SCA Laurel Sovereign of Arms
Online System for Commentary and Response

Site News
LoIs
KLoIs
SENA
Prec
AH
Track
Sub Status

Name:

Password:

Create Account

MAIL ME my password.



SEARCH:

[ Site News | LoIs | KLoIs | SENA | Prec | AH | Track | Sub Status ]

East LoI dated 2011-05-21

Unto SCA College of Arms, and all others who do receive this letter, greetings from Asa in Svarta, Blue Tyger Herald.



The Eastern College herewith submits for approval and registration the following items, with our thanks

This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

1: Aine Campbell - New Name & New Device

Or, on a chevron inverted sable three lit candles palewise Or, in chief a reremouse sable

Submitter desires a feminine name.

Áine is an Early Modern Irish Gaelic name found in Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchade, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Aine.shtml), in years 1316-1468. The submitter prefers the name without the accent; accents can be omitted from Gaelic names as long as it is done consistently.

Campbell is found in Black, s.n. Campbell. Examples are <Duncan Campbell dominus de Gaunan>, a charter witness in 1390, and <Nigellus filius Colini Campbell>, dated 1282. The byname is also found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Index of Scots names found in Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/scots/dost/campbell.html), dated 1492-1572 and later.

The combination of Gaelic and Scots is a step from period practice [Deirdre Thomson, 10/2010, Middle].


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

2: Alesia de Maris of Ravenstar - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 1988, via the East

Per pale sable and Or, two ravens respectant counterchanged

Her name was registered 08/1988 via the East. Her device, Argent, a raven close, on a chief sable three mullets Or, was registered 12/1987 via the East


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

3: Alessandra Brucioli - New Name & New Device

Azure, on a bend argent between two estoiles Or three bay leaves vert

Sound most important.

Alessandra is also found in Juliana de Luna, "Names from Sixteenth Century Venice" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/16thcvenice.html), where it is recorded as a feminine given name prior to 1600.

Brucioli is a surname found 62 times in David Herlihy, R. Burr Litchfield, Anthony Molho, and Roberto Barducci, editors, "Florentine Renaissance Resources: Online Tratte of Office Holders 1282-1532" (http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/tratte/doc/TLSURNAM1.html).

Commenters noted that the 'c' in the byname is pronounced /ch/, as in the word church, not in the manner the submitter expects.

The leaves on the original form blurred the line between bendwise and palewise. The device was redrawn with the submitter's permission.


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

4: Beatrice de Warynton - New Badge

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 2010, via the East

(Fieldless) A bee bendwise argent

Her name was registered 08/2010 via the East. A device, Argent, a peacock and on a chief embattled azure three crescents argent, was registered 11/2010 via the East.


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

5: Birna Svensdotter - New Name & New Device

Gules, a bear rampant on a chief argent three wooden staves bendwise sinister proper

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (Viking) most important.
Culture (Viking) most important.
Meaning ('she-bear') most important.

Birna is a feminine given name found in the Viking Answer Lady, "Old Norse Names" (http://www.vikinganswerlady.com/ONWomensNames.shtml), which states that it may be identical with the Old Icelandic birna, 'she-bear', citing GB pp. 8; CV pp. 63 s.v. birna.

Svensdotter is a patronym formed from the Swedish given name Sven (ibid., http://www.vikinganswerlady.com/ONMensNames.shtml, under the entry Sveinn):

Found both as a personal name and as a by-name in Old Danish as Swen, in Old Swedish as Sven, and in OW.Norse as Sveinn. From the OW.Norse noun sveinn "young man." Forms of this name were common in Norway from the 10th century on. This was a very popular name and is recorded in a large number of runic inscriptions, including the nominative case forms n=sa=u=kain=fa, saen, sai(n), san, sen, sin (3 instances), siuta, suaen, suain (25 instances), sua(in)n, su[ai]n, [su]ain, [suain] (8 instances), sua[in]..., suan, suein (9 instances), (s)(u)ein, [suein], suen (4 instances), [suen], suin (23 instances), [suin] (5 instances), the genitive case forms suais, suins (3 instances), suin(s), [suins], uis and the accusative case forms sin, suain (13 instances) su[ain], [suain] (4 instances), suein (4 instances), [su]ein, suen (3 instances), [suen], suil, suin (14 instances), [suin] (4 instances), (s)u(in)..., [sun]. Diminuitive forms of this name include Sveinungr and Sveinki.

