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Palimpsest Rules Letter dated 2016-10-16

To Andrewe Bawldwyn our Sovereign King of Arms and to the right wise and discreet heralds of the College of Arms, beseecheth meekly your humble servant Ursula Georges that you make the following changes to the Standards for Evaluation of Names and Armory.

1: Change to SENA GP.3.A Temporal Definition - New Rule Change

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

SENA currently states that names from Pharaonic Egypt are not registrable. However, precedent holds that names recorded in the Demotic script may indeed be registered. We propose clarifying this point.

The relevant portion of SENA GP.3.A currently reads:

We allow elements and patterns from before the Middle Ages, but require them to be from cultures that were known to medieval and Renaissance Europeans. Therefore, classical Greek and Roman names are registerable, but names from Pharaonic Egypt are not.

We propose the wording:

We allow elements and patterns from before the Middle Ages, but require them to be from cultures that were known to medieval and Renaissance Europeans. Therefore, classical Greek and Roman names are registerable, but names recorded only in Egyptian hieroglyphs are not.

The insert/delete version is:

We allow elements and patterns from before the Middle Ages, but require them to be from cultures that were known to medieval and Renaissance Europeans. Therefore, classical Greek and Roman names are registerable, but names from Pharaonic Egypt recorded only in Egyptian hieroglyphs are not.


2: Change to SENA PN.2.B Name Phrase Requirements - New Rule Change

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

SENA PN.2.B currently includes an example stating that Old Norse nicknames should be in lowercase. However, Appendix A allows both upper- and lowercase. This discrepancy raises a larger issue: our choices for capitalization are frequently based on standard scholarly forms, rather than period practice. For example, Roman inscriptions were entirely in uppercase, while we register mixed-case forms. The proposed wording refers to Appendix A for capitalization standards.

The current relevant portion of SENA PN.2.B. reads:

Each name phrase must be grammatically correct for its position in a name. In some languages, spelling changes are used to indicate aspects of relationships in bynames. Some languages capitalize some bynames, but consistently use lower case for others.

For example, because of the way Gaelic grammar works, the byname mac Fearchair 'son of Fearchar' must be changed to mhic Fhearchair when it occurs after another byname of the form mac X (i.e., when your father was the son of Fearchar). So, the son of Donnchadh mac Fearchair would be Fionn mac Donnchaidh mhic Fhearchair. For example, most Norse descriptive bynames are consistently in lower case. Thus, Halla the skald would be Halla skaldkona, not Halla Skaldkona.

The proposed rule reads:

Each name phrase must be grammatically correct for its position in a name. In some languages, spelling changes are used to indicate aspects of relationships in bynames. Capitalization should be consistent with the language of the name phrase. Some patterns for capitalization in important European languages can be found in Appendix A.

For example, because of the way Gaelic grammar works, the byname mac Fearchair 'son of Fearchar' must be changed to mhic Fhearchair when it occurs after another byname of the form mac X (i.e., when your father was the son of Fearchar). So, the son of Donnchadh mac Fearchair would be Fionn mac Donnchaidh mhic Fhearchair. For example, we typically register Dutch locative markers in lowercase. Thus, Frederick van der Vaerden may be registered without specific evidence for this capitalization pattern, whereas Frederick Van Der Vaerden would require specific evidence for Van Der.

The insert/delete version is:

Each name phrase must be grammatically correct for its position in a name. In some languages, spelling changes are used to indicate aspects of relationships in bynames. Some languages capitalize some bynames, but consistently use lower case for others. Capitalization should be consistent with the language of the name phrase. Some patterns for capitalization in important European languages can be found in Appendix A.

For example, because of the way Gaelic grammar works, the byname mac Fearchair 'son of Fearchar' must be changed to mhic Fhearchair when it occurs after another byname of the form mac X (i.e., when your father was the son of Fearchar). So, the son of Donnchadh mac Fearchair would be Fionn mac Donnchaidh mhic Fhearchair. For example, most Norse descriptive bynames are consistently in lower case. Thus, Halla the skald would be Halla skaldkona, not Halla Skaldkona. For example, we typically register Dutch locative markers in lowercase. Thus, Frederick van der Vaerden may be registered without specific evidence for this capitalization pattern, whereas Frederick Van Der Vaerden would require specific evidence for Van Der.


Written at Cynnabar on the feast day of Saint Ambrose in the year of grace mmxvi. Ursula Georges, Palimpsest Herald.


OSCAR counts 2 Rule Changes. These 2 items may or may not require payment. There are a total of 2 items submitted on this letter.

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