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East LoI dated 2013-07-27

To Gabriel Laurel, Juliana Pelican, and Emma Wreath, greetings from Alys Eastern Crown and the heralds of the East!

(I'm sitting in for Blue Tyger right now while he's at Pennsic.)

It is the intent of the College of Heralds of the East to register the following items. Unless otherwise noted, the submitter has no desire for authenticity and allows any changes.

This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

1: Anlon Find mac Robartaigh - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 2002, via Æthelmearc

(Fieldless) Three chevronels couped and braced azure.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

2: Arnbiǫrg Niálsdóttir - New Name & New Device

Purpure, on a bend engrailed between two axes bendwise argent an arrow inverted purpure.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Client requests authenticity for Viking Age Sweden.
Sound (Arn-byorg Nyals-dottir) most important.

Arnbiǫrg is a female given name found in "Viking Names found in the Landnámabók," by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/landnamabok.html). The same name, spelled Arnbjǫrg, is also found at p. 7 in Geirr Bassi. The submitter prefers whichever spelling is more authentic for Viking Age Sweden. Aryanhwy Sans Repose noted that the use of j in Norse transcriptions developed in the 18th century. Therefore, the spelling Arnbiǫrg is more authentic.

Commentary suggested that the spelling Arnborg *might* be more appropriate for Sweden; as this suggestion would benefit from more commentary, the given name was not changed.

Niálsdóttir - Geirr Bassi p. 13 lists Njáll as a masculine given name of Celtic origin. According to p. 17 of Geirr Bassi on the formation of patronymics, the proper genitive form of Njáll is Njáls, yielding Njálsdóttir. The patronymic was submitted as Njálsdóttir but we changed it to Niálsdóttir to meet the submitter's authenticity request, based on the commentary that the use of j in Old Norse transcriptions was post-period.

Correction (2013-Sep-12 13:09:09): The submitter has withdrawn her authenticity request for Sweden/Swedish. She has indicated that <Arnbiǫrg Niálsdóttir> is her preferred name.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

3: Aurelia di Giovanni Bedic - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.

Aurelia is the subject of Academy of St. Gabriel Report 3230, which states:

There are two 16th century Italian women writers, <Aurelia Petrucci> and <Aurelia Roverella>. [3] We also found a woman from Palermo named <Aurelia> who was baptised sometime between 1561 and 1563 [4], and in a book from the end of the 16th century/beginning of the 17th century we find <Aurelia Litta> and <Aurelia Serbellona>.[5]

The cited footnotes are:

[3] Ockerbloom, Mary Mark, ed., "A Celebration of Women Writers: Writers from Italy" (WWW: University of Pennsylvania, no date) http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/_generate/ITALY.html

[4] Lyneya Fairbowe, unpublished research based on a baptismal register from Palermo 1561-3 that is available from the research library of the Church of the Latter Day Saints.

[5] "Cesare Negri's Le Gratie d'Amore / Nuove Inventioni Di Balli (1602/1604)" (WWW: Gregory Blount of Isenfir). http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/negri/

http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/negri/transcription/0006.clean.html

Giovanni is a male given name found in "Names from Sixteenth Century Venice" by Juliana de Luna (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/16thcvenice.html). di Giovanni follows the standard pattern for forming Italian patronymics set out in Appendix A of SENA.

Appendix A of SENA states that the pattern [given] + [patronymic] + [family name] is found in Italian, and that "patronymic bynames in these patterns are generally marked with di."

Bedic is the submitter's legal surname, as confirmed by Yehuda Elmet and Alys Eastern Crown. She is using it in the position of the family name in the naming pattern; this should be well within the scope of the Legal Name Allowance.

The submitter would like the family name Bedicci or Bedici if it can be documented. We had no success documenting either of these family names at Kingdom.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

4: Avonmore, Shire of - New Branch Name

No changes.

The Shire's name was documented based on the name of a river in Ireland, recorded in the Annals of the Four Masters in entry dated 1578 in Gaelic as Abhainn Mhóir, translated into English as Avonmore:

M1578.7: O Ceallacháin do bhathadh i n-Abhainn Mhóir . . . (http://www.ucc.ie/celt/published/G100005E/index.html).

