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East LoI dated 2007-10-31

Unto Elisabeth Laurel, Jeanne Marie Wreath, Margaret Pelican, the SCA College of Arms, and all others who do receive this letter, greetings from Tanczos Istvan, Blue Tyger Herald!

It is the intent of Easterners to register the following items. Unless otherwise noted, the submitter has no desire for authenticity, allows any changes, and allows a holding name.

This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

1: Alana bat Meir - Resub Name Change From Holding Name

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in February of 2008, via the East.

Old Item: Norma of Settmour Swamp, to be released.
Sound most important.

Her previous name submission of Eliana Mazdak was returned on the June 1995 LoAR for inadequate documentation; her device; Or, two fern fronds in pile vert, on a chief triangular azure a plate; was registered in August 1995 (via the East) under the holding name Norma of Settmour Swamp.

The Pennsic worksheet says that the client would prefer the name Illana, if possible. This desire is not repeated on the form.

Meir is a Jewish masculine name dated to the 10th-16th c. in Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Jewish Given Names Found in Les Noms Des Israélites en France" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/jewish/levy/meyer.html). Meir is also found in Eleazar ha-Levi's "Jewish Naming Convention in Angevin England" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/jewish.html).

Alana is dated to 1381 as a Latinized feminine name in England, according to precedent (Morgana of the Mists, 08/2002 R-Meridies), citing Tangwystyl citing Fenwick, Poll Taxes of 1377, 1379, and 1381, Part 1: Bedfordwhire-Leicestershire p. 112. Alana is also found in footnote 58 in "Subsidy Roll 1319: Langbourn ward", Two Early London Subsidy Rolls (1951, pp. 242-48. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=31936&strquery=alana): "Doubtless connected with John de Can(n)efeld 1297-8 LBC 52 (bailiff of weavers), 1310-11 LBD 251 (weaver), or Roger de Kanefeud 1297-8 Will (of St. Nicholas Acon, wife Alana)."

According to the Aug. 97 ILoAR of the Midrealm, Illana is dated to 1245 in Talan Gwynek's "Glossary of Personal Names in Diez Melcon." Spanish/French combinations are considered a step away from period practice, but registerable (Iuliana Muñoz Maldonado de Castile, Oct. 2005 A-Atenveldt). However the note about desiring "Illana" is only on the worksheet, so kingdom is leaving to Pelican the decision about any changes to the given name.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

2: Aleksandr the Traveller - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1994, via the East

(Fieldless) A windmill vert vanes set saltirewise maintaining through the sinister chief blade a cavalry lance fesswise reversed Or.

His name was registered in May 1994, via the East. His device, Per bend azure and vert, an astrolabe within a bordure embattled Or, was registered in June 1995, also via the East.

A precedent exists that says that a tower and a windmill are not a CD (Delftwood, Barony of; May 1994 R-East). Commenters found nothing to override it, but the wording implies that there may have been issues with the particular depiction of a windmill ("The sails of the windmill are effectively invisible here"), so this precedent may not apply here. If it is upheld, this device will conflict with Sheri Lynn of Emerson Lake: Or, a tower vert (May 1989 Atlantia).

There are also possible problems with identifiability: one commenter noted that at first, he thought the lance was a steel-nibbed pen.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

3: Alexondra Ivasheva - New Name & New Device

Per pale sable and argent, two lions couchant addorsed counterchanged, on a chief vert a plate.

No major changes.
Sound most important.

Alexondra is the submitter's mundane given name, as shown on a copy of her birth certificate.

Ivasheva is dated to the late 16th century in Wickenden 3rd ed. s.n. Ioann: Mar'ia Ondreeva zhena Ivasheva.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

4: Alheydis von Riga - New Name & New Device

Barry wavy argent and sable, on a chief wavy sable an otter statant regardant argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (German) most important.
Culture (German) most important.

Alheydis is dated to 1312, 1352/64, etc. in Academy of S. Gabriel report 2174 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/2174), citing Zoder: Familiennamen in Ostfalen.

Riga is dated to 1581 on a map found at http://historic-cities.huji.ac.il/latvia/riga/riga.html.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

5: Angus mac Padraig - Resub Name Change From Holding Name & New Device Change

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in February of 2008, via the East.

Gules, in fess a spear between two wingless wyverns combatant argent.

Old Item: Angus of Smoking Rocks, to be released.
Old Item: Gules, on a plate two wingless dragons combattant sable all within a bordure indented argent, to be released.
Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Meaning most important.

His previous name submission, Angus Mockler, was returned on the Aug. 2002 LoAR for conflict with Angus McClure (06/91 An Tir). His device, Gules, on a plate two wingless dragons combattant sable all within a bordure indented argent, was registered under the holding name Angus of Smoking Rocks.

Angus: Black p. 23 under Angus dates Angus mac Dunec 1204-1211.

mac Padraig: OCM p. 153 under Patraic, used by settlers in Scotland, variant of Patrick, Patricius. (The form says it may be changed to 'mac Phadraig' if lenition is required. Kingdom doesn't think lenition applies to masculine one-generation patronymics.)

This name mixes Scots Angus with Gaelic mac Padraig. This is one step from period practice, but registerable (Elspeth O'Shea, Feb. 2000 A-Middle). (Based on "Scottish Gaelic Given Names" by Sharon Krossa at http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/gaelicgiven/index.shtml, a fully Gaelic form would be Aonghus mac Padraig. However, this would involve changing the language, which is a major change that the submitter won't allow, so kingdom has left the name as submitted.)

This device is probably clear of Macsen Felinfoel (Oct. 1989 East): Gules, a dragon statant erect to sinister, wings displayed, argent, with one CD for the number of primary charges and another for removing the wings.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

6: Anna de Tatecastre - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.

