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East LoI dated 2013-01-17

Greetings unto Gabriel Laurel, Juliana Pelican, Emma Wreath, and the entire College of Arms from Istvan Blue Tyger and Joscelin Blue Tyger in training!



The Eastern College submits for approval and registration the following items, the last of three letters which contain Pennsic submissions, plus some other submissions received during and after Pennsic.



Please note the continuing issue with the appearance of greens, which Eastern Crown's and Blue Tyger's scanners tend to render as teals. All items are colored with Crayola or Rose Art green markers unless otherwise specifically indicated.



The East wishes to thank Abdullah ibn Harun, Alana O'Keeve, Andreas von Meißen, Aryanhwy merch Catmael, Ásfríðr Úlfvíðardóttir, Brunissende Dragonette, Eleazar ha-Levi, Emma de Fetherstan, Etienne Le Mons, Gunnvor silfraharr, Joscelin le esqurel, Lillia de Vaux, Magnus von Lübeck, Marie de Blois, Marietta da Firenze, Martyn de Halliwell, Tanczos Istvan, and Yehuda ben Moshe for their commentary on the kingdom internal letter.

This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

1: Aethelnoth of Alebridge - New Household Name & New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 1991, via the Middle

Domus Millarii

Gules, a crested Roman Gallic helm between two lightning bolts in fess Or.

No major changes.
Meaning (Keeping the word Millaria or the closest form possible) most important.

This submission is a resubmission of a household name originally returned in the Middle Kingdom circa 1994. Eastern Crown has been unable to verify this return, but is taking the submitter at his word.

This household name is a Latinized form of an English Sign Name meaning House of the Milestone. An example of a fully Latinized inn-sign name was <signum Ursi> (at the sign of the bear), found in the raw data for Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada, "English Sign Names" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/inn/raw.shtml).

Domus appears in Harper Colins Latin Concise Dictionary pg 71 s.n. domus with the meaning "house (esp in town)". Domus was recently accepted as a household designator in the 02-2011 LOAR for "Domus Pugni Argentei."

Millarii appears in Harper Collins Latin Concise Dictionary pg 134 s.n. millarium, with the meaning "I and II nth milestone". Millarii is the genitive form, used for correct Latin grammar.

Orle provided documentation that Romans used inn signs as did the English, citing Fritz Endell, Old Tavern Signs. Cambridge: Houghton Mifflin. 1916. (http://archive.org/stream/oldtavernsignsex00enderich#page/n45/mode/2up) and W. C. Firebaugh, The Inns of Greece & Rome, and a history of Hospitality from the Dawn of Time to the Middle Ages. Chicago: Pascal Covici; 1928; pp. 157-171 (http://www.elfinspell.com/ClassicalTexts/Firebaugh-TheInnsOfGreeceAndRome/Chapter11.html). Among those named were: The Bear in the Cap, The Four Sisters (or Quattuor Sorores), The Elephant, The Cock, The Camel, The Great Eagle, The Little Eagle, The Serpent, The Great Crane, The Sword, The Wheel, and The Olives. Given this pattern it seems plausible that a Roman inn was named after a Roman artifact. As a Latinized English inn-sign name, it should be registrable either way.

The use of a lightning bolt not as part of a thunderbolt is a step from period practice. As this is the only SFPP in this badge, it can be registered.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

2: Arturus of Aranmor - New Name & New Device

Argent, a dragon rampant between three wheels azure.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.

Arturus -- Withycombe, 3rd ed. s.n. Arthur. has Artur(us) dated to 1086.

Aranmor - A Dictionary of Irish Place-Names by Adrian Room, s.n. Aran Island (Dongeal), gives Árainn Mhór, 'big island', as an undated spelling.

According to The Whole Works Concerning Ireland Rev. and Improved, Volume 2 by James Ware (http://books.google.com/books?id=t7RQAAAAcAAJ) at p. 199 the place name Aran-more is found in the Letters Patent of xxxi Elizabeth. In addition, Aranmore appears to be a variant of the more common Lingua Anglica form Arranmore. See, e.g., Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Encyclopedia (Merriam-Webster 2000) (http://books.google.com/books?id=V2d12iZkgOwC) s.n. Ciaran of Clonmacnoise, using the spelling Aranmore.

Monasticon hibernicum: or, A history of the abbeys, priories, and other religious houses in Ireland by Mervyn Archdall (http://books.google.com/books?id=wTYNAAAAYAAJ) at p. 180 reports that a document of 11 April 1581 records the place name are Arrynmore.