M1578.7: O'Callaghan, i.e. Callaghan, the son of Conor, son of Donough, son of Teige Roe, was drowned in the River Avonmore . . . (http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/T100005E.html).

SENA NPN 1.C.2.c on the Lingua Anglica rule in non-personal names states:

c. Lingua Anglica Allowance: We also allow the registration of translations of attested and constructed household names, heraldic titles, and order names into standard modern English, which we call the lingua Anglica rule. We allow this because the meanings of these names would have been clear to the speakers of these languages, but may be unclear to modern speakers. The translation must be a literal, plausible and complete translation. Under no circumstances will translations of the meanings of given names or placenames be registerable under this rule.

However, SENA does not expressly allow for the Lingua Anglica forms of branch names. We received no commentary at Kingdom on whether the Lingua Anglica allowance should be applied for branch names.

However, with assistance from Aryanhwy Sans Repose, we were able to document Avonmore as a constructed English name.

Avon is dated to c.1540 in Watts s.n. Avon.

Ekwall p. 330 s.n. mor gives the element mor as a place name element meaning "moor, waste upland; fen." Ekwall p. 331 s.n. More gives the period spelling la More dated to 1198. Use of this element as the second element of place names is found in:

Exmoor -- Ekwall p. 171 s.n. Exe, with the dated spelling Exemora (1204). The spelling Exemore is found in 'Close Rolls, Richard II: March 1399', Calendar of Close Rolls, Richard II: volume 6: 1396-1399 (1927), pp. 451-461. (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=107650&strquery=Exemore)

Dartmoor -- Ekwall p. 139 s.n. Dart, with the dated spelling Dertemora (1182). The spelling Dartmore appears in 'Elizabeth: May 1581, 1-5', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Elizabeth, Volume 15: 1581-1582 (1907), pp. 145-154. (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73511&strquery=Dartmore).

This evidence suggests Avonmore as a plausible constructed place name.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

5: Bhakail, Barony of - New Order Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in July of 1974,

Order of the Tear of Bhakail

(Fieldless) On a goutte de larmes, a natural salamander tergiant Or

Bhakail, Barony of was registered in July of 1974.

The term "goutty de larmes" (goutty azure), representing tears, appears in Parker, A Glossary of Terms Used in Heraldry (http://karlwilcox.com/parker/?page_id=1721).

The OED entry on "goutte" has the following definition:

A small drop-shaped figure (of specified tincture), used as a charge". The first dated instance is a1400 Morte Arth. 3759: "That bare of gowles fulle gaye, with gowces (?read gowtes) of syluere.

One of the definitions of "gout" is the following:

A drop of liquid, esp. of blood. In the later use, after Shakspere, it tends to mean: A large splash or clot." An example is 1503 Art Good Living & Dying X iiij: "The ewyl rich the qwich may not haue 3yt oon gowt of Watyr..."

In the OED under "tear", we have a number of meanings relating to drops of liquid. Some examples:

a1340 Hampole Psalter cxxv: 6 Þa þat dos goed werkis in terys of penaunce.

1388 Wyclif Ps. cxxv[i] 5 Thei that sowen in teeris: schulen repe in ful out ioiyng.

1560 Daus tr. Sleidane's Comm. 18 The people...are all in teares and mournyng.

1637 Milton Lycidas 14 He must not flote upon his watry bear...Without the meed of som melodious tear.

The French term "larmes" is also found in period: for example, in the title of the book _Les larmes de S. Pierre et autres vers sur la Passion..._ (The tears of St. Peter and other verses on the Passion) by Robert Estienne. A 1606 edition can be seen at http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k5543092g/f2.image.

Based on the above, one could argue that "tear" is just a Lingua Anglica form of either the Middle English gowt(e) or the French "larme".


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

6: Bhakail, Barony of - New Order Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in July of 1974,

Order of the Pasguarde

Gules, a sword bendwise sinister proper sustained by an armored arm embowed argent issuant from a demi-sun issuant from sinister Or.

