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East LoI dated 2008-04-05

Unto Elisabeth Laurel, Jeanne Marie Wreath, Margaret Pelican, the SCA College of Arms, and all others who do receive this letter, greetings from Brunissende Dragonette de Broceliande, Blue Tyger Herald.

It is the intent of Easterners to register the following items.

Unless otherwise noted, the submitter has no desire for authenticity, allows any changes, and allows a holding name.

This item was on the 08-2008 LoAR

1: Eva Bengrek - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Client requests authenticity for Welsh language and/or culture.
Language (Welsh) most important.
Culture (Welsh) most important.

Eva: "A Simple Guide to Constructing 13th Century Welsh Names" by Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/welsh13.html) under Women's Names gives the period spelling Eva for [Eve].

Bengrek: ibid under Bynames Based On A Personal Nickname gives Pengrek as a period spelling of [Pengrych] 'curly-head'. The article further notes that "Women will always use the mutated form of a nickname", and gives Bengrek as the mutated form of the nickname in question.

Submitted as Efa Pengrych, the name has been changed by kingdom to Eva Bengrek, in order to match the documentation, correct the grammar, and to comply with the submitter's request for an authentic name.


This item was on the 08-2008 LoAR

2: Johanne i Visby - New Name & New Device

Azure, a chevron argent and in sinister chief a mullet Or.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language (Swedish language, 15th century) most important.

Johanne is found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Swedish Given Names from SMP" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/smp/), dated to 1456. The specific citation is under Bradhe (http://www.sofi.se/servlet/GetDoc?meta_id=1801): Johanne Braudes dotter. It's not marked as an inflected form.

Aryanhwy's article states that locative bynames were "less common, but still appropriate." A locative byname is formed with the preposition i + place name. Visby is a city in southwestern Sweden. According to the Encyclopedia Britannica (http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9075501/Visby), Visby was a major commercial center in the medieval period:

By 1161 the town developed into one of the principal northern European mercantile centres, and it soon occupied a leading position within the Hanseatic League, which had previously been dominated by Lübeck (now in Germany). It reached its zenith in the 13th century. Earning the epithet regina maris ('queen of the sea'), it developed its own maritime code and coined its own money. The town began to decline, however, in the face of Lübeck's rising power, and in 1299 the league removed Visby's Hanseatic privileges. The town retained a share of Baltic commerce, though without the advantages afforded by league status. The next blow to the town was delivered by the Black Death about 1349-50.

In 1361, during the conquest of Gotland by the Danish king Valdemar IV Atterdag, a hastily assembled peasant army attempted to halt the invaders near Visby. It is unclear whether citizens of the town aided the ill-equipped defenders, but the town yielded soon after the peasants -- including women and children -- were brutally slaughtered (the discovery of their mass graves in the early 20th century was a major archaelogical find). A heavy tribute was exacted by Valdemar IV, but Visby continued to prosper from regional trade.

The Swedish diplomatarium at http://www.statensarkiv.se/ has a Latin document from 1225 (http://fmpro.ra.se/ra/medeltid/pdf/434.pdf) which spells the city's name as Visby at the beginning and wisby at the end. The 'w' spelling appears to be the more common; it occurs for example as de Wisby in a Latin document from 1268 (http://fmpro.ra.se/medeltid/pdf/876.pdf). The spelling didn't change much over the next several centuries: there's an engraving from 1580 which has the placename variously as Visbia Gothorvm, Wisby Gotlandiae, and ante portas Wisbii (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:VisbyEngraving1580.jpg). These are of course all in Latin, supporting de Visby as a byname. However, kingdom has no reason to think the Swedish spelling was any different, and the submitter marked "Swedish" language most important, so the preposition has not been changed. The submitter will accept whatever spelling of Visby is appropriate to match the spelling of her given name.