The entry cites GB p. 15 s.n. Sveinn; FJ pp. 276-282, 351 s.n. Sveinn, Svein-; CV p. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV p. 608 s.v. sveinn; NR s.n. Svæinn.

The patronym is formed from the genitive form of the father's given name + -dotter. Examples of this pattern are <Cecilia Johans dotter> (1311) and <Cecilia Knutzdotter> (1336), both found in SMP, s.n. Cecilia (http://www.sofi.se/5187).

As documented, this name appears to consist of an Old Norse given name and a Swedish byname. There is a step from period practice for the language combination [Sighfridh hauknefr, 03/2009].

The device was printed on a color printer. At the time it was scanned, it was still red, albeit a little on the light side.


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

6: Charis Olynthia - Resub Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in August of 2010, via the East

Gules, an ounce's head cabossed Or charged with the astrological symbol for Leo sable, a bordure argent semy of suns gules

Her name was registered 08/2010, via the East. This is a redraw of her previous submission, Gules, an ounce's head cabossed Or charged with the astrological symbol for Leo sable, a bordure argent semy of suns gules, which was returned at the same time:

The astrological symbol on the primary charge is a single pen-width wide, which is narrower than the prominent markings around the beast's eye, and was seen by most commenters as an artistic detail. There is precedent for this:

This device is returned for violating section VII.7.a of the Rules for Submissions, which says that "Elements must be recognizable solely from their appearance." The tertiary rapier was initially interpreted by far too many commenters as internal detailing, since it is so thin. [Basilius Fuchs, June 2010, R-An Tir]

Since it is indistinguishable from an artistic detail, we will not grant difference for it. Therefore, this device conflicts with the device of Patricia de Lyon, Gules, a lion's head cabossed and a bordure argent. There is a single CD for the addition of the tertiary suns.

The documentation of the tertiary charge from the prior attempt is below:

The submission includes a copy of a 16th century woodcut showing the astrological signs and their symbols (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Zodiac_woodcut.png), including that of Leo. Per precedent, astrological symbols are registerable without a step from period practice (Mealla Caimbeul, 05/2009 A-Caid).

For completeness, an instance of the symbol in a period manuscript was found (rather than relying on a composite image in Wiki). It appears in the text of Albumasar, Flores Astrologiae, c. 1500 edition (transl. Johannes <Hispanus>), found at http://daten.digitale-sammlungen.de/bsb00045363/image_33.


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

7: Conall an Doire - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for 15th century.
Language (Irish/Gaelic) most important.
Culture (Irish/Gaelic) most important.

Conall is a masculine given name found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Conall.shtml) as the name of 45 men, years 565-1599. The submitted spelling is the standard Old Irish, Middle Irish, and Early Modern Irish Gaelic nominative form.

an Doire is a masculine descriptive byname meaning '[of] the Oak-grove/Oak-wood' (ibid., http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/anDoire.shtml). It is the standard Early Modern Irish Gaelic genitive form of the name, and was used in the names of three men, years 1249-1588.

The name pattern <given name> + <descriptive byname> is found in the same article (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/index.shtml).

Both elements in this name were found in 15th century entries in the annals, so this name could meet the authenticity request. It must be stated, however, that the annals were compiled in the 17th century from earlier material, so the spellings are sometimes from the later time instead of the years in the entries.


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

8: Conall mac Taichlich - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in June of 2011, via the East

Per bend embattled argent and vert, two talbots passant contourny counterchanged

His name is on the East's March 24, 2011 External Letter of Intent.