This order name follows the pattern of naming orders after objects or heraldic charges found in "Medieval Secular Order Names" by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/).

A pasguarde is a plate reinforcement for the left elbow used in jousting, discussed in "A Record of European Armour and Arms Through Seven Centuries" by Guy Francis Laking (1921) (http://www.archive.org/stream/recordofeuropean04lakiuoft/recordofeuropean04lakiuoft_djvu.txt). The relevant section of Laking's book quotes a 1629 Greenwich inventory of "the greate chamber late Mr. Pickerings," which contains the item: "Diverse parcell of the Earl of Pembrokes armo'viz. one Tilte headpeece one Grandguard one Pasguarde one Mainefree one Turning Gauntlett and one Shafforne." The OED s.n. pass-guard gives the spelling pace guarde (a1548).


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

7: Bhakail, Barony of - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in July of 1974,

(Fieldless) Three rapiers inverted proper conjoined in pile and overall a salamander tergiant fesswise sable enflamed proper.

This badge should be associated with the Barony's Company of the Flame and Salamander, which appeared on the East's June 26, 2013 LoI.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

8: Bhakail, Barony of - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in July of 1974,

(Fieldless) A human head erased proper attired of a jester's cap gules.

The jester's cap is based on models found in period artwork. It is clearly visually different from the cap in the armory of Gautier d'Isigny-sur-Mer (Aug. 1994, Caid): Ermine, a jester's cap gules. I am forwarding it and leaving the question of how to blazon this style of jester's cap to Wreath.

This badge should be associated with the Barony's Order of the Harlequin, which appeared on the East's June 26, 2013 LoI.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

9: Bhakail, Barony of - New Order Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in July of 1974,

Order of the Eft

Vert, in pale a lotus blossom in profile and a natural salamander tergiant Or.

Evete is a Middle English term for a newt, lizard or salamander, found in the Middle English Dictionary:

c1225(OE) Wor.Aelfric Gloss.(Wor F.174) 544/8: Lacerta: evete. a1225(?c1175) PMor.(Trin-C B.14.52) 277: Þar beð naddren and snaken, eueten [vrr. euete, euethen] and fruden. a1325 Gloss.Bibbesw.(Cmb Gg.1.1) 531: Crapaude e lezart [glossed: tode..hevete]. a1350 SLeg.Patr.(Ashm 43) 12: No foul worm in Irlond..bbote alute schort euete; & 3ut heo is tailes. (a1387) Trev. Higd.(StJ-C H.1) 1.335: Enettes [read: Euettes; L lacertas]. (a1398) * Trev. Barth.(Add 27944) 59a/a: Þe kynde of euetis [genus lacertarum]. (a1398) * Trev. Barth.(Add 27944) 268b/b: Þe tail of þe serpent groweþ eft if it is y kutte a way as þe tayl of an euete. (a1398) * Trev. Barth.(Add 27944) 297b/a: Salamandra is a manere kynde of ewte ouþer of leesarde and is a pestilence beste and most venemous. (a1398) * Trev. Barth.(Add 27944) 297b/b: Þe lusard is a manere kynde of euete and crepeþ and is foure footed and cloue foted. (a1398) * Trev. Barth.(Add 27944) 324b/b: Evete eiren beþ liche to serpentes eiren. c1400(?a1300) *KAlex.(LdMisc 622) 6110: Eueten, snaken & paddes brood. ?a1425(c1400) Mandev.(1) (Tit C.16) 40/22: In þat abbeye ne entreth not no flye, ne todes, ne ewtes. (1440) PParv.(Hrl 221) 355: Newte or ewte, wyrme: Lacertus.

Finally, the OED entry for eft has the following:

Forms: 1. efeta, -e, 2-4 euete, 2-7 evete, 4 auete, 4-6 ewt(e, (5 eefte, 6 ewft, euit), 6-8 euet, (8 eff, 9 dial. effet, evvet), 7 - eft. See also NEWT. [OE efeta, of unknown origin. The form NEWT (a newt corruptly for an ewt) is more frequent in literary use, and in some dialects has superceded the older form.] A small lizard or lizard-like animal. Now (like NEWT) chiefly applied to the Greater Water-Newt (Triton cristatus) and to the Smooth Newt (Lophinus punctatus), of the order Salamandridæ.

