms, with du X, de la X, or des X; or from signs, with au Z, àa Z, or aus/aux Z.

As the submitter allows all changes, we have updated the name accordingly. I have no French and am not clear on what grammatical rules impact whether au, àa or aus/aux is most appropriate; I would love to be educated on this!

Original submission was colored with colored pencil which did not scan well or show up on the color corrected version. Kingdom recolored with marker and submitter has approved the updated artwork.


11: Ealusaid de Ros - New Name & New Device

Per fess wavy Or and azure, three lions rampant gules and a polypus Or.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language (unspecified) most important.
Culture (unspecified) most important.

Tir Righ Submission

Ealusaid is found in "Scottish Gaelic Given Names: For Women" by Sharon L. Krossa https://medievalscotland.org/scotnames/gaelicgiven/women.shtml which lists it as a late medieval name found in both 1401-1500 and 1501-1600 date ranges.

From Black, sn Ross:

ROSS. (1) The first record of this surname in Scotland is in Ayrshire, a considerable portion of the northern part of which in the twelfth century was held by a family of Ros or Ross, that came from Yorkshire. Godfrey de Ros, a vassal of the de Morevilles, obtained from Richard de Moreville the lands of Stewarton in Cunningham (Chalmers I, p. 505). James de Ros, Reginald de Ros, and Peter de Ros appear about the same time as vassals of Richard de Moreville and as witnesses in his charters. Godfrey de Ros witnessed de Moreville's charter of Gillemoristun, "que antiquitus uocabatur peniacob" to Edulfus filius Utredi, a. 1189 (REG., p. 39).

Submitted as "Ealusaid of Ros", commenters found that "Ros" was the Gaelic version of "Ross" (and thus "of Ros" combined English and Gaelic in the same name phrase) and recommended either "of Ross" or "de Ros". The submitter was contacted and requested the submitted version "Ealusaid de Ros".

The device was recolored at kingdom as the original (attached) appears to have been done in pencil crayon. The submitter has approved the recolored version.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=558/2017-03-29/21-31-13_Ealusaid_name_0001.jpg
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=558/2017-03-29/21-31-15_Ealusaid_name_0002.jpg

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=558/2017-03-29/21-20-13_Ealusaid_device_cropped.jpg


12: Edward Holgrove - New Name Change & New Device

OSCAR NOTE: the old name was registered in September of 1986, via An Tir.

Per pale sable and gules, in fess three cannon barrels palewise argent.

Old Item: Duncan Macquarie, to be retained as an alternate name.
Submitter desires a masculine name.
No changes.

Tir Righ Submission

Edward is found in "English Given Names from 16th and Early 17th C Marriage Records: Edward" by Sara L. Uckelman (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/parishes/edward.html) which includes a large number of examples dating between 1540 and 1620.

Holgrove is found in The National Archives (http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/rd/99c67708-cc29-4200-a051-2f3debaed3f5) "Feoffment in Trust", Add Mss 17332 dated 25 July 1535, which says "The lands and free tenements, rents and services in Erthingley (Ardingly) called Holgrove, formerly belonging to Julian Holgrove, in trust for the grantor and Alice his wife and the heirs of their bodies".

The question of whether the name "Holgrove" was normalized in this document was raised by commenters, however as it can be found just slightly past the grey period in the IGI extracts which we felt lent credibility to it being a period spelling. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NLQH-JBW Richard Holgrove married Anne Davenport, 30 Nov 1652; London, England Batch M00136-1)

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=558/2017-03-29/21-56-49_Edward_name_0001.jpg


13: Eithne ingen Ferchart - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language (11th c scots gaelic) most important.
Culture (11th c scots gaelic) most important.

<Eithne> is found in Mari's Annals Index, http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Eithne.shtml, with dates between 763 and 1016. Given the submitter's request for an 11th c. Scots Gaelic name, I'll also note the draft, very incomplete information at https://medievalscotland.org/scotnames/gaelicgiven/women/eithne.shtml which mentions the female name <Ethen> in a Latin-language Scottish record (12th c.)

<Ferchart> is dated to an 1178 charter in Black, sub Farquhar. Black states that "Ferchart was the father of Fergus." I would guess that <Ferchart> is then a nominative from. <Ferchar> is also found in Mari's Annals, at http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Ferchar.shtml, and the genitive form given there is <Ferchair>. I'm not sure what the genitive of the submitted <Ferchart> would be and would appreciate more info on this.


