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East LoI dated 2011-12-04

Unto SCA College of Arms, Laurel, Pelican, Wreath, and their staff, and all others who do receive this letter, greetings from Asa in Svarta, Blue Tyger Herald and Lillia da Vaux, Eastern Crown Herald.



The Eastern College herewith submits for approval and registration the following items, with our thanks

This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

1: Alaric Godricson - New Name & New Device

Argent, a saltire sable between four badger's paw prints, claws outward, gules.

No major changes.
Sound (unspecified) most important.

Alaric is the expected vernacular of Alaricus, found in Morlet I, s.n. Alaricus, dated a. 875-12th C. The 12th century instance is from a Latin document. According to Withycombe, s.n. Alaric, Alaricus is an Old German name, and was the name of several West Gothic kings. It is also found in the MED:

?a1475(?a1425) Higd.(2) (Hrl 2261) 5.221: Attulfus kynge, cosyn [Trev.: alye; L affinem] to the seide Alaricus.

(a1387) Trev. Higd.(StJ-C H.1) 5.221: Oon Athulphus, kyng Alaricus his alye [Higd.(2): cosyn; L affinem].

Godricson is intended as a patronymic byname constructed from the masculine given name Godric. Bardsley, s.n. Godrich gives <Robert fil. Godric>, dated 1273. A likely inflected form, <Godrici> is dated 1133-60 in the MED. There is also a 12th century saint, Godric of Finchale, who was the namesake of <Ralph Godric> in the 12th century [Dave Postles, "Resistant, Diffused, or Peripheral? Northern Personal Names to ca. 1250" (In: Studies on the Personal Name in Later Medieval England and Wales, ed. D. Postles, J.T. Roenthal, Kalamazoo, MI: Western Michigan University, 2006, pp. 280-4)]. According to this book, this saint was the subject of the 1175 text Libellus de vita et miraculis S. Godrici, heremitae de Finchale by Reginald of Durham. Lastly, a <Godric Lefled> appears in 'Regesta 47: 1295', Calendar of Papal Registers Relating to Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 1: 1198-1304 (1893), pp. 558-563 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=96041&strquery=Godric).

The submitted spelling is interpolated from Godricsone, dated 1066 according to the introduction to R&W, "Surnames of Relationships: Johnson, Williamson, etc Distribution and Origin". The submitter's preferred -son spelling is dated 1332 (ibid.).

If Godricson cannot be registered, the submitter specifically allows the change to the attested Godricsone. The submitter allows intermediate changes.

There is a step from period practice for the use of pawprints.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

2: Albert Villon - New Alternate Name & New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 2002, via the East

Bilal al-Andalusi

Per fess gules and azure, three pomegranates argent seeded gules and a horse statant argent.

No major changes.

Bilal is an ism found in "Period Arabic Names & Naming Practices" by Da'ud ibn Auda (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/arabic-naming2.htm).

al-Andalusi is a locative byname found in "Andalusian Names: Arabs in Spain" by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/andalusia.html#locative).

Correction (2012-Feb-15 17:02:02): The submitter has indicated that this is a device change, with the old device retained as a badge.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

3: Alexander le Goth - New Name

No major changes.

Alexander is found in "An Index to the 1296 Lay Subsidy Rolls for Rutland, England" by Karen Harris (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/Rutland/given-masc-alpha.htm). Alexander can also be documented to the 16th century, in "Late Sixteenth Century English Given Names" by Talan Gwynek (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/eng16/eng16alpha.html).

le Goth is grandfathered to the submitter via the name of his father, Gaston le Goth, registered Feb. 2008 via the East. Documentation of the relationship has been provided:

I, <name>, known in the SCA as Gaston Le Goth, attest that <name>, known in the SCA as Alexander Le Goth, is my legal son. <Signed with legal name>, date: 8/5/11

The original documentation for the father's name included the following: the online French dictionary at "Le Trésor de la Langue Française informatisé" (TLFi, http://atilf.atilf.fr/) identifies goth as a 16th century adjective derived from the Latin Gothi 'the Goths.' The entry dates two (apparently plural) spellings to period: <Gotz> (1521) and <Gothz> (1532). The term gothes is also a header in the MED. An example from the MED is "(a1387) Trev. Higd.(StJ-C H.1) 1.151: &Thorn;he firste Amazones were þe wyfes of Gothes [L Gothorum]." As such, it is thought that name was a plausible vernacular French or English form, and there should be no problems with using the grandfather clause to register the byname.

The submitter will accept intermediate changes.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

4: Alexandra Pavone - New Name & New Device

Purpure, a triangle argent masoned sable between in chief a capital letter A and a unicorn's head erased argent..

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No changes.

Alexandra is found in England in 1205, possibly after the name of a saint who was martyred at the start of the 4th century (Withycombe, s.n. Alexandra). It is also found in the IGI Parish Extracts in England and Spain:

ALEXANDRA ARREGUIA MURGA Female Christening 28 July 1576 Nuestra Senora La Antigua, Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain ALEXO DE ARREGUIA MARIANA DE MURGA Batch: K871191

ALEXANDRA DEL CASTILLO Female Marriage 3 July 1606 San Julian, Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain LORENSO CASINELO Batch: M871143

ALEXANDRA <PILAND> Female Christening 16 November 1634 St James', Bristol, Gloucester, England JAMES PILAND Batch: C390701

ALEXANDRA BARREY Female Christening 3 August 1561 Great Hormead, Hertford, England WM Batch: P012061

ALEXANDRA CHIDOCKE Male Christening 14 January 1643 Saint James The Apostle, Dover, Kent, England MASTERS CHIDOCKE KATHERINE Batch: C036551

ALEXANDRA FOXE Male Christening 23 October 1546 Saint George Tombland, Norwich, Norfolk, England Batch: P011601

ALEXANDRA NICOLLS Female Christening 25 March 1577 Marshfield, Gloucester, England LAURENTIJ NICOLLS Batch: P008261

ALEXANDRA PARRISH Male Christening 12 May 1595 Grundisburgh, Suffolk, England Batch: P013401

ALEXANDRA SMITH Female Christening 7 May 1637 St Mary Le Port, Bristol, Gloucester, England LODWICK SMITH Batch: C027281

ALEXANDRA WILTON Female Christening July 1604 Marshfield, Gloucester, England THO. WILTON Batch: P008261

Pavone was intended as an unmarked locative based on the Italian town of Pavone Canavese, but commenters couldn't find strong enough evidence of this surname in period. A similar name, Pavoni, appears as a family name in "Florentine Renaissance Resources: Online Tratte of Office Holders 1282-1532," edited by David Herlihy, R. Burr Litchfield, and Anthony Molho (http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/tratte/doc/SURNAM1.html).

"Fourteenth Century Venetian Personal Names" by Arval Benicoeur and Talan Gwynek (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/venice14/venice14sur.html#table) shows several examples of surnames derived from the names of birds, including <Galinarion>, a Venetian form of a dialect word, Gallinaro 'chicken', and <Stornello>, from a form of storno 'starling'. Pavone could fit this pattern, as it is a common noun meaning 'peacock' in both period and modern Italian. For example, it is found as part of the title of one of Æsop's fables (confirmed in a 1542 edition, which was mentioned in H.E. Smith, "An Early Italian Edition of Æsop's Fables", Modern Language Notes, 1910; 25(3):65-7), and is in Dioscorides. We are giving the submitter the benefit of the doubt that this name is plausible based on this pattern.

The combination of either English and Italian, or Spanish and Italian is a step from period practice.

Correction (2012-Feb-12 16:02:30): The submitter has requested authenticity for "11th century Italian".

Submitters were split as to whether the charges in the device were a primary and two secondaries, or a group of three primaries. As the charges in chief are not as large vertically as the bottommost charge, our usual standard, this device is being forwarded.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

5: Alysaundre Sherre de Saford - New Name

No major changes.

Alysaundre is an undocumented variant of the surname Alisaundre, found in Bardsley, s.n. Alexander, dated 1379. The i/y swap is unremarkable in English, so this spelling should be reasonable.