This seems to us to be at least arguable support for Order of the Eft as a Lingua Anglica form.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

10: Black Icorndall, Canton of - New Heraldic Title

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 2010, via the East

Black Squirrell Pursuivant

This heraldic title follows the pattern of [color] + [charge] found in "Heraldic Titles from the Middle Ages and Renaissance" by Juliana de Luna (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/HeraldicTitles/heraldic_titles_by_type.shtml#CHARGES), which gives the examples of:

Blanc Sanglier Pursuivant

Blanch Lyon Pursuivant

Blanch Lyverer Pursuivant

Blanche Rose Pursuivant

Although it is not required, a petition of support from the Canton was included for this heraldic title.

The spelling black can be found in the Middle English Dictionary s.n. blak with the following dated examples:

a1425 *Medulla (Stnh A.1.10) 44a/a: Niger: blacke. c1440(?a1400) Perceval (Thrn) 774: Þer brent of birke and of ake Gret brandes and blake [rime: make, ake]. a1450(a1338) Mannyng Chron.Pt.1 (Lamb 131) 7073: Þy blake cloþes schalt þou loþe. (1455) Acc.St.Ewen in BGAS 15 154: Item, one sewte of black vestementes. (a1475) Recipe Painting(2) in Archaeol.J.1 (Sln 73)

Submitted as Black Squirrel Pursuivant, Kingdom commenters were unable to find support for the spelling squirrel in period. However, the spelling squirrell appears in 'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1630', Middlesex county records: Volume 3: 1625-67 (1888), pp. 30-37. (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66022&strquery=Squirrell). We therefore changed the name to Black Squirrell Pursuivant to reflect the documented spelling.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

11: Carillion, Barony of - Resub Order Name

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1986, via the East

Order of Bellina

This is a resubmission of the Order name Order of the Cokebelle which was returned on the March 2013 LoAR for not following a period pattern of constructing order names. This resubmission completely changes the name.

This order name follows the pattern of Orders named after a person, identified in "Medieval Secular Order Names" by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/). The May 2011 LoAR states that "[a] given name can be used to create an order name (one named after a founder or inspiration)." [Order of Taillefer, 5/2011 LoAR, A-Lochac].

Bellina is a female given name found once in "Feminine Given Names from the Online Catasto of Florence of 1427" by Arval Benicoeur (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/catasto/#alpha). SENA NPN.1.B.2 permits the Lingua Anglica "Order of" to be combined with the Italian "Bellina."

If this Order name is registered, it should be associated with the badge (Fieldless) A hawk's bell per pale Or and sable, registered to the Barony of Carillion in October 2012 via the East.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

12: Conall Ó Cellaigh - Resub Badge

OSCAR finds the name on the East LoI of May 23, 2013 as submitted.

(Fieldless) On a Celtic cross azure a wolf rampant argent.

Conall Ó Cellaigh is the same submitter as Conall mac Muirnigh, whose name, device and badge appeared on the East's February 2013 LoI. While the February 2013 LoI was still in commentary, he withdrew all three submissions. His new name, Conall Ó Cellaigh, and a new device appeared on the East's May 2013 LoI. This badge is a resubmission of his withdrawn badge, (Fieldless) a wolf rampant regardant argent charged with a Celtic cross gules.

There was discussion in commentary of whether or not the wolf was large enough to be recognized. It is clearly a dog of some kind. Therefore, we have opted to forward this badge for the benefit of additional commentary.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

13: Constança Navarra - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.

Constança is a Spanish female given name found in "Spanish Names from the Late 15th Century" by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/isabella/WomensGivenAlpha.html).