This device is clear of both Thomas der Kreuzfahrer (Jan. 1997 East): Azure, a chevron argent, overall a Latin cross Or and Alainn Aodhmoira Bean Larren (Jan. 1980 Meridies): Azure, a chevron argent, overall a winged catamount sejant affrontée, wings elevated, sable; in each case, there's one CD for removing the overall charge, and another for adding the secondary mullet. It's also clear of Elrhond Windrider (Aug. 1980 Atenveldt): Azure, a chevronel interlaced with another inverted argent, with one CD for the number of primaries and one for adding a secondary. Against Jacopo di Nicolò (Jan. 1997 East): Gules, a chevron argent, in chief a compass star Or, there's at least a CD for the field and one for the position of the mullet; there may also be a third CD, for compass star versus mullet, but the question is rendered moot by the other CDs. The same question is rendered similarly moot against Pippin Hodge (Jan. 1987 West): Per chevron gules and sable, a chevron argent between two compass stars and a lion's head cabossed Or; there's a CD for the field and another for the number of secondary charges. And finally, this should be clear of John de Caversham (Jul. 1996 East): Azure, a chevron couched from dexter argent, with one CD for the change in position/orientation of the primary charge, and another for the addition of the secondary charge.


This item was on the 08-2008 LoAR

3: Johanne i Visby - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 2008, via the East

(Fieldless) A swan naiant argent charged with a mullet azure.

Her name and device are submitted in this letter.

This badge is clear of Aliz de Bâle (Dec. 2002 Outlands): (Fieldless) A swan naiant argent semy-de-lys azure, with one CD for the type and number of tertiary charges, and another from the fieldless bribe.


This item was on the 08-2008 LoAR

4: Jon i Visby - New Name & New Device

Gules, two bars wavy and in sinister chief a pair of compasses argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Swedish language, 15th century) most important.

Jon is found among the 15th-16th century Swedish men's names listed in Academy of St. Gabriel report 2296, citing SMP (http://www.s-gabriel.org/2296).

The same St. Gabriel report states that locative bynames were "less common, but still appropriate" for late-period Sweden. A locative byname is formed with the preposition i + place name. Visby is a city in southwestern Sweden. According to the Encyclopedia Britannica (http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9075501/Visby), Visby was a major commercial center in the medieval period:

By 1161 the town developed into one of the principal northern European mercantile centres, and it soon occupied a leading position within the Hanseatic League, which had previously been dominated by Lübeck (now in Germany). It reached its zenith in the 13th century. Earning the epithet regina maris ('queen of the sea'), it developed its own maritime code and coined its own money. The town began to decline, however, in the face of Lübeck's rising power, and in 1299 the league removed Visby's Hanseatic privileges. The town retained a share of Baltic commerce, though without the advantages afforded by league status. The next blow to the town was delivered by the Black Death about 1349-50.

In 1361, during the conquest of Gotland by the Danish king Valdemar IV Atterdag, a hastily assembled peasant army attempted to halt the invaders near Visby. It is unclear whether citizens of the town aided the ill-equipped defenders, but the town yielded soon after the peasants -- including women and children -- were brutally slaughtered (the discovery of their mass graves in the early 20th century was a major archaelogical find). A heavy tribute was exacted by Valdemar IV, but Visby continued to prosper from regional trade.

The Swedish diplomatarium at http://www.statensarkiv.se/ has a Latin document from 1225 (http://fmpro.ra.se/ra/medeltid/pdf/434.pdf) which spells the city's name as Visby at the beginning and wisby at the end. The 'w' spelling appears to be the more common; it occurs for example as de Wisby in a Latin document from 1268 (http://fmpro.ra.se/medeltid/pdf/876.pdf). The spelling didn't change much over the next several centuries: there's an engraving from 1580 which has the placename variously as Visbia Gothorvm, Wisby Gotlandiae, and ante portas Wisbii (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:VisbyEngraving1580.jpg). These are of course all in Latin, supporting de Visby as a byname. However, kingdom has no reason to believe that the Swedish spelling was any different, and the submitter marked "Swedish" language as most important, so the preposition has not been changed. The submitter will accept whatever spelling of Visby is appropriate to match the spelling of his given name.


This item was on the 08-2008 LoAR

5: Magdalena Winter - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2002, via the East

Argent, on a bend cotised azure a mullet of six points Or.

Her name was registered in April 2002, via the East.

Her device, Argent, on a bend cotised azure three mullets of six points Or was registered in Dec. 2004, also via the East.

Her original badge submission, blazoned the same as this one, was returned at kingdom on March 2006 for conflict with Rowan le Beau (March 1998 Æthelmearc): Argent, on a bend cotised azure a lily palewise Or between two others argent.

This submission includes a letter of permission to conflict from Rowan.


This item was on the 08-2008 LoAR

6: Mahin Bãnu Tabrîzî - Resub Name Change

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in August of 2008, via the East.