Alysaundre appears many times in the MED, both as the name of the herb and the given name Alexander. Examples include the following:

c1450(1369) Chaucer BD (Benson-Robinson) 1026: She wolde not..sende men into Walakye, to Pruyse, and into Tartarye, To Alysaundre, ne into Turkye.

a1500(?a1400) Chestre Launfal (Clg A.2) 276: Vppon þe toppe an ern þer stod Of bournede golde..Alysaundre þe conqueroure..Ne hadde noon scwych iuell.

(a1460) DSPhilos.(Helm) 191/35: He ... seid that he wolde put him to the wille of kinge Alysaundre.

Withycombe, s.n. Alexandra, also mentions that Alisaundre is a feminine name, e.g., the mother of St. Thomas of Canterbury in early 14th century English legendary histories.

Sherre is a surname dated to 1353 in "Freebridge Hundred and Half: West Lynn," An Essay towards a topographical history of the county of Norfolk, vol. 8, pp. 533-7 (http://www.british-history.ac/report.aspx?compid=78495&strquery=Sherre). The bynames in this source do not appear to have been normalized.

Saford is a place name found in Ekwall, s.n. Seaford. The submitted spelling is dated 1150. Saford is also found in the Close Rolls of Henry III from 1263, where the original Latin text refers to <Samuele de Saford'> and <Samuel de Saford> in the same document ['Close Rolls, February 1263', Calendar of Close Rolls, Henry III: volume 12: 1261-1264 (1936), pp. 203-216. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=94010&strquery=Saford].

Correction (2012-Feb-12 16:02:50): The submitter allows intermediate changes.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

6: Angelina Capasso - New Name & New Device

Gules, a passion cross ermine between in base two daisies slipped and leaved proper and on a chief invected argent three wings in lure gules.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for Italian.
Sound most important.

Angelina is a 16th century feminine given name found in Juliana de Luna's article in progress, "Late Period Italian Women's Names". We were not given a URL for this article, and a copy was not provided by Heralds Point.

However, Butler's Lives of the Saints gives the history of Blessed Angelina di Marsciano (1377-1435), Italian founder of a Franciscan order (http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA163). An image of a 1626 woodcut bearing the legend "B.ANGELINA DE CORBARIA COMITISSA" is found with other renaissance depictions at "La Beata Angelina dei Conti di Marsciano" (http://www.beatangelinadimarsciano.it/iconografia.htm).

It is also found in Spain in the IGI Parish Extracts:

Angelina Agudo Herrera Female Christening 27 February 1578 Santa Maria, Cabezon De Pisuerga, Calladolid Spain Juan Agudo Leonor de Herrera Batch: C871691

Angelina Bermejo Female Marriage 5 April 1588 Santiago Apostol, Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain Melchor Andado Batch: M871061

Angelina Braser Female Christening 2 February 1556 Olot, Genona, Spain Ramon Braser Barthomeua Batch: L892691

(and so on)

Capasso appears in a list of family names in Francesco de Pietri, Dell'historia Napoletana scritta dal signor Francesco de' Pietri libri due. Oue la primiera antichissima origine dell'alma citta di Napoli, il famosissimo culto, ... nouellamente si spiegano (http://books.google.com/books?id=m9_j8R02ux8C&pg=PA83, p. 83), published by Nella Stampa di Gio and Domenico Montanaro in 1634. Assistance finding an earlier instance of the name is appreciated. (That is, other than a genealogical site, http://www.capasso.org/history.html, provided by the submitter.)

Correction (2012-Feb-12 16:02:35): The authenticity request is for "Italian, as close as possible to submission".

The device has a complexity count of nine, just over the rule-of-thumb limit. Therefore, we are forwarding it so that the College of Arms can discuss whether it has good enough period heraldic style to surpass the limit.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

7: Archebios Achaios - New Name

Sound (Sounds as much as possible like Archubeas) most important.

Archebios appears 34 times in the Lexicon of Greek Personal Names, across all volumes, according to the Complex Search Form (http://www.lgpn.ox.ac.uk/database/lgpn.php).

Archaios 'the Achaean' is a header form in Liddell and Scott, A Greek-English Lexicon. It was used by classical authors, including Homer and Thucydides.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

8: Armand Giovanni - New Name

No major changes.

Armand is the submitter's legal middle name, as attested by the consulting herald and Istvan. Armand is also the expected vernacular form of Armandus, a Latinized French given name found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Names from 13th and 14th-century Latin Records from Gascony" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/earlygasconlatin.html), dated 1283-6, 1310, and 1310/1. It is a given name by type, so can be used as a given name via the legal name allowance.

Armand is also a given name found in the IGI parish extracts:

ARMAND <CHAIGNAT> Male Christening 15 February 1636 Gimouille, Nievre, France JEAN CHAIGNAT MARYE BARREAU Batch: C810541

ARMAND <FALIZE> Male Christening March 1644 Saint Michel, Namur, Namur, Belgium ... FALIZE MARIE ... Batch: C870283

The instance from Belgium is likely to be French as well.

Giovanni is found with a count of 2 in "Family Names Appearing in the Catasto of 1427" by Ferrante LaVolpe (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ferrante/catasto/family_names.html).

The combination of French and Italian would normally be a step from period practice [Tessa Cheval, 11/00].


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

9: Avraham ben Zebulun - New Name & New Device

Purpure, a cockatrice erect Or.

Client requests authenticity for Khazar tribe.

Avraham and Zebulon are masculine given names found in Christian Settipani and Kevin Alan Brook, "Khazarian Names" (http://www.khazaria.com/khazar-names.html).

ben 'son of' is the patronymic particle for Hebrew.

The device conflicts with that of Huette Aliza von und zu Ährens und Mechthildberg (May 1991, Caid), Purpure, a dragon with the head and wings of an eagle couchant, wings addorsed, Or. A letter of permission to conflict has been received:

I, <name>, known in the Society as Huette Aliza von und zu Ährens und Mechthildberg, do hereby give <name>, known in the SCA as Avraham ben Zebulun, permission for his armory, "Purpure, a cockatrice erect Or" to look similar to, but not identical to, my armory, "Purpure, a dragon with the head and wings of an eagle couchant, wings addorsed, Or". I understand that this permission cannot be withdrawn once [name of submitter*]'s armory is registered.
Signed, dated 10 Sept 11

* The name was not filled in here, but as the name was entered earlier and the intent was clear, it was not thought that a corrected letter was needed.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

10: Bianca di Alessandro - New Name & New Device

Azure, a chalice and on a chief engrailed argent three roses azure barbed and seeded proper.

No major changes.
Language (Venetian) most important.
Culture (Venetian) most important.

All elements and the name pattern <given name> di <father's given name> are found in Arval Benicoeur and Talan Gwynek, "Fourteenth Century Venetian Personal Names" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/venice14/venice14given.html#table and http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/venice14/).


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

11: Bianca di Alessandro - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 2012, via the East

(Fieldless) On a chalice argent a rose azure, barbed and seeded proper.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

12: Bridgit Katherine Fitzgerald - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 1997, via the East

Vert, a feather between three cats sejant argent.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

13: Bronwyn of the Kings Field - New Name & New Device

Vert, an eagle and on a chief indented argent three escarbuncles azure.

No major changes.
Meaning (spelling: surname changed to single word is acceptable) most important.

The name was submitted as Bronwyn of the King's Field, but was changed in kingdom (see below).

Bronwyn was a previously SCA-compatible name, with no evidence of its use in period. However, in the acceptance of Bronwyn Schutelisworth (Mar. 2011, Caid), the following was noted:

While precedent says that Bronwyn is not a period name, commenters were able to find it as a grey period given name. Aryanhwy merch Catmael said: "In the IGI parish record extracts, there's a marriage entry for one Bronwyn N. (to James Howard), 26 JUL 1620 Northaw, Hertford, England." Therefore, this name is registerable (in English contexts) as a late period feminine name.