The submitter would prefer the spelling Aranmor if it can be documented, but has expressly consented in e-mail with Eastern Crown to Aranmore if it cannot.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

3: Arturus of Aranmor - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name on the East LoI of January 17, 2013 as submitted.

Azure, a wheel Or charged on the hub with a triskele azure.

The submitted badge is clear of László Rózsa (December 1997 via the Outlands): Per fess azure and gules, a wheel Or, by the difference in the field and the addition of the triskele as a tertiary charge. It is also clear of Øpi Váli (April 1999 via Atlantia): Azure, a wheel, a bordure Or, by the removal of the bordure and the addition of the triskele as a tertiary charge.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

4: Ástríðr Alfvinsdóttir - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Ástríðr - "Viking Names found in Landnámabók", by Aryanhwy merch Catmael http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/landnamabok.html

Lena Peterson's Nordiskt Runnamnslexikon (http://www.sofi.se/servlet/GetDoc?meta_id=1472) has Alfvin/Olfun from two Danish inscriptions. SMP also shows the adoption of the Old English Ælfwine as Alwin or Alffwin. The surname formed from Alfvin is Alfvinsdóttir.

Submitted as Ástríðr Elvinsdóttir, no documentation could be found supporting the surname, so we have changed it to the closest-sounding documentable name we could find. Assistance is requested documenting the submitted form.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

5: Barbara de Vries - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 2011, via the East

Gules, a bend between three steins and a domestic cat dormant, on a chief argent a threaded top-weighted drop spindle between and conjoined to two clews of yarn gules.

The submitter's original device, Gules, a bend between three steins and a domestic cat dormant, on a chief argent a threaded top-weighted drop spindle between two clews of yarn gules, was returned on the January 2011 LoAR due to the inability to identify the charge on the chief as a top-weighted drop spindle. This redesign cures the original reason for return.

Commenters questioned whether the drop spindle, the clews of yarn, and the threads connecting the drop spindle to the clews are three different kinds of tertiary charges in violation of the rule against "slot machine" heraldry in SENA A.3.D.2.a. Since we were unable to find precedents clearly addressing the issue, we have opted to forward this for clarification from Wreath.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

6: Barbeta Kyrkeland - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2008, via the East

(Fieldless) A lace-making bobbin Or.

Lillia Diademe provided images of period lace bobbins (http://ilaria.veltri.tripod.com/bobbins.html), which closely match the depiction in this badge.

Questions were raised whether this badge conflicts with Ardanroe, Shire of (November 1994 via Meridies): (Fieldless) An oar inverted Or. On a visual comparison, it appears that the two badges might well be clear.

Commenters also questioned whether a lace-making bobbin is a DC away from a distaff or a drop-spindle. If not, this device would conflict with An Tir, Kingdom of (October 1982 via An Tir): (Fieldless) A distaff Or or Matilda of Tay (March of 1984 via Calontir): Per bend sinister ermine and gules, in sinister base a threaded drop-spindle Or.

Since there are no precedents governing these issues, we are sending the badge up for clarification from Wreath.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

7: Cecily Windham - New Name & New Device

Argent, on an ostrich plume palewise sable two plates in pale.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Sound (unspecified) most important.

Cecily is found in "English Names found in Brass Enscriptions" by Julian Goodwyn (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/brasses/women.html) dated to 1442.

Lillia Diademe provided additional documentation from the IGI Parish Records Extracts showing the given name within a few years of the byname:

Cecily Abbies Female Baptism/christening date: 08 Sep 1583 SOUTHILL, BEDFORD, ENGLAND Father: John Abbies Batch: P00341-1
Cecily Arnold Female Baptism/christening date: 13 Nov 1575 MAULDEN, BEDFORD, ENGLAND Father: Richard Arnold Batch: P00392-1

Windham is found in the surnames section of the Julian Goodwyn's above-cited article dated to 1571 (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/brasses/lastnameIZ.htm#W).


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

8: Charles Bray - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (late-period English) most important.
Culture (late-period English) most important.

Charles is a masculine given name found in "English Names found in Brass Inscriptions" by Julian Goodwyn (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/brasses/men.html) dated to 1585.

Bray appears as a surname in the same article dated to 1516 (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/brasses/lastnameAH.html#B).


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

9: Cristiana Crane - New Name & New Device

Azure, a crane in its vigilance argent and a tierce ermine.