Anna is found in Eleazar ha-Levi's "Jewish Naming Conventions in Angevin England". Anna is also found in Talan Gwynek's "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/reaneyAG.html), dated to 1199.

de is given as the element introducing locative bynames in the same article.

Tatecastre is dated to 1086 in Mills p. 338 s.n. Tadcaster.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

7: Avi de Tatecastre - New Name & New Device

Gules estencely, on a chevron Or three frets azure.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Culture (Jewish in England before 1396) most important.

Avi is found in Daniel Stuhlman: "Hebrew Names and Name Authority in Library Catalogs" (a doctoral dissertation, http://idea.library.drexel.edu/bitstream/1860/465/12/Stuhlman_Daniel.pdf). It is glossed as 'my father', or a possible short form of Avraham, and is listed as occurring in 2Ki 18:2 (for a woman) and Dan 5:13. If Avi is judged unregisterable, the submitter will accept Abram, which is found in Eleazar ha-Levi's "Jewish Naming Conventions in Angevin England".

Tatecastre is dated to 1086 in Mills p. 338 s.n. Tadcaster.

Eleazar ha-Levi points out that the cited dissertation gives no evidence for period use of Avi. There is however a basically equivalent name which is period: Alexander Beider's A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names, p. 272 under Abe says that this name "was used in the Middle Ages in ... southern France and Catalonia". Dated cites (in Hebrew: Aleph-Bet-Aleph) include 15th c. Silesia and 1586 Prague. Kingdom doesn't know enough about the transliteration of Hebrew to figure out whether the information from Beider supports the form Avi or not, so has left the decision about any changes to Pelican.

This device is clear of Dubheasa ní Chéirin (Oct. 1995 Atlantia): Gules, on a chevron doubly cotissed Or three frets conjoined azure, with one CD for the change in type of secondary charges (cotises versus roundels) and another for the change in number of secondaries (four vs. semy).


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

8: Barbeta Kyrkeland - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (English/Scots) most important.
Culture (English/Scots) most important.

Barbeta is a feminine name (a pet form of Barbara) dated to 1191 in R&W p. 26 s.n. Barbet.

Kyrkeland is dated to c. 1280 in Black p. 406 s.n. Kirkland. R&W p. 266 s.n. Kirkland notes cities by this name in Cumberland and Lancastershire in England, and dates de Kerkeland' 1196 from a Pipe Roll for Cumberland.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

9: Beatrice Lilli - New Name & New Device

Or, a fleur-de-lys between three bees gules.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.

Documentation is based on Academy of S. Gabriel report 3271 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/3271).

Beatrice is from Arval Benicoeur: "Feminine Given Names from the Online Catasto of Florence of 1427" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/catasto). Beatrice Portinari (1266-1290) inspired Dante to write the Divine Comedy.

Lilli is dated to 1447 in southern Italy, citing Faraglia, N.F.: "1800 Surnames Recorded in 1447" (http://www.abruzzoheritage.com/magazine/2002_06/d.htm).

Two commenters called conflict with Beatrice Lillie, an actress who lived from 1894 to 1989 according to the Internet Movie Database (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0510389/). Neither Eastern Crown nor any of the other commenters had ever heard of her, so kingdom doesn't think she's important enough to protect.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

10: Brigiða in kollramma - New Name & New Device

Per bend vert and purpure, a coney couchant and an orle argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Meaning (hard-headed, stubborn) most important.

Brigiða is a feminine name found on p. 8 of Geirr Bassi.

inn rammi is found on p. 26 of same, as a byname meaning 'the strong', and kollr is a byname (p. 24) glossed as 'head, pate, skull'. The construction inn kollrrammi is based on the byname inn hamrammi 'strongly built' (p. 22); the submitter and consulting herald request the assistance of the CoA's Norse scholars to improve the formation.

The name was changed at kingdom from "Brigiða inn kollrrammi". The byname needs to agree in gender with the given name, and a final 'r' is generally dropped in combining forms. There's some doubt that the combination of "strong" and "head" had anything but its literal meaning in Old Norse; the closest alternative found by commenters is 'fasthaldi', glossed as "tenacious" on p. 21 of Geirr Bassi. This isn't quite the same thing as "stubborn", so kingdom has left the byname as the submitted construction in hopes that the CoA can turn up something even closer to the desired meaning.

This device is clear of Bianca del Coniglio (Mar. 1987 West): Per pale gules and sable, a rabbit rampant to sinister within an orle argent, with one CD for the field and another for the posture or orientation of the rabbit.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

11: Brilliana de la Hay - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 2007, via the East

Vert, a mastiff sejant erect maintaining in its sinister forepaw a sword inverted Or and a bordure embattled erminois

Her name was forwarded to Laurel on the June 2007 LoI, which will be decided this month. Her original device, Vert, a mastiff sejant erect maintaining in its sinister forepaw a sword inverted, a bordure embattled Or, was returned at kingdom for conflict with Lughaidh Mac Sheóinín (Nov. 2002 Ansteorra), Vert, a wolf rampant and a chief raguly Or, with just one CD for the change from a chief to a bordure. This submission changes the tincture of the peripheral charge to clear this conflict.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

12: Cáemgen MacGregor of Kelvin - New Name & New Device

Gules, on a pile Or a mastiff sable, a bordure argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.

He will accept major changes to the given name, especially a Gaelic spelling.

Submitted as Kevin, which is found in OCM s.n. Cáemgen p. 41 as an Anglicized form; however, kingdom found no evidence for period use of this form, so it was changed to Cáemgen, as specifically allowed by the submitter, in order to make the name registerable: OCM says this was the name of two saints.