It is also found as a 16th century English surname.

of the Kings Field is a constructed locative byname. Commenters expected the construction of Kingsfeld or of Kingsfield (in some spelling), similar to <de Kingeswde> (1185), <de Kingeswode> (1275, 1330), <de Kyngesmulne> (1249), and <de la Kingesmille> (1275), found in R&W, s.nn. Kingswood and Kingsmill. In fact, a <Christ Kingsfield> is found as a resident of London in 1638. 'Inhabitants of London in 1638: St. Botolph without Aldersgate, London', The inhabitants of London in 1638 (1931), pp. 203-209 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=32075&strquery=Kingsfield).

It was found that the spacing of the name, the inclusion of the definite article, and the capitalization could be supported. Watts gives the following:

Kings sand, 'king's beach', 1602 (s.n. Kingsand)

Kinges delfe 'the king's channel', [1020x23]12th; Kinges delfe, [c. 1050]14th; Ki- Kyngesdelf, c. 1223-1390 (s.n. King's Delph)

Kinge moore, the Kyngmoore, 1589-90; the king(e)s moor(e), 1619-58 (s.n. Kingstown)

The Towne of the Abbey, Abbey Towne, 1649 (s.n. Abbeytown)

by the water, dated 1493. (s.n Allerton ~Bywater)

Kynges Wode, 1268 (s.n. Kingswood ~H&W)

And lastly, Ekwall, s.n. Bishops Castle, gave <Bissopes Castell>, 1269. Interestingly, an instance with the apostrophe was found. Mills' A Dictionary of London Place Names, s.n. King's Road has <The King's High Way from Chelsea to London> in 1620. However, it couldn't be determined if this was a modernized form and precedent states that apostrophes in possessives weren't used until after our period. As a result, the apostrophe has been removed in order to forward on the name.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

14: Buyan Delger - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 2007, via the East

Or, a sun per pale gules and sable within a Chinese dragon in annulo contourny sable.

This is a resubmission of Or, a sun gules within a Chinese dragon in annulo contourny sable, returned on the same letter:

This device is returned for conflict with the device of Elizabeth Amy Godwin, Or, a compass star gules and a gore sinister sable, with a single CD for changing the type of the secondary charge.

The submitted device does not conflict with the device of Etienne d'Argent, Or, a mullet of twelve points pierced gules, a chief triangular sable. The piercing of the mullet is equivalent to adding a tertiary charge (an Or roundel) and thus there is a CD for removing the tertiary charge. There is a second CD for changing the type of the secondary charge from a chief to a Chinese dragon.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

15: Christoff le Goth - New Name & New Device

Argent, two swords inverted in saltire sable and overall a sea-turtle tergiant, a bordure azure.

No major changes.

Christoff is a masculine given name (and as a feminine name!) found in the Netherlands and Switzerland in the IGI Parish Extracts:

Christoff Scholer Male Christening 15 May 1548 Basel, Basel, Switzerland Beat Scholer Barbara Hoffmeyer Batch: C739872

Christoff Wuest Female Christening 6 October 1560 Basel, Basel, Switzerland Christoff Wuest Batch: C739963

CHRISTOFF BAGANNIJ Male Marriage 24 May 1649 Nederlands Hervormde Kerk, Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands GEESIJEN WEELHOUW Batch: M903466

CHRISTOFF BOSSERTT Male Christening 19 January 1620 Katholische, Dussnang-Fischingen-Bichelsee-Niederhofen-Au, Thurgau, Switzerland HANS BOSSERTT ELSI BRAEITTENMOSERI Batch: J985291

CHRISTOFF GESLER Male Christening 11 February 1609 Katholisch, Basadingen, Thurgau, Switzerland DIONISIUS GESLER VERENA ERDT Batch: C990882

CHRISTOFF HAINTZLE Male Christening 18 October 1634 Evangelisch, Diessenhofen, Thurgau, Switzerland CHRISTOFF HAINTZLE BARBARA BRACKIN Batch: C983981

CHRISTOFF ROSCHACH Male Christening 2 October 1649 Evangelisch, Arbon, Thurgau, Switzerland SEBASTIAN ROSCHACH ELISABETH HAMMERERIN Batch: C983866

CHRISTOFF SEHN Male Christening 22 September 1643 Katholische, Dussnang-Fischingen-Bichelsee-Niederhofen-Au, Thurgau, Switzerland JOERG SEHN MARIA HERIN Batch: J985291

Christoff Sust or Suess Male Christening 29 July 1600 Basel, Basel, Switzerland Conrad Sust or Suess Maria Heusler Batch: C739961

Christoff Trucker Male Christening 14 April 1539 Basel, Basel, Switzerland Christoff Trucker Batch: C739961

Christoff Von Mechel Male Christening 1549 Basel, Basel, Switzerland Peter Von Mechel Batch: C739962

Christoff Waldkyrch Male Christening 7 February 1591 Basel, Basel, Switzerland Conrad Waldkyrch Batch: C739962

Christoff Waldtkyrch Male Christening 4 May 1596 Basel, Basel, Switzerland Conrad Waldtkyrch Batch: C739962

Christoff Weckerlin Male Christening 20 September 1590 Basel, Basel, Switzerland Thomas Weckerlin Batch: C739962

Christoff Wolacker Male Christening 31 March 1545 Basel, Basel, Switzerland Hans Wolacker Batch: C739963

le Goth is grandfathered to the submitter via the name of his father, Gaston le Goth, registered in Feb. 2008 via the East. Documentation was provided:

I, <name>, known in the SCA as Gaston Le Goth, attest that <name>, known in the SCA as Christoff Le Goth, is my legal son. <Signed with legal name>, date: 8/5/11

The original documentation for the father's name included the following: the online French dictionary at "Le Trésor de la Langue Française informatisé" (TLFi, http://atilf.atilf.fr/) identifies goth as a 16th century adjective derived from the Latin Gothi 'the Goths.' The entry dates two (apparently plural) spellings to period: <Gotz> (1521) and <Gothz> (1532). The term gothes is also a header in the MED. An example from the MED is "(a1387) Trev. Higd.(StJ-C H.1) 1.151: &Thorn;he firste Amazones were þe wyfes of Gothes [L Gothorum]." As such, it is thought that name was a plausible vernacular French or English form, and that there should be no problems with using the grandfather clause to register the name.

The submitter will allow intermediate changes.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

16: Crispin MacCoy - New Name & New Device

Argent, a cross fourchetty and on a chief sable an eye argent irised azure.

No major changes.
Sound (pronunciation) most important.

Crispin is a given name dated 1336 in R&W, s.n. Crispin. It is also found in the IGI parish extracts:

CRISPIN BARNES Male; Christening ;2 December 1563; Alcester, Warwick, England Batch: C035451

CRISPIN CRISPE Male; Christening; 25 October 1573; Ubbeston, Suffolk, England Batch: C133911

CRISPIN NORRIS OR HEWES Male; Marriage; 22 September 1577; Terling, Essex, England; Batch: M015051

CRISPIN PURGALL Male; Marriage; 27 June 1563; Heigham, Norfolk, England Batch: M133411

CRISPIN STANLEY Male; Marriage; 26 April 1592; Claxby Near Normanby, Lincoln, England; Batch: M027491

and so forth.

MacCoy is the expanded form of McCoy, found in the IGI Parish Extracts:

KATHERING MCCOY Female Marriage November 1613 Clackmannan, Clackmannan, Scotland DONALD MCCAPIE Batch: M114662

This is the defining instance for the cross fourchetty. Batonvert provided documentation for this cross, both to show that it is a period charge and to show that it is distinct from the cross moline. It is a continental charge found in the The Armorial de Gelre (c. 1370), Wapenboek Beyeren (c. 1405), Siebmacher's Wappenbuch of 1605, Codex Ingeram (c. 1450), and Anto Tirol's Armorial (c. 1540), among others.

The first and second images are from the Armorial de Gelre, c.1370, fol. 91 and 33. The first shows the arms of Van Damme (cross fourchetty), and the second has the arms of Pitingen (Pittange) (cross moline).

The third and fourth images are from Anto Tirol's Armorial, c.1540 (BSB Cod.Icon 310; online at http://dfg-viewer.de/show/?set%5Bmets%5D=http%3A%2F%2Fmdz10.bib-bvb.de%2F~db%2Fmets%2Fbsb00001649_me ts.xml), image 199 (fourchetty) and 208 (moline). These are the arms of von Eschenbach and Hofwart.