Navarra is an unmarked byname believed to mean "of Navarre" or "from Navarre" found s.n. Cristina in "16th Century Spanish Names" by Elspeth Ann Roth (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/spanish/fem-given-alpha.html). Cristina Navarra is dated to 1574. The submitter prefers Navarra over the marked locative de Navarra.

Correction (2013-Aug-06 15:08:12): The submitter agrees to add "of Barony Beyond the Mountain" or "of Beyond the Mountain" to clear conflict if necessary. <Beyond the Mountain, Barony> was registered in September of 1973.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

14: East, Kingdom of the - New Heraldic Title

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 1973,

Blue Talbot Herald

This heraldic title is intended to be used by a Deputy to the Brigantia Herald's Office. SENA NPN 1.B.4 states that the standard heraldic designators for heraldic titles for Kingdoms are Herald and Pursuivant.

Evidence of titles named in the pattern [color] + [charge] is found in "Heraldic Titles from the Middle Ages and Renaissance" by Juliana de Luna (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/HeraldicTitles/heraldic_titles_by_type.shtml#ENGLISH_CHARGES).

The spelling blue for the color is found in the Middle English Dictionary s.n. bleu dated to 1455: "(1455) Acc.St.Ewen in BGAS 15 149: A part of a blue chesyple."

The spelling talbot referring to a dog is found in in the Middle English Dictionary s.n. talbot dated to c. 1460: "c1460 Of alle mennys (Dub 432) 33: Talbot ontrewe was þe oon dogges name, Bauling bewmond anodre..þe thrid..was called bolde egremonde." The use of a talbot as a heraldic charge is found in Parker's A Glossary of Terms Used in Heraldry s.n. dog: "Azure, a talbot seiant within a bordure engrailed azure--Simon SUDBURY, Bp. of London, 1362; afterwards Abp. of Cant., 1375-81."


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

15: East, Kingdom of the - New Heraldic Title

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 1973,

Chamfron Herald

This title is intended to be used by a Deputy to the Brigantia Herald's office. SENA NPN 1.B.4 states that the standard heraldic designators for heraldic titles for Kingdoms are Herald and Pursuivant.

"Heraldic Titles from the Middle Ages and Renaissance" by Juliana de Luna (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/HeraldicTitles/) provides evidence of heraldic titles based on heraldic charges.

A chamfron is a piece of equestrian armor and has been used as a heraldic charge. The Middle English Dictionary s.n. percer(e) dates this spelling to 1467: "(1467) Doc.in Bentley Excerpta Hist. 209: Lorde Scales..rode streight and light before the Kyng and made take of his trapper, shewyng that his hors had no chamfron nor peser [read: perser] of steele."

SENA NPN 3.C states "The Order of the Whistle does not conflict with the Order of the Whistle of Drachenwald, because the substantive elements being compared are Whistle and Whistle of Drachenwald." Therefore, Chamfron Herald should not conflict with the Order of the Chamfron of Caid (June 2009 via Caid).


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

16: East, Kingdom of the - New Heraldic Title

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 1973,

Jogelour Herald

This title is intended to be used by a Deputy to the Brigantia Herald's office in charge of tournament-related heraldic display.

SENA NPN 1.B.4 states that the standard heraldic designators for heraldic titles for Kingdoms are Herald and Pursuivant.

"Heraldic Titles from the Middle Ages and Renaissance" by Juliana de Luna (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/HeraldicTitles/) provides evidence of heraldic titles based on surnames.

Jogelour is a surname dated to 1348 in the Middle English Dictionary s.n. jogelour (http://quod.lib.umich.edu/m/med/med_ent_search.html).

Question was raised in commentary whether Jogelour was too generic a term to be used for a heraldic title. The precedents concerning generic identifiers did not seem applicable in this context. Therefore, we have forwarded this for a definitive ruling from Pelican.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

17: Elisabetta Lucia Portinari - New Name & New Device

Gules, a rose argent barbed and seeded proper and on a chief invected argent three arches sable.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Client requests authenticity for 15th-16th cen. Italy.

The submitter is willing to drop the "Lucia" if necessary for authenticity.