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

9: Cristine Spinster - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister argent and azure, a ram's head couped contourny and a spinning wheel reversed counterchanged

Cristine is found in Talan Gwynek, "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/reaneyAG.html), s.n. Christina, dated 1277-78 to 1312.

Spinster is intended as an occupational byname for a woman who spins wool. It is found in the OED, dated 1362 in the submitted spelling (s.n. spinster, definition 1). In addition, it is found as a byname in the Middle English Dictionary:

spinnestre (n.) - (1367) Cart.St.John in OHS 69 155:Cecilia Spinster.

spinnestre (n.) - (1380) in Thuresson ME Occup.Terms 204: Katerina Spynnestere, Anna Spinster.


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

10: Dabíd Docair - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Gaelic) most important.
Culture (Gaelic) most important.
Meaning (David) most important.

Dabíd is the Middle Irish Gaelic (c900-c1200) nominative form of a masculine name found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Dauid.shtml), s.n. Dauíd, Dabíd / Dauídh, Daibhídh. Forms of the this name are used by six men in Annals entries for the years 1164-1582. Dabid is found in the CELT database in the Lives of the Saints from the Book of Lismore (http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G201001/)). For example, a <Dabid meic Iese> is mentioned in line 1778 of Part 5 (http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G201001/text005.html). The notes on the text state that it is "By unknown authors in Irish monastic scriptoria Date range: c. 1100-1200, various and unknown" and that approx. 99% of the text is Middle Irish and Early Modern Irish.

Docair '[the] Grievous/Troublesome/Difficult (Mischievous)' is a masculine descriptive byname (ibid., http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Docair.shtml), s.n. Docair. It is the standard Early Modern Irish Gaelic nominative and genitive form of the name, found in entries for years 1383 and 1387 as the name of one man. Docair is also found as a common word in the Lives of the Saints from the Book of Lismore from c1100-1200 (http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G201001/text005.html, line 1886): "De dia furtacht cona riabhi docair di a tuismed a meic" ("An angel of God came to help her, so that the bringing forth of her son should not be difficult"; translation found at http://books.google.com/books?id=sBgMAAAAIAAJ; Whitley Stokes, ed., Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1980, p. 204). As stated earlier, this text would either be Middle Irish or Early Modern Irish Gaelic.

The name follows the pattern <single given name> + <descriptive adjective> (ibid., http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/index.shtml).

The combination of Middle Irish Gaelic and Early Modern Irish Gaelic is a SFPP [Tigernach Ó Catháin, 11/01], of which the submitter is aware.


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

11: Drogo Bryce of Middlefordshire - New Name

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Language (Norman) most important.
Culture (Norman) most important.

Drogo is a given name found in Bardsley, s.n. Drew, with the example <Drogo Beuviere> purportedly found in the Domesday book (1086). The entry (s.n. Drew) simply states "Bapt. 'the son of Drew,' or 'Dru' (Drogo in Domesday)".

Bryce is found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "An Index to the 1332 Lay Subsidy Rolls for Lincolnshire, England" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/LincLSR/).

of Middlefordshire is intended as a locative byname based on the name of the submitter's first branch, Middleford, Shire of (Ansteorra, 06/1984). The release of this branch name is on the April 26, 2011 xLoI for Ansteorra. When using branch names as locatives in personal names, they must be used exactly as they are registered (minus the designator); thus, the name was constructed in order to give the submitted spelling (instead of of Middleford):

Middle- is found in Watts, s.nn. Middleton, Middlemarsh, Middleham, Middle Moor, Middleton, Middle Fen, and Middlesbrough, with <Tres Middelton> (1201, 1242), <Middelmersh> (1227), <Mid(d)elham> (1184), <Middelmor> (1286), <Middelton> (1194-1332), <Middelfen> (1251), and <Middlesbrough> (1407).

ford + shire is found in Ekwall, s.nn. Oxford, Herefordshire, Hertford, and Bedford with <Oxnafordscir> (1010) and <Herefordscir> (1038, 1056), <Heortfordscir> (1050), and <Bedanfordscir> (1011).