(As the images have been uploaded here, they are not provided in the packet.)

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=363/2011-12-02/21-51-10_gelre091.jpg
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=363/2011-12-02/21-51-10_gelre033.jpg
#3 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=363/2011-12-02/21-51-10_bsb00001649_00199.jpg
#4 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=363/2011-12-02/21-51-10_bsb00001649_00208.jpg


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

17: Crispin MacCoy - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 2012, via the East

(Fieldless) A cross fourchetty sable.

Batonvert provided documentation for this cross, both to show that it is a period charge and to show that it is distinct from the cross moline and cross fourchy. It is a continental charge found in the The Armorial de Gelre (c. 1370), Wapenboek Beyeren (c. 1405), Siebmacher's Wappenbuch of 1605, Codex Ingeram (c. 1450), and Anto Tirol's Armorial (c. 1540), among others.

In addition to the examples shown with his device, we also have further examples to show that the cross moline and cross fourchetty were distinct charges.

Images 1 and 2 are from Siebmacher's Wappenbuch of 1605, plate 110 (moline) and 225 (fourchetty), the arms of Hofwart and the civic arms of Kirchen.

Images 3 and 4 are from the Codex Ingeram (also known as the Codex Cotta), c.1450, fo.109 (moline) and 131 (fourchetty). These are the arms of Hofwart and Truchsess von Kullental.

(As the images have been uploaded here, they have not been provided in the packet.)

Commenters were not sure if this conflicts with Michel de Groot (November 2004, Ansteorra), Quarterly argent and gules, a cross fleury sable. There is a CD for fieldlessness, but the second CD needs to come from the type of cross. Two other possible conflicts were called: Allyn Samildanach (August of 1979, West), (Tinctureless) A cross of Samildanach, and Juan Santiago (December of 2003, West), (Fieldless) A cross of Santiago sable. There would be one CD for fieldlessness, but the second CD needs to come from the type of cross.

The above submission has images. To view them, see the URLs below:
#1 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=363/2011-12-02/22-05-36_Sieb110.jpg
#2 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=363/2011-12-02/22-05-36_Sieb225.jpg
#3 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=363/2011-12-02/22-05-36_Ingeram_109.jpg
#4 https://oscar.sca.org/showimage.php?I=363/2011-12-02/22-05-36_Ingeram_131.jpg


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

18: Doroga Voronin - New Name & New Device

Per pale purpure and vert, on a chief argent a raven displayed sable.

No major changes.

If the name must be changed, the submitter wishes to be contacted in advance. Both elements are from Wickenden, 3rd edn.

Doroga, s.n. Doroga, is a masculine given name dated to 1555.

Voronin, s.n. Vorona, is a patronymic form dated to c. 1495.

There is a step from period practice for the use of a bird displayed that is not an eagle.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

19: Drake MacGregor - New Name & New Device

Per fess gules and sable, on a roundel engrailed Or a dragon passant sable.

No major changes.
Spelling (wishes to stay with Drake as given name) most important.

Drake is a masculine given name found in the IGI parish extracts:

DRAKE DUNINGTON Male Christening 6 October 1625 Settrington, Yorkshire, England LAURENTII DUNINGTON Batch: P007771

DRAKE FRIER Male Christening 5 September 1591 Saint Dunstan, Canterbury, Kent, England Batch: P015151

DRAKE FRYAR Male Christening 21 April 1587 Saint Dunstan, Canterbury, Kent, England THO. FRYAR Batch: P015151

DRAKE RALEGH Male Christening 5 May 1608 Withycombe Raleigh, Devon, England GEORGE RALEGH Batch: C052171

MacGregor is a surname found in Black, s.n. MacGregor, dated 1603. A

<Gregor MacGregor vic Jeane> is found in "Names from Papers Relating to the Murder of the Laird of Calder" by Margaret Makafee (http://www.contrib.andrew.cmu.edu/~grm/calder.html). The names in this article have not been normalized. In addition, <Denesoun M'Gregor> appears in Black s.n. Denson dated to 1589.

The submitter allows intermediate changes.

The device is clear of the badge of Myron Duxippus Draco (September 1994, East), (Fieldless) On a bezant invected a wyvern displayed sable. There is a CD for comparing engrailed and invected, and another for changing the field. It was also noted that there is a CD between a roundel engrailed and a sun [Iain Monlach, LoAR 04/1991], so this is not a conflict with, for example, Stefan of Seawood (January 1973), Azure, upon a sun Or an eagle displayed sable.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

20: Elena Hylton - New Name & New Device

Azure, a chevron throughout between three needles bendwise sinister argent.

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound (Hill-ton) most important.

Elena is found in Elena is found in Talan Gwynek's "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/reaneyAG.html), s.n. Ellen, dated between 1187 and 1381.

Hylton is found in Karen Larsdatter, "Surnames in 15th Century York" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/york15/surnames-alphabetical.htm#H). In addition, Watts, s.n. Hilton gives the spelling <Hylton(e)> dated 1250-1495, and <Hil- Hylton'> dated 1256, and 1539-1664.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

21: Ermengarde Constant - New Name & New Device

Azure, a ferret rampant and in sinister chief a mullet of eight points argent.

No major changes.
Sound (submitter prefers changes to first name rather than last name if necessary) most important.

Ermengarde is a female given name dated to 12th to 13th century in Withycombe, s.n. Ermyntrude. Both the submitted spelling and the spelling <Ermengard'> are found in a Latin in 'Close Rolls, July 1250', Calendar of Close Rolls, Henry III: volume 6: 1247-1251 (1922), pp. 299-309 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=93172&strquery=Ermengarde).

Constant is an undated header form in R&W, with the spelling <le Costent'> dated 1194 and 1197, and <le Constent'> dated 1196. The submitted spelling is plausible, as R&W, s.n. Constantine, shows a likely common derivation from the Latin constans 'steadfast, resolute'; therefore, the submitted spelling (using 'a' rather than 'e') can be interpolated from the byname Constantin (1272). Constant is found as a given name in the MED (it seems to be short for Constantyn in this source):

a1450(a1338) Mannyng Chron.Pt.1 (Lamb 131) 6974: Syre Guncelyn aryued at Toteneys & sire Constant wyþ his harneys. þat herde þe Bretons alle aboute..To Constant come þen men ynowe.

a1450(a1338) Mannyng Chron.Pt.1 (Lamb 131) 7045: Constant was eldest & mere, & was a monk, a man of lere.

This could be seen as either a descriptive byname or an unmarked patronym, and shows that the submitted spelling is plausible.

Although the typed form states that the submitter allows intermediate changes, this may have been added by a bug in the submission database at Heralds Point. As the worksheet was missing from the packet, if could not be confirmed if the submitter allowed such changes or not. The name was not changed in kingdom, and if a change needs to be made, it's likely a minor one (e.g., changing the byname to Constent). As a result, it was not considered necessary to follow up with the submitter at this time.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

22: Fionn mac Con Dhuibh - New Name

No major changes.
Meaning (spelling of Fionn most important) most important.

Fionn is found in "Index of Names in Irish Annals" by Mari neyn Bryan (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/masculine/Finn.shtml), dated to 1209. It is the standard Early Modern Irish Gaelic nominative spelling of the name.

Con Dhuibh is the genitive form of Cú Dhubh, dated to 1201 in Early Modern Irish Gaelic (ibid., http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/masculine/CuDub.shtml). It is the standard Early Modern Irish Gaelic genitive spelling of the name.

The submitter allows intermediate changes.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

23: Gaius Claudius Valerianus - New Name & New Device

Per chevron inverted argent and vert, a stag's head caboshed sable and two lightning bolts in saltire Or.

No changes.

Gaius is a praenomen found in "Roman Names" (http://web.archive.org/web/20070622102631/http://www.personal.kent.edu/~bkharvey/roman/sources/names .htm). It is also found in Lindley Richard Dean, "A Study of the Cognomina of Soldiers in the Roman Legions" (http://books.google.com/books?id=MF0KAAAAIAA), p. 78.

Claudius is a nomen found in "Roman Names" (op. cit.). It is also found in Dean (op. cit.), p. 320.