14: Gey Sha of Dragon Haven - New Name & New Device

Per pale argent and Or, three fleurs-de-lis sable

Sound most important.

<Gey> from the record of Gey Hyll, male, christened 1560. England. Batch no. P01663-1

https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N5MX-CBF

<Sha> is a surname used as a (second) given name from the record of Godfrey Sha, male, married 1598, England. Batch no. MO4993-6, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NVYX-83G

<Dragonhaven> is a constructed place name.

The May 2008 LoAR discusses -haven in constructed English placenames:

"When this element was ruled SCA--compatible as a deuterotheme in English place names, the only examples that had been found to that point appended the element Haven to an already existing place name. Since then, examples have been found of -haven used as a genuine deuterotheme, in Whytehauene 1279 and Whithaven 1535 (Watts s.n. Whitehaven), and Kihavene, Kyhavene c.1 170-1316 and Kayhaven 1532 (Watts s.n. Keyhaven)."

Watts glosses <Keyhaven> as "the cow's haven." Juliana's article Compound Placenames in English (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/EnglishCompoundPlacenames/index.shtml) shows several examples of Haven added (as a second word) to an existing placename, including Deere Haven. This seems to support Animal + Haven; whether it supports Monster + Haven seems worth discussing.

The submitter also noted that R&W sn Dragon has "atte Dragon," an inn-sign name, "that could lead to an unmarked form" and thus be combined with Haven. SENA does allow unmarked locatives in English but I read it as all inn sign locatives are marked (either 'atte Z' or 'of the Z').

The spelling <Dragon>, referring to the mythical beast, is dated to period per the OED:

c1540 (▸?a1400) Destr. Troy 166 A derfe dragon drede to be-holde.

Commenters were unanimous in their appreciation for this design!


15: Glymm Mere, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 1993, via An Tir.

Black Oak, Order of the

Juliana de Luna's article "Medieval Secular Order Names: Standard Forms of Order Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/order/new/ListingOfStandardForms.html#AllPerson) includes Color+Heraldic charge.

Black is the ordinary color name for the heraldic tincture sable. Oak is a standard heraldic charge according to Parker (s.v. Oak, https://www.heraldsnet.org/saitou/parker/Jpglosso.htm).


16: Glymm Mere, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 1993, via An Tir.

Golden Boar of Glymm Mere, Order of the

Juliana de Luna's article "Medieval Secular Order Names: Standard Forms of Order Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/order/new/ListingOfStandardForms.html#AllPerson) includes Color+Heraldic charge.

Gold is the ordinary color name for the heraldic tincture Or. Boar is a standard heraldic charge according to Parker (s.v. Boar, https://www.heraldsnet.org/saitou/parker/Jpglossb.htm).

Clear of Golden Boar, Order of the [Ben Dunfirth, Barony of: 1996-01 via Middle] by addition of the branch name.


17: Glymm Mere, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 1993, via An Tir.

Golden Dragon of Glymm Mere, Order of the

Juliana de Luna's article "Medieval Secular Order Names: Standard Forms of Order Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/order/new/ListingOfStandardForms.html#AllPerson) includes Color+Heraldic charge.

Gold is the ordinary color name for the heraldic tincture Or. Dragon is a standard heraldic charge according to Parker (s.v. Dragon, https://www.heraldsnet.org/saitou/parker/Jpglossd.htm).

Clear of Golden Dragon Pursuivant [Dragon's Laire, Barony of: 2016-05 ] by addition of the branch name.


18: Glymm Mere, Barony of - New Order Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 1993, via An Tir.

Hunting Hauk, Order of the

(Fieldless) A falcon reguardant argent perched atop a gloved fist fesswise azure

Submitter suggested this pattern was supported by Juliana de Luna's article "Medieval Secular Order Names: Standard Forms of Order Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/order/new/ListingOfStandardForms.html#AllPerson), which does include Other adjective + Charge.

However, the Other Adjective + Charge examples in JdL's article are: Double Crown (Spain) Crowned Ibex (Germany) Pale Horse (Germany) Prisoner's Iron (France)

I'm not sure these examples support *any* adjective + charge. They're cited in precedent most recently as support for the motif "winged charge" in order names, and talk about the above order names being ways to convey more specific details about heraldic charges. (The last example, prisoner's iron is not so much 'adj + charge' as it is a description of a specific type of fetter or handcuff.) I don't see that 'hunting' conveys more specific details about the charge hawk, other than 'a bird used for hunting' which I don't see would be drawn any differently as a charge due to that detail.