For the use of shire in a locative name, R&W, s.nn. Berkshire, Shropshire, and Lancashire, has <William Berksir> (1249), <William de Barkescire> (1317), <John Barksher> (1525), <Edith de Shropshir'> (1226), <Alice de Shropshire> (1327), <Richard Shropschire> (1414), <Richard de Lancastreschire> (1387), and <Robert Lancashire> (1604).


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

12: Elgiva Wilhelm - New Name & New Device

Argent, on a roundel azure a bat displayed Or, in chief three flax flowers azure

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Sound (unspecified) most important.

Elgiva is a header form found in Withycombe. On checking the entry, it states that this spelling is "a 19th-C revival of a latinized form". However, it is also found in the MED:

(c1400) Higd.(1) (Hrl 1900) 517: This Elgiva my3t conceyve no childe by the kyng and therfore heo toke that Suanus whanne he was newe bore of a prestes wif.

(c1400) Higd.(1) (Hrl 1900) 518: Harold Harefote was..anone as he was y-bore ybrou3t to the bedde of this Elgiva and leyde by hir as thou3 heo had y-bore hym.

(c1400) Higd.(1) (Hrl 1900) 7.517: Elgiva my3t conceyve no childe by the kyng and therfore heo toke that Suanus..and leyde hir silf doun as it were a child bedde and child by hir.

Wilhelm is found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Women's Surnames in 15th- and 16th-Century Germany" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/womenssurnames.html). The article includes <Helena Wilhelm Rumlin> and <Ottilg Wilhelmyn>, both from 1497. The latter uses a feminized form, <Wilhelmyn>. Unmodified surnames are also attested in this article.

The combination of English and German is a step from period practice, but is registerable [Godfrey von Rheinfels, 05/2004].


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

13: Erhart von Stuttgart - New Name & New Device

Sable, a cross between in bend two eagles and in bend sinister two sinister gauntleted fists Or

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Client requests authenticity for 16th century German (Neckar River region).
Sound (unspecified) most important.
Language (German) most important.
Culture (16th century German (Neckar River region)) most important.

Erhart is a masculine given name with 43 instances in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "German Names from Nürnberg, 1497" (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/german/nurnberg1497.html).

von is the German locative preposition; examples of its use are <von Augspurg> and <von Munchen> (ibid., http://heraldry.sca.org/names/german/surnamesnurnn-z.html).

Stuttgart is documented in Jacob Gretser, Elias Hasenmüller, and Cleophas Distelmeyer, Histori des Jesuitischen Ordens (http://books.google.com/books?id=rEY8AAAAcAAJ), published 1595. The locative is found on p. 367: <zu Stuttgart> ('at/to Stuttgart').

The original form was created with clip art, and the shield-shape was not lined up properly. In addition, the cross was slightly couped on the black and white emblazon compared to the color emblazon. The device was redrawn with the submitter's permission to correct these issues.

Commenters noted that this design was not a marshalled design:

Isabelle of Carolingia. Device. Purpure, a cross between in bend two anchors and in bend sinister two bells and on a chief Or a rose fesswise purpure slipped brown leaved vert. Many commenters suggested that this should be considered a marshaled design. It is not. Our rules require that the field be divided for it to have the appearance of marshalling or impalement. While the addition of a cross throughout does not remove the appearance of marshalling on a divided field, neither does it add the appearance of marshalling on a singly-tinctured field. [Isabelle of Carolingia, 09/2008]


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

14: Grim the Skald - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 2011, via the East

Or, on a saltire cotised gules a Norse sun cross argent

His name was registered 03/2011 via the East.


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

15: Hadchester, Shire of - New Branch Name & New Device

Per fess embattled purpure and Or, a decrescent and a laurel wreath counterchanged

Hadchester is a constructed English place name based on the elements Had- and -chester, both found in Ekwall.