Elisabetta is a female given name recorded before 1600 found in "Names from Sixteenth Century Venice," by Juliana de Luna (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/16thcvenice.html).

Lucia appears as a female given name recorded before 1600 in Juliana's article, as well as in "Feminine Given Names from the Online Catasto of Florence of 1427," by Arval Benicoeur (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/catasto/#alpha.

Portinari is a family name found 116 times in "Florentine Renaissance Resources: Online Tratte of Office Holders 1282-1532," edited by David Herlihy, R. Burr Litchfield, and Anthony Molho (http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/tratte/doc/SURNAM1.html) and also once in "Florentine Renaissance Resources: Online Catasto of 1427," edited by David Herlihy, R. Burr Litchfield, and Anthony Molho (http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/catasto/newsearch/family_names.html).

Kingdom commenters concluded that the device is clear of the device of Arbella Symson (March 2013, Atlantia): Purpure, a rose and on a chief invected argent three greyhounds passant sable. There is a DC for the field and a DC for the change of type of the tertiary charges.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

18: Elisabetta Lucia Portinari - New Badge

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

(Fieldless) A rose argent barbed and seeded proper within and conjoined to an arch sable.

The submitter's name and device appear elsewhere on this letter.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

19: Ellen Hughes - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2009, via the East

(Fieldless) Within and conjoined to an annulet azure, three holly leaves conjoined in pall inverted vert fructed gules.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

20: Endeweard, Barony of - New Badge

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Per chevron Or and sable, in base a tower within an orle argent.

This badge is intended for use as the Populace Badge of the Barony. The Shire of Endeweard was elevated to Baronial status by the Board of Directors at the January 2013 meeting.

Commenters questioned whether the motif "...in base a X, an orle..." was period. However, SENA Appendix J does not list this motif as one of the disallowed layouts of two charge groups on the field. Accordingly, since the motif can be blazoned and the charges are identifiable, we are sending it on for further commentary.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

21: Endeweard, Barony of - New Badge

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Per chevron Or and sable, in base a keystone within an orle argent.

This submission is to be associated with Order of the Keystone of Endeweard

The Shire of Endeweard was elevated to Baronial status by the Board of Directors at the January 2013 meeting. The name Order of the Keystone of Endeweard appeared on the East's June 26, 2013 LoI.

This design uses a period image of a keystone as seen in the arms of Cunha, found in 1440-1550 Armas de los Condes, Vescondes etc. de Cataluña, de Castilla, de Portugal [BSB Cod.icon. 290] (http://daten.digitale-sammlungen.de/~db/bsb00001370/image_247).

Commenters questioned whether the motif "...in base a X, an orle..." was period. However, SENA Appendix J does not list this motif as one of the disallowed layouts of two charge groups on the field. Accordingly, since the motif can be blazoned and the charges are identifiable, we are sending it on for further commentary.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

22: Endeweard, Barony of - New Badge

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Per chevron Or and sable, in base a portcullis within an orle argent.

This submission is to be associated with Order of the Portcullis of Endeweard

The Shire of Endeweard was elevated to Baronial status by the Board of Directors at the January 2013 meeting. The name Order of the Portcullis of Endeweard appeared on the East's June 26, 2013 LoI.

Commenters questioned whether the motif "...in base a X, an orle..." was period. However, SENA Appendix J does not list this motif as one of the disallowed layouts of two charge groups on the field. Accordingly, since the motif can be blazoned and the charges are identifiable, we are sending it on for further commentary.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

23: Endeweard, Barony of - New Badge

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Per chevron Or and sable, in base a beacon within an orle argent.

This submission is to be associated with Order of the Beacon of Endeweard

The Shire of Endeweard was elevated to Baronial status by the Board of Directors at the January 2013 meeting. The name Order of the Beacon of Endeweard appeared on the East's June 26, 2013 LoI.

Commenters questioned whether the motif "...in base a X, an orle..." was period. However, SENA Appendix J does not list this motif as one of the disallowed layouts of two charge groups on the field. Accordingly, since the motif can be blazoned and the charges are identifiable, we are sending it on for further commentary.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

24: Geneviève Lucrezia Bonaventure D'Este - New Name & New Device

Geneviève Lucrezia Bonaventure D'Este

Purpure, an eagle argent armed and on a chief Or a lion passant purpure between two roses gules.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Culture (French-Italian) most important.