No major changes.

Christiana appears in Withycombe, p. 32, with this spelling dated to 1179.

Crane is a surname derived from a descriptive byname found in R&W s.n. Crane with this spelling dated to 1177.

Commenters felt the submitted name was clear of Christianna MacGrain (June 1984 via Meridies) by the removal of the syllable Mac-.

Correction (2013-Mar-19 14:03:44): Due to a typo, the 'h' was admitted from the given name in the header. I have confirmed with the submitter that she does indeed want Christiana.

Correction (2013-Mar-19 14:03:07): Due to a typo, the 'h' was admitted from the given name in the header. I have confirmed with the submitter that she does indeed want Christiana.

As of the October 2012 LoAR, the use of a tierce with any other charge is a SFPP. However, this is the only SFPP in the device.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

10: Eleanor Volante - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.

Eleanor appears in Withycombe p. 96 dated to 12th-15th cens.

Volante- Reaney & Wilson s.n. Volant lists the dated forms Henry le Volaunt (1221) and Robert le volant (1221). Commenters found Volant (1471) and Volande (1528) as bynames s.n. Volant in "Names from Lallaing 1384 - 1600" by Domhnall na Moicheirghe (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/lallaing_names.html). These spellings suggest that the requested Volante could be plausible. Assistance in documenting the submitted spelling is requested.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

11: Godric FitzEdmond - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 2012, via the East

Vert, in bend two mastiff's heads couped Or marked sable.

This badge is clear of the device Anna Eisenkopf (August 1996, East): Vert, two hound's heads couped respectant Or under SENA A.5.E.4 - complete change of arrangement of primary charge group. Anna's hound's heads are in fess; these are in bend.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

12: Gwenhwyvar verch Ioan - Resub Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Meaning (daughter of John) most important.

This name is a resubmission of Gwenhwyvar verch Ieuan, which was returned on the April 2012 LoAR (R-East) for conflict with Gwenhwyvar verch Owein. April 2012 was the last pre-SENA meeting.

Gwenhwyvar is a feminine given name appearing in "A Simple Guide to Constructing 16th Welsh Names (in English contexts)," by Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/welsh16.html)

Ioan is a masculine given name appearing in Morgan and Morgan, p 130, s.n. Ieuan with this spelling dated to 1567.

Sans Repose suggested that Ioan is roughly pronounced 'YOAN', rhyming with Joan. Based on this information, the byname appears sufficiently different in both sound and appearance to warrant having Pelican make the conflict call.

The byname is clearly different in appearance from Gwenhwyvar verch Owein, so the real question for determining conflict is whether it is pronounced differently. Please discuss.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

13: Helga stjarna - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2010, via the East

(Fieldless) A rat dormant bendy azure and argent.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

14: Hilary of Aranmor - New Name & New Device

Per pale Or and vert, an oak tree counterchanged fructed between three acorns counterchanged.

No major changes.

Hilary - According to Withycombe s.n. Hilary this name "was not uncommon in England from the 13th to 16th C., and had continued in infrequent use ever since. In the 12th and 13th C it was also used as a female name."

Aranmor - A Dictionary of Irish Place-Names by Adrian Room, s.n. Aran Island (Dongeal), gives Árainn Mhór, 'big island', as an undated spelling.

According to The Whole Works Concerning Ireland Rev. and Improved, Volume 2 by James Ware (http://books.google.com/books?id=t7RQAAAAcAAJ) at p. 199 the place name Aran-more is found in the Letters Patent of xxxi Elizabeth. In addition, Aranmore appears to be a variant of the more common Lingua Anglica form Arranmore. See, e.g., Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Encyclopedia (Merriam-Webster 2000) (http://books.google.com/books?id=V2d12iZkgOwC) s.n. Ciaran of Clonmacnoise, using the spelling Aranmore.

Monasticon hibernicum: or, A history of the abbeys, priories, and other religious houses in Ireland by Mervyn Archdall (http://books.google.com/books?id=wTYNAAAAYAAJ) at p. 180 reports that a document of 11 April 1581 records the place name are Arrynmore.

The submitter would prefer the spelling Aranmor if it can be documented, but has expressly consented in e-mail with Eastern Crown to Aranmore if it cannot. Kingdom was unable to find documentation for this form.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

15: Ile du Dragon Dormant, Barony de l' - New Badge

OSCAR is unable to find the name, either registered or submitted.