Had- has a variety of possible roots, including the Old English hæþ 'heather', the OE name Headda (Headda's leah = Hadley), or the OE name Hada (Hada's stoc = Hadstock). Examples are the following:

s.n. Hadham - Haedham (c. 960), Hedham (c. 996-1228), Hadham (c. 1050, 1212), and Heddeham (c. 1175)

s.n. Hadleigh - Hadleg (1199), Hadlega (1183, 1191), Hadley (1248), and Haddeleye (1254)

s.n. Hadley - Haddeley(e) (1237)

s.n. Hadlow Down - Hadleg (1254) and Haddele(gh) (1279, 1296)

s.n. Hadstock - Hadestoc (c. 1050)

s.n. Hadstone - Hadeston (1189), Hadistona (1236), and Haddeston (1251)

-chester is derived from the OE caster 'Roman fort'. Examples are the following:

s.n. Chichester - Cisseceaster (895, c. 930) and Cicestre (DB)

s.n. Winchester - Wintanceaster (744)

s.n. Leicester - Ledecestre (DB), Legrecestra (1130), Leirchestre (1205)

In addition, during preparation of the submission, Aryanhwy merch Catmael provided the following:

Watts, _Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names_ s.n. Hadfield derives this place name from OE <hæth> 'heather' + <feld> 'field'. Period spellings of the place include <Hadfeld> 1372 and 1378. Another origin for the prototheme <Had-> is the OE personal name <Hæda> or <Hædda>; this is the origin of the element in Much Hadham, period forms of which include <Magna Hedham> 1278, <Muchel Hadham> 1373. This is an unusual origin of the element; the entry says "The absence of the genitive ending -an is note- worthy; for this reason the name has usually been taken to be 'heath homestead'. The difficult here is the lack of any trace of -th-."

The element <-chester> comes from OE <ceaster> 'city, old fortification', from Latin <castra> 'camp'. The term "has a fairly wide currency in OE and in place names" according to Smith, _English Place-Name Elements_, s.v. ceaster. The entry says "In place names, <ceaster> was clearly used to describe important Roman towsn [sic] and cities, being often added in OE as a suffix to the Romano-Brit names...But there are p.ns. with this el., esp. in the NCy, which cannot be associated with particular remains of this kind'...As a final el., it is combined with: (v) OE or other pers.ns, or words denoting people, as Godmanchester, Kenchester, Muncaster, Pabcastle, Tadcaster."

A combined petition for the name and device was provided. The petition was signed by the Herald, Seneschal, Deputy Seneschal, Archery Marshal, Mistress of Arts and Sciences, Exchequer, and three other gentles. Each entry was signed with the legal name and was dated.

The device was redrawn with permission to make the charges and the line of division more identifiable. (For those viewing armory only, the petition is described in the name documentation summary.)


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

16: Hans Steiner - New Name Change

OSCAR NOTE: filing name should not be registered for a primary name change. It was, in in August of 2011, via the East.

Old Item: Hans Krüger, to be released.
Submitter desires a masculine name.
No changes.
Language (German) most important.
Culture (German) most important.
Meaning (spelling: Steiner) most important.

The submitter's current name was registered 05/2007 (East). Although the "no changes" boxes were checked, the form also indicated that the submitter would accept Hans der Steiner and any other minor changes to the byname as needed for registration, as long as the first name is unchanged.

The name was submitted as Hanse Steiner. Documentation for Hanse was not provided, and could not be found in German, although it was found in Dutch. The submitter was contacted to clarify his wishes, and he stated that he preferred the German spelling Hans. The correspondence is included in the packet.

Hans is a masculine given name in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "German Names from 1495" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/german1495.html), with this spelling appearing 272 times. It is also grandfathered to the submitter.

Steiner is a surname that appears once (ibid., http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/surnames1495n-s.html). A variant spelling, <Steyner>, id dated 1366-71 (Bahlow/Gentry, s.n. Steiner).