Old Item: Selena d'Ambra, to be released.
Submitter desires a feminine name.

Her current name, Selena d'Ambra, was registered in Jan. 1991, via the East.

Her original name change submission to Mahin Bãnu was returned on the Sep. 2007 LoAR (R-East) because it lacked a byname: Mahin Bãnu is a compound given name. This resubmission adds a locative byname to solve this problem.

Mahin Bãnu is the name of a princess of the Safavid Dynasty in 16th century Iran. She is more commonly known as the princess Soltãnum, sister of Shah Tahmasb. The name appears in an article by Abolala Soudavar, "A Chinese Dish from the Lost Endowment of Princess Soltãnum", originally published in Iran and Iranian Studies: Essays in Honor of Iraj Afshar. (Ed. by Kambiz Eslami. 1st ed. Princeton, NJ: Zagros Press, 1988. Pp. 125-147.) A copy of the article is found on the author's website: http://www.soudavar.com. The name appears in this spelling on an inscribed bowl. In addition, Mahîn Bânû is found as a feminine name in "Persian Names from the Safavid Period" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael and Ursula Georges (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ursula/persian.html). Aryanhwy's and Ursula's article discusses name formation, including a few instances where women's names include bynames: "Some women are known by just a single name, and there are no patronymic bynames (bynames based on the father's given name), though these phenomena could be artifacts of the transcription. We did find several examples of locative bynames (bynames based on location), e.g. Samarqandî, Tabrîzî, etc.)" Based on this, Tabrîzî is a locative byname appropriate for a Safavid woman. Since Laurel has concluded that Mahin Bãnu is a compound given name, Mahin Bãnu Tabrîzî or Mahîn Bânû Tabrîzî should be an acceptable combination of given name + locative byname.

The submitter will accept whatever accent markings are appropriate.


This item was on the 08-2008 LoAR

7: Margaret Gresham - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Margaret is dated to 1446 (R&W s.n. Clarvis) in Talan Gwynek's "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/reaneyintro.html).

Gresham: R&W s.n. Gresham dates Thomas Gresham to 1446.


This item was on the 08-2008 LoAR

8: Østgarðr, Crown Province of - New Order Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 1984, via the East

Order of the Sea Dog of Østgarðr

(Fieldless) A sea-dog rampant azure, finned and clawed Or.

The branch name Crown Province of Østgarðr was registered in Apr. 1984, via the East.

This order name follows the meta-pattern of orders named for heraldic charges, as noted in the Aug. 2005 Cover Letter. A sea dog is a standard heraldic charge, appearing in Fox-Davies A Complete Guide to Heraldry p. 205. Sea dogs and sea-wolves have been registered at least 79 times in the SCA, most recently in Feb. 2007. The phrase "of Østgarðr" has been added in order to clear the conflict with the heraldic title Sea-Dog Herald, registered Jan. 2003 via Trimaris, and transferred to Sebastian Halyburton in Dec. 2003. A letter of permission to conflict from Sebastian is included. By precedent, "group references (which are normally transparent for conflict purposes) can clear a conflict in conjunction with a letter of permission to conflict." (Ansteorra, Kingdom of, 09/01 R-Ansteorra.)


This item was on the 08-2008 LoAR

9: Sibán Gallowglass - New Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1993, via the East

Purpure, on a lozenge ployé between four feathers embowed in annulo argent a domestic cat couchant gardant sable.

Old Item: Per chevron Or and sable, two oak branches gules, slipped sable, and a winged cat sejant affronty, wings displayed Or, to be released.

Her name and current device were registered in May 1993, via the East.


Here ends this East Kingdom letter of intent.

Yours in service,

Brunissende

Blue Tyger Herald

Bibliography

Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme and Akagawa Yoshio. A Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry as used in the Society for Creative Anachronism. 2nd ed., 1992.

Jones, Heather Rose. A Welsh Miscellany. Compleat Anachronist #66, 1993.

Reaney, P.H. and R. M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. Third edition, Oxford University Press, 1995.


OSCAR counts 4 New Names, 1 New Order Name, 2 New Devices, 1 New Device Change and 3 New Badges. These 11 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $33 for them. OSCAR counts 1 Resub Name Change. This item is not chargeable. There are a total of 12 items submitted on this letter.

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