However, Glymm Mere does have the Order of the Hunting Horn (June 2014) which might support <Hunting Hauk> through the grandfather clause.

Both Hunting and Hauk are cited in the MED:

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/m/mec/med-idx?type=id&id=MED21513 - a1375 WPal.(KC 13) 414: I hent þis at hunting, swiche hap god me sent.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/m/mec/med-idx?type=id&id=MED20132 - c1330(?c1300) Guy(1) (Auch) 3336: As hauk þat fleyþe his hors gan gon.


19: Glymm Mere, Barony of - New Order Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 1993, via An Tir.

White Chalice of Glymm Mere, Order of the

(Fieldless) A jeweled chalice argent

Juliana de Luna's article "Medieval Secular Order Names: Standard Forms of Order Names" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/order/new/ListingOfStandardForms.html#AllPerson) includes Color+Heraldic charge.

White is the ordinary color name for the heraldic tincture argent. Chalice is a standard heraldic charge according to Parker (s.v. Chalice, https://www.heraldsnet.org/saitou/parker/Jpglossc.htm).

We note the device of Reuben the Curious, which features three prominent lozenges on a chalice which were specified in the blazon upon submission (see http://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=19536). However, this design was registered as simply "a jeweled chalice" with no specification as to the shape or tincture of the jeweling; we have followed this precedent in the submitted blazon. Such decoration would not then count as a tertiary charge, as seen in the return of this badge from July 2011:

Octavia Laodice. Badge. (Fieldless) On a county coronet vert a bezant. The roundel in this submission appears to be the sort of artistic decoration one would expect to see on a crown; therefore it is not significant enough to count as a true tertiary charge.

We believe this is clear of Per bend sinister sable and gules, a tankard argent. [Giles MacManus: 2002-07 via Atlantia], with a DC for field and a DC for type of drinking vessel. Precedent gives a DC for a goblet vs. a tankard (see http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2007/08/07-08lar.html s.n. Lasairíona inghean Ghéibheannaigh).


20: Guðrun Sæbjarnardottir - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 2014, via An Tir.

Per bend sinister vert and azure, a furison Or.

Client has permission to conflict with Eirikr Hrafnkelsson, Sable, a furison Or, sent via e-mail and identity of sender confirmed by Black Lion. Black Lion emailed Eirikr asking him to confirm "the following statement":

I, (modern name)l, known in the SCA as Eirikr Hrafnkelsson, give (modern name) known in the SCA as Guðrun Sæbjarnarsdottir, permission for her armory "Per bend sinister vert and azure, a furison Or." to look similar to, but not identical to, my armory, "Sable, a furison Or.". I understand that this permission cannot be withdrawn once Guðrun's armory is registered.

Eirikr's response states, in part, "it cannot be confused with mine at any range where the Furison can be seen. Please grant the Lady permission to conflict, with my blessing;" he signs off on the email with both his modern and SCA names.


21: Halima al-Rakkasa - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1999, via An Tir.

(Fieldless) A borage flower and a crescent argent conjoined in pale.

Tir Righ Submission


22: Helena Roth - New Name & New Device

Or, a bear salient and on a chief vert three roundels Or

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No holding name.
No changes.

I am utterly tickled by this documentation which ffride graciously supplied in kingdom:

H. Jacob Roth (male) married Helena Korditerin (female) in Wagenhausen, Thurgau, Switzerland, 1649. Batch no. M99092-2 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FVV3-4JK)

This was recolored in kingdom as the original used pencils and showed up as teal rather than vert. Submitter has approved the new version.


23: Idonia Shirwod - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in July of 2010, via An Tir.

Purpure, in pale three snails Or

We believe this is clear of Vert, three snails Or [Alana O'Keeve: 2006-07 via East], with an SC for arrangement.


24: Illaria de Mortest - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 2016, via An Tir.

Argent, on a pile azure between two arrows in chevron inverted, a chimera countourney rampant argent


25: Johanna de Wassington - New Name & New Device

Argent, a horse salient sable charged on the hip with a mullet Or, in chief an arrow fesswise gules

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.

Johanna is modern first name. WA Drivers License attested by Zahra bint al-Rammah, Aestel & Mary Kargashina, Demi Lion.