French and Italian can be combined under Appendix C of SENA as long as the name elements are within 300 years of each other. According to Appendix A of SENA, double given names are found in both French and Italian. In addition, both French and Italian use the pattern [given name] + [byname/family name] + [locative].

Genevieve is found s.n. Geneviève in "Late Period French Feminine Names" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/latefrench.html) dated to 1477, 1478, 1498, 1501, 1524, 1537 (2), 1552, 1553, 1564, 1585, 1586, 1588, 1608, 1619. The submitter would very much like the accent grave over the next to last 'e' if that can be documented to period.

Lucrezia appears as a female given name in "Names from Sixteenth Century Venice" by Juliana de Luna (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/16thcvenice.html).

Bonaventure -- The family name was originally submitted as Bonaventuri. The submitter requested the spelling Bonaventure if it could be documented in Italian or French. Bonaventure appears as the given name of an Italian man in "Names Found in Commercial Documents from Bordeaux, 1470-1520," by Aryanhwy merch Catmael and Talan Gwynek (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/bordeaux.html). Bonaventure also appears as a French given name dated to 1546 at p. 179 s.n. Bonaventure in "Dictionnaire des noms de famille en Wallonie et à Bruxelles" by Jean Germain, Jules Herbillon (Lannoo Uitgeverij, Jan 1, 2007) (http://books.google.com/books?id=4bYErd60g3YC). Unmarked patronymics are permitted under Appendix A of SENA in both Italian and French. We therefore changed Bonaventuri to Bonaventure to meet the submitter's request.

D'Este is a locative byname meaning "from Este" found in "Fourteenth Century Venetian Personal Names," by Arval Benicoeur and Talan Gwynek (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/venice14/venice14sur.html#table).


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

25: Havre de Glace, Barony of - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 2002, via the East

Azure, on a lily argent seeded Or between a chief embattled argent and a ford proper

The Barony submitted this badge under the name Havre des Glaces; this is not the Barony's registered name. I have correct the forms to the registered name, Havre de Glace.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

26: Katerina de Faie - New Name & New Device

Azure, a catamount passant argent, on a chief Or three roses azure.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound ('cat' and 'fay') most important.

Katerina is a feminine given name dated to 1560-65 in "Names and Naming Practices in the Fitzwilliam Accounts from 16th century Ireland" by Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/lateirish/fitzwilliam.html)

de Faie is an Anglicized Irish surname found as an italicized 16th or early 17th cen. form in Woulfe p. 257 s.n. de Fae.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

27: Liesl Lüder - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in May of 1996, via the East

Counter-ermine, on a chevron argent three roses proper

This is a resubmission under SENA of an identical device that was returned on the 10/2011 LoAR with the following comment:

Liesl Lüder. Device. Counter-ermine, on a chevron argent three roses proper.

Unfortunately, this lovely device is returned for conflict with the device of Fiona Clare O Doinn, reblazoned elsewhere on this letter as Counter-ermine, on a chevron gules a poppy affronty argent between two poppies affronty Or. There is a CD for the change in tincture of the chevron, but no CD for the change in tincture only of the tertiary charges, as poppies affronty are not significantly different from roses.

It should be noted that under the proposed new rules, this would not be a conflict.

Under SENA there are now two DCs from Fiona's device -- one for the tincture of the chevron and another for the tincture of the tertiary roses.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

28: Mongu Chinua - New Name & New Device

Purpure, in pale two wolves statant and on a chief argent three sheaves of arrows sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (Mongol) most important.
Culture (Mongol) most important.

Mongu appears in "Mongolian Naming Practices" by Marta as tu Mika-Mysliwy (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/mongolian_names_marta.html) as a variant of Mongke, with the meaning "silver."

Chinua appears in "Documentation and Construction of Period Mongolian Names" by Baras-aghur Naran (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/mongol.html) as a name element meaning "wolf."