Purpure, a chevron argent within a bordure Or semy-de-lys purpure.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

16: Isylte Aron - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2010, via the East

Per pale sable and vert, three hawthorne leaves conjoined in annulo Or.

We are forwarding this submission assuming that there is a DC between these hawthorne leaves and oak leaves. If there is not, this device conflicts with Avine de Hert (March 2008 via An Tir): (Fieldless) Three oak leaves conjoined in annulo Or, with only one DC for the field.

Commenters also questioned whether the leaves drawn were truly hawthorn leaves -- there is some evidence that they are (http://www.treetrees.com/leaves/leaf-shape-ovoid.htm) and (http://green.kingcounty.gov/gonative/Photo.aspx?Act=view&PhotoID=503), but contrary evidence that "common hawthorn" leaves look different (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Eenstijlige_meidoorn_%28Crataegus_monogyna_branch%29.jpg).

We were unable to find any precedents concerning whether hawthorn leaves conflict with oak leaves, or regarding the proper rendering of hawthorn leaves. Therefore, we are forwarding this device for guidance from Wreath on both questions.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

17: Joscelin le esqurel - New Blanket Permission to Conflict

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2010, via the East

I, [legal name], known in the SCA as Joscelin le esqurel, waive the full protection of my registered name as follows: For "Joscelin le esqurel," I grant permission to any future submitter to register a name that is not identical to it.

Dated: 8/6/12 and signed with legal signature


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

18: Joscelin le esqurel - New Blanket Permission to Conflict

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2010, via the East

I, [legal name], known in the SCA as Joscelin le esqurel, waive the full protection of my registered armory as follows: For "(Fieldless) A squirrel courant sable," I grant permission to any future submitter to register armory that is not identical to it. I understand that this permission can be withdrawn by written notice to the Laurel Sovereign of Arms, but that conflicting items registered while it is in force will remain registered.

Dated: 8/6/12 and signed with legal name


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

19: Joscelin le esqurel - New Blanket Permission to Conflict

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2010, via the East

I, [legal name], known in the SCA as Joscelin le esqurel, waive the full protection of my registered armory as follows: For "(Fieldless) A squirrel courant purpure" I grant permission to any future submitter to register armory that is not identical to it. I understand that this permission can be withdrawn by written notice to the Laurel Sovereign of Arms, but that conflicting items registered while it is in force will remain registered.

Dated: 8/6/2012 and signed with legal name


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

20: Juliana le Chaluner - New Name

No major changes.
Sound most important.

Juliana appears Withycombe s.n. Julian(a) dated to 1196-1220 and 1273.

le Chaluner appears in "12th & 13th Century English Textile Surnames" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/textile.html) dated to 1285 s.n. Challener. R&W s.n. Challener lists Ralph le Chaluner dated to 1224.

R&W contains several examples of the masculine le used in occupational bynames for women: s.n. Cropper ('cropper or reaper'), Alice le Crappere (1315); s.n. Parker ('park keeper'), Claricia le Parkeres (1327), and s.n. Retter ('net-maker'), Alice le Retour (1279).

While prior registration is no guarantee, Eastern Crown notes that Rose le Marinier was registered in April 2010 (A-East) based on the above documentation.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

21: Katharine of Kyngesbridge - New Name & New Device

Per saltire sable and purpure, in chief three descrescents in fess and in base a triquetra Or.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language (14th cen. England) most important.
Culture (14th cen. England) most important.

Katharine is found in "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames" by Talan Gwynek (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/reaneyHZ.html) s.n. Katharine, with the submitted spelling dated to 1294 and 1327.

Kyngesbridge is dated to the 10th year of the reign of Richard II, or 1387 in 'Deeds: C.701 - C.800', A Descriptive Catalogue of Ancient Deeds: Volume 1 (1890), pp. 454-465. (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=64236&strquery=Kyngesbridge).

Submitted as Katharine of Kingsbridge, the submitter asked in email with Eastern Crown that the spelling of the byname be made period for the 14th century. Kingsbridge had been documented as a place name in Watts p. 346 s.n. Kingsbridge, with the dated form Kingesbrig' (1230, 1244).

The submitter permits any changes to the byname necessary to make it period.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

22: Kjafinnr Sauðr - New Name & New Device

Gules, a musimon rampant sable and on a chief argent a furison sable.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Meaning (Kevin The Sheep) most important.

The submitter wants Kevin the Sheep, but most especially "The Sheep" in Old Norse.