Additionally, The Historical Gazetteer of England's Placenames (http://placenames.org.uk/browse/mads/epns-deep-05-b-subparish-000499) sn. Whashton has: Wassingtun, Wassington 1208, 1257, 1316. SENA Appendix A for Middle/Early Modern English notes locatives can be marked with de.

DMNES sn. Joan (http://dmnes.org/name/Joan) gives us examples found in Latin, in England: 1246 Johanna (nom); 1279-80 Johanna (nom); 1296 Johanna (nom); 1321 Johanna (nom)

(thanks to ffride!)

This was submitted on outdated forms; submitter redid the drawing and provided new forms.

I note that the Aug 2001 CL on internal detailing states "silhouette depictions are acceptable in the SCA as long as identifiability is preserved." In this design, all four limbs and the head are separate and easily visible and the posture is quite clear.


26: Kata Jóhansdottir - New Device

OSCAR finds the name on the An Tir LoI of November 30, 2016 as Kata Johansdottir.

Per chevron argent and gules, an increscent, a decrescent and a sun counterchanged.

I initially wondered if increscent + decrescent + sun should count as slot machine. However, it was pointed out that we'll register the 'phases of the moon' motif without that concern, and this seems like a similar approach.


27: Katlyn Lindsay of Shetland - New Name & New Device

Per pale gules and Or, a ferret rampant guardant to sinister argent and on a chief sable a lute reversed Or

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound (Name starts with K) most important.
Culture (Scottish/Celtic/English) most important.

<Katlyn> is justified from the record of Catlyn Mathew, female, married 1563, Canterbury, England. Batch no. M01516-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NLH8-P51)

As noted on the December 2014 LoAR sn. Killian Flynn: (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2014/12/14-12lar.html#55) "As English names use c/k switches (e.g., Catherine/Katherine), this name is plausible as an entirely 16th century English name...."

Christofer Lindsay was christened 1577, Lincoln, England. Batch no. C16322-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NX1J-KJP)

<Shetland> is documented via the Pont Maps of Scotland, http://maps.nls.uk/pont/texts/transcripts/ponttext82v-83r.html, specifically:

"The soudermost poynt of Schetland be him also is 60 Gr. 3 M.

The nordermost poynt of Shetland be him is 61 Gr 6 m."


28: Kay O Brein - New Name

No major changes.
Sound (O Brein) most important.

Kay - IGI, female christened 01 Dec 1622, Batch CB2517-1 https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NLVW-55Q

O Brein - Names found in Anglicized Irish Documents http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/ - Terence OBrein 1583

(This appeared on the KLOI as OBrein, without a space. I was the consulting herald for this and worked with the submitter at the event; I can attest that her intent was O Brein although my poor handwriting does not make that clear! Additionally, spacing seems like a minor change which the submitter permits.)


29: Ljúfvina haustmyrkr Hrafnsdóttir - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in December of 2014, via An Tir.

(Fieldless) A mermaid sable.


30: Madelêne l'Incomplète - New Device

OSCAR thinks the name is registered as Madelêne l'Incomplète in March of 1986, via An Tir.

Argent fretty vert, on a fess gules a bull passant argent.

Tir Righ Submission

The original submission had a too wide fess (attached). The device was redrawn with a narrower fess and approved by the submitter.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=558/2017-03-29/21-23-56_Madelene_device_cropped.jpg


31: Mickel of Morganwc - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name on the An Tir LoI of November 30, 2015 as submitted.

Per bend Or and azure, a tree eradicated proper and a spoon Or

Previous submission returned Feb 2016 LoAR:

Mickel Morganwc. Device. Per bend Or and azure, a tree eradicated proper and a spoon bendwise inverted Or.

This device is returned for violating SENA A3D2c, Unity of Posture and Orientation, which states "The charges within a charge group should be in either identical postures/orientations or an arrangement that includes posture/orientation" The charges here are not in a unified arrangement, as the bendwise orientation of the spoon has to be described independently of the default orientation of the tree.


32: Nicklaß Volkhart - New Name & New Device

Quarterly Or and sable, a stag's head erased azure

No major changes.
Sound most important.

<Nicklaß> from "German Names form Nürnberg, 1497" by Sara L Uckelman - heraldry.sca.org/names/german/nurnberg1497.html, 2 occurrences

Anna Volkhart, christened 1594 in Basel, Switzerland; batch C73996-2; https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FVN7-CLN. SENA treats High German, Low German, Swiss German, etc as one language group.