Valerianus a cognomen found in Dean (op. cit.), p. 56.

There is a step from period practice for the use of lightning bolts not in conjunction with a thunderbolt.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

24: Gamli Tottr - Resub Device

OSCAR thinks the name is registered as Gamli tottr in February of 2008, via the East.

Sable semy of lozenges ployé argent, a man statant affronty argent kilted vert, maintaining in his hands two maces argent.

His prior device submission, Sable, a man statant affronty argent crined and bearded Or maintaining in each hand a flanged mace argent, was returned when his name was registered:

This device is returned for conflict with the device of Bari the Unfettered, Barry argent and gules, a naked man manacled on each wrist, lengths of broken chain pendant, and a length of broken chain at his feet, all proper. In a similar case, Laurel ruled:

[(Fieldless) A horned man vested of a loincloth maintaining in his dexter hand a sword inverted and in his sinister hand two spears inverted crossed at the butts argent] Conflict with Bari the Unfettered, Barry argent and gules, a naked man manacled on each wrist, lengths of broken chain pendant, and a length of broken chain at his feet, all proper. There's one CD for fieldlessness. There is no difference for the changes to the small held charges (including the chains in Bari's armory as small held charges), and no difference for adding the horns to the man's head. [William FitzHugh de Cambria, 12/02, R-Meridies]

The submitted device has a single CD for changes to the field, and thus must be returned for conflict with Bari's device.

The submitted device is also returned for conflict with the device for Gilrae of Moorburn, Azure, a fox-headed woman affronté statant, hands crossed at the waist, vested argent, with a single CD for changes to the field. No difference is granted for the position of the arms or for the type of head.

Commentary raised the question of presumption: the name means "Gamli [the] dwarf", and the emblazon showed a stocky human figure that resembles the usual RPG depiction of dwarves. However, to be presumptuous, this would have to be a clear association to a specific dwarf, the Tolkien character Gimli the Dwarf. The names are sufficiently different to not create allusion, and Gimli was noted for wielding axes, not maces. The charge here is drawn well within the limits for human figures, with no overt dwarfish characteristics (apart from a slight stockiness). We do not find any issue with presumption.

Correction (2012-Feb-12 16:02:35): The name should be Gamli tottr, as OSCAR points out.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

25: Godric FitzEdmond - New Name & New Device

Vert semy of arrows bendwise, a boar's head erased argent.

No major changes.

Godric is found in Withycombe, s.n. Godric, who says, "It is very common in England before the Norman Conquest" and "It seems to have died out in the course of the 13th and 14th century". <Godric(us)> is dated 1086.

Bardsley, s.n. Godrich gives <Robert fil. Godric>, dated 1273, putting this spelling closer in time to the submitter's desired spelling of the patronymic marker. A likely inflected form, <Godrici> is dated 1133-60 in the MED. There is also a 12th century saint, Godric of Finchale, who was the namesake of <Ralph Godric> in the 12th century [Dave Postles, "Resistant, Diffused, or Peripheral? Northern Personal Names to ca. 1250" (In: Studies on the Personal Name in Later Medieval England and Wales, ed. D. Postles, J.T. Roenthal, Kalamazoo, MI: Western Michigan University, 2006, pp. 280-4)]. This saint was the subject of the 1175 text Libellus de vita et miraculis S. Godrici, heremitae de Finchale by Reginald of Durham. Lastly, a <Godric Lefled> appears in 'Regesta 47: 1295', Calendar of Papal Registers Relating to Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 1: 1198-1304 (1893), pp. 558-563 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=96041&strquery=Godric).

Edmond is found in Withycombe, s.n. Edmond, who says, "Edmund was often written in the French form Edmond in the latter Middle Ages. It was less common after the 15th C, but continued to be used in certain families..."

Edmond is also found in the MED, with examples listed below:

(1419) *Will Bury 155: I be qweþe to þe sexteyn of seynt Edmond xx s. for tythys for3etyn.

(1467) Acc.Howard in RC 57 421: A peyre of close hosen for m. Edmond Gorge..and a peyr close hosen for lytelle Edmond.

(1430) Doc.in Flasdieck Origurk. 86: Nicholas Edmond hath lete certayn landis and tenementis in ffeltham to John Shepherd and Agnes, his wiff, for terme of her lyuys.

The pattern <Fitz+given name> is found in R&W, for example FitzSymond (s.n. FitzSimon), dated to 1387. Even if the surname could not be constructed in a time compatible with the given name, a number of late-period instances of FitzEdmond (in some spelling) were found at British History Online, with <John Fitz Edmond Gerrauld> dated to 1592 ["Calendar of the manuscripts of the Most Honourable the Marquess of Salisbury" (http://books.google.com/books?id=YJ8KAAAAYAAJ), p. 220] and <Piers Butler FitzEdmonde, of Roskrea> dated 1592 ['Cecil Papers: November 1592', Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 4: 1590-1594 (1892), pp. 242-249 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=111587&strquery=FitzEdmond)]. Since Godric is a saint's name, there should be no step from period practice for temporal disparity.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

26: Jahhāf ibn-'Awānah - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister Or and azure, a rose gules bendwise sinister slipped and leaved vert and a scimitar bendwise sinister proper.

No major changes.
Language (Retaining Jahhāf) most important.

The name was submitted as Jahhāf ibn-'Awānah, but was changed to remove the unnecessary hyphen.

Jahhāf is an ism found in "Arabic Names from the al-Andalus" by Juliana de Luna (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/alandalus/mascism.html).

'Awānah is found in The Fihrist of al-Nadim, a 10th century handbook on Arabic literature (Bayard Dodge, ed.; vol 2, p. 966). A copy of this source was not provided by Heralds Point, so this element could not be confirmed. The typed form used a normal apostrophe; however, the worksheet appears to use a hamza.

Although the patronym could not be confirmed from the source used at Heralds Point, it was also found in the name of an Arabic ruler of India, <Al-Hakim bin 'Awānah Al-Kalbi>, dated to 725-726 AD in Records of the Gupta Dynasty by Edward Thomas (Oxford University, 1876, http://books.google.com/books?id=X1YIAAAAQAAJ, p. 56).

ibn is the Arabic patronymic particle, found abbreviated ("b.") in Juliana's article (op. cit.,http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/alandalus/complete.html).

The submitter allows intermediate changes.

Correction (2012-Jan-19 17:01:04): The unncessary hyphen after ibn somehow crept back into the header.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

27: Katerina Zubovoloka - New Name & New Device

Argent, on flaunches azure two horses combattant argent.

No major changes.
Language (Russian) most important.
Culture (Russian) most important.

Katerina is a variant of the Russian feminine name Ekaterina, interpolated from <Koterina> (1588-9) and <Katryna> (1591), both found in Wickenden, 3rd edn. Wickenden s.n. Ekaterina also has <Katerinka> dated to 1538-9.

Zubovoloka is a feminized form of the byname Zubovolok. The masculine form is dated 1569 (ibid.). Feminization rules are discussed in the same source.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

28: Kayle of the White Horse - New Name & New Device

Vert, a bend sinister between a ferret and a horse combattant argent.

Kayle is a male given name found in "Names Found in Anglicized Irish Documents" by Mari neyn Bryan, s.n. Callogh dated to 1602 (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/masculine.shtml).

of the White Horse is a Lingua Anglica translation of the Irish Gaelic in Eich Gil '[of] the White Horse', found in Mari neyn Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" dated 1014-1118 (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/inEichGil.shtml).

The byname can also be considered as an English inn-sign name, following the pattern <color + animals>, found in "English Sign Names" by Mari ingen Briain (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/inn/#ColorAnimal). In addition, Bardsley, s.n. Whitehorse has <Whithors> (t. Edw. I), <Whytehors> (1285), <Whytehorse> (1312), and <Whithors> (1358).

The combination of Anglicized Irish and Gaelic is registerable with a step from period practice, but if the byname is considered as an English name, it can combined with the Anglicized Irish given name without a penalty.

The submitter would like "Kayle" to be preserved if the name must be changed.