If the name had to be changed to the alternative specified by the submitter, der was noted as the German locative preposition, but a source was not provided. Since the preposition was not added to the name, the Eastern College of Heralds didn't bother documenting this further.


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

17: Isobel of Werchesope - New Device

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in March of 2011, via the East

Gules, a saltcellar Or, spilling salt argent

Her name was registered 03/2011 via the East.


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

18: Jekel von dem Hayn - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister azure and argent, a pegasus segreant counterchanged, on a chief argent five annulets, three and two, azure

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (mid-14th C Silesia, specifically Gorlitz) most important.
Culture (mid-14th C Silesia, specifically Gorlitz) most important.

Jekel is found in Talan Gwynek, "Medieval German Given Names from Silesia" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/talan/bahlow/bahlowMasc.html). It is a variant of Jacob, found in 10 instances dated between 1350 and 1396.

von dem Hayn is a byname interpolated from "Henczel von dem Hain = Henczel Hayn, Görlitz 1352" and "Matz Drausche von Hain, Görlitz 1566", both found in Bahlow/Gentry, s.n. Hain.

The device was redrawn with the submitter's permission to correct the depiction of the line of division.


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

19: Katrina MacCullauch - New Name & New Device

Per pale argent and sable, two swan's necks respectant erased and necks entwined counterchanged

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.

Katrina is found in Talan Gwynek, "A List of Feminine Personal Names Found in Scottish Records" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/scottishfem.html#scottishfemlate). The name is a variant of Katherine, and is dated 1548.

MacCullauch is based on Black, s.n. MacCulloch, which has an example <M'Cullauch>, dated 1439. The scribal abbreviation has been expanded for registration.

The forms appeared to be modified when the emblazon was added using a computer art program, as the escutcheon wasn't lined up quite correctly. In addition, the majority of the commenters had a problem identifying the swan's heads. The device was redrawn with the submitter's permission to try to correct these problems.

Correction (2011-Jun-01 20:06:35): Oops - we intended this as "swan's heads", not "swan's necks".


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

20: Lillia de Vaux - New Blanket Permission to Conflict

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 2006, via the East

Argent semy of crampets, a bend azure

Her name was registered 11/2006 via the East. The device was registered 12/2007, also via the East.

I, <legal name>, known in the SCA as Lillia de Vaux waive the full protection of my registered armory "Argent semy of crampets, a bend azure". I grant permission to any future submitter to register armory that is at least one CD from my registered armory. I understand that this permission can be withdrawn by written notice to the Laurel Sovereign of Arms, but that conflicting items registered while it is in force will remain registered.

Signed and dated, 01 Mar 2011


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

21: Lillia de Vaux - New Blanket Permission to Conflict

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 2006, via the East

(Fieldless) A crampet argent ermined vert

Her name was registered 10/2006 via the East. This badge was registered 08/2010 via the East.

I, <legal name>, known in the SCA as Lillia de Vaux waive the full protection of my registered armory "(Fieldless) A crampet argent ermined vert". I grant permission to any future submitter to register fielded armory that is not identical to my registered armory. I understand that this permission can be withdrawn by written notice to the Laurel Sovereign of Arms, but that conflicting items registered while it is in force will remain registered.

Signed and dated 23 Apr 2011


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

22: Lillia de Vaux - New Blanket Permission to Conflict

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 2006, via the East

(Fieldless) A crampet azure

Her name was registered 10/2006 via the East. This badge was registered 08/2010 via the East.

I, <legal name>, known in the SCA as Lillia de Vaux waive the full protection of my registered armory "(Fieldless) A crampet azure". I grant permission to any future submitter to register fielded armory that is not identical to my registered armory. I understand that this permission can be withdrawn by written notice to the Laurel Sovereign of Arms, but that conflicting items registered while it is in force will remain registered.

Signed and dated 23 Apr 2011


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

23: Lillia de Vaux - New Blanket Permission to Conflict

OSCAR finds the name registered exactly as it appears in October of 2006, via the East

(Fieldless) A crampet argent

Her name was registered 10/2006 via the East. This badge was registered 12/2007 via the East.