This was submitted with the surname <Volckhart>, but the submitter requested <Volkhart> if it could be supported; we have updated the name accordingly.

Correction to Name (2017-Apr-06 20:04:29): Hyperlinked URL for given name - http://heraldry.sca.org/names/german/nurnberg1497.html

Correction to Name (2017-Apr-06 20:04:36): Hyperlinked URL for given name - http://heraldry.sca.org/names/german/nurnberg1497.html

Kingdom commentary focused on how identifiable the azure head was against the sable quarters. I think it's not ideal but sufficiently recognizable as a stag's head.


33: Osrikr Rolfsson - New Name & New Device

Vert, a wolf rampant regardant and on a chief triangular argent, a sheaf of arrows inverted sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Culture (Old Norse/Viking) most important.

<Osrikr> was submitted as constructed ON Name; however, the patryonymic as given is an Old Danish/Old Swedish form (Rolf from ON Hrolfr) and not ON. ffride suggested the following would be more plausible for this name:

Diplomatarium Norvegicum has:

<Guttorm Rolfsen> Norwegian, 1315 (http://www.dokpro.uio.no/perl/middelalder/diplom_vise_tekst_2016.prl?b=6635&s=n&str=rolfs%n)

<Pall Rolfsson> Norwegian, 1347 (http://www.dokpro.uio.no/perl/middelalder/diplom_vise_tekst_2016.prl?b=2534&s=n&str=rolfs%n)

<Þorer Rolfsson> Norwegian, 1359 (http://www.dokpro.uio.no/perl/middelalder/diplom_vise_tekst_2016.prl?b=365&s=n&str=rolfs%n)

So, we can document Rolfsson, with two -ss- to the 14th century.

We can also show that a contemporary hypothetical name such as Ásrikr would have changed over time.

Lind col. 90 sn. Ásúlfr

Osulfuer, Norway, 1383

Osolfer, Norway, 1435

col. 92 sn. Ásvaldr

Oswalder, Norway, ca. 1396-1419

col. 83 sn. Ásmundr

Osmunder, Norway, 1407

and that -ríkr became -rikr:

col. 223 sn. Eiríkr

Eirikr, Norway, ca 1280 (I looked this one up to double check http://www.dokpro.uio.no/perl/middelalder/diplom_vise_tekst_2016.prl?b=71&s=n&str=E%rikr)

col. 389 sn. Guðríkr

Guþrikr, Iceland circa 1262

Gudrikr Symonsson, Aslak Bolt's cadastre, Norway, ca. 1432-1433.

col. 885 sn. Sigríkr

Sirikr Olafs s., Norway, 1312.

So Osrikr seems to be a reasonable form of a medieval Norwegian name to go with "Rolfsson".

-----

If anyone would like to review the submitter's original docs, see the An Tir LoI here http://oscar.sca.org/kingdom/kingloi.php?kingdom=10&loi=4329


34: Raskviðr Bjarnarson - New Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 2015, via An Tir.

Or, a brown bear's head cabossed proper within nine valknuts in annulo sable.

Old Item: Per pale Or and sable, a stag trippant contourny, hoof resting upon a tree stump counterchanged, in sinister chief a mullet of six points Or., to be released.

Submitter's original forms were printed too small and colored in crayon; kingdom prepared new forms which submitter has approved. Kingdom commenters wished for a lighter shade of brown; however, this is what crayola offers so this is what we used (the original crayon was in fact significantly lighter).


35: Rauðkinn Starradóttir - Resub Name Change From Holding Name

OSCAR NOTE: the old name was registered in August of 2008, via An Tir.

Old Item: Misty of Madrone, to be released.
No changes.
Meaning (Red cheek 10th c Norse) most important.

Submitter's previous submission, Rauðkinn eyverska Starradottir, was returned on the May 2008 LoAR:

Rauðkinn eyverska Starradottir. Name.