This name was originally submitted from Pennsic Herald's Point as "Kevin Sauðr". Kevin is the submittor's legal given name; his driver's license was reviewed by Alia Marie de Blois and Ulric von der Insel. Gunnvor Orle provided documentation and analysis during kingdom commentary for Kjaffinr as a hypothetical Old Norse rendering of Caoimhín, the origin of the modern Kevin. Based on "Old Norse Forms of Early Irish Names" by Talan Gwynek (<a href="http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/drafts/irish-norse.html">http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/drafts/irish-norse.html</a>), Gunnvor advised:

"I derive the Kj- by looking at how Old Norse transforms the following EIr names:

EIr Cellach >> ON Kjallakr
EIr Cerball >> ON Kjarvalr
EIr Cerd(d)in >> ON Kjartan

Under Melkólfr, Talan says, 'The lenited final -m of Coluim was a nasalized voiced bilabial fricative that might have been perceived as either /m/ or /v/ (spelled f); the f spelling and /v/ pronunciation might have been favored by analogy with native ON names in -ólfr.' Then there's also: Pictish Domnach, EIr Domnóc >> ON Dofnakr

I really need a EIr expert to comment on how EIr Caoimhín is pronounced to be certain, but with what I have now, my best guess is that the second syllable would have the spelling in -f-, and that leads naturally to using the ON name element -finnr."

After bringing this option to the submitter's attention, he requested that his given name be changed to Kjafinnr or the closest registerable form.

Sauðr - Lind, personbinamn, col 304, has Sauðr as a standalone name, listing a Þorbiorn sauðr.

Parker defines a musimon as "resembling a ram with goat's horns as well as its own."

SENA A.4.A states:

Any armorial design that does not fit within our core style rules may still be registered if it can be documented as following a pattern of period practice within the armorial style of a single time and place within the temporal scope of the Society. This time and place may be in Europe or may be from a non-European period armorial tradition, such as Islamic or Japanese heraldry. We call such a design an Individually Attested Pattern. All elements in an Individually Attested Pattern must be found in that single time and place, including charges, arrangement of charge groups, and lines of division.

Documentation of an Individually Attested Pattern is required for this device's use of a sable charge on a gules field. Commenters were able to provide substantial documentation for black animate charges on red, including one instance of a goat clymant sable on a gules field found in Das Ehrenbuch der Fugger dated to 1545-47. However, none of the examples also had charged chiefs. SENA A.4.B. states that, for an IAP, "The overall design of the submission must be similar to the types of designs that document the use of the non-core style elements. In general, examples must match the submission in style and complexity." Therefore, the evidence presented does not sufficiently support this device. Nevertheless, We are sending this device to Laurel in the hope that further research will provide that additional evidence.

The following evidence was provided by Brunissende Dragonette (there were more, but sadly the links don't seem to want to work):

Black on red:
http://www.wappenbuch.de/pages/wappen_52_Siebmacher.htm
http://www.wappenbuch.de/pages/wappen_32_Siebmacher.htm

Black on red with red being only part of the field
http://www.wappenbuch.de/pages/wappen_219_Siebmacher.htm
http://www.wappenbuch.de/pages/wappen_44_Siebmacher.htm
http://www.wappenbuch.de/pages/wappen_54_Siebmacher.htm
http://www.wappenbuch.de/pages/wappen_59_Siebmacher.htm

Black on Red (& blue)
http://www.wappenbuch.de/pages/wappen_224_Siebmacher.htm

The following examples are also from Siebmacher, provided by Istvan Non Scripta - some of them are identical to the ones provided by Brunissende:

Plate 33: sable human statant affronty on gules field.
Plate 42: sable lion on gules field.
Plate 48: sable wing on a gules field. (there's an argent talon issuant from it)
Plate 50: sable reindeer/stag on gules field (argent antlers/horns)
Plates 52 and 72: sable human head on a gules field.
Plate 156: sable snake on gules field - it's knotted in a non-named shape

Lastly, there are five attached plates provided by Gunnvor Orle. Again, there is some overlap with the previous documentation.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1/2013-01-13/09-59-06_sog-gunnvor1.png
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1/2013-01-13/09-59-06_sog-gunnvor2.png
#3 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1/2013-01-13/09-59-07_sog-gunnvor3.png
#4 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1/2013-01-13/09-59-07_sog-gunnvor4.jpg
#5 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=1/2013-01-13/09-59-08_sog-gunnvor5.jpg


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

23: Lucie Lovegood of Ramisgate - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 2011, via the East

Argent, a sea-hedgehog proper within a bordure checky vert and argent.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

24: Mabon Chwibanwr Pytt - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister Or and vert, a boar rampant sable, a chief Or.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Meaning (\'the whistler\') most important.