I, <legal name>, known in the SCA as Lillia de Vaux waive the full protection of my registered armory "(Fieldless) A crampet argent". I grant permission to any future submitter to register fielded armory that is not identical to my registered armory. I understand that this permission can be withdrawn by written notice to the Laurel Sovereign of Arms, but that conflicting items registered while it is in force will remain registered.

Signed and dated 23 Apr 2011


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

24: Marion Quyn - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
Language (British Isles) most important.
Culture (British Isles) most important.

Marion is a feminine given name found in the online MED: "(1422) Plea & Mem.in Bk.Lond.E. 126/162: We presente Marion, þe wif of John Thornton, for a foreyn, retaillyng and byeng as a fre woman."

Quyn is a byname found in 1457 in 'London and Middlesex Fines: Henry VI', A Calendar to the Feet of Fines for London & Middlesex: volume 1: Richard I - Richard III (1892), pp. 182-202. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=78825: "John Whitberwe, John Breynt, John Lyon, John Nycoll, Thomas Bygg, and Thomas Quyn, and John Robyns, and Margaret, his wife. Premises in Hendon and Fyncheley. Anno 36." (The bynames in this source do not appear to have been normalized.)

This name conflicts with Maire Quinn (11/1992, Calontir). Maire was found as an English given name in 1599 and 1637 (IGI Parish Extracts), and <Seinte Maire Overee de Suthwerk> (Saint Mary Overie of Southwark) was found dated 1365 in 'Parishes: St Michael Paternoster', The Cartulary of Holy Trinity, Aldgate: London Record Society 7 (1971), pp. 86-90 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=64033). Thus, it appears as though Maire is equivalent to Mary in English (per RfS V.1.a). Marion is a diminutive of Mary, so those two given names conflict under RfS V.1.a.i, even if they were significantly different in sound and appearance. This leaves only the byname to possibly clear the conflict. Unfortunately, Quyn and Quinn are variant spellings of the same name and are equivalent by RfS V.1.a, so this name is about as close as you can get.

Although Maire Quinn is no longer active, she has been located and a letter of permission to conflict is being obtained. We are sending this up in the meantime, and will add a correction when the letter is received. If the letter falls through, the submitter will accept the name Marion Quyn of Cheschire, where the spelling of the locative is found in Watts, s.n. Cheshire, dated 1430.


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

25: Maximillian Elgin - New Name & New Device

Per bend sinister sable and gules, in pale three axes fesswise reversed Or

Submitter desires a masculine name.
No major changes.
Sound (unspecified) most important.

Maximilian is dated 1585 in a non-modernized entry in 'Cecil Papers: December 1585', Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 3: 1583-1589 (1889), pp. 115-128 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=111485): "Item, geven to my heir Maximillian, the two cusshons and thinges belonging to the canapy, and also the carpet."

Elgin is found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "Index of Scots names found in Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/scots/dost/elgin.html), which this spelling dated between 1552 and 1648.

English and Scots are registerable without a SFPP [Michael Duncan of Hadley, 04/2004].

Correction (2011-Jul-04 18:07:48): I have to note that this is technically a kingdom redraw. We got a submission for this AGES ago (then the submitter pulled the name before it even got to an Internal Letter of Intent). As it was barely more than a sketch colored in pencil, we re-did it. The submitter approved this emblazon.


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

26: Miles Boweman - New Name & New Device

Gules, a drawn bow nocked with an arrow and on a chief Or a snake nowed vert

Submitter desires a masculine name.

Miles is found in Karen Larsdatter, "An Index to the 1523 Subsidy Roll for York and Ainsty, England" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/york16/given-masc-alpha.htm), with three instances in this spelling.

Boweman is a byname of <Lowerance Boweman, tailour> found in 'Admissions to the Freedom of York: Temp. Edward VI (1547-1553)', Register of the Freemen of the City of York: Vol. 1: 1272-1558 (1897), pp. 267-273 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=48274). The names are not normalized.