This name consists of three bynames and no given name in violation of RfS III.2.a, which says "A personal name must contain a given name and at least one byname." The name Rauðkinn was documented as a descriptive byname. The submitter provided some examples of Old Norse names found both as descriptive bynames and given names. However, we do not believe these examples are sufficient to support Rauðkinn as a given name. Metron Ariston explains:

The problem, as I see it, is that, while some Old Norse names do appear both as given names and as bynames, the evidence that the given names are derived from the meaningful bynames rather than constructed from a pool of dithematic components does not seem to have been established. Given that certain components appear to have gone into the name pool in Germanic languages fairly early on, many of them no longer should be interpreted as having intelligible meaning in Old Norse just as in Gothic or Old English. Was someone who bore the name Álfgeirr really thought of as "Elf Spear" or Rauðúlfr as "Red Wolf"? I suspect not. What is really needed is some evidence that both parts of the constructed name were used as elements in the given name pool in Old Norse. With the "red" part of the name, there is no problem since one can point to several instances from Geirr Bassi alone both as a stand-alone element (Rauðr)and as the first element in a dithematic name (Rauðbjǫrn, Rauðúlfr). However, I have been able to find no instances where kinn or any clearly cognate form is used in the Norse given name pool (or in any of the equivalent Germanic languages either at this point). As a result I would not consider this a reasonable given name construction. (Incidentally, while I find the runic lexicon used so heavily in the submitter's documentation to be an invaluable resource, I also tend to use it very carefully both because so many of the forms are readings filled in on the basis of known lexical forms to make sense of broken inscriptions and because so many of the inscriptions are highly structured memorials whose conventions are not nearly as well determined at this point as, for instance, those of Greek grave stelae or Latin curse tablets upon which we can rely for less well-attested name forms in those languages.

As we know of no Old Norse name similar in sound and appearance to Rauðkinn, we are unable to replace it with a registerable name. Therefore, we are forced to return this name.

Submitter has dropped the central byname. As before, Rauðkinn is a byname meaning 'red cheek', found in GB p. 26. Patronyimc based on Starri, GB p. 15 s.n. Starri; NR s.nn. Starri, Starr.

From Juliana de Luna's kingdom commentary:

In the original submission (see http://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=5730), commenters identified the given names "Kolbrún" and "Kolbeinn" as similar in appearance at least to bynames that mean "black brow" and "black leg." "Rauð-" is found in names like Rauðbjorn, Rauðúlfr, Rauði, and Rauðr (all masculine given names from the Viking Answer Lady's site, all from Geirr Bassi except Rauði, which is from Fellows Jensen). She also documented "Auga" (eye) as a body part used as both byname and given name. What's missing from all of this that one could wish for is documentation for -kinn in a given name. There are three examples of what look like other body parts, two examples of what looks like a color+body part, and two different colors used as a first name element (Rauð- and Kol-). To this we can add:

Hvíthofði means "white-head" and is another byname turned masculine given name in the Viking Answer Lady's website. "Hæringr" means "hoary man" and is another one.

As this adds to the submitter's original documentation for the same element and construction, we are passing this on for further commentary. I am uploading the submitted documentation here for reference; I think what is above is more relevant than the entirety of what was submitted, which includes a long list of bynames as given names.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=708/2017-04-01/16-24-07_raudkinn_name_0001.jpg
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=708/2017-04-01/16-24-08_raudkinn_name_0002.jpg
#3 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=708/2017-04-01/16-24-10_raudkinn_name_0003.jpg


36: Reginleif in hárfagra - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 2003, via An Tir.

Azure, a bowen knot and in chief a threaded needle reversed Or


37: Rosalie Ashcombe - New Name & New Device

Vert, a bend sinister wavy azure fimbriated, overall a rose argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound most important.
Meaning (from place with ash trees) most important.

Rosalie is found in Withycombe, p.119 as header. Rosalie is found in Dauzaut on p.527 of the 1951 edition, in reference to an Italian saint of the 12th C. <Rosalie Langmod> was registered September 2016 with the following comment: "This name combines an early 17th century French rendering of an Italian saint's name with a Middle English byname dated circa 1400. This lingual mix is acceptable under Appendix C of SENA."

Ashcombe - Eckwall p.14 sn Ashcombe

We believe this name should be clear of <Rosalie Ashleigh>, with substantial change to one syllable.

This was redrawn at kingdom to use a more recognizeable heraldic rose. Submitter has approved the redraw.


38: Runa Grafeldr - New Name

No major changes.
Sound most important.

The feminine given name Rúna is found in the Nordiskt runnamnslexikon by Lena Peterson, p. 126. (http://www.sofi.se/images/runor/pdf/lexicon.pdf)

The byname gráfeldr is found in "The Old Norse Name" by Geirr Bassi Haraldsson, p. 22.