MacGregor is a header in Black, p. 505. Dated spellings include mc gregoure 1617, M'Gregare 1500, M'Gregur 1600, and McGrigour 1586. A combination of Gaelic and Scots is a step from period practice, but registerable (Elspeth O'Shea, 02/00 A-Middle).

Kelvin is dated to 1200 in Johnston, p. 214 as the name of the river that runs through Glasgow. Timothy Pont's late-period maps of Scotland (http://www.nls.uk/pont/index.html) have the river's name as Kelvyn. Commenters were unsure about the use of a river name in a Scots or English locative. Black p. 391 s.n. Kelwiny has Isaac de Kelwiny 1296, but he gives no information about the origins of the name. Kingdom asks the CoA's help in sorting out this locative.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

13: Caitrina inghean uí Bhraonáin - New Name Change

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in February of 2008, via the East.

Old Item: Gráinne inghean uí Bhraonáin, to be retained as an alternate name.
Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.

Her current name was registered in June 2001 via the East.

Caitrina is found in Sharon Krossa's "Scottish Gaelic Given Names" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/gaelicgiven/index.shtml), dated to 1467 in a Scottish Gaelic context. The remainder of the name is grandfathered to the submitter.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

14: Cassandra Grey of Loch Leven - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 2002, via the East

Quarterly vert and azure, a compass rose and a chief argent.

Her name was registered in Aug. 2002, via the East. This device is clear of Vincenzo Crovetto Genovese (Jan. 1996 An Tir): Sable, a compass rose and a chief embattled argent, with one CD for the field and another for the type of chief.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

15: Catalina Doro - New Name Change & New Device Change

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in February of 2008, via the East.

Gules, a bend between six mullets Or.

Old Item: Catalina d'Orieux, to be released.
Old Item: Vert, on a lozenge Or a cat dormant sable, in dexter chief a mullet Or, to be released.
Submitter desires a feminine name.
No changes.

Her current name and device were registered in Feb. 1994, via the East.

Catalina is grandfathered to the submitter. Use of an 'l' form of Catherine can be justified in Italy: Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Italian names from Imola, 1312" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/italian/imola.html) has Cathalina and Cathelina as well as Catherina (in a Latinized context).

Doro is a 'patronymic, from a pet form of Teodoro, Isidoro, Polidoro, etc.', found in "Fourteenth Century Venetian Personal Names" by Arval Benicoeur (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/venice14/).

This device is clear of Ermina de Falaise (Aug. 1999 East): Vert, a bend between six oak leaves Or, with one CD for the field and another for the type of secondary charges.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

16: Chiara di Marzo - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Meaning ('pale, white, clarity' for the first name, and 'of Mars' for the last name) most important.

Chiara is a header in DeFelice's Nomi; the entry notes a 'culto di Santa Chiara di Assisi' (and other saints) who died around 1308. It is also found as a feminine name in "Names in 15th Century Florence and her Dominions" by Juliana de Luna (class handout, KWHS 2007), and in Arval Benicoeur's "Feminine Given Names from the Online Catasto of Florence of 1427" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/catasto/).

Marzo is a masculine name from Juliana's cited article, which also says that 'di+name' is used to form literal patronymics. Also, the Latinized name Marzus appears in Juliana's "Masculine Names from Thirteenth Century Pisa" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/pisa/pisa.html), and Marzi is found as a patronymic in Ferrante LaVolpe's "Family Names Appearing in the Catasto of 1427" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ferrante/catasto/family_names.html).


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

17: Chyldeluve de Norfolk - New Name & New Device

Per pale argent and azure, a saltire couped gules and a leopard's head cabossed argent, and on a point pointed per pale gules and argent a rose per pale argent and azure.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.

If her name must be changed, she cares most about meaning and language/culture; the specifics line appears to read 'French, Cildlufu', but is difficult to make out.

Chyldeluve is dated to 1248 in Talan Gwynek's "Feminine Given Names from A Dictionary of English Surnames" under Childlove (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/reaneyAG.html).

Norfolk is a header in Ekwall; this spelling is dated to 1043-5. Also, R&W p. 323 s.n. Norfolk has Robert de Norfolk 1228.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

18: Creatura Christi of Oakes - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in December of 2006, via the East

Per bend embowed counterembowed azure and vert, an oak sprig fructed argent and another Or.

Her name was registered in Dec. 2006, via the East.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

19: Deredere Cambroun de Lochabor - New Request for Name Reconsideration Change

OSCAR finds the name on the East LoI of June 24, 2006 as submitted.

Old Item: Derder Cambroun de Lochabor, to be released.
No major changes.

Sorry about the awkwardness of the submission type: OSCAR doesn't support this action well. This one is a bit weird -- it's a request for reconsideration with more evidence. Sort of.

If her name must be changed, she cares most about spelling. Her name was submitted to Laurel as Deredere Cambroun de Lochabor, citing Talan's "A List of Feminine Personal Names Found in Scottish Records". It was registered on the Oct. 2006 LoAR as Derder Cambroun de Lochabor, because further research showed that the form Deredere is not the nominative form of this name. The submitter wishes the spelling of her first name to be changed back to that of her original submission, or as close as possible. If she can't have Deredere as in Talan's article, she will accept Derdere, which is mentioned on the LoAR as a rare but possible form. As a last resort, she will take Dierdre using the Mundane Name Allowance: it is one of her mundane middle names, as attested by the attached copy of her birth certificate.

The consulting herald poses a question: "In the case of Romanized names, where does the actual pronunciation of the original (in this case Gaelic) name fit? Does the Latinized spelling really reflect what was used?"