Mabon is described in Morgan & Morgan, s.n. Mabon as a Celtic deity, with a mythical <Mabon fab Modron> found in the story of Culhwch and Olwen. However, it is also found in the Book of Taleisin as the name of a great warrior, so the authors conculuded that the name was "used in the early period". Heini Gruffudd, Welsh Names for Children has the name <Mabon ab Iarddur> dated c1100. It is also found as a literary name in the MED dated a1500: "a1500(a1400) Libeaus (Lamb 306) 2033: Tho Mabon and Lybeous Faste to-geder hewes And slaked not for no synne."

Chwibanwr meaning 'one who whistles, a piper' is found in Dictionary of the Welsh Language by William Owen Pughe, 1832, p. 358 (http://books.google.com/books?id=cKv0SWDJxgUC&pg=PA358). Assistance documenting this element is appreciated, Eastern commenters were unable to supply additional documentation.

Pytt is based on R&W s.n. Pitt, which lists the surnames atte Pitte (1294) and Pyts (1395), derived from the Old English pytt. In addition, Bardsley s.n. Pitt has de la Pitte (Hen. III) and in the Pyt (c. 1300).

English and Welsh can be combined under Appendix C of SENA.

The submitter allows adding/deleting a word like "de" or "the" or changing language when the change is small.

Correction (2013-Jan-17 20:01:30): Pro Forma: The chief, as Bruce noted, is vert, not Or.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

25: Mederic de Caen - New Name & New Device

Bendy Or and azure of six, on a fess gules a lion passant guardant between two swords Or.

Spelling most important.

Mederic submitter's given name. Pennsic Herald's Point attested to Mederic as the given name appearing on his Canadian passport expiring Mar. 15, 2015. The name is not obtrusively modern: Medericus of Autun (d. 700) is a saint with a feast day on August 29. (http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/0829.htm)

Submitted as de Cadon, the submitter requested the byname be changed to de Caen if possible. de Caen is very possible since Caen is found as a place name in "Names From the Signet Documents of Henry V (1413-1422)" by Alys Mackyntoich (http://st-walburga.aspiringluddite.com/docs/SignetHenryV.pdf). The requested change therefore has been made. The submitter's preference for <Caen> was confirmed by Eastern Crown in e-mail.

The 'spelling desired' field says "would prefer". We assume that was the "would prefer 'Caen', and it got cut off because of the quote.

Correction (2013-Jan-24 14:01:45): The source for this particular article of mine is the "Anthology of Chancery English" which dates the spelling <Caen> to several documents written by the signet of Henry V between 1417 and 1422. For example, Document 1417C81/1364/36Signet of Henry V includes the line "Yeuen in oure Towne of Caen þe .ve. day of Septembre vnder our signet . . ."

The source material uses <de> and <of> more or less interchangeably for place names.

The device appears clear of Randall of Hightower (January 1973), Ermine, on a fess gules a lion passant guardant Or, with one DC for the field and a second DC for changing the number of tertiaries.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

26: Nīhānī al-Zahra' - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound most important.

Nīhānī is found in "Persian Feminine Names from the Safavid Period" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael & Ursula Georges (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ursula/persian.html) dated to the late 15th/early 16th century. The article states "Because of the limitations of HTML, we have not been able to transcribe these names accurately. We have used a circumflex accent (ˆ) instead of the macron (-). . ." We have translated the circumflexes back into macrons.

al-Zahra' is found in "Andalusian Names: Arabs in Spain" by Juliana de Luna (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/andalusia/#WomensBynames), dated between 700 and 1200 AD.

For elements in Persian dated after 1100, Appendix C of SENA permits combinations with Arabic. Under section PN.2.C.2 of SENA, name elements from two regional naming groups that are listed in Appendix C as combinable must be dated to within 300 years of one another. We are giving the submitter the benefit of the doubt since the date ranges of the documentation for the phrases are within 300 years.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

27: Patricio de Cordoba - Resub Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 1997, via the East

Purpure, on a bezant a drakkar purpure and a bordure Or.

His original submission, Quarterly sable and Or, in each Or quarter three keys in pale fracted in chevron wards to base sable was returned for appearance of marshalling on the April 2009 LoAR. This is a complete re-design.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

28: Rose Erembourc - New Name Change From Holding Name

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in April of 2013, via the East.