The submitter prefers to capitalize both names and drop the accents, taking Runa Grafeldr


39: Sarah Huntsman and Tristan O'Shea - New Household Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name (Sarah Huntsman) registered exactly as it appears in January of 2016, via An Tir.
OSCAR thinks the name (Tristan O\'Shea) is registered as Tristan O'Shea in December of 2014, via An Tir.

Hart and Horne Inn

Per chevron throughout sable and vert, two hunting horns and a hart's head erased affronty argent.

No major changes.
Sound (I'd really prefer no changes.) most important.
Meaning (I'd really prefer no changes.) most important.

Submitter form had her as the sole owner on the HH name but she confirmed by email she would like both name and badge co-owned.

This was submitted without a designator, simply as "Hart and Horne." Submitter was contacted and stated she would like "Harte and Horne Inn." Designators in Inn-Sign Names in Medieval and Renaissance England by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/kwhss/2015/KWHSS%202015%20inn%20sign.pdf) gives two examples of the pattern X Inn - Star Inn (1605) and Spurre Inn (1607).

English Sign Names from 1636, also by Juliana de Luna, cites four examples of the pattern "two charges (joined by and)." In addition, that article cites both Hart (13 examples) and Horne (2 examples).

Submitter's original drawing had the per chevron division starting from the corners of the field; some people felt this was too low and better described as chape, in which case the green sections could not have a charge on them. To avoid any confusion, Kingdom prepared this redraw, which submitter has approved. Original emblazon below for comparison.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=708/2017-04-01/15-50-47_sarah_device.jpg


40: Sebhdann inghen Cináedha - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Client requests authenticity for late 7th century Dal Riata Gael (circa 700 AD).
Language (late 7th century Dal Riata Gael) most important.

<Sebhdann> is found in Mari's Index of Names Found in Irish Annals, sn Sebdann (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Sebdann.shtml). There is one example of the spelling Sebhdann, from the Annal Mari marks as A.

This was submitted with the byname <ingen>; however, Mari's article says "NOTE: The Annals referenced below under the code letters A, B, C, E, & F tend to use later spellings than the other Annals. In some cases, the spellings listed in these Annals may not be appropriate for the year referenced in the Annal entry." Given Sebhdann seems to be a later period spelling, and indeed as cited uses the patronymic marker <inghen>. We have thus updated the marker to this spelling.

Cináedha - genitive of Cináed(h), also in Mari's Annals Index (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Cinaed.shtml). For this specific spelling, note this line from the raw data there: U U913.1 S Mael Muire ingen Cinaedha m. Ailpin.

Given that some of these spellings may be from documents written much later than the people they are about, I'm not sure that this name meets the authenticity request.


41: Selege Sweteglee - Resub Name

Original submission, Soelig Sweteglee, returned by Laurel July 2009:

The name is returned for lack of documentation for Soelig. The LoI provided the following information:

Soelig is hypothesized to be an Old English given name - R&W sn Sealey hypothesizes this word as the origin of the byname Sely. This is also used as a woman's name, documented to 1221 as Sely and 1219 as Sela - if a form of this name ending (with two syllables) in a g cannot be documented please return this instead of changing to Sely or Sela

However, this misstates the evidence. As Blue Anchor notes, it is not Soelig that Reaney & Wilson give as the Old English root of Sely, but sælig, with an aesc. There is no evidence, however, that sælig was ever used as a personal name in Old English; lacking such evidence, or evidence that it follows a documented pattern of Old English feminine names, Sælig is not registerable as a given name. Soelig, being a mistranscription of the Old English word, is also not registerable, barring alternative documentation.

This was submitted with the first name <Selege>, based on a late period English surname:

Mary Selege, 19 Jun 1597, Tillington, Sessex, England, GS Film Number 002197975. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2Q7-373Y. However, no batch number is given for this record, so I don't know if it's acceptable.

Submitter states that if <Selege> is not acceptable, she will accept <Sely>, from RW sn <Sealy>: sely filia Nicholai, 1221. (Kingdom commentary also suggested several other alternatives that might be of interest to the submitter; I have contacted her to inquire about those but have not heard.)

<Sweteglee> - Ric. Sweteglee, 1332, Jonsjo sn Sweteglee


42: Sigríðr in Ráðspaka - New Name & New Device

Gyronny arrondi azure and Or, a crescent pendant argent

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Meaning (Sigríðr Truth Speaker) most important.