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

20: Dorio of the Oaks - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 1999, via the East

Azure, a chevron ploye cotised and in base a pelican in her piety argent.

His name was registered in Oct. 1999, via the East. His initial device submission, Sable, an oak tree eradicated argent charged with a lozenge gules, was returned at the same time for conflict. His first resubmission, Azure, a hurst of five oak trees argent, was returned on the Oct. 2003 LoAR for conflict. His last resub, Argent, a hurst of five oaks azure, was returned at kingdom in Oct. 2005, also for conflict. This is a complete redesign.

The submitter was recognized as a Pelican in Jan. 2006.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

21: Eirikr inn kyrri Gunnarsson - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Meaning most important.

The submitter asks for 'grammar changes only, please'.

All documentation from Geirr Bassi.

Eiríkr is a masculine name found on p. 9. Accents on Old Norse names may be dropped as long as they are dropped throughout.

inn kyrri is a byname meaning 'the quiet', p. 25.

Gunnarr is a masculine name found on p. 10. The patronymic is formed according to the instructions on p. 17.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

22: Eldrich Gaiman - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 2004, via the East

(Fieldless) A grenade proper.

His name was registered in Oct. 2004 via the East.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

23: Faolán Ó Sirideáin - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Meaning ('wolf' for the given name, and 'wild one' for the byname) most important.

The submitter allows changing Fáelán to the later form Faolán if needed for registration.

Fáelán is the Middle Irish form of a masculine name, identified under this heading (p. 92) in OCM as the name of three 7th-9th c. kings, as well as 14 saints. It's also found as the name of 19 men between 628 and 1423 in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/). The Early Modern (c. 1200-c. 1700) spelling is Faolán.

Ó Sirideáin is a header in Woulfe p. 645; the name is dated to at least the 16th c.

Submitted as Fáelán Ó Sirideáin, the name was changed at kingdom to the fully-Early Modern form Faolán Ó Sirideáin, as specifically allowed by the submitter, in order to make the name registerable: A name combining Old/Middle and Early Modern orthography is considered a step away from period practice (Tigernach Ó Catháin, 11/01 A-Caid), and a combination of a byname dated only to late period with a given name spelling appropriate for before c. 1200 constitutes another step away from period practice: there is a gap of over 300 years between them.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

24: Gamli tottr - New Name & New Device

Sable, a man statant affronty argent crined and bearded Or maintaining in each hand a flanged mace argent.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.

If his name must be changed, he cares most about the sound of the given name and the meaning of the byname.

Gamli is a masculine name found twice in the Landnamabok, according to Geirr Bassi p. 10.

tottr: ibid., a descriptive byname meaning 'dwarf, small person'.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

25: Gaston le Goth - New Name Change

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in February of 2008, via the East.

Old Item: Damon the Goth, to be released.
Submitter desires a masculine name.
Meaning ('Gaston the Goth' or 'of the Goths') most important.

He will accept his existing byname 'the Goth' if needed for registration. His current name was registered in Apr. 1989, via the East.

Gaston is a header in Dauzat p. 281, identified as a masculine given name (and patronymic surname). It's also found twice in Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Names Found in Commercial Documents from Bordeaux, 1470-1520" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/bordeaux.html).

le Goth is intended as a translation of his current byname. The online French dictionary at "Le Trésor de la Langue Française informatisé" (TLFi, http://atilf.atilf.fr/) identifies goth as a 16th century adjective derived from the Latin Gothi 'the Goths.' The entry dates two (apparently plural) spellings to period: Gotz 1521 and Gothz 1532.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

26: Genevieve de Bordeu - New Name & New Device

Quarterly azure and sable, a bend argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Meaning most important.

Genevieve is from Colm Dubh's "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/paris.html).

Bordeaux is a header in Dauzat & Rostaing. The entry reads: "Bordeaux, ch.-l.dép Gir. (Burdigala, 1er s.; Bordeu, 1280): nom prob. aquit., formé de deux rad. de sens obscur: burd- et gala. Capitale de l'Aquitaine Seconde des Romains, puis de l'Aquitaine féodale (archevêché) enfin de la prov. de Guyenne." Brunissende provides the following translation: "Bordeaux, head of the department of Gironde (Burdigala during the 1st century, Bordeu in 1280): name probably originating from Aquitaine, form from 2 roots of unclear meaning: burd- and gala. Capital of the Aquitaine Second of the Romans, then of the feudal Aquitaine (seat of an archbishop) and finally of the province of Guyenne." The submitted Bordeaux was changed at kingdom to Bordeu in order to match this documentation.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

27: Giovanna Valori - New Name & New Device

Per chevron ermine and azure, two mullets azure and a horse salient Or.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language (Italian 15th century) most important.
Culture (Italian 15th century) most important.

Both name elements are from the Online Catasto of 1427. (http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/catasto/). Giovanna is a feminine given name, with 40 occurrences. Valori is a family name which occurs three times in the data.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

28: Goerijs Goriszoon - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (Dutch) most important.
Culture (Dutch) most important.

Both name elements are from Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "15th Century Dutch Names" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/dutch/dutch15.html). Goerijs is a masculine name, dated in this spelling to 1478-81. Goriszoon is expanded from the abbreviation Gorisz., dated 1478-81, found under Goerijs in the patronymics section. This spelling of the patronymic suffix can be found for example under Aernt: Aerntszoon, 1478-81.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

29: Guilhem Bosquet - New Name & New Device

Argent seme of trees vert, a reremouse displayed sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound most important.