The following precedent was noted in commentary:

The byname Miles is the approved alternate Latin term for "knight". As such, it violates RfS VI.1 Names Claiming Rank and is not registerable. Miles is also used as an English given name in period. Therefore, it is registerable as a given name. However, it has to be unmistakably in a given name context. In a three element name of this type, the second element can be a byname or it can a second given name (in the 16th C). As this usage is not clearly as a given name, Miles is not registerable in this context...The form Miles Martin is also registerable as it uses Miles in a context that can only be a given name. [Mark Miles Martin, 03/2010]

As Miles in this submission is a given name, it should be registerable.


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

27: Riocard Docair - New Name & New Device

Per pale sable and argent, a ladder bendwise sinister argent and a torch gules, on a chief azure an open book argent

Submitter desires a masculine name.
Language (Gaelic) most important.
Culture (Gaelic) most important.
Meaning (Gaelic form of Richard, byname meaning 'the troublesome') most important.

Riocard is the Gaelic form of Richard, found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Riocard.shtml), s.n. Riocard (Risderd). The submitted spelling is the standard Early Modern Irish Gaelic nominative form, found in entries for years 1322-1598 as the name of seven men.

Docair '[the] Grievous/Troublesome/Difficult (Mischievous)' is a masculine descriptive byname (ibid., s.n. Docair). It is the standard Early Modern Irish Gaelic nominative and genitive form of the name, found in years 1383 and 1387 as the name of one man. The name pattern <single given name> + <descriptive adjective> is found in Mari's article (op. cit., http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/index.shtml)

The device has a complexity count of eight, which is the rule-of-thumb limit.


This item was on the 08-2011 LoAR

28: Ysane la Fileresse - New Name

Submitter desires a feminine name.
No major changes.
Language (Unspecified) most important.
Culture (Unspecified) most important.
Meaning (Unspecified) most important.

The documentation summary indicates that the intended time period is the mid-1300s.

Ysane is found in Colm Dubh, "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/paris.html#Y), as the name of one women, <Ysane [une fame]>.

la Fileresse 'spinner' is based on Colm Dubh "Occupational By-Names in the 1292 Tax Role [sic] of Paris" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/parisbynames.html), with the example <Marguerot, fileresse de soie>, found in Colm Dubh, "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/paris.html#M).

We'd expect fileresse to not be capitalized, based on the pattern of the rest of the names in the cited article. However, the byname <le prestre> is found as <le Prestre> in Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Names in the 1292 census of Paris" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/1292paris.pdf). We are giving the submitter the benefit of the doubt that the occupation could have been capitalized.


Standard Bibliography:

[Bahlow/Gentry] Bahlow, Hans. Deutsches Nameslexikon. (translation by Edda Gentry

[Bardsley] Bardsley, Charles. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames.

[Black] Black, George F. The Surnames of Scotland.

[Cleasby and Vigfusson] Cleasby, Richard, and Gudbrand Vigfusson, An Icelandic-English Dictionary.

[Ekwall] Ekwall, Eilert. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place-names.

[Geirr Bassi] Geirr Bassi Haraldsson. The Old Norse Name.

[OED] The Oxford English Dictionary.

[SMP] Sveriges medeltida personnamn (SMP).

[Watts] Watts, Victor, ed. Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names, Based on the Collections of the English Place-Name Society.

[Withycombe] Withycombe, E.G. Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names.


OSCAR counts 16 New Names, 1 New Name Change, 1 New Branch Name, 15 New Devices and 2 New Badges. These 35 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $105 for them. OSCAR counts 1 Resub Device. This item is not chargeable. OSCAR counts 4 Blanket Permissions to Conflict. These 4 items may or may not require payment. There are a total of 40 items submitted on this letter.

[ Site News | LoIs | KLoIs | SENA | Prec | AH | Track | Sub Status ]


Site Copyright © 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2011, Lewis Tanzos