Quoting ffride from kingdom commentary:

Lind col. 885 sn. Sigríðr

Lind Personbinamn col. 284 sn. Ráðspaki

Note all the examples are variants of "hinn Ráðspaki", the expected feminine form would be hin Ráðspaka, or in Ráðspaka.


43: Sigrun Osrikskona - New Name & New Device

Purpure, three drinking horns fretted in triangle and on a chief triangular argent, a sheaf of arrows inverted sable.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Culture (Old Norse/Viking) most important.

Quoting ffride from kingdom commentary:

For temporal consistency with the name Osrikr, Lind col. 888 sn. Sigrún has:

Sigrun Gunnærs d., Norway, 1359.

As above, we can document a medieval Norwegian form of the constructed name Ásrikr, could become Osrikr.

Lind col. 90 sn. Ásúlfr: Osulfuer, Norway, 1383; Osolfer, Norway, 1435

col. 92 sn. Ásvaldr: Oswalder, Norway, ca. 1396-1419; col. 83 sn. Ásmundr; Osmunder, Norway, 1407

and that -ríkr became -rikr:

col. 223 sn. Eiríkr: Eirikr, Norway, ca 1280

col. 389 sn. Guðríkr: Guþrikr, Iceland circa 1262; Gudrikr Symonsson, Aslak Bolt's cadastre, Norway, ca. 1432-1433.

col. 885 sn. Sigríkr: Sirikr Olafs s., Norway, 1312.

So Osrikr seems to be a reasonable form of a medieval Norwegian name, SENA Appendix A notes the use of a byname indicating you're someone's wife, requires no further documentation, hence "Osrikskona"


44: Simon Fisc - New Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 2004, via the East.

Azure, a salmon attired with an elk's antlers and on a chief wavy Or three pheons inverted gules.

Old Item: Per fess azure and gules, on a fess between three dolphins Or an arrow azure, to be released.


45: Simon Fisc - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 2004, via the East.

A salmon attired with an elk's antlers Or

We believe this is clear of:

Pean, a catfish naiant Or. [Jararvellir, Barony of: 1984-01 via Middle] For the Jararvellir Musicke Consort - DC for field, DC for addition of antlers.

Vert, a sailfin sculpin naiant proper. [Nautichthys oculofasiatus] [Cathal Sean O'Connlauin: 1980-06 via West] - DC for field, DC for tincture (a salifin sculpin proper being argent marked sable).


46: Skjaldar-Þorsteinn - New Name & New Device

Quarterly sable and gules, in bend two bears dormant argent

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Meaning (Skjaldor = shield, Norse) most important.

Both names are from Geirr Bassi. Skjaldar- is on p. 27 and is a prepended byname. Þorsteinn, a masculine given name, is found on p. 16.

This was submitted as Skjaldar Þorsteinn, unhyphenated; we have updated to match the documentation.

Kingdom commentary pointed out the chiefmost bear is not centered in the quarter; I don't see this as requiring more than an artist's note, if that.


47: Thadeus Waldner - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound most important.

<Thadeus> is dated to 1439 in "German Names from Kosice, 1300-1500" by by Guntram von Wolkenstein and Anya Mstyslavyaya, https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/guntram/kosice.htm , record of Thadeus Schynnagel

<Waldner> is documented via familysearch:

Jacob Waldner, married July 1588, Wuerttemberg, batch M92335-6 - https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JHNS-KVM

Joerg Waldner, married July 1587, Wuerttemberg, M92339-2 - https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JHKW-6JS


48: Vivian Ultoom - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 2015, via An Tir.

Argent, a raven sable within an annulet of ivy purpure.

Clear of Fieldless, a raven sable within and conjoined to a chaplet of ivy vert (Matthew of Battle, Oct 2008) with a DC for field vs fieldless and another for tincture of ivy.


Ever in Service,

Rhieinwylydd Lions Blood


OSCAR counts 20 New Names, 1 New Name Change, 1 New Household Name, 9 New Order Names, 23 New Devices, 2 New Device Changes and 10 New Badges. These 66 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $264 for them. OSCAR counts 1 New Holding Name Change. OSCAR counts 1 Resub Name, 1 Resub Name Change and 1 Resub Device. These 4 items are not chargeable. There are a total of 70 items submitted on this letter.

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