The name was submitted as Guilhermo, based on "Some Names in Latin from a French Document circa 1442" by Margaret Makafee (http://www.contrib.andrew.cmu.edu/~grm/latin-france.html). The context makes it clear that this is an inflected form, which we do not register. The name was therefore changed at kingdom to Guilhem, which is found six times in Aryanhwy's "Names from Périgueux, 1339-1340" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/perigueux.html).

Bosquet is a surname found in "Some Names from Picardy in the 14th Century: Personal names found in the Armorial du dénombrement de la Comté de Clermont en Beauvaisis 1373-1376" (KWHS Proceedings, 2007) by Chrestienne la pescheresse.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

30: Henna Sinclair - New Name & New Device

Gules, three Norse sun crosses one and two within a bordure Or.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.

Henna is dated to 1192 as a feminine form of Henn, a pet name for Henry, in R&W s.n. Henn.

Sinclair is a header in Black; dated spellings include Sinclaire 1598 and Synklair 1526. The submitted spelling seems a reasonable variant based on these.

If this name conflicts with the historical Henry Sinclair, the submitter would like to add 'of Berwyic', which is found in Black p. 71 s.n. Berwick: William de Berwyic, 1317. (Kingdom does not think a conflict exists, regardless of whether the historical person is deemed important enough to protect: Henna is not itself a diminutive of Henry, and it looks and sounds different.)

This device is probably clear of both Cathleen de Barre (Dec. 1996 West): Gules, three crosses crosslet fitchy Or and John of Blackhawk (Apr. 1996 West): Gules, three patriarchal crosses in chevron Or, with one CD for the bordure and another for the type of cross.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

31: Iulianiia Trieskova - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in July of 2006, via the East

Argent, in fess two oak trees proper, on a chief vert an arrow reversed argent.

Her name was registered in July 2006, via the East. Her previous device submission, Argent, a tree eradicated proper and on a chief vert an arrow argent, was returned at kingdom for conflict with Aline von Ronneburg (06/2001 Drachenwald), Argent, a birch tree eradicated, on a chief vert a horse passant contourny argent, with just one CD for the change in type of the tertiary charge. This submission adds another tree to clear this conflict. This device should also be clear of Myrgan Wood, Barony of (May 2005 An Tir): Argent, an elm tree eradicated proper leaved gules and on a chief vert an arrow argent, with one CD for the number and another for half the tincture of the primary charges.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

32: Kaðall Ragason - New Name & New Device

Gules estencely, a sun in splendor and on a chief embattled Or three Norse sun crosses gules.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound most important.

All documentation from Geirr Bassi. Kaðall: p. 12, a masculine name of Irish origin, found twice in the Landnamabok.

Ragi: p. 14, masculine name found once in the Landnamabok. The instructions on p. 17 say that -i becomes -a in the genitive, hence Ragason for the patronymic.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

33: Kathryn Fontayne - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.

She will accept changes to the given name, but appears to want only Fontayne or Fonteyn for the surname; the instructions are hard to make out because of copier margin cut-off.

Kathryn is found in Aryanhwy's "Index of Names in the 1541 Subsidy Roll of London" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/english/enggivlondon1541.html). It can also be interpolated from Katheryn, dated 1570 in Talan's "Feminine Given Names from A Dictionary of English Surnames" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/reaneyHZ.html), and Katryn, dated 1569 in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Names and Naming Practices in the Registers of the Church of St. Mary's, Dymock" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/dymock/).

Fontayne is found in Bardsley s.n. Fountain: Geoffrey de la Fontayne 1273, William Fonteyn temp. Edw. III. Ary's above-cited article also has the surname Fountayne, her "Index of Names in the 1292 Subsidy Roll of London" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/english/surlondon1292.html) has a la Fontayne, and R&W s.n. Fountain has "ME fontayne (a1450 MED)" (where MED stands for the Middle English Dictionary).


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

34: Kathryn Fontayne - New Alternate Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2008, via the East

Merewen de Ingham

No major changes.
Sound most important.

Merewen is a feminine name dated to 1202 in R&W s.n. Marvin.

de Ingham is dated 1162-8, ibid. s.n. Ingham.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

35: Kathryn of Oldenburg - New Device

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Per fess gules and Or, a sun Or and a peregrine falcon displayed sable.

Her name was registered in June 1986, via the East.

Commenters in kingdom noted that there really isn't much that makes this a "falcon" rather than an "eagle", but Eastern Crown prefers to leave the reblazon decision to Wreath.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

36: Kiyohara Soteme - New Name & New Device

Azure semy of mullets of eight points, a chevron cotised between three foxes rampant each maintaining an arrow argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound most important.

Kiyohara is listed as a clan name on p. 393 of Solveig's Name Construction in Medieval Japan. There was a famous 10th century poet called Kiyohara no Motosuke, so the clan name is period. (See for example "Calligraphy and Literature", Ishikawa Prefecture Cultural Assets, which lists a Katakana version of an anthology compiled by Motosuke and four others: http://www.pref.ishikawa.jp/bunkazai/e-syoseki/e-9.htm.)

Soteme is an attested feminine name from the Nara period (784), Solveig pp. 282, 384.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

37: Leofwyn of Whittlesey - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.

Leofwyn is found as the name of a wife and widow in the British Academy - Royal Historical Society: Anglo-Saxon Charters, The Electronic Sawyer: Wills and Bequests (S1527), in a will dated 'probably before AD 1038' (http://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/chartwww/eSawyer.99/S%201482-1539.html). It's also found as the name of a wife, dated 995 x 999, under 'Grants of the laity' (S1218) in a grant of land to Christ Church, Canterbury (http://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/chartwww/eSawyer.99/S%201164-1243a.html). Also, Marieke van de Dal's "Anglo-Saxon Women's Names from Royal Charters" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/marieke/anglosaxonfem/) has Leofwen and Leofwenne.