Old Item: Rose of the Isles, to be released.
Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.

Her original name submission, Serenity of the Isles, was returned on the May 2011 LoAR (via Caid) because Serenity was determined to be presumptuous of a title of honor used in period for reigning princes and other dignitaries. Rose of the Isles was established as a holding name in July 2011 via Caid to hold the submitter's armory.

Rose is dated to 13th C (382); 1265 (389); 1324 (430) in "Feminine Given Names in Morlet, Étude d'anthroponymie picarde" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/picardefem.html). It is also a header spelling in Withycombe which cites Rose to 1316.

Erembourc is found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "French Surnames from Paris, 1421, 1423 & 1438" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/paris1423surnames.html) which cites Erembourc in 1438.

English and French are an allowed combination via Appendix C of SENA, but kingdom was able to document 'Rose' as French.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

29: Sergei Rozvad syn - New Device

OSCAR finds the name on the East LoI of December 21, 2012 as submitted.

Argent, a domestic cat courant sable and on a chief embattled azure a shepherd's crook fesswise Or.

This device was pended on the 6 December 2012 Eastern LoD for a re-drawing to make the cat more explicitly courant.

The submitter's name appears on the East's 21 December 2012 xLoI.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

30: Snorri Óláfsson - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Culture (Viking Age Scandinavia) most important.
Meaning (Olaf's son) most important.

Snorri is a masculine given name appearing 15 times in the Landnámabók according to Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Viking Names found in the Landnámabók" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/landnamabok.html).

Óláfsson is a patronymic byname formed based on the masculine given name Óláfr, found in Geirr-Bassi at p. 13. The patronymic is formed according to the rules set out in p. 17 of Geirr-Bassi.

For Scandinavian names, the pattern [given name] + [patronymic] is found in Appendix A of SENA and does not require further documentation.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

31: Sol la Cantor - New Name Change

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in April of 2013, via the East.

Old Item: Esmeralda la Sabia, to be released.
Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Culture (13th Century northern Spain (Road to Santiago)) most important.

Sol appears in Diez Melcon p. 297 "Sol Rodriz, filia de Rodrigo Hectaz" (1111).

la Cantor likewise appears in Diez Melcon p 259 s.n Cantor "Maria la Cantor" (1234).


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

32: Tree of the Forest - New Name & New Device

Per pale sable and vert, a tree and an orle Or.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Meaning (Tree of the Forest) most important.

Tree is a late period English surname used as a given name, as permitted by precedent. [Alton of Grimfells, 04/2010, A-East] Bardsley p. 763 s.n. Tree dates Eliz. Tree to 1583. Tree is also dated to 1588 in the IGI Parish Records (extracts)

Joane Tree Female Christening 29 Sep 1588 SOUTH BERSTED,SUSSEX,ENGLAND Batch: C070111

of the Forest - Bardsley p. 296 s.n. Forrest dates Johannes del Forest to 1379. "of the Forest" would be a completely English as well as a Lingua Anglica form of del Forest.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

33: Vivienne Aurelia le Lyon - New Name & New Device

Gules, a winged lion rampant contourny and on a bordure Or three fleur-de-lys sable.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Culture (Submitter does not want the Anglicized version of any of the names; she wants an all-French name) most important.

Vivienne - Academy of S. Gabriel report 1031 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/1031) mentions Viviene as an Old French feminine form of Vivian. "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" by Colm Dubh (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/paris.html) has one Vivien le serjant; Viviene or Vivienne is the expected feminine form. The submitted spelling of the name is found dated to 1333 and 1337 at p. 147 of "Annales de la Société historique et archéologique de Tournai, Volume 7" (http://books.google.com/books?id=Fq8XAAAAYAAJ)

Aurelia is found s.n. Aurelia in Withycombe which states there was an 11th C French saint of that name.

Aurelia is also a late-period English literary name found in Aurelia, the Paragon of Pleasure and Princely Delights: Contayning the Seven Dayes Solace (in Christmas Holy-dayes) of Madona Aurelia, Queene of the Christmas Pastimes, & Sundry Other Well-courted Gentleman and Gentlewomen, in a Noble Gentleman's Pallace, published in 1593. (http://books.google.com/books?id=yXfvtgAACAAJ&dq=aurelia&hl=en&sa=X&ei=gSbnULb-Io2z0QHZ34Ao&ved=0CEo Q6AEwAg).