One commenter questioned whether the device conflicts with Wilhelm der Krieger (November 1993, An Tir), Vert, a bend sinister between two foxes heads erased argent. There is a CD for the change in type of secondary charge, but whether the change in orientation of half of the charge group is enough for a second CD was not discussed.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

29: Matsumoto Kiku - New Name

No major changes.
Language (Japan) most important.
Culture (Japan) most important.

Both elements are from NCMJ (revised edn.).

Matsumoto is a surname dated to 1468 (p. 322).

Kiku is a feminine given name dating to 1572 (p. 378).


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

30: Meara of Havre de Glace - New Name Change & New Device

OSCAR NOTE: 'Old Item' should contain the former primary name. The form that is there is not a registered name.

Per pale azure and argent, a rose gules and a chief Or.

Old Item: Máire inghean uí Mheardha, to be released.
Spelling (Meara) most important.

Her current name was registered Feb. 2009 via the East.

Meara is found in Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada, "Names Found in Anglicized Irish Documents" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/Feminine.shtml), dated 1602. The instance of Meara, <Giles ny Meara>, in the cited article was thought to show that this is a masculine given name. As the submitter gave no preference as to gender, the name is being forwarded without changes.

of Havre de Glace is a locative byname based on Havre de Glace, Barony of, a branch name registered Oct. 2002 (East).


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

31: Melina al-Andalusiyya - New Name Change

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in March of 2012, via the East.

Old Item: Melina Delabarge, to be retained as an alternate name.
Submitter desires a feminine name.
No changes.

Her current name, Melina Delabarge, was registered 04/2010 via the East.

Melina occurs once in Juliana de Luna, "A Listing of All Women's Given Names From the Condado Section of the Florence Caslato of 1427" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/condado/womens/pc.html). It is also grandfathered to the submitter.

al-Andalusiyya is a documented feminine locative byname, found in Juliana de Luna, "Andalusian Names: Arabs in Spain" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/andalusia.html#Locative).

The combination of Italian and Arabic is a step from period practice [Amat al-Shakoor di Riccardo, 10/2004].


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

32: Milka Vydrin - New Name

No major changes.
Language (Unspecified) most important.
Culture (Unspecified) most important.
Meaning (last name means 'otter', wants a short given name) most important.

Milka is found in Wickenden (2000), on p. 213, where it is stated to be a diminutive of Mil (p.212). Milka is dated 1088. Milka is also found in Alexander Beider, A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names (Bergenfeld, NJ: Avotaynu, 2001), s.n. Milke. It is stated to be a Biblical name, found in Genesis 11:29 (the wife of Abraham's brother Nachor), and is also used by Czech Christians and, uncommonly, by German Jews. It is stated to be derived from the root mil- 'nice', and the diminutive suffix -ka. The submitted spelling is found in 1334 (Czech), and in 1364 and 1487 (Germany).

Vydrin is derived from the masculine name Vydra, meaning 'otter'. (ibid., p. 405). An example is <Ivanko Vydrin>, 881. The byname is also found in "Zoological Bynames in Medieval Russia" by Paul Wickenden of Thanet (http://www.goldschp.net/archive/zoonames.html#mammals), dated to 1564.

The submitter allows intermediate changes.

Although the submitter's permanent address is in the West Kingdom, the submitter prefers to submit via the East, where she is attending school.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

33: Moire MacGraha - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in April of 2010, via the East

Vert, three quavers in bend sinister argent.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

34: Muirenn ingen Dúnadaig - New Name & New Device

Argent, three fox's masks and a chief indented vert.

Language (9th Century Irish) most important.
Culture (9th Century Irish) most important.

All elements are from (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/).

Muirenn is a feminine given name dating to 643-979, with the submitted spelling being the standard Old Irish Gaelic and Middle Irish Gaelic form of the name, found in "Index of Names in Irish Annals" by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/feminine/muirenn.shtml).

ingen is the pre-1200 form of 'daughter', per Sharon Krossa, "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names" (http://medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/#simplepatronymicbyname and http://medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/#spelling).

Dúnadaig is the standard Old Irish Gaelic genitive form of Dúnadach, dated to 873, also found in "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Dunadach.shtml). In patronymic bynames, the father's name does not need to be lenited if it starts with "D".

If this name is deemed to be a conflict with Muirenn ingen Donndubáin (Feb. 2003, Caid), the submitter authorizes the change to Muirenn Ruad ingen Dúnadaig.

Ruaid 'red' is a descriptive byname dated to 1039 in "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Ruadh.shtml). The spelling Ruad is the standard Middle Irish Gaelic (c900-c1200) nominative form, and does not need to be lenited.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

35: Oguri Tatsuko - New Name

No major changes.
Language (Japanese) most important.
Culture (Japan) most important.

Both elements are from NCMJ (revised edn.).

Oguri is a historical surname dating to 1572 (p. 324).

Tatsuko is a historical feminine given name date to 1572 (p. 385).


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

36: Ose Silverhair - New Name & New Device

Quarterly argent and gules, a wool comb bendwise tines up sable.

Ose is interpolated from the following: Lind, Norsk-Isländska Dapnamn, pp. 60-62, s.n. Asa, includes the spellings <Ase> (1384); <Âsa>, <Ôsa>, <Osa>, and <Aasu> (1329); <Aasa> (1495 and 1484); and <Oosa> (1394).

Silverhair is intended as the lingua anglica form of a byname, constructed using the pattern of names <gullbrá> 'golden-brow' and <svartkollr> 'black-pate', both found in Geirr Bassi (pp. 22 and 28, respectively).

Geirr Bassi includes a number of nicknames comprised of [color] + [hair/facial hair]: gullskeggr 'gold-beard', inn granrauði 'red-beard', grabárðr 'gray-beard', inn hárfagri 'fair-hair', bláskegg 'black-beard', refskegg 'fox-beard', hærukollr 'hoary-head', hæulangr 'one with long white hair', etc. In addition, Geirr Bassi also includes the nickname sílfri 'silver'. Cleasby & Vigfusson page b0205, entry 17 includes the adjective gló-bjartr, adj. light blond, of hair, and s.n. SILFR (p. 528) has the following: "Fms. vi. 243. II. as a nickname, silfri, silfra, Vd., Vápn. 12; whence Silfra-staðir, Silfr-toppr (or Silfrin-toppr), 'Silver-forelock,' Silver-top, the name of a mythical horse, Gm." Secondly, the entry for HADDR (ibid., p. 60227, entry 7), states the following:

HADDR, m. [Goth. hazds; A. S. prob. heard, v. infra], hair, only in poetry a lady's hair; haddr Sifjar, the gold-hair of the goddess Sif., Edda 69, 70; hár heitir lá, haddr þat er konur hafa, 109; bleikja hadda, to bleach, dress the hair, 75, Korm. 26, Gkv. 1. 15; bleikir haddar, Fas. i. 478; grass is called haddr jarðar, Bm.; hadds höll is the head, Eb. (in a verse). haddaðr, part. hairy, Lat. crinitus; barr-h., barley-haired, an epithet of the earth; bjart-h., bright-haired; bleik-h., blond-haired; hvít-h., white-haired, Lex. Poët. hadd-bjartr, adj. bright-haired, blond, Hornklofi. hadd-blik, n. bleaching the hair, Edda 77.

As such, it was thought that <silfr-haddr> was a reasonable constructed Old Norse name, for which Silverhair would be the lingua anglica form.

The worksheet indicated that the submitter wants a Danish name; however, this was not stated on the typed form. The submitter will allow the attested spelling Osa if necessary. No other changes are authorized.

The wool comb appears to be a charge that must be in trian aspect, as seen in the PicDic.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

37: Ose Silverhair - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 2012, via the East

(Fieldless) A wool comb bendwise tines up sable.

The wool comb appears to be a charge that must be in trian aspect, as seen in the PicDic.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

38: Phebee Fayrhehe - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in February of 2008, via the East

Bendy argent and sable, a dog sejant guardant and on a chief gules three escarbuncles argent.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

39: Raina Iskremorova - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in December of 2004, via the East

Argent, on a phoenix facing sinister, incensed azure, issuant from flames proper issuant from base, a sun Or and in chief seven roundels gules.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

40: Raina Iskremorova - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in December of 2004, via the East

(Fieldless) A pair of testicles Or.