Whittlesey is a small town outside Petersborough in southeast England. If necessary, Whittlesey may be changed to Whittlesea, and 'of' may be changed to reflect the appropriate term used during the 11th or 12th century to denote one's place of origin. Mills p. 377 s.n. Whittlesey dates Witlesig c. 972 and Witesie 1086 (Domesday Book), and derives the placename from an Old English personal name Wittel plus eg 'island'. Ekwall p. 515 s.n. Whittlesey concurs, and adds Wittleseia 1086. Based on these, neither of the two placename spellings (that the submitter will allow) exactly matches the period of her given name, but they're pretty close. (Kingdom would have changed the locative to Wittlesie were it allowed, based on the two spellings from 1086.)


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

38: Malcom Korbinian - New Name & New Device

Per chevron sable and Or, an increscent and a decrescent argent and an eagle sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Meaning (raven) most important.

This was submitted as Malculms (from Withycombe s.n. Malcolm, dated to 1428), because the consulting herald couldn't find documentation for the submitter's preferred Malcolm. It was changed at kingdom to Malcom to better match this preference while removing any possibility of a (second) step from period practice due to temporal difference.

Malcom is dated to 1518 and 1521 in Sharon Krossa's "Early 16th Century Scottish Lowland Names" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/lowland16/index.shtml). Malcolm is also likely a period spelling, but evidence for it is all earlier than the 16th century: Black p. 576 s.n. Malcolm has (among others) Malcolm, pincerna regis 1204-11, Malcolm, judex c. 1205, as well as Latinized Malcolmus c. 1198.

Korbinian is from Talan Gwynek's "Late Period German Maculine Given Names", dated to 1501-1550 in the table from 16th c. Plauen, used as an unmarked patronymic. German-English is a step from period practice, but registerable (Lillian von Wolfsberg, 11/01 A-Atlantia). If Korbinian won't work, please use Corbin, which is dated to 1086 and 1201 in R&W, and is also the submitter's mundane surname. [Blue Tyger will attest to this -- I was the herald of record]


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

39: Nigell Tarragon - New Name & New Device

Per pale gules and Or all goutty counterchanged, a double-headed eagle per pale Or and gules.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound most important.

Nigell is dated c. 1153-66 in Black s.n. Nigel, p. 629. Also, R&W p. 320 s.n. Neal has Nicholaus Nigelle 1252, and Withycombe p. 228 s.n. Nigel says "Oseney 1460 has Nygell, Nigelle".

Tarragon is the submitter's father's registered surname (Brion Anthony Uriel Tarragon, Sep. 1984 via Atenveldt). A signed letter from Brion attesting that Nigell is his legal son is included.

This device is clear of Amadeus von Koburg (Jul. 1989 Atlantia): Per pale gules and Or, a double-headed eagle, wings inverted and displayed, counterchanged, a chief counter-ermine, with one CD for removing the chief and another for adding the gouttes. (Or by Istvan's count, one CD for the type of secondary charge, one for the number of secondaries, and one for their tinture.)


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

40: Noomi bat Avraham - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound most important.

Noomi is given as the Roman-letter reading of a Hebrew feminine name (Yod Mem Ayin Nun) dated to 1446 in Brandenburg, in Alexander Beider: A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names, p. 551 s.n. Noyme. (The entry also cites the same Hebrew name with a different reading [Noyme] from 1594 in Prague.) Submitted as Naomi, the name was changed at kingdom to (hopefully) better match the documentation and to comply with the submitter's desire for a more period form of her name. (Note to Pelican: if all else fails, Eastern Crown can attest that Naomi is the submitter's mundane given name, as shown on her driver's license.)

bat Avraham is based on Eleazar ha-Levi's "A Jewish Memory Book: Nuremburg, 1349" (KWHS Proceedings, 2004).


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

41: Oriana Macauslan - New Name & New Device

Quarterly per fess wavy purpure and vairy purpure and argent, two estoiles argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.

The name has been changed at kingdom from Ariadne Macauslan.

She cares most about "a Scots Ariana related to the Buchanan Macauslans". [None of the 'if my name must be changed' boxes are checked on either the form or the worksheet.]

A woman named Oriana was excommunicated in 1602, according to Withycombe p. 234 s.n. Oriana.

Macauslan is a header on p. 455 of Black. He cites an Alexander Macausland who lived in 1421.

The consulting herald believed that Ariadne should be registerable as a saint's name, based on Withycombe p. 31. However, the September 2001 Cover Letter's explanation of the saint's name allowance makes it clear that saint's names are subject to the same lingual consistency rules as any other name. According to Ælfwyn æt Gyrwum's "Concerning the Name Arianrhod" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/problem/names/arianrhod.shtml), there's no evidence for period use of a variant of Ariadne in the British Isles. Academy of St. Gabriel report 3330 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/3330) recommends Ariadne for a Greek persona. Neither English nor Gaelic can be combined with Greek (Diana Spartene, 01/03 R-Calontir and Aodh Marland, 03/94 A-Atlantia), so Scots-Greek is highly unlikely to be registerable. Kingdom has therefore changed the submitted Ariadne to Oriana in order to make the name registerable. (Scots and English can be combined without being considered a step from period practice [Michael Duncan of Hadley, 04/04 A-Caid].)


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

42: Phebee Fayrhehe - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound ('fee-bee fair-eye (or fair-ee)') most important.

Phebee is dated to 1583 as a feminine name in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Names in Chesham, 1538-16001/1" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/chesham/).