SENA Appendix A permits double given in later period French but does not identify specific dates. The submitted documentation dates the given name elements to the 13th and 11th centuries. Kingdom is dubious about whether this is sufficiently "late" for a double given name, but is sending it up in this form in case the CoA can document the names later in period.

le Lyon is found in Reaney and Wilson s.n. Lyon, which cites Johanna le Lyon (1332). Lyon is also found, without the article, in Hitching & Hitching. pages xlix (1602) and lxi (1602)

Correction (2013-Jan-28 10:01:50): Upon being offered the option, the submitter expressed a desire for <Vivienne Aurelia de Lyon>.


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

34: Yehuda ben Moshe - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister sable and argent, two lions counterchanged.

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.

Yehuda is found as a masculine given name in A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names by Alexander Beider, p. 458, s.n. Yude "a very common name in medieval German speaking provinces, among the 10 most common names in Rhineland (1096) and South Germany (1298)."

Moshe is found as a masculine given name in A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names by Alexander Beider, p.384, s.n. Moyshe "it was the 7th most common name in Rhineland (1096) and 4th in popularity in South Germany (1298)."

ben is used in hebrew names to form patronymics, as set forth in Appendix A of SENA. (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/sena.html#AppendixA).

Since Beider is not a common book in the CoA, Lillia Diademe kindly provided a more detailed summary of the documentation:

The Hebrew for Yude is found in Kiev in the 10th C, in Germany (1096, 1298, 1392-1793). The German examples included 34, 36, and 28 people, respectively. So yes, it's a very popular name, meaning 'lion'. In Latin in 15th century Ruthenia or Volhynia, it's found as Ihuda. The submitted spelling is found as the first variant in the variation scheme, in a 1494, 1506 Russian instance, where the transliterations given were Ihuda, Ihude, Yehuda, or Yehude.

The Hebrew for Moshe is found in Kiev (10th century) in a patronym, in Germany (1096, 1298, 1364-1800), and in Prague (1540-1786). The submitted spelling is the transliteration provided for the first two examples, with the transliteration Moyshe used for the 1364-1800 German instance and the instance from Prague

Although the form states that "Hebrew, 12th century" is most important to the submitter, the submitter himself clarified in commentary that he has no such preference: "Even if it's on the form, please disregard that request - I will be happy with any time period prior to AD 1600. Not that there was much change in Hebrew naming practices throughout the period (and beyond)..."


This item was on the 04-2013 LoAR

35: Zühal bint 'Azzah - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound (ZO HAL bint AZZ AH) most important.

The construction ism + nasab is found in "Period Arabic Names and Naming Practices" by Da'ud ibn Auda (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/arabic-naming2.htm)

Zühal appears in "Sixteenth-Century Turkish Names" by Ursula Whitcher dated to 1520 and 1530 CE (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ursula/ottoman/)

bint - as per Da'ud's article means "daughter of."

'Azzah is a feminine given name found in Da'ud's above-cited article (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/arabic-naming2.htm).

Precedent permits the registration of matronymics in Arabic:

Zafira bint Zahira. We are willing to give the submitter the benefit of the doubt, and have changed the name to Zafira bint Zahira in order to register it. The registration of Umm al-Ghazala Jami'a bint Shirin al-Armaniyya (March 2006) gives a number of examples of matronymic bynames in Arabic, provided by Palimpsest. At that time, the precedent from April 1994 forbidding matronymics was not explicitly overturned. We hereby do so. [September 2008 LoAR, A-Atenveldt]

In addition, "Arabic Names from al-Andalus" by Juliana de Luna (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/alandalus/) discusses the use of matronymics in Arabic names.

As per SENA Appendix C Turkish and Arabic can be mixed 1100-1600.

The submitter allows adding/deleting a word like "de" or "the" or changing language when the change is small.


Yours in service to heraldry,

Tanczos Istvan, Blue Tyger Herald
Joscelin le esqurel, Blue Tyger in Training


OSCAR counts 18 New Names, 1 New Name Change, 1 New Household Name, 14 New Devices and 6 New Badges. These 40 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $120 for them. OSCAR counts 1 New Holding Name Change. OSCAR counts 1 Resub Name, 1 Resub Device and 1 Resub Badge. These 4 items are not chargeable. OSCAR counts 3 Blanket Permissions to Conflict. These 3 items may or may not require payment. There are a total of 47 items submitted on this letter.

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