The testicle is a period charge, used in the arms of Bartolomeo Colleoni (c. 1395/1400-1475) and has previously been registered as a heart inverted. Whether this badge runs afoul of RfS IX.1, Vulgar Armory, is up for Wreath to decide.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

41: Raina Iskremorova - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in December of 2004, via the East

Per fess purpure and argent, three sets of testicles counterchanged.

The testicle is a period charge, used in the arms of Bartolomeo Colleoni (c. 1395/1400-1475) and has previously been registered as a heart inverted. Whether this badge runs afoul of RfS IX.1, Vulgar Armory, is up for Wreath to decide.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

42: Sabina Iulia Metella - New Name & New Device

Argent, a pomegranate slipped and leaved vert seeded gules within a bordure purpure estencelly argent.

No major changes.
Sound (Sabina) most important.

Sabina is the name of a Roman saint, martyred c. 126, who was the widow of Valentinus and daughter of Herod Metallarius (Catholic Encyclopedia, http://www.newdvent.org/cathen/13290a.htm).

Iulia is the expected feminine form of Iulius, a nomen found in Nova Roma, "Roman Names" (http://novaroma.org/via_romana/names2.html). Lindley Richard Dean, A study of the cognomina of soldiers in the Roman legion ((http://books.google.com/books?id=MF0KAAAAIAAJ, p. 88) gives further evidence of Iulius as a nomen. Julia is found as a female name in "Roman Names".

Metella is the expected feminine form of Metellus, a cognomen found in "Roman Names". Metellus is also mentioned in Plutarch's Lives (e.g., http://books.google.com/books?id=JiUJAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA366).

According to Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "A Simple Guide to Classical Roman Naming Practices" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/other/sg-roman.html), women didn't use praenomina with the classical naming system, but "something more like true given names" were used by the imperial period. As such, it is considered that this name would be plausibe at that later time.

Feminization of names by changing the last letter to -a is discussed briefly in "Roman Names".


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

43: Samuel Spede Bumpus - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Sound ("Speed Bump") most important.

Samuel is dated to 1604-1616 in "English Given Names from 16th Century and Early 17th Century Marriage Records" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/parishes/parishes.html).

Spede is dated to 1277 in R&W s.n. Speed. Bardsley, s.n. Speed dates <John Speede> to 1555-6. The submitted spelling is also found in the IGI Parish Extracts:

ANNE SPEDE Female Christening 9 May 1624 Shelton, Nottingham, England JEROME SPEDE Batch: P011321

EDWARD SPEDE Male Marriage 10 October 1595 East Horndon, Essex, England Batch: M041961

EDWARD SPEDE Male Christening 9 July 1609 Saint Mary, Aylesbury, Buckingham, England HENRY SPEDE Batch: C073641

ELIZABETH SPEDE Female Christening 29 March 1573 Baldock, Hertford, England SPEDE Batch: C072101

ELIZABETH SPEDE Female Christening 4 April 1596 Saint Mary, Aylesbury, Buckingham, England HENRY SPEDE Batch: C073641

GEORGE SPEDE Male Christening January 1575 Baldock, Hertford, England ROBT. SPEDE Batch: C072101

JOANNES SPEDE Male Christening 31 August 1544 Saint John The Baptist, Croydon, Surrey, England Batch: C098652

JOHANE SPEDE Female Christening 1564 Layston, Hertford, England RICHARD SPEDE Batch: C072581

...and so forth.

Bumpus is an undated header form in R&W, that redirects to s.n. Bompas. <Anne Bompase> found in 1616, with the submitted spelling not being listed until 1670. The submitter would prefer the submitted form, or the modern variant, Bump. However, the submitted spelling is found in the IGI Parish Extracts:

ELLEN BUMPUS Female Christening 2 June 1648 Tingewick, Buckingham, England WILLIAM BUMPUS Batch: C148591

SUSANNA BUMPUS Female Marriage 6 June 1647 Saint Matthew Friday Street, London, London, England RICHARD HAVISON Batch: M001501

Although some commenters thought that this name was obtrusively modern, joke names in and of themselves are not necessarily unregisterable:

The fact that this is a "joke name" is not, in and of itself, a problem. The College has registered a number of names, perfectly period in formation, that embodied humor: Drew Steele, Miles Long, and John of Somme Whyre spring to mind as examples. They may elicit chuckles (or groans) from the listener, but no more. Intrusively modern names grab the listener by the scruff of the neck and haul him, will he or nill he, back into the 20th Century. A name that, by its very presence, destroys any medieval ambience is not a name we should register. [Porsche Audi, August, 1992, pg. 28]

The name is being forwarded to the College of Arms for further discussion of this issue.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

44: Sarra Daykin - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in January of 2011, via the East

Gules, on a sun between six roses slipped and leaved in annulo Or two lions combattant gules.

This is a resubmission of Gules, on a sun between six roses slipped and leaved in annulo Or, a lion contourny gules, returned Jan. 2011 via the East:

This device is returned for conflict with the badge of the Royal University of Ithra, Gules, on a sun Or eclipsed gules, an Arabian lamp flammant Or. Eclipsing of suns, in the SCA, is considered a tertiary charge. There is a single CD for the addition of the secondary charge group, but no difference is granted for the change of only the type of the single charge on the sun, nor do we grant difference for quaternary charges (the lamp).

While the Cover Letter to the June 2004 LoAR limited the case in which conflicts will be called under unregisterable alternate blazons, this device does conflict because it is the old device with the unregisterable alternate blazon.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

45: Scandlán mac Tigernáin - New Name & New Device

Per pale azure and sable, a wolf's head couped close ululant contourney and in chief three towers argent.

No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for 9-10th century Irish Gaelic.

All elements are found in and all elements are in Middle Irish Gaelic.

Scandlán is a Middle Irish Gaelic masculine name dated to 882, 913, and 974, found in Mari Elsbeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Scandlan.shtml).

Tigernáin is the genitive form of Tigernan, which is dated to 980 (ibid., http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Tigernan.shtml). It is also Middle Irish Gaelic.

mac is the patronymic particle meaning 'son'. The name is constructed according to Sharon Krossa, "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names" (http://medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/#simplepatronymicbyname).

Correction (2012-Feb-12 18:02:43): The submitter allows intermediate changes.

There is a step from period practice for the use of a wolf ululant.

The device was redrawn with the submitter's permission in order to correct the orientation of the wolf's head.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

46: Scarlactus Salvanus de Solario - New Name & New Device

Or, a standing balance between three fleurs-de-lys purpure.

No major changes.

Scarlactus and Solvanus are both masculine given names in "Masculine Names from 13th Century Pisa" by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/pisa/pisa.html).

de Solario is a byname found in the same article.

We don't have evidence of double given names in Italy during the 13th century [Angelo d'Amico, 02/2003 LoAR, A-West], but they are found later. Since the submitter did not request authenticity for the earlier time period, the name is being forwarded unchanged.

The client wants to keep Scarlactus and de Solario. Salvanus can be changed as needed. The submitter allows intermediate changes.

Correction (2012-Feb-12 18:02:17): The attested spelling of the second given name is Salvanus.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

47: Shyvan Floyd - New Name & New Device

Argent, a dragonfly bendwise sinister purpure winged sable.

Sound most important.

Shyvan is the Anglicized Irish form of Siobhan, dated 1600-01 in Mari ingen Brian meic Donnchada, "Names Found in Anglicized Irish Documents"(http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/Feminine.shtml).

Floyd is an English surname found in Bardsley, s.n. Floyd, dated 1510 and 1570.

Anglicized Irish and English are registerable without a step from period practice.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

48: Spvrivs Ivlivs Flavvs - New Name & New Device

Gyronny of sixteen Or and gules, and on a chief sable a bee Or.

No major changes.
Language (Roman) most important.
Culture (Roman) most important.

Spurius is a praenomen, Iulius is a nomen, and Flavus is a cognomen (and Flavius a nomen) in "Roman Name" by Nova Roma (http://novaroma.org/nr/Roman_name).