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

29: Stoldo Venturini - New Name

Client requests authenticity for 15th-16th cen. Italy.
Sound (similar to 'Taldo') most important.
Spelling (last name beginning with V) most important.

Stoldo is a masculine given name found in Catasto of Florence (1427), summarized in "Italian Renaissance Men's Names," by Ferrante LaVolpe (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ferrante/catasto/names.txt).

Venturini is a family name appearing in "Names in 15th Century Florence and her Dominions: the Condado," by Juliana de Luna (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/condado/familyalpha.html), which also uses data from the 1427 Catasto.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

30: Sweyn Mac Awliffe - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound (unspecified) most important.

Sweyn is a 16th century English surname found in the IGI Parish Records:

Roger Sweyn; Male; Marriage; 08 Dec 1572; Saint Dunstan, Stepney, London, England; Batch: M05576-1

Such surnames can be used as given names by precedent. [Alton of Grimfells, 4/2010 LoAR, A-East].

McAwliffe appears in "The council book of the Corporation of Youghal: from 1610 to 1659" p. 27 dated to 1613 (http://books.google.com/books?id=RAYwAAAAMAAJ). It appears to be Anglicized Irish. Mc is a scribal abbreviation that must be expanded to Mac for registration. In addition, Awliffe is an Anglicized Irish masculine given name from 1601-3 in Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada, "Names Found in Anglicized Irish Documents" (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/Masculine.shtml), with examples of Awliffe m'Mahone I Leyne and Awliffe M'Shiary. The name itself pre-dates 1600, as the variant spelling Awlliffe is dated to 1597-8 in Mari's article. This data further supports the submitted byname.


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

31: Taldo Venturini - New Name

Client requests authenticity for 15th-16th cen. Italy..
Sound (similar to 'Stoldo') most important.
Spelling (last name begins with V) most important.

Taldo is a masculine given name found "Names in 15th Century Florence and her Dominions: the Condado," by Juliana de Luna (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/condado/mensalpha.html).

Venturini is a family name appearing in the same article. (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/condado/familyalpha.html).


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

32: Valentina Amore - New Name & New Device

Per pale argent and gules, a three-towered castle counterchanged and on a chief Or three hearts gules.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.

Valentina is a female given name found in "Names from Sixteenth Century Venice" by Juliana de Luna (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/16thcvenice.html) as the name of a Venetian woman recorded before 1600.

Amore is an Italian surname found in "1800 Surnames Recorded in 1447" by N.F. Faraglia (http://www.abruzzoheritage.com/magazine/2002_06/d.htm).


This item was on the 10-2013 LoAR

33: Wolfaert van Utrecht - New Name & New Device

Gules, a ram's head caboshed and on a chief argent a roundel between an increscent and a decrescent gules.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Dutch) most important.
Culture (Dutch) most important.

Wolfaert is a masculine given name found in "15th Century Dutch Names" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/dutch/dutch15.html) with the submitted spelling dated to 1478-51.

van Utrecht is a Dutch locative byname based on the city of Utrecht in the Netherlands. "Names from Antwerp, 1443-1561" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael and Kymma Godric (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/dutch/plaiser.html) has van Utrecht dated to 1547.

The motif of a roundel between an increscent and a decrescent is a Step from Period Practice under Appendix G of SENA.

Kingdom commenters found this device to be clear of the device of Nadezhda Volyn'skaia (Nov. 2004, An Tir): Vert, a ram's head affronty erased, on a chief argent three increscents sable. There is one DC for the change in tincture of the field, a second DC for the change in the tincture of the charges on the chief, and probably a third DC for the change in the type of the tertiaries.



OSCAR counts 12 New Names, 3 New Order Names, 1 New Branch Name, 4 New Heraldic Titles, 7 New Devices and 13 New Badges. These 40 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $120 for them. OSCAR counts 1 Resub Order Name, 1 Resub Device and 1 Resub Badge. These 3 items are not chargeable. There are a total of 43 items submitted on this letter.

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