Fayrhehe is dated to 1297 s.n. Fairegh in Jönsjö's Studies on Middle English Nicknames, I: Compounds. Closer to the time period of the given name, F.K. & S. Hitching, References to English Surnames in 1601 and 1602 p. xliv has the surname Fayry. She's made no request for authenticity, however, and with only 286 years between surname and given name, the submitted combination is registerable, so kingdom made no changes.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

43: Rebecca de Tatecastre - New Name & New Device

Azure estencely, on a bend sinister Or four rabbits couchant fesswise purpure.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (Jewish in England before 1396) most important.
Culture (Jewish in England before 1396) most important.

Rebecca is found in Eleazar ha-Levi's "Jewish Naming Conventions in Angevin England".

Tatecastre is dated to 1086 in Mills p. 338 s.n. Tadcaster.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

44: Ruantallan, Barony of - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1988, via the East

(Fieldless) An escarbuncle gyronny argent and azure.

The branch name was registered in May 1988, via the East.

This is to be designated as a populace badge. A petition signed by many of the officers is included.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

45: Ruantallan, Barony of - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1988, via the East

Per fess azure and argent, a mountain couped counterchanged.

This submission is to be associated with 'Order of the Iceberg'

The branch name was registered in May 1988, via the East. The associated order name was registered to Ruantallan in Sep. 1991, via the East.

A petition signed by many of the group's officers is included.

Kingdom commentary questioned the validity of this blazon and the blazonability of this depiction. Eastern Crown feels unqualified to judge, and leaves the decision to Wreath.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

46: Saikhan Saran - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2007, via the East

Vert, in pale a fox passant argent between two crescents, a bordure dovetailed Or.

Her name was registered in Feb. 2007, via the East.

This device is clear of Alain du Val (Oct. 1993 East): Vert, in pale a crescent Or and a wolf passant reguardant to sinister argent, with one CD for adding another crescent, and another for the bordure. (This was redrawn at kingdom, with the submitter's approval, to make the bordure more even, its "teeth" deeper, and the primary charges larger.)


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

47: Séamus mac Neachtain - New Name & New Device

Per chevron sable and gules, a Thor's hammer inverted and on a chief argent three mullets of six points sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound (Shamus mac Naughton) most important.

Séamus is given as an Early Modern Irish masculine name in Mari's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/). There are 14 men found in the annals with this name, dated 1398 - 1608.

mac Neachtain, meaning 'son of Neachtan', is based on the CELT archive, which lists in the Annals of the Four Masters, entry M1548.4: mac Dubhghaill Mic Neachtain (http://www.ucc.ie/celt/published/G100005E.html).

This device is clear of Anund Vittfarne (Oct. 1994 Drachenwald): Sable, a Thor's hammer and on a chief argent a Norse sun cross sable between two Cornish choughs proper, with one CD for the field, and another for the type of tertiaries via RfS X.4.j.ii. It's also clear of Br{o,}ndólfr Ásgeirsson (Oct. 2004 Æthelmearc): Gules, a stone throwing hammer and on a chief argent two ravens sable, with one CD for the field, and another for type and number of tertiaries.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

48: Simon Gwyn - New Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 2003, via the East

Per saltire azure and sable, two winged lynxes combattant guardant argent.

Old Item: Azure, on a pale between two swords argent three open books azure, to be released.

His name and current device were registered in Jan. 2003 via the East.

This device is clear of Tamera FitzGloucestre of the White Boar (Feb. 1982 East): Azure, two cats combatant, tails sufflexed, argent, both maintaining a fountain fimbriated argent, with one CD for the field, and one for adding the wings.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

49: Siobhan Reed - New Name & New Device

Sable, a winged talbot sejant Or and on a chief argent three goblets sable.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound (Shayna) most important.

The worksheet says she wants a name that starts with S and is pronounced like Shay-nah, and will accept any changes to get that. [The submission form has some marginal notes that are partially cut off on the photocopies, which, when combined with the consulting herald's difficult handwriting, renders them illegible.]

Siobhan is a feminine name from OCM p. 165. It's also found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Siban.shtml) as the name of 22 women between 1310 and 1600.

Reed is a surname dated to 1362 and 1364 in Black p. 688 s.n. Reid.

Kingdom doesn't think Siobhan (which is pronounced something like /shuh-VON/, as far as we know) sounds much like Shay-nah, but the closest alternative found is not dated: OCM p. 165 has masculine Séadna, which is pronounced roughly /SHAY-nuh/ if we're reading the pronunciation guide correctly.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

50: Stonemarche, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1989, via the East

Order of the Lamp of Apollo

No major changes.
Meaning most important.

Submitted as "Keepers of the Lamp of Apollo", no documentation for "keepers" as an order designator was provided or found, so this was changed at kingdom to "Order of the Lamp of Apollo", as specifically allowed by the submitters.

This is for the baronial A&S award.

Per the Aug. 2005 LoAR, orders named for objects of veneration of the form 'non-Christian deity plus associated object' are only one step from period practice. Period references to Apollo abound; the title page of Shakespeare's Venus and Adonis (Quarto 1, 1593), for example, has a quote directly below the title: "Vilia miretur vulgus: mihi flauus Apollo / Pocula Castalia plena ministret aqua." There are references to the god throughout the plays, for example in Taming of the Shrew, act 1, scene 2: "Wilt thou haue Musicke? Harke Apollo plaies". (Found at The Internet Shakespeare Editions: http://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Annex/DraftTxt/index.html .) The submission form is signed by the baron and the seneschal.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

51: Stonemarche, Barony of - New Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1989, via the East

Order of the Furison of Stonemarche

No changes.