The submitter would prefer to use Flavius over Flavus for the cognomen, if it can be justified.

The submitter also wants all of the u's to be replaced with v's. Examples of this convention are found in the photo of a 1st century CE urn at http://www.vroma.org/images/raia_images/urn2b.jpg (description at http://www.vroma.org/images/raia_images/index3.html), which states, "DIS MANIBVS C IVLIVS HERMES VIX[IT] ANN[IS] XXXIIII M[ENSIBUS]V DIEB[US] XIIII C IVLIVS ANDRONICVS CONLIBERTVS FEC[IT] BENE MERENTI DE SE".


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

49: Svanhildr Karlsdottir - New Device Change

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in November of 1990, via the East

Per fess embattled azure and gules, a demi-swan rising from the line of the division, wings displayed, and a cross formy argent.

Old Item: Per chevron sable and gules, a chevron ermine cotised between two swans naiant respectant wings elevated and addorsed and a vol argent, to be released.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

50: Thomas MacCay of Castle Campbell - New Name & New Device

Per chevron sable and vert, on a chevron between a wolf's head erased ululant contourny and a raven's head erased argent, a pair of compasses azure.

No major changes.
Language (Scots) most important.
Culture (Scots) most important.

The name was submitted as Thomas MacCay of Castle Campbell, but was changed to expand the scribal abbreviation in the surname.

Thomas is dated 1324-1648 in "Index of Scots names found in Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/scots/dost/thomas.html).

McCay is found in Black, s.n. MacKay in Black. <Gilnew McCay> was a tenant of Arskynnel Beg in Kintyre, 1506. <McCay> is dated 1606 in "Index of Scots names found in Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/scots/dost/mackay.html).

Castle Campbell, formerly Castle Gloume, is a header in Johnston. The name was changed to this form in 1489, named after its owner, the first Duke of Argyll. The act of parliament that changed the name of the castle reads as follows:

Oure souerane lord, of his riale autorite, at the desire and supplicacioune of his cousing and traist consalour Coline, erle of Ergile, lord Campbele and Lorne, his chancellare, has chengeit the name of the castell and place quhilk wes callit the Glovme pertenyng to his said cousing, and in this his present parliament makis mutacioune and chengeing of the said name and ordinis the sammyn castell to be callit in tyme tocum Campbele [The Records of the Parliaments of Scotland to 1707, K.M. Brown et al eds (St Andrews, 2007-2011), 1490/2/28. (http://www.rps.ac.uk/mss/1490/2/28)].

Examples of castles named after the surname or clan name of the owners are found in Timothy Pont's 16th century maps of Scotland, e.g., <Dowglas Castel>, <Sempil Castel> (http://maps.nls.uk/pont/texts/transcripts/ponttext153v-154r.html and http://maps.nls.uk/pont/texts/transcripts/ponttext153v-154r.html). The same maps also give examples of <Castel(l) + place name>: <Castell Nagair> ((http://maps.nls.uk/pont/texts/transcripts/ponttext86v-87r.html) and <Castell Megarie> (http://maps.nls.uk/pont/texts/transcripts/ponttext86v-87r.html).

The spelling <Campbell> is found in Scots, dated 1492-1650 in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Index of Scots names found in Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/scots/dost/campbell.html), and the spelling <castle> is found in 1640 in the RPS:

..as may appeir by the garisone, armes and ammunitione in the castell of Edinburghe and by materiellis furnished thame be the toune, and one the other pairt scandalous relationis of our parliamentarie proceedingis have beene mad at the counsall table of England, and the benefiet of heiring befoir the counsall denyit to our commissioneris, great violence and outrage done by the castle of Edinburghe, not onlie against men and buildingis bot weomen and childrine, our shipis and goodis takine at sea, and the owneris stryped naked and barbarouslie usit, a commissione givine for subdeweing and destroying of this whole kingdome, all thingis devysed and done that may make a rupture and irreconcilable warre betuixt the tuo kingdomes... [The Records of the Parliaments of Scotland to 1707, K.M. Brown et al eds (St Andrews, 2007-2011), 1640/6/6; http://www.rps.ac.uk/mss/1640/6/6].

As such, the spelling of the locative is plausible in period Scots.

Correction (2012-Feb-12 19:02:58): The originally submitted name was Thomas McCay of Castle Campbell. A typo crept in...


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

51: Tristan le Goth - New Name

No major changes.

Tristan is found in Dauzat as a header form, where it is described as an ancient baptismal name that became fashionable through the Breton romances (frequent at end of 13th Century, Paris Rôles de taille). It is also the name of multiple men in Jean Froissart's Chroniques (written 1373-1400), such as <Tristan de la Gaille>, found in M.S. Berlin Rehdiger 3, fol. 120v (http://www.hrionline.ac.uk/onlinefroissart/browsey.jsp?AbsDiv=ms.f.transc.Bre-3&AbsPb=Bre-3_120v). The French transcriptions at the Online Froissart do not appear to have been normalized (the English translations are normalized).

le Goth is grandfathered to the submitter via the name of his father, Gaston le Goth, registered Feb. 2008 via the East. Documentation of the relationship has been provided:

I, <name>, known in the SCA as Gaston Le Goth, attest that <name>, known in the SCA as Tristan Le Goth, is my legal son. <Signed with legal name>, date: 8/5/11

The original documentation for the father's name included the following: the online French dictionary at "Le Trésor de la Langue Française informatisé" (TLFi, http://atilf.atilf.fr/) identifies goth as a 16th century adjective derived from the Latin Gothi 'the Goths.' The entry dates two (apparently plural) spellings to period: <Gotz> (1521) and <Gothz> (1532). The term gothes is also a header in the MED. An example from the MED is "(a1387) Trev. Higd.(StJ-C H.1) 1.151: &Thorn;he firste Amazones were þe wyfes of Gothes [L Gothorum]." As such, it is thought that name was a plausible vernacular French or English form, and that there should be no problems with using the grandfather clause to register the name.

The submitter will accept intermediate changes.


This item was on the 03-2012 LoAR

52: Ysabella de Conventre - New Name & New Device

Per fess sable and vert, an increscent and a pawprint argent.

Language (Scottish, 14th century) most important.
Culture (Scottish, 14th century) most important.

Ysabella is found in Talan Gwynek, "A list of feminine personal names found in Scottish Records; part two: pre-1400 Names", s.n. Isabel. The submitted spelling is dated to 1365.

de Conventre is found in Black, s.n. Coventry, which lists a <Thomas de Conventre>, canon of Caithness, 1348.

There is a step from period practice for the use of a pawprint.


Standard Bibliography:



[Bardsley] Bardsley, Charles. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames.

[Black] Black, George F. The Surnames of Scotland.

[Cleasby and Vigfusson] Cleasby, Richard, and Gudbrand Vigfusson, An Icelandic-English Dictionary.

[Dauzat] Dauzat, Albert. Dictionnaire Etymologique des Noms de Famille et des Prenoms de France.

[Ekwall] Ekwall, Eilert. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place-names.

[Geirr Bassi] Geirr Bassi Haraldsson. The Old Norse Name.

[Johnston] Johnston, James R. Place-Names of Scotland.



[LGPN] Lexicon of Greek Personal Names (Vol 1-4).

[Liddell & Scott] Liddell, H.G. and Robert Scott. A Greek-English Lexicon.

[Lind] Lind, E. H. Norsk-Isländska Dopnamn ock Fingerade Namn från Medeltiden.

[Morlet I] Morlet, Marie-Therese. Les Noms de Personne sur le Territoire de l'Ancienne Gaule du VI au XII Si.

[Wickenden] Paul Wickenden of Thanet, A Dictionary of Period Russian Names.

[R&W] Reaney, P.H. and R. M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames.

[NCMJ] Solveig Throndardottir. Name Construction in Mediaeval Japan.

[Withycombe] Withycombe, E.G. Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names.


OSCAR counts 36 New Names, 2 New Name Changes, 1 New Alternate Name, 32 New Devices, 1 New Device Change and 5 New Badges. These 77 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $231 for them. OSCAR counts 3 Resub Devices. These 3 items are not chargeable. There are a total of 80 items submitted on this letter.

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