This is for the baronial service award. A letter of permission to conflict is included from James of the Lake, Furison Herald. This is meant to follow the "heraldic charge" pattern of order name. The submission form is signed by the baron and the seneschal.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

52: Thomas Caulfield - New Name & New Device

Or, a wyvern and on a chief embattled azure three axes Or.

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Thomas is a header in Withycombe, dated in this spelling to 1086, 1199-1220, and 1273. It's also found in "Late Sixteenth Century English Given Names" by Talan Gwynek (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/eng16/eng16alpha.html).

Caulfield is found in Room, Dictionary of Irish Place-Names, p. 34 s.n. Castle Caulfield: "The English name is that of Sir Toby Caulfield (or Caulfeild) whose residence here was built in the early 17th century. The house was burnt down in 1641 and remains in ruins."

This device is clear of Megan ni Phádraig (May 1998 Atlantia): Argent, a dragon statant, on a chief embattled azure three mullets argent, with one CD for the field and another for multiple changes to the tertiaries.


This item was on the 02-2008 LoAR

53: Titus Aurelius Coimagnas - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (Latin / early Irish) most important.
Culture (Latin / early Irish) most important.

Titus is listed by Varro (116-27 BC) as one of the 18 praenomina which remained in use, according to Withycombe p. xviii.

Aurelius is identified as the name of a Roman gens in Withycombe s.n. Aurelian.

Coimagnas is the Ogham form of Old Irish Cáemán, according to Tangwystyl's "Some Masculine Ogham Names" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/tangwystyl/ogham/). Examples of foreign cognomina can be found in "Roman Names" (http://www.personal.kent.edu/~bkharvey/roman/sources/names.htm): Aphrodisias, Athenagoras, Cassander/-dra, Demosthenes, Eutychus/-es from Greek; Bato, Bitus from Germanic sources; Divixtus, of Gallic origin. The first two of these show that words ending in -as seemed to transfer directly to Roman usage.

This second source, at Kent State, seems to have disappeared. If anyone can find support for the foreign cognomen, we'd appreciate it. ( Note that google has cached the article: http://www.google.com/search?q=cache:OUI9hG-algsJ:www.personal.kent.edu/~bkharvey/roman/sources/name s.htm )


Bardsley, Charles Wareing. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames. Oxford University Press, London, 1901.

Beider, Alexander. A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names: Their Origins, Structure, Pronunciation, and Migrations. Bergenfield, NJ: Avotaynu, 2000.

Black, George F. The Surnames of Scotland. New York Public Library, 1989.

Dauzat, Albert and Marie-Thérèse Morlet. Dictionnaire étymologique des noms de famille et prénoms de France. Librairie Larousse, Paris, 1989.

Dauzat, Albert et Charles Rostaing. Dictionnaire Étymologique des Noms de Lieux de la France. Paris, 1963.

De Felice, Emidio. Dizionario dei nomi Italiani. Mondadori, Milan, 1986.

Ekwall, Eilert. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names. Fourth edition. Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1991.

Eleazar ha-Levi. "Jewish Naming Convention in Angevin England". http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/jewish.html.

Fenwick, Carolyn C., ed. The Poll Taxes of 1377, 1379, and 1381, Part I: Bedfordshire-Leicestershire. Series: Records of Social and Economic History, new series 27. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press for the British Academy, 1998, ISBN: 0-197-26186-8.

Geirr Bassi Haraldsson. The Old Norse Name. Private Press, Maryland, 1977.

Herlihy, David and Christiane Klapisch-Zuber, "Census and Property Survey of Florentine Domains in the Province of Tuscany, 1427-1480", Machine readable data file. Online Catasto of 1427 Version 1.1. Online Florentine Renaissance Resources: Brown University, Providence, R.I., 1996. http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/catasto/overview.html

Johnston, James B. Place-Names of Scotland. Edinburgh? 1934.

Jönsjö, Jan. Middle English Nicknames: I. Compounds. Lund Studies in English 55, Sweden, 1979.

Mills, A.D. A Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1991.

Morlet, Marie-Therese. Dictionnaire Étymologique des Noms de Famille. Librairie Académique Perrin, 1997.

Ó Corraín, Donnchadh and Fidelma Maguire. Irish Names. Lilliput Press, Dublin, 1990.

Paul Wickenden of Thanet. A Dictionary of Period Russian Names. 3rd edition. SCA, Inc., 2000.

Reaney, P.H. and R. M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. Third edition, Oxford University Press, 1995.

Room, Adrian. Dictionary of Irish Place-Names. Belfast: Appletree Press, 1994.

Solveig Throndardottir. Name Construction in Mediaeval Japan. Carlsbad, NM: The Outlaw Press, 1994; Potboiler Press, 1999 (Box 30171, Columbia, MO 65205).

Talan Gwynek. "Late Period German Masculine Given Names." http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/germmasc.html.

Talan Gwynek. "A List of Feminine Personal Names Found in Scottish Records." http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/scottishfem.html.

Woulfe, Patrick. Sloinnte Gaedheal is Gall. Irish Names and Surnames. M.H. Gill & Son, Dublin, 1923.

Zoder, R. Familiennamen in Ostfalen. 2 vols. Hildesheim, 1968.


OSCAR counts 32 New Names, 3 New Name Changes, 1 New Alternate Name, 2 New Order Names, 27 New Devices, 3 New Device Changes and 4 New Badges. These 72 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $216 for them. OSCAR counts 2 New Holding Name Changes. OSCAR counts 2 Resub Name Changes and 1 Resub Device. These 5 items are not chargeable. OSCAR counts 1 Request for Name Reconsideration Change. This item may or may not require payment. There are a total of 78 items submitted on